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DINBURGH: THOMAS CONSTABLE AND CO. 
HAMILTON, ADAMS, AND CO., LONDON. 

MDCCCLVIII. 



EDINBURGH: T. CONSTABLE, PaiXTER TO HER MAiUII 



CONTENTS. 



Chairs in Edinburgh University, with a h'st of Professors, Patrons, &c, 

Bursaries and Scholarships, Library, and Museums, . . 

Foundation of the University, 

Matriculation, . . . . . . . . 

Table of Classes, Professors, Fees, and Hours of Meeting, 

Subjects treated by the various Professors, and Text^books recom- 
mended : — 

Faculty of Arts, . . . . 

Faculty of Theology, ... 

• Faculty of Law, 

Faculty of Medicine, 

Bachelor and Master of Arts Examination, 1859, 

Statutes relative to the Degree of M.D., and Eegulations as to Lec- 
turers whose Course of Lectures are to qualify for the Degree 
ofM.D., ..... 

The Scotch Bar, .... 

Writers "to the Signet, . ' . 

Theological Students, ... 

Graduates in Arts, 1858, 

Graduates in Medicine, 1858, 

Pnzemen, &c., 1858, ... 

Abstract "Universities Bill" as applicable to Edinburgh University, 

Graduates arranged in order of Merit, . . • •. • 



PAGE 

5 



11 
19 
22 
25 
31 

34 
39 
40 
40 
41 
42 
45 
51 
50 






Principal, JOHN LEE.D.D., LL.D., M D. 



Librarian, John Small, IM.A. 
5ec. ^0 the Sen. Academicus, P. Kelland. 
Secretary to the University, Alexander 
Smith. 



Regius Keeper of the Museum of Natural 
History, George James Allman, M.D. 

Regius Keeper of the Botanic Garden, 
John Hutton Balfour, M.D. 



o i . 






=i^ 


1 


5 ='-3 


Chairs. 


Professors. 


-as 


Patrons.* | 


1597 


Humanity 


James Pillans, M.A 


1820 


Lords of Session, Town 
Council, Fac. of Ad- 












vocates, Soc. of Wri- 










ters to the Signet. 


1708 
167-1 

1708 


Greek 


John S. Blackie, M.A, 
Philip Kelland, M.A. 
A. C. Eraser, M.A.,LL.D. 


1852 

1838 
1856 


Town-Council. 
Town-Council. 
Town-Council. 


Mathematics 


Logic and Metaphysics. . 


1708 


Moral Philosophy 


Pat. C. MacDougall 


1852 


Town-Council. 


1708 


Natural Philosophy .... 


Jas. D. Forbes, D.C.L... 


1833 


Town-Council. 


1762 


Rhet. and Belles Lettres 


W. E. Aytoun, D.C.L. . . 


1845 


Crown. 


1786 


Practical Astronomy 

Universal History 


C. Piazzi Smyth 


1845 


Crown. 


1719 


Cosmo Junes 


1846 


Faculty of Advocates 








and Town-Council. 


1790 


Agricultare 


John Wilson 


1854 


Lds. of Session, Town- 










Council, and Sena- 






■' 




tus Academicus. 


1839 
1855 


Music 


John Donaldson 

Geor,;e Wilson, M.D 


1845 

1855 


Principal ^ Professors 
Crown. 


Technoloey 


1620 
1635 


Divinity 


John Lee, D.D 


1844 


Town-Council. 


Divinity and Ecclesiasti- 




1846 


cal History 


James Robertson, D.D. . 


1843 


Crown. 


Biblical Criticism and 




BibUcal Antiquities.. . 


Robert Lee, D.D 


1846 


Crown. 


1642 
1707 


Hebrew 


David Listen, M.A 


1848 


Town-Council. 
Crown. 


Public Law 


1710 


Civil Law 


Arch. C. Swinton, LL.B. 


1842 


Faculty of Advocates 
and Town-Council. 




1722 


Law of Scotland 


John Shank ]More 


1843 


Faculty of Advocates 
and Town-Council. 


1825 


Conveyancing 


Alex. Montgomerie Bell 


1856 


Town-Council, Deputy 
Keeper and Soc. ot 
Writers to the Signet 


1685 


Institutes of Medicine.. 


John H. Bennett, M.D. 


1848 


Town-Council. 


1768 


Dietetics, Materia Me- 










dica, and Pharmacy . . 


Robert Christison, M.D. 


1832 


Town-Council, 


1S07 


Medical Jurisprudence 










and Police 


T. Stewart Traill, M.D . . 


1832 


Crown. 


1713 


Chemistry and Chemical 








1831 
1685 


Pharmacy 


LyonPlayfair, C.B. ,Ph. D. 


1858 

1842 
1855 


Town-Council. 
Town-Council. 
Town-Council. 


Surgery 


Practice of Physic 


Thomas Layeock, M.D. , 


1705 
1806 


Anatomy 


Jehu Goodsir 


1846 


Town-Council. 
Crown. 


Jjiilitary Surgery 

General Pathology 




1831 


Wm. Henderson, M.D. . . 


1842 


Town-Council. 


1726 


Midwifery and Di seases of 










Women and Children 


J. Y. Simpson, M.D 


1840 


Town-Council. 


1741 


Clinical Medicine 


f J. H.Bennett, M.D... 
tThos. Layeock, M D.. 


1848 
1855 




1803 

1676 
1767 


Clinical Surger}' . . . 


James Syme 


1833 

1845 
1855 


Crown. 

Crown is Town-Council 

i.rown. 

1 


Botany 


John H. Balfour, M.D.. 
Geo. J. iUlman, M.D. . . . 


Natural History 



* The Patronage is to some extent altered by the Universities Act of last Session of 
Parliament. The University Commissioners fix the period Avhen the alteration shall 
take effect. See p. 53 hereof. 



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EDINBURGH UNIVEESITY CALEISDAR. 



The University of Edinburgh was founded in 1582. 
James vi. granted the Charter of Erection, constituting 
the Lord Provost, Magistrates, and Town-Council of 
the Burgh of Edinburgh, with the advice of the City 
Ministers, electors of all the Professors, with the power 
of removal as well as of appointment. To the same 
parties was also committed the regulation of the mode 
of teaching, the discipline, the fees, and the accommo- 
dation of the students, who it was originally intended 
should reside within the "University walls. The Charter 
contemplated an extensive school of learning "Humanity, 
Languages, Philosophy, Theology, Medicine, Law, and 
all other sciences w^hatsoever." 

By a recent Act of Parliament — an abstract of which 
will be found at page 51,— the patronage and control of 
the University has been transferred from those in whom, 
they were originally vested, to a University Council, 
University Court, and Court of Curators,— the function 
of the last being solely to elect Professors. Commis- 
sioners have been appointed to carry this Bill into 
effect. 

In the University of Edinburgh, as it is at present 
constituted, there are four Faculties, viz., 1. Arts, — 
comprising Latin, Greek, Mathematics, Logic and Meta- 



8 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

physics, Natural Philosophy, ]\Ioral Philosophy, and 
Rhetoric. Under this head, too, fall Practical Astronomy, 
Agriculture, Universal History, Theory of Music, and 
Technology. 2. Theology, — comprising Systematic 
Theology, Biblical Criticism, Ecclesiastical History, and 
Oriental Languages. 3. Law, — comprising Medical 
Jurisprudence, Civil Law, Law of Scotland, and Con- 
veyancing. 4. Medicine, — comprising Dietetics, Ma- 
teria Medica, and Pharmacy, Chemistry, Theoretical and 
Practical Surgery, Institutes of Medicine, Midwifery 
and Diseases of Women and Children, Clinical Surgery, 
Clinical Medicine, Anatomy Theoretical and Practical, 
General Pathology, Natural History, Practice of Physic, 
and Botany. 

A College Winter Session extends over about five 
months and a half. The Summer Session extends over 
three months. 



MATRICULATION. 

Students cannot be admitted to any of the Classes or 
privileges of the University until they have enrolled 
their name in the Secretary's office and obtained a Ma- 
triculation Ticket, for which the Fee is £1 for the whole 
year, but 10s. for the Summer Session alone. Students 
of Divinity enrol their names in a separate book. Fee 
10s. 



the session of 1858-59 WILL BE PUBLICLY OPENED ON 
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1, AT TWO o'CLOCK, P.M., WHEN 
AN ADDRESS TO THE STUDENTS WILL BE DELIVERED BY 
THE VERY REVEREND JOHN LEE, D.D., PRINCIPAL. 



CLASSES. 



The Classes for the different Branches of Study will be opened 
follows : — 



FACULTY OF AKTS. 



Classes. 



unior Humanity 

enior Humanity ... -J 

irst Greek 

econd Greek 

bird Greek 

irst Matliematical ... 
econd Mathematical. . 
hird Mathematical ... 
ogic & Metaphysics... 

[oval Philosophy 

atural Philosophy ... 
hetoric and Belles ") 

Lettres j 

lEnglish Language and 

Literature.) 
ractical Astronomy... 

griculture 

niyersal History 

heory of Music 

echnology 



Days and Hours of 
Attendance. 



Nov. 2, 12 & 2 o'ck. 
Nov. 2, 9 o'clock. ) 
[half-pafit 8), J 
Nov. 2,- 10 & 1 o'ck. 
Nov. 2, 11 o'clock. 
Nov. 2, 2 o'clock. 
Nov. 2, 12 o'clock. 
Nov. 2, 10 o'clock. 
Nov. 15, 9 o'clock. 
Nov. 2, 1 o'clock. 
Nov. 2, 12 o'clock. 
Nov. 2, 1 1 o'clock. 

Nov. 2, 4 o'clock. 



Nov. 9, 12 o'clock. 
Nov. 11, 3 o'clock. 
Nov. 9, 2 o'clock. 
Nov. 2, 10 & 12 o'ck. 
Nov. 2, 12 o'clock. 



Professors. 



Mr. PUlans. 
Mr. Blackie. 
Mr. kelland. 



Mr. Fraser. 
Mr. Macdougall. 
Mr. Forbes. 

Mr. Aytoun. 



Mr. Smyth. 
Mr. J. Wilson. 
Mr. Innes. 
Mr. Donaldson. 
Dr. G. Wilson. 



Class 
Fee. 



£ s. d. 
3 3 

3 3 



3 3 



1 1 

4 4 
4 4 
Free. 
3 3 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 



'ebrew — 

Junior Class 

Advanced Clas.s — 
Hebrew & Syriac 

ivinity 

ivinity and Church 

History 

Iblical Criticism & 
Biblical Antiquities 



Nov. 11, 9 o'clock. Eev. D. Liston. 
Nov. 11, 10 o'clock, 
Nov. 11, 11 o'clock 
Nov. 11, 12 o'clock, 

Nov. 11, 1 o'clock, j Dr. R. Lee. 



Principal Lee. 
Dr. Robertson. 



2 


2 





2 


2 





2 


2 


o! 


2 


2 


Oi 


2 


2 


oj 



FACULTY OF LAW. 



edical Jurispru- 
ience (for Students 

jfLaw) 

Ivil Law 

iw of Scotland ... 
mveyancing 



Nov. 30, 2 o'clock. 

Nov. 12, 3 o'clock. 
jNov. 12, 3 o'clock. 
iNov, 12, 4 o'clock. 



Dr. TraiU. 

Mr. Swinton. 
Mr. More. 
Mr. Bell. 



4 4 

4 4 

4 4 

4 4 



10 



EDINBUKGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 



Classes. 



Dietetics, Materia^ 
Medica, and Phar- >- 
Tuacy ) 

Chemistry 

Surgery 

Institutes of Medicine 

Midwifery and Dis- 
eases of Women and 
Childi-en 

Clinical Surgery— \ 
{3fon. and Thurs.) ) 

Clinical Medicine — ) 
{Tues. and Frid.) ) 

Anatomy 

General Pathology ... 

Natural Hi story 

Practice of Physic 



Days and Hours of 
Attendance. 



Nov. 2, 9 o'clock. 



Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



2, 10 o'clock. 
2, 10 o'clock. 
2, 11 o'clock. 



Professors. 



Class 
Fee. 



Nov. 2, 11 o'clock. 



Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



4, 12 o'clock. 

5, 12 to 2 o'ck 

2, 2 o'clock. 

2, 4 o'clock. 

2, 1 o'clock. 

2, 3 o'clock. 



Dr. Christison. 

Dr. L. Playfair. 
Mr. Miller. 
Dr. Bennett. 

Dr. Simpson. 

Mr. Syme. 

(Drs. Bennett &) 
\ Laycock, / 
Mr. Goodsir. 
Dr. Henderson. 
Mr. Allman. 
Dr. Laycock. 



£ s. d. 

4 4 

4 4 
4 4 

4 4 

4 4 

4 4 

4 4 

4 4 

4 4 

4 4 



Sma 
Fee? 



£ s. 



2 



3 



Practical Anatomy, under the superintendence of Professor Goodsir.^ 
Practical Chemistry, under the superintendence of Dr. Lyon Playfair. 
Analytical Chemistry, under the superintendence of Dr. Lyon Playfair. 



SUMMEE COUKSES. 



Botany, Professor Balfour, 

[Second Course, £3, 3s., and bs. 
Perpetual Ticket, £6, 6s.] 
Natural History, 
Medical Jurisprudence, . 
Clinical Lectures on Medicine, 
Clinical Lectures on Surgery, . 
Practical Anatomy, 



Class Fee. Small Fees. 
£4 4 £0 5 



Third Course, free. 



3 



GRADUATION FEES. 

In Medicine (Stamp-duty of £10 included). 

In Arts, . . • • 

In Divinity, 



£25 

3 

10 10 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 



11 



SUBJECTS TEEATED BY THE VARIOUS PROFES- 
SORS, AND TEXT-BOOKS RECOMMENDED.* 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 
1. Humanity. 

PROFE.SSOII PILLANS. 

In Loth Classes a Trial Exercise will l)e written in the Class- 
room on the first Saturday of the Session.t 

Junior Class. 

From November till Christmas.— First Principles of Latin Gram- 
mar, for a week, and continued, where necessary, by the Class- 
Assistant. Text-Book, Mair's Introduction : Readings in Curtius, 
and in the Fasti and Tristia of Ovid. 

After Christmas— Qnxtms, Ovid, Odes of Horace, and a portion 
of Livy, lib. vi. 

Throughout the Session weekly, written Exercises, and on Wed- 
nesday, at 12 o'clock, lessons in Ancient Geography. Text-Book, 
« First Steps," &c. On Friday, at 2 p.m., Lectures on Roman Litera- 
ture. 

Senior Class. 

From November till Christmas. — Livy, lib. ix. ; Horace's Satires 
and Epistles. On Wednesday, at 9 o'clock, Geographical Demon- 
strations, with extracts from Lucan. Statius, Silius Italicus, Martial, 
Claudian, &c. Text-Book, " Elements of Physical and Classical 
Geography." 

After Christmas. — Cicero, B. ii. Tusc. Disp. ; Tacitus, Annals ; 
Ars Poetica. 

On Wednesday at 9 a.m., a Course of Lectures on General Gram- 
mar, and on alternate Fridays, Examinations, conducted chiefly in 
Latin, on Adam's Roman Antiquities. 

Throughout the Session, written Exercises in Prose and Verse. 

* The information given under this head has been kindly supplied by the Professors, 
t This Exercise is to test the actual proficiency of the Students at the time of entering 
the Classes, that it may be compared with a similar one to be done in.March 1859. 



12 EDIi^URGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

2. Greek. 

PROFESSOR BLACKIE. 

Entrance Examination on the Greek Grammar and the first 
Fifteen Chapters of Luke's Gospel. 

First Class. 

Cebetis Tibula ; Xenophon's Memorabilia ; a Book of Homer read 
by the Students, and one expounded by the Professor ; Dr. Clyde's 
Greek Syntax ; Exercises in Greek Composition. 

Second Class. 
Plutarch's Life of Alcibiades ; a Play of Euripides or Sophocles ; 
a Book or two of Homer ; once a week a Play of Aristophanes 
expounded by the Professor. 

Third Class. 

Plato's Republic. Twice a week a Course of Lectures on Homer's 
Hiad, Critical and Philological. Exercises in Greek Composition. 

X.D. — Those who are found deficient in elementary knowledge 
will be drilled in a separate Class, taught by a University Tutor. 



3. Mathematics. 

PROFESSOR KELLAND. 

First Class. 



Theory of Arithmetic ; Six Books of Euclid and part of the 
Eleventh Book ; Plane Trigonometry, with its Applications ; Men- 
suration ; the Elements of Perspective ; and Geometrical Conic 
Sections. 

Text-Books. — Plaj-fair's Geometry and Trigonometry indispensable. Elliotfs Mensu- 
ration and Wallace's Conic Sections are recommended and largely drawn on. 

Second Class. 

Introductory Lectures. Algebra, with its Applications to Analy- 
tical Trigonometry, Analytical Conic Sections, and Solid Geometry. 

Text-Books. — Eellands Elements of Algebra indispensable. Colenso's Examples, 
Wrigley's Examples, or Bland's Equations, referred to and recommended. Snowball's 
Trigonometry. 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 13 

Third Class. — Nine to Ten, three days a week. 

The Differential Calculus, with its Branches and Applications. 

Text-Boohs. — Hall's Differential Calculus. As the aim is, as completely as possible 
to read through the book, no other works are recommended. 

For the advanced Students, Lectures are given on the higher 
portions of Definite Integrals and on Finite Differences. 

Examinations, viva voce, are carried on daily in all the Clas.ses. Written Exami- 
nations take place on alternate Saturdays. Exercises for solution at home are given out 
on Fridays. The Prize List is made out from a summation of the whole work. Extra 
Prizes are adjudged by competitions on Arithmetic, Equations, Trigonometry, &c., against 
time. Extra Prizes are also awarded for original Solutions of Problems, Essays, &c. 



4. Logic and Metaphysics. 

PROFESSOR FRASER. 

The doctrine and discipline of Rational or Intellectual Philo- 
sophy, in its two departments of Logic and Metaphysics, is the 
province of this class. Logic, i.e., the Pure Science of Thought and 
Theory of its Amplications, is viewed as the introduction to Philo- 
sophy. Metaphysics, i.e., the Theory of the Matter of Thought in its 
idtiinojte relation to Reason, is treated as the higher part of philo- 
sophical study. It is intended that the Lectures of this Session 
shall embrace, in the following order, a discussion of the elements 
of Pure and A2)plied Logic — 

iMRonrcTioN. — Province and Philosophical Relations of Logic. Advantages and 
Methods of Logical Study. 

Part I. — Pure Logic, or Science of the Form as distinguished from the Matter of 
Thought, i.e., conditions of the concord of Thought with itself. (1.) The Matter of thought 
psychologically described, and distinguished from the Form : (a) Necessary matter, i.e., 
the perceived and immediately known ; (b) Probable matter, i.e., the inductively be- 
lieved and mediately known ; (c) Possible matter, i.e., the conceived and knowable. (2.) 
Analysis of the Foi-m as distinguished from the Matter of Thought : (a) Prepositional 
forms, i.e., formal analysis of notional quantity ; (b) Illative relations of propositional 
forms, i.e., formal or syllogistic analysis of Inference — Relation of Pure Logic to the 
Organon of Aristotle, and to works founded thereon. 

Part II. — Applied Logic, or theory of the discord and concord of Formal Thought 
in relation to its Matter. (1.) Discord, i.e., Theory of Error: (A) Errors classified; 

(a) Verbal, i.«., abuse of language; (b) Physical, i.e., misinterpretation of nature; (c) 
Metaphysical, i.e., attempted violation of the necessary limits of knowledge. (B) Moral 
and Intellectual Causes of Error. (2.) Concord, i.e.. Theory of Knowledge, and aids to 
the attainment of Truth ; (a) Symbolical methods, or aids to the logical use cf language ; 

(b) Physical methods, or rules of inductive research and conditions of Proof; (c) 
Metaphysical methods, through which Logic merges in Metaphysics, in quest of the 



14 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

grounds and limits of Real Science, and the ultimate relations of Knowledge and Faith. 
Introduction to Metaphysics-Relation of Applied Logic to the Philosophical Works of 
Bacon and Descartes. 

The class meets daily at one o'clock, on five days in each 
■week. The hours are devoted partly to an exposition of Doctrine 
through the Lectures of the Professor ; and partly to a Discipline, 
hy oral and written Examinations, short Exercises, and Essays, 
meant to train the members in logical habits, and to a reflective 
life. Some hours in each week are devoted to Lectures ; others 
to the Discipline based on the Lectures, and on portions of philo- 
sophical books recommended for private study. Advanced Stu- 
dents are placed in a Senior Division. Prizes are adjudged to 
Junior and Senior Students, for eminence in the business of the 
Session, and also for success in private study during the Summer 
Vacation. 



5. Moral PMlosophy. 

PROFESSOR MACDOUGALL. 

The course of Lectures and study for this Session is designed to 
comprehend mainly the following subjects :— 

iNTRODUCTOiiY.— The aims, province, and methods of Ethical 
study. The relations of Ethics or Moral Philosophy to Psycho- 
logy. 

Division I,— General view of the mental constitution, or 
powers to be regulated by the sense of Duty. Particular exa- 
mination of the" powers usually denominated Active,— including 
detailed consideration of the Emotions, Desires, and Affections ; 
with discussion of the more important philosophical questions 

relating to them. 

Division IL— Ethics, more properly, and strictly so called ; or 
the system of ethical truth, and the Philosophy of that system : 
including (1.) Exposition of Duties, with their grounds ; and (2.) 
Inquiry into the nature and faculty of I\Ioral Approbation, or the 
Theory of Moral Perception and Moral Sentiments. Review of 
leading Ethical Theories. Examination, in particular, of the. 
views of Bishop Butler on both the preceding Divisions. 

Division III. — Inferential, and consummative ; as to the 
existence, moral government, and character of Deity ; the immor- 
tality of the soul ; and future retribution. Duties thence arising, 



TACULTY OF ARTS. 15 

and reflex influence on Morality generally. Comparison of 
Natural and Christian Ethics. 

The Class meets from twelve to one o'clock each day, for five 
days of the week. The time is devoted in part to the Lectures of 
the Professor, and, in part, to examinations, written and oral, on 
these and* on prescribed portions of Ethical authors. Subjects 
are also prescribed for elaborate Essays, as well as for briefer 
occasional exercises ; and prizes are awarded at the close of the 
Session for general industry, proficiency, and ability. 



6. Natural Philosophy. 

PROFESSOR FORBES. 



The subjects embraced in the Course of Natural Philosophy are 
the following : — 

Properties of Bodies, Mechanics (including Statics and Dyna- 
mics, and their application to Civil Engineering), Hydrostatics, 
Pneumatics (including the Steam-Engine), Heat, Acoustics, Optics, 
Astronomy, Electricity and Magnetism (including Terrestrial 
Magnetism). All these subjects are not, however, gone over in a 
single Session ; but while the Mechanics of Solid and Fluid Bodies 
forms an invariable part of the Course, the other subjects are altered 
more or less from year to year. It is intended that, in the Session 
1858-9, Astronomy and Electro-Magnetism (including Dia-Mag- 
netism), and probably a part of Optics or Acoustics, shall be 
included in the Course. 

The works on which the two principal written Examinations will 
be held are — 

Third or Junior Division. 

In January — Potter's Mechanics — the Statical part (except 
Chapters iv. and ix.), and i\iQ first and third Chapters oi Dynamics . 
In March — Herschel's Astronomy in Lardner's Cyclopaedia. 

For the Second or Middle Division, 

In January — Potter's Mechanics generally. In Mhrch — 
Electricity, Magnetism, and Acoustics, in Lardner's Handbook of 
Natural Philosophy, 1856. 



1 6 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

For the First or Highest Division. 

In January— A. Select Mechanical Problems. B. First three, 
and 9th and 11th Sections of Newton's Principia, by J. H. Evans, 
Cambridge, 1837. hi J/arcA— Grant's History of Astronomy, 8vo. 
1852. ^ 

At the close of each Examination, the names of the whole of the regular Students who 
have entered the Examination wiU be suspended in the Class in the order of merit, de- 
termined by a system of marks. Prizes (of which the chief is the Straton Prize) wUl 
be awarded by combining the results of these Examinations with others to be afterwards 
announced. 



7. Rhetoric and Belles-lettres. 

{English Language and Literature^ 

PROFESSOR AYTOUN. 

The Students are taught and exercised, (1.) In the Principles 
of Vernacular Composition, a considerable portion of the lectures 
relating to the examination of style, as exhibited by eminent Eng- 
lish authors. The history, formation, and development of the 
language are likewise comprehended in this branch. (2.) The 
leading rules for the framing and arrangement of spoken discourses 
are explained and illustrated. (3.) A critical review of British 
Literature, from the Anglo-Saxon period downwards, in its con- 
nexion with external history and social development. (4.) Occa- 
sional Lectures tending to illustrate remarkable epochs in Ancient' 
and Mediceval Literature will be delivered in the course of the 

Session. 

Written exercises are prescribed, from tiipe to time, with a view 
to the improvement of the Students in English Composition. 
These are returned to the Students after being revised and cor- 
rected by the Professor. 

Prizes are awarded for composition in prose and verse, and tor 
accomplishment in elocution. 



8. Practical Astronomy. 

f PROFESSOR SMYTH. 

These lectures are confined strictly to the subject of Practical] 
Astronomy, and are intended to illustrate the best methods oi| 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 17 

applying instrumental measurement to celestial phenomena, for 
the purpose of deducing their nature, and ascertaining their bear- 
ing on astronomical theory. 

They will commence with the simplest estimations of angle and 
distance required in first approximations ; and will then show how 
rapidly, as well as securely, the true arrangement of the universe 
may be arrived at by any one who, observing independently for 
himself the successive phenomena presented by the skies, is able, 
as he proceeds, to strengthen his means of observation and refine 
his methods of computation, up to the limits which the present 
advanced condition of Optics, Mechanics, and Mathematics place 
within his reach. 



9. Agriculture. 

PROFESSOR J. WILSOX. 

The Lectures extend over two Sessions ; the first course treat- 
ing of the Principles, and the second of the Practice of Agricul- 
ture. 

First Course. — History of Agriculture. General purposes of 
Agriculture ; conditions afi"ecting it ; and principles on which it 
is based. The Chemistry of Agriculture. The Geology of Agri- 
culture. The Botany of Agriculture. The Physics of Agricul- 
ture. 

Second Course. — The Mechanics of Agriculture and their appli- 
cation. Sequence of Agricultural operations. Economical Division 
of Labour. Rotations of various districts discussed and explained. 
Improvement of the Soil by Draining, Manuring, &c. Live stock. 
The Economics of Agriculture. Farm Engineering and Construc- 
tion. Agricultural Policy. General Management and Improve- 
ment of Landed Property. 



10. Universal History. 

PROFESSOR INNES. 



11. Theory of Music. 

PROFESSOR DONALDSON. 

This Chair was founded for the teaching of Music as a Scientific 



18 EDINBUKGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

Art, on the widest and most comprehensive scale on which it can 
be taught. 

The Lectures embrace the following subjects : — 
The phenomena and philosophy of sound, the theory of sound 
generally, of accordant and discordant sounds particularly, the 
laws of harmonic, and their application to the theory of Music. 

The expositions of the subjects included in this branch of ex- 
perimental philosophy, are illustrated with diagrams and appa- 

General rules for constructing harmony, with an exposition of 
methodical composition in the different counterpoints, loith a 
practical application of the principles and doctrines appertaining 
to the science ; and a critical analysis of the works of the great 
masters, ancient and modern ; the form and construction of their 
musical compositions. Occasional lectures are given on the com- 
pass and properties of each musical instrument, and on their 
structure. The instruments are exhibited, with illustrations of 
the experimental researches of Weber, Chladni, Savart, and 
Wheatstone, which have for their object to discover the true 
principles on which musical instruments ought to be constructed, 
and which may lead, and have led, to the invention of new ones. 
Lectures are also delivered occasionally on the history of the 

science. i a • 4- 

Three courses of Lectures are given during the Session ; tu-o tor 
gentlemen, and 07ie exclusively for ladies. The subjects taught 
in the ladies' class are the rules of harmony as drawn from the 
works of Albrechtsberger, Beethoven, Mozart, and other writers 
on harmony, as bearing more especially on the general construc- 
tion of musical compositions, with a practical application of these 
rules ; comparing these rules with the best classical models, with 
an explanation and exposition of the principles which ought to 
re«-ulate the fingering of the Pianoforte, exhibiting the structtire of' 
the instrument, and the best method of producing gracefully a 
fine tune. 



12. Technology. 

PROFESSOR G. WILSON. 

The full Course of Technology extends over three Sessions; the 
general principles being treated in each Session. 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 19 

I. — Mineral Technology. 
Industrial Relations of the Atmosphere, the "Waters, and the 
Solid Crust of the Globe. Building- Stones, Mortars ; Coal, and 
other solid Fuels. Glass-making, Pottery, and Porcelain, Metallo- 
techny and Metallurgy. 

II. — Vegetable Technology. 

The Plant as a manufacturing Agent. Gum. Sugar. Amyla- 
ceous Substances, Albuminous Substances, and Fermentation. 
Distillation and Gas-making. Wood, its Mechanical and Chemical 
applications. Caoutchouc. Gutta Percha, the Resins, Fats, Oils, 
Candles, Soaps. Textile tissues, Bleaching, Dyeing, Calico- 
printing. 

III. — Animal Technology. 

Bones, Horns, Shells, Corals, their Mechanical and Chemical 
applications. Skins, Glue-making, Tanning Leather, Fur, Wool, 
Hat-making, Brush-making. 

Arts related to all the departments of Technology, Writing, 
Printing, Painting, Engraving, Photography, Telegraphy, &c. 

The Lectures will be illustrated by Experiments and Drawings, 
and by Specimens and Models from the Natural History and In- 
dustrial Museums. Occasion will be taken throughout the Course, 
to visit, at intervals, Manufactories and Workshops in Edinburgh 
or the neighbourhood. 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 
1. Divinity. 

PRINCIPAL LEE. 

In the Class of Systematic Theology, the Law of the Church of 
Scotland requires that every Student must be enrolled at least 
four Sessions, three of which must be years of regular or constant 
attendance — or, if he attend only two full Sessions, the course must 
be extended to five Sessions. In every case, six Discourses must be 
delivered with approbation, before the Professor can be entitled to 
give such a certificate as can warrant a Presbytery to take the 
Student on trials for license. In the University of Edinburgh, 
the present Professor of Divinity has, during the last fifteen years, 
arranged his lectures in the order of the articles of the Confession 



20 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

of Faith framed by the Assembly of Divines at Westminster, and 
ratified by the Parliament of Scotland in 1690. Durmg the ap- 
proaching Session (1858-59), the lectures are intended to be ae- 
livered as heretofore at least three days every week, and to ex- 
tend over the subjects of the first ten Chapters of the Confession. 
The remaining days of every week will be occupied partly m 
Examinations, but chiefly in hearing Discourses or other Exercises 
composed by Students, and judging of their merits. Every Stu- 
dent, in the last year of his course, is expected to have delivered 
all the discourses required at the Divinity Hall before the end ot 
December, as about that period it is desirable that every document 
necessary 'for entitling Presbyteries to take on trials the candidates 
for license should be satisfactorily prepared. 

2. Biblical Criticism and AnticLuities. 

PROFESSOR R. LEE. 

This class is now included in the curriculum required by the 
Church of Scotland of Students in Divinity. 

The Lectures are comprehended in two courses, which are 
delivered during alternate Sessions. One of these courses relates 
to the Criticism of the Old Testament ; the other to that of the 

""Suhiects of First Course.— \. Canon of Old Testament _; Con- 
dition and History of Hebrew Text; Account of principal 
Versions, particularly Septuagint, Vulgate, and Targums ; Mo- 
dern efforts to improve Hebrew Text ; Account of printed Edi- 
tions, &c. 2. Hermeneutics, or, Principles of Interpretation, as 
applicable to Sacred Scriptures. _ . xr m . 

Subjects of Second Co.^m.-Manuscripts of New Testament ; 
different systems of classification ; accounts of particular MSfe. ; 
disputed passages ; quotations in New Testament. &c. &c. ; mo- 
dern editions of New Testament-their characteristics and 

merits, , m n j 

On these subjects Lectures are delivered on Tuesdays and, 
Thursdays ; Monday's Lectures are devoted to Biblical AntiquH 
ties • on Wednesday the Professor prelects on some portion of the 
Greek New Testament, and on Fridays he hears expositions by, 

the Students. , ^ -x- • i? n ^ 

The Course of Lectures on the New Testament Criticism falls tc 

l)e delivered Session 1858-59, 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 21 



3. Ecclesiastical History. 

PROFESSOR ROBERTSOX, 

Subject of Lectures — History of the Christian Religion and 
hurch from the Introduction of Christianity to the Council of 
Dhalcedon, a.d. 451. 

Introduction. — 1. The Christian Church according to the view 
jf it given in Scripture. 2. Object of Ecclesiastical History — 
Departments embraced by it — Sources whence it is to be derived. 
3. Method of the Course of Lectures — Importance of this branch of 
Bistorical Study. 

First Division, to a.d. 117. — 1. Religious and Moral Condition 
5f the Jews in the time of our Lord and his Apostles. 2. Religious 
■ind Moral Condition of the Greeks and Romans during the same 
period. 3. Life and Ministry of John the Baptist, and Life and 
Ministry of Jesus. 4. Ministry of the Apostles to the destruction 
3f Jerusalem — The Churches founded by them — The Worship. 
Grovernment, and Discipline of those Churches. 5. The later 
Ministry of the Apostle John, and the condition of the Church at 
the time of his death. 

Second Division, from 117 to 193. — 1. External History 
OF THE Church : — Progress of the Gospel — Hostile dispositions of 
the heatben towards it — Persecutions which ensued. 2. Here- 
tics : — Alexandrian and Syrian Gnostics — Marcion and his fol- 
lowers — Montanists and Alogi. 3. Intf.rnal History op the 
Orthodox Church : — Apologies for Christianity — Development 
of idea of Catholic Church — Canon of New Testament formed — 
Rule of Faith extended — Rise of a Clerical order. 

Third Division, from 193 to 324. — 1. External History of 
the Church : — Hostility of Neo-Platonists to Christianity — Feel- 
ings of the populace thus embittered against it — Frequency and 
severity of persecutions — Spread of the gospel notwithstanding. 
2. Heretics : — Montanists — Monarchians — Manichaeans. 3. 
Theology: — Alexandrian School: its celebrity, particularly under 
Origen — School of Antioch founded by Luciau. 4. Goveknment 
and Discipline of the Church : — History of the Hierarchy — 
Schisms of Felicissimus and Novatian — Public worship — Incipient 
Monachism. 

Fourth Division, from 324 to 451. — 1. Final Struggle be- 
tween Paganism and Christianity : — Christianity favoured by 



22 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

Constantine and his sons — Paganism re-established by Julian the 
Apostate, tolerated under the succeeding Emperors till the acces- 
sion of Theodosius, but suppressed by this Phnperor in the East 
in 381, and in the West in 392. 2. Theology :—Arian contro- 
versy ; Origenistic and Pelagian controversies — Nestorian and 
Eutychean controversies concerning the Person of Christ. ^ 3. 
Hierarchy :— Increased consequence of the Clergy — Appoint- 
ment of Patriarchs — Roman Patriarchs and Hierarchy in the West. 
4. MoNACHisM : — Origin and history of Monachism — Relation of 
the Monks to the Clergy. 5. Changes in Public Worship :— 
Introduction of Saint Worship. 6. History of Christian 
Ethics:— Morals of the Clergy — Influence of the Church on 
Legislation. 7. Spread op Christianity. 



4. Hebrew. 

peofessor liston. 

Junior Class. 

Grammar (Tregelles' Heads of Hebrew Grammar) ; first twenty 
chapters of Genesis, and eight or ten Psalms. 

Senior Class. 

Grammar. The Psalms and a Historical Book on alternate 
weeks. 

Syriac will form extra study. {Text-Books, Elements of Gram 
mar, published by Bagster, and Gutbir's Syriac New Testament.) 

The Chaldee of Daniel will also be studied. 



FACULTY OF LAW. 
1. Medical Jurisprudence. 

professor TRAILL. 

Part I. — Forensic Medicine. 

Section 1. Qi(Cstions affecting the Civil m- Social Rights of Individuals.— Bnr&tiou o 
Human Life. Personal identity. Marriage. Divorce. Pregnancy. Parturition. Im 
potence. Paternity and affiliation. Survivorship. Mental alienation. Rights of Dea 
and Dumb. Exercise from public duties. Simulated diseases. 

Section 2. lu juries to Propcrfi/.—T<i msances. Arson. Forgery. Coining. 

Section 3. Personal J^jifr/es.— Defloration. Rape. Mutilation. Infanticide. Homi 



FACULTY OF LAW. 23 

side. Starvation. Death from extremes of temperature. Wounds. Toxicology, or 
joisoning by inorganic, vegetable, and animal substances. Imaginary and pretended 
joisonings. 

Part II. — Medical Police. 

Section 1. Health of Individuals as affected hy Cleanliness and ventilation. Aliment 
Exercise. Celibacy. Marriage. Lactation. Professions and trades. 

Section 2. Health of Communities as affected hy Climate. Sites of towns and habita- 
ions. Drainage and s-ewerage. Paving and care of public roads. Cemeteries. Con- 
itruction of hospitals, schools, and prisons. Lazarettos. Punishments. 

Two Courses are annually given ; one adapted for Students of 
Law during the Winter, and another for Medical Students during 
the Summer. 



2. Civil Law. 

PROFESSOR SWINTON. 

General principles of Roman Law, with references to the Laws 
3f Modern Nations. 

The Students are examined on the contents of the Lectures, and 
the Institutes of Justinian ; and subjects are prescribed for four 
or five written Essays in the course of the Session. Cumin's 
Manual of Civil Law, and Sandars' Institutes of Justinian, are re- 
commended. Students intended for the Scotch Bar must make 
themselves acquainted with either Warnkoenig's Institutiones 
Juris Romani Privati, or Mackeldey's Systema Juris Romani 
hodie usitati, 

A Prize of ten guineas is awarded for an Essay written during 
the Summer recess. 



3. Law of Scotland. 

PROFESSOR MORE. 

Principal Heads of Lectures : — Introductory. Social or Domestic 
Relations. Contracts or Obligations. Quasi or implied Contracts. 
Obligations from Delinquency or implied Delinquency. Assigna- 
tion of Personal Rights. Discharge, extinction, and suspension of 
Obligations. Distinction between Heritable and Moveable rights. 
Real or Heritable Rights. Succession, Heritable and Moveable. 
Election Law. Actions and Diligence. Criminal Law. 



24 EDINBURGH UNIVEESITY CALEKDAR. 



4. Conveyancing, 

PROFESSOR BELL. 

The Lectures are intended to assist Students of Law in the pre- 
paration of Deeds and Instruments, and in judging of their legal 
efficacy, and adaptation to the objects of the parties. 

The Course is divided into three branches ; the ^rs^, relating to 
the particulars applicable to all or most deeds ; the seco7id and 
third, to those peculiar to p,ersonal or moveable, and to heritable 
or real rights, respectively. ' 

Under Branch First are explained— (1.) The solemnities of 
authentication of deeds. (2.) The necessity of delivery and 
acceptance. (3.) That the parties must be competent, and the 
subject-matter lawful. (4.) There must be deliberate consent; 
under which head are noticed shortly the general rules applicable 
to essential error, fraud, force and fear, as grounds of reducing, 
and to homologation, and rei interventus, as grounds of support- 
ing deeds. (5.) The Stamp Laws, in their relation to Conveyanc- 
ing-. (6.) The parts common to all or most deeds, being the narra- 
tive or introductory ; the warrandice, registration, and testing 

cIBjUSCS 

Branch Second.— (l.) The personal bond, and other personal 
obligations, transmissions thereof, inter vivos, and discharges. 
Pers'onal contracts, and deeds relating to corporeal moveables, 
including maritime writs. (2.) Bills and promissory notes, their 
authentication, structure, transmission, and extinction. (3.) 
Writs of personal diligence. 

Branch Third. — (1.) The writs constituting a feudal estate, and 
the rights thence arising to superior and vassal. (2.) The writs 
of transmission, voluntary or judicial, of such estate, and of bur- 
gage lands. (3.) The marriage-contract, bonds of provision, and 
other relative writs, as affecting either personal or real estate, or 
both. (4.) Testamentary deeds, applicable to either or both 
classes of estate. (5.) The entail and disentail, and relative deeds. 
(6.) The completion of titles, by executors or next of kin, or heirs 
of persons deceased, to moveable or heritable estate. (7.) Heritable 
securities ; their constitution, transmission, and extinction. (8.) 
Writs of real diligence ; and lastly. Leases. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 25 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 
1. Materia Medica. 

PROFESSOR CHRISTISON. 

Introductory. — Materia Medica comprises the subjects of 
ireneral Therapeutics, Special Therapeutics, and Pharmacy ; and 
)iet and Regimen equally with Remedies ordinarily so called. 
Arrangement of the Course under that view of its objects. 

General Topics. — On Pharmacopteias. On General Thera- 
)eutics, or the Actions of Remedies. 1. Physiological, or Actions 
•n the Healthy Body, viz., their kinds of action, their modes of 
ction, and the circumstances which modify their actions. 2. 
Therapeutic, or Actions on Disease ; their several kinds of action 
>n disease. 

Special Topics. — I. The Natural History, Pharmacy, Thera- 
)eutic actions, Uses, and mode of administering Remedies, ordi- 
larily so called. 1. Mineral substances, arranged according to their 
hemical constitution, viz., Non-metallic oxidiable elements ; 
Lcids ; ordinary metals and their compounds ; alkalis and earths, 
md their compounds ; compound inflammables ; mineral waters. 
I. Vegetable substances, arranged according to the natural fami- 
ies of plants, as this arrangement also classifies them in some 
neasure according to their actions on the body. 3. Animal sub- 
;tances. 4. Imponderables, or Qualities of matter, viz., Heat, 
;old, electricity, galvanism, magnetism ; appendix on acupuncture. 
5. Blood-letting, general and local. 

II. On Diet and Regimen. — 1. Food, viz., its relative diges- 
iibility and nutritiveness ; the effects of improper food on man ; 
;he proper food for man in various circumstances of life ; such as 
for maintaining the athletic constitution ; for persons under 
Drdinary vigorous exercise ; for those in confinement ; for chil- 
iren ; for hospitals. Dietetic treatment of diseases in detail, 
iccording to their nosological arrangement. — 2. Drink ; its kinds ; 
ts effects, when erroneous ; proper drink for health ; regula- 
;ion of drink in the treatment of diseases. 3. Condiment ; its 
dnds ; their actions in health, and their applications to the treat- 
nent of diseases. 4. Exercise. 5. Climate. 6. Clothing. 7. 
Cleanliness. 8. Moral discipline. 



26 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

2. Chemistry. 

PROFESSOR PLAYFAIR. 

.The Course of instruction consists — 

1. Of Lectures. — In the Course of Lectures the general sub- 
jects of Theoretical Chemistry, including a detailed description of 
Elementary Bodies and their Compounds, will be considered with 
especial reference to their useful applications to the Industrial 
Arts, The subjects of Chemical Physics will also be fully dis- 
cussed in their bearing on the general laws which govern the 
union of the different bodies. Examinations of the Students, 
both oral and written, will frequently be held. 

2. Laboratory.— The Laboratory is open for the reception of 
Pupils who desire to study Analytical Chemistry, or to undertake 
Chemical Investigations. The Hope Prize, of the annual value of 
£oO, is awarded to the author or authors of the best Investiga- 
tions. The fee for the Laboratory is ^10 for six months, or ,£6 
for three months. It will be open during all the Winter Session, 
and for three months in the Summer Session. 

3. Practical Classes. — The instruction in these will be chiefly 
devoted to practice in Qualitative Analysis, with the view of 
enabling the Student to test unknown substances, poisons, urine, 
&c. At the same time, practice will be given in the preparation 
of Chemical Compounds. 



3. Surgery. 

PROFESSOR MILLER. 

The Principles of Surgery. 

1. Elementary Diseases, including especially the inflammatory 
process, congestion, &c. 

2. Diseases in certain tissues, &c. 

3. Injuries. 

The Practice of Surgery. 

1. The subject of operations in general. 2. Injuries and dis- 
eases of the head. 3. Affections of the orbit and its contents. 4. 
Affections of nose, lips, checks, jaws, neck, &c. 

Text-Book. — Professor Miller's Principles and Practice of Sur- 
gery. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 27 

4. Institutes of Medicine. 

PROFESSOR BENNETT. 

This Course of Lectures is divided into three parts. I. His- 
OLOGT, or a Systematic Account of the Doctrine of the Tissues. 
Physiology, or a Systematic View of the Functions of the 
.nimal Body, arranged in three groups. 1. Function of Nutri- 
Lon ; 2. Function of Innervation ; and 3. Function of Reproduc- 
Lon. III. Pathological Physiology, in relation to the three 
roups of functions referred to ; but more especially the general 
octrines of congestion, fever, inflammation, tubercle, cancer, 
lorbid growths, and degenerations of texture, parasitic growths, &c. 

These Lectures are illustrated by diagrams, preparations, and occasional experi- 
lents. Every Saturday a demonstration is given from 11 to 12, a.m., under a series of 
licroscopes, illustrative of the properties, mode of development, and functions of the 
arious tissues and organs of the animal body. Examinations of the Class ■wiU also be 
eld at stated periods. 

Te^^iSooA:.— Text-Book of Physiology. By John Hughes Bennett, M.D., &c. Edin- 
urgh, 1858. 

Summer Course. 

Practical Histology, and the use of the Microscope. 

This Course is divided into, — 1. Lectures on the construction of 
klicroscopes, as instruments of Physiological and Pathological re- 
earch, and as a means of diagnosis at the bedside. 2. The mode 
•f employing the various parts of the apparatus. 3. The prac- 
ical demonstration, examination, and description, by each Student, 
)f all the textures and fluids of the animal body, in health and 
lisease ; examination of an extensive histological collection of 
)bjects, and experimental investigation into the phenomena of 
jontractility, ciliary action, inflammation, &c. 

This Course is an Appendix to that of the Institutes, and an introduction to the 
ligher kinds of Clinical Study. 

Text-Book. — An Introduction to Clinical Medicine, &c.. Lectures iv. and v. By John 
3ughes Bennett, M.D., &c. Third Edition. Edinburgh, 1857. 



5. Midwifery and Diseases of Women and CMldren. 

PROFESSOR SIMPSON. . 

The Course of Instruction comprises, — 

I. \st, The anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive 
)rganSj and their products ; 2d, Natural and morbid parturition ; 



28 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

3c?, The pathology of the puerperal state ; Ath, The physiology and 
pathology of pregnancy ; 6th, The special pathology of the female 
sexual organs ; and &h, The hygiene and diseases of infancy and 
childhood. 

II. Clinical Lectures are given once a week, during the Session, 
on Diseases of Women, in connexion with No. 12 Ward, Royal 
Infirmary, which the Managers of that Institution have placed at 
Dr. Simpson's disposal for this purpose. 

III. Weekly Examinations and Demonstrations in Obstetric 
Operations will be conducted on Saturdays in the class-room, at the 
usual Lecture hour, by the Class Tutor, under the superintendence 
of the Professor. 



6. Clinical Surgery. 

PROFESSOR STME. 

The objects of this Course are to teach the discrimination of 
Surgical diseases, by pointing out their distinctive characters in- 
the living body ; and to impress the principles of treatment, by 
showing their application in practice. With these views, all thei 
patients whose cases come under consideration are placed before i 
the Students in the theatre of the hospital, when, with due re- 
gard to their feelings, the opinions entertained as to the seat and 
nature of the malady are freely expressed, and the means ofi 
remedy deemed requisite are administered, either at the same , 
time, or upon some other more convenient occasion. The Lectures 
are delivered at 12 o'clock on Mondays and Thursdays, and the 
hospital is visited daily. 

The Text-Book is the Professor's " Principles of Surgery." 



7. Clinical Medicine. 

PROFESSORS BENNETT AND LAYCOCK 

This Course, as directed by Dr. Bennett, is composed of two 
parts, — 1. Lectures on Tuesdays and Fridays, in which the. 
Student's attention is first directed to the methods of examining, 
the patients by interrogation, observation of symptoms, percussion, 
auscultation, the use of the microscope, and of chemical tests ; 
subsequently to the history and ti-eatment of cases in the wards. 
2. Visits on the other four days of the week to the Clinical Wards 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 29 

the Infirmary, at which the Student is taught to examine for 
raself the condition of the patient, form a diagnosis, and suggest 
treatment. 

Text-Book. — Introduction to Clinical Medicine ; or, Clinical 
ectures on the Principles and Practice of Medicine. By John 
ughes Bennett, M.D., &c. 



8. Anatomy. 

PROFESSOR GOODSIR. 



9. General Pathology. 

PROFESSOR HENDERSON. 

In these Lectures the Causes, Processes, and Phenomena of 
isease are treated of as separate and distinct subjects of study, 
ith the view of exhibiting the general facts or laws proper to 
ich of these departments of Pathology. Accordingly, the 
Durse is divided into three Sections, as follows : — 

1. Etiology, or the Causes of Disease, e.g., the operation of 
)ld and heat ; nature, &c., of morbid poisons. 

2. General Pathology of the functions morbidly affected, or 
athological Physiology, as of digestion, respiration, &c., &c., in 
isease. 

3. General Pathology of the Symptoms and Signs of Disease, 
ich considered by itself, e.g.^ pain, hsemorrhages, convulsions, &c. 



10. Natural History. 

PROFESSOR ALLMAN. 

The Zoological Lectures will embrace a general view of the 
nimal Kingdom, an exposition of the principles which should 
aide us in its study, and of the laws of a philosophical classifi- 
ition. They will be occupied with the demonstration of the five 
reat plans recognisable among animals, namely, Vertebrata, 
NNULosA, MoLLUscA, Radiata, and Protozoa ; the subordinate 
roups into which each of these admits of being divided will be 
efined and illustrated, and the laws of its Distribution in Time 
ad Space examined. 

The Geological Lectures will be occupied with an examination 



30 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

of the physical forces which have brought about the present con 
dition of the earth's crust, considered under two distinct aspects 
]. lis, mode of formation ; 2. Th.Q successive periods of time vih.\c\ 
have elapsed during its formation. 

In the Mineralogiccd Lectures it is proposed to embrace th 
general principles of Crystallography, when the six great system 
of Crystals will be explained, and their laws demonstrated. Th 
various physical properties of minerals, and the value of these pre 
perties in the diagnosis of species will be considered, and th 
more important mineral species will be described. 



11. Practice of Physic. 

PROFESSOR LAYCOCK. 

1. Constitutional Diseases and Therapeutics. 

2. Epidemiology and Treatment of Fevers. 

3. Special Diseases. 
Two Prizes will he given for the lest written Report of th 

Lectures. 

A Summer Course of Lectures on Medical Psychology will 
delivered, open to gentlemen of all professions. 

1. So much of Psychology and of the Laws of Life will be cod 
sidered as may be necessary to set forth the Principles of a scienc 
of Mental Physiology, based on the Anatomy and Physiology of th 
Nervous System. The doctrines of this division will be introduc 
tory to the succeeding practical divisions of the course. 2. Mento 
Pathology. 3. Mental Therapeutics, or the Medicinal and Mora 
Treatment of Insanity, and of analogous affections of the feeling 
and judgment. 4. Mental Hygiene, or the Prevention of Insanit 
and of nervous affections in general. This division will includ 
an examination of the means suitable for maintaining a soun 
mind in a sound body. 

Gentlemen, not medical, who may propose to attend the Cours( 
are recommended to acquire a general knowledge of the Anatom 
and Physiology of the nervous system in man and animals, an 
of the instincts of animals and vegetables, if not already acquainte 
therewith. 

Books recommended. — Sir W. Hamilton on the Philosophy of Common Sense, No 
A. toReid; Mill's Logic, Book iii. ; Herbert Spencer's Psychology, Part iv.; Morel] 
Psychology; Sir H. Holland's Chapters on Mental Physiology; Rymer Jones' Manual 
Zoology ; Solly on the Human Brain, Parts i. to x. 



ARTS EXAMINATION. 3l 

12. Medical Jurisprndence. 

PROFESSOR TRAILL. 
[See Faculty of Law, p. 22.] 



13. Botany. 

PROFESSOR BALFOUR. 

Lectures at the Royal Botanic Garden every Monday, Tuesday, 
/ednesday, Thursday, and Friday, at 8 a.m., from the beginning 
f May till the end of July. — Examinations in the Mathematical 
lass-room at the College on Wednesday at 3 p.m. — Demonstra- 
ons (from 9 to 10 a.m.) on the Natural Orders, in the open 
round of the Garden ; on the Prepaiations, in the Museum of 
conomic Botany ; and on the Plants, in the Hot-houses. — Satur- 
ays occupied -with Excursions and Demonstrations in the fields. 

Rooms at the Garden open to pupils for the consultation of 
■otanical Works, for the examination of Hpecimens, and for the 
Se of the Microscope. — Prizes for Herbaria, Essays, Museum 
reparations, and Competition Examinations. 



BACHELOR AND MASTER OF ARTS EXAMINATION. 

1859. 

The Faculty of Arts give notice, that the folio w- 
hg are the Eegnlations to be observed by Candidates 
)v the Degrees of Bachelor and Master of Arts : — 

1. It is required that Candidates for the Degree of Master of 
trts shall have completed four years of Academical Study, and 
fctended the following Classes : — Latin, Greek, Mathematics, 
,ogic and Metaphysics, Moral Philosophy, Natural Philosophy, 
ad Rhetoric ; of which Greek, Logic and Metaphysics, Moral 
hilosophy, and Natural Philosophy, must have been attended 
uring separate Sessions. 

2. It is required that Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor 
f Arts shall have completed three years of Academical Study, 



32 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

and attended the following Classes -.-Latin, Greek, Mathematics 
Loo-ic and Metaphysics, and Moral Philosophy; of Avhich Greek 
Logic and Metaphysics, and Moral Philosophy, must have beei 
attended during separate Sessions. 

3. The Books and Subjects upon which the Candidates are t. 
be examined are specified below. 

4 The names of intending Candidates for the year 18d9 mus 
be announced to the Dean of the Faculty before the 18th o 
March 1859, and the Tickets and Certificates of the requisit 
Classes, together with Matriculation Tickets, must be lodged wit! 
him before'' Friday the 1st of April. 

5 The Examinations for the year 1859 will take place on th 
seven following days -.-Monday the 1 1th of April, Tuesday th 
12th, Wednesday the 13th, Friday the 15th, Saturday the 16tl 
Monday the 18th, and Tuesday the 19th. 

6. The Examinations will be conducted by requiring from th 
Candidates tvritten answers to questions and translations, and, a 
the option of the Examiners, viva voce answers to questions arisin 
out of the books or subjects prescribed. The written answei 
and translations are to be given in to the respective Professors i 
the close of each Examination. 

7. For the Degree of M.A., the days of Examination are fixe 

as follows : — , . . , 

First Day, Monday, April ll.-Latin : for the minimum qual, 
fication, from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

Second Day, Tuesday, April 12.-Greek: for the mmimui 
from 10 to 1 • for the maximum, from 2 to 4. \ 

Third Day, Wednesday, April 13.— Mathematics : tor tt 
minimum, from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

FourthDay, Friday, April 15.— Logic and Metaphysics : tor tJ 
minimum, from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

Fifth Day, Saturday, April 16.--Moral Philosophy: for tlj 
minimum, from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. J 

Sixth Day, Monday, April 18.— Natural Philosophy : for i\ 
minimum, from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

Seventh Day, Tuesday, April 19.— Rhetoric : from 10 to 1. 
S. For the Degree of B.A., the Examinations will take place 
the hours above announced, on the First, Second, Third, Fourt 
and Fifth Days. 

9. Those Candidates who" may be found entitled to the Degrei 



ARTS EXAMINATION. 33 

of B.A. and M.A. will be classified in the order of their pro- 
ficiency, as ascertained by the results of the Examinations : and 
the List of Graduates affixed to the College Gates, suspended in 
the Library, and advertised in the newspapers. 

10. The following are the subjects of Examination in the dif- 
ferent departments for 1859 : — 

Latin. — Translation of English Narrative into Latin Prose ; 
Livy, Books viii. and ix. entire ; Cicero, Tusculan Questions, 
Book ii. ; Horace, Odes, Book ii., with the principal metres ; Axs 
Poetica. For honours, in addition to the above, the First Book 
of Cicero, De Finibus ; the Eighth Satire of Juvenal ; and the 
Agricola of Tacitus. 

Greek. — For the minimum : Strabo's Geography, Book xvii^ 
and the Fifth and Sixth Books of the Odyssey ; History of Greek 
Literature (Brown, Miiller, Mure, or Dr. Smith's Dictionary) ; 
Laws of Hexameter and Iambic Verse. For the maximum ; 
First Twelve Books of the Iliad ; Greek Prose Composition, 

N.B. — Besides the above, the Candidates for both grades will 
be required to translate some passage of an easy prose author 
which they have not seen before, ad aperturam. 

Mathematics. — The First Six Books of Euclid, Elementary 
Algebra, and the Rudiments of Trigonometry and Conic Sections, 
for the minimum. Higher Algebra, Plane Trigonometry, Conic 
Sections, Analytical Geometry, and the Differential Calculus, for 
honours. 

Logic and Metaphysics. — For the minimum : The Professor's 

Lectures ; Port-Royal Logic. For honours, in addition to the 

, above, the " De Anima" of Aristotle ; Bacon's "Novum Organum ;" 

the History of Speculative Philosophy in the 17th and 18th cen- 

, turies (Stewart, Cousin, Tennemann.) 

PJtetoric and Belhs Lettres {English Language and Literature^ 
I —The Professor's Lectures. 

Moral Philosophy. — For the minimum: The Professor's Lec- 
tures, with Dugald Stewart's " Philosophy of the Active and 
Moral Powers." For honours, add Plato's Republic, Books 4th, 
5th, 6th, and 7th ; and Rev. W. Archer Butler's Lectures on the 
History of Ancient Philosophy, First, Second, Third, and Fourth 
Series. 

Natural Philosophy. — For the minimum : Potter's Mechanics ; 
,and Questions on at least two of the following subjects: — Ele- 

c 



34 EDINBURGH UNIVEESITY CALENDAR. 

ments of Astronomy, Optics, and Hydrostatics, a^ given in the 
Lectures, or in such elementary works as those of Herschel and 
Lardner. For honours, Jackson's Mechanics ; Grant's History of 
Astronomy ; and the Theory of Optics. 

It is recommended that Students, at the close of the Third 
Year of the regular Curriculum in Arts, should offer themselves 
for that part of the Examination which relates to Classical pro- 
ficiency. Those who avail themselves of this recommendation 
will undergo the Examination in Mathematics and Philosophy at 
the close of the Fourth Year of their Studies, as usual. 

Students, therefore, for whom the Session 1858-59 is the Third 
of the Curriculum, will be entitled to join the Classical Examina- 
tion in April 1859, and also to take the Bachelor's Degree. 

PHILIP KELLAND, D.F. 

University of EmNBUEaH, 
A'pril 1858. 



STATUTES relative to the Degree of Jil.D., and Regu- 
lations as to Lecturers whose Course of Lectures 
are to Qualify for the Degree of M.D. 



I. Act of the Town-Council. 

Edinbukgh, 9>th August 1854. 
The Magistrates and Council, having considered the judgment 
recently pronounced by the House of Lords, in the processes of 
Suspension and Interdict and of Declarator, at the instance of the 
Senatus Academicus, to.^-ether with the Statutes of the University 
relative to the Degree of M.D., sanctioned by the Magistrates and 
Council on 27th October 184G, and the Regulations as to Lecturers 
whose Courses of Lectures are to qualify for the Degree of M.D., 
approved of on 2Cth January 1847, the operation of which Statutes 
and Regulations was suspended by reason of the said process of 
Suspension and Interdict ; further, considering that in consequence 



^ STATUTES RELATIVE TO DEGREE OF M.D. 35 

of such suspension the Magistrates and Council, on 7th September 
1847, revived and re-enacted the Statutes of ]3th November 1S33 
(and which ■were rescinded by the foresaid Act of 27th October 
1846), as Interim Rules and Regulations, until such time as other 
or further Regulations should be enacted by the Patrons, and that 
it is proper that the Statutes and Regulations first before men- 
tioned should now receive effect and be acted on ; therefore the 
Magistrates and Council, on report from the College Committee, 
made in pursuance of the remit to them, dated 6th June last, ke- 
GALLED the interim Rules and Regulations revived and re-enacted 
as aforesaid, and rescinded the same accordingly ; revived and 
BE-ENACTED the Statutes of the University relative to the Degree 
of M.D., sanctioned by the Magistrates and Council on 27th Oc- 
tober 1846, and the Regulations as to Lecturers whose Courses of 
Lectures are to qualify for the Degree of M.D., approved of on 
26th January 1847 ; and directed the Senatus Academicus to 
; abide by, and conform to, the said Statutes and Regulations in 
every respect. 

The Magistrates and Council directed this Act to be extracted 
without abiding another reading in Council, and that the same, 
together with the statutes and Regulations revived and re-enacted 
as aforesaid, be printed, and copies transmitted to the Senatus 
Academicus and to the Royal Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons 
for their information and guidance. 

D. M'Laren, Lord Provost. 



II. Statutes of the University of Edinburgh, relative to the Degree 
of M.D. , sanctioned on 'ilih October 1846. 

Sect. I. No one shall be admitted to the Examinations for the 
Degi"ee of Doctor of Medicine who has not been engaged in medical 
study for four years, during at least six months of each in the 
University of Edinburgh, or in some other University where the 
Degree of M.D. is given ; unless, in addition to three Medical 
Sessions so constituted, he has attended, during at least six winter 
months, the Medical or Surgical Practice of a General Hospital, 
which accommodates at least eighty patients, and during the same 
period a course of Practical Anatomy. 



During Courses of 



During Courses of 
Six Months. 



36 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

Sect. II. No one shall be admitted to tlie Examinations for the 
Degree of Doctor who has not given sufficient evidence — 

• 1. That he has studied, once at least, each of the following 
departments of Medical Science, under Professors of Medicine in 
this or in some other University, as already defined, viz.— 

ANATOMY \ 

CHEMISTRY, 

MATERIA MEDICA and PHARMACY, . 
INSTITUTES of MEDICINE or PHYSIOLOGY, 

PRACTICE of MEDICINE, 

SURGERY, ^ ^ 

MIDWIFERY, pnd the DISEASES peculiar to WOMEN and j Six Months. 

CHILDREN, 

GENERAL PATHOLOGY, or, in Schools where there is no 
such Course, a Three Months' Course of Lectures on Mor- 
bid Anatomy, together with a Supplemental Course of 
Practice of Medicine, or Clinical Medicine, 

PRACTICAL ANATOMY (unless it has been attended in the \ 
year of extra-academical Study allowed by Sect. I.), 

CLINICAL MEDICINE, that is, the Treatment of Patients \ During Courses of 
in a Public Hospital, under a Professor of Medicine, by I ^^ ^;^„^°°;se'; ^j 
whom Lectures on the cases are given, . . . • ) Three Months. 

CLINICAL SURGERY, ^ ' 1 During Courses of 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE, \ at least Three 

BOTANY, 'I Months. 

NATURAL HISTORY, including ZOOLOGY, . . . | 

2. That in each year of his Academical Studies in Medicine he 
has attended at least two Six Months' Courses of Lectures, or one 
of these and two Three Months' Courses. 

3. That, besides the Course of Clinical Medicine already pre- 
scribed, he has attended, for at least six months of another year, 
the Medical or Surgical Practice of a General Hospital, either at 
Edinburgh or elsewhere, which accommodates not fewer than 

eighty patients. v, v a 

4. That he has been engaged, for at least six months, by Ap- 
prenticeship or otherwise, in Compounding and Dispensing Drugs 
at the Laboratory of an Hospital, Dispensary, Member of a Surgical 
College or Faculty, Licentiate of the London or Dublin Society of 
Apothecaries, or a professional Chemist or Druggist. 

5. That he has attended, for at least six months, by Apprentice- 
ship or otherwise, the Out-practice of an Hospital, or the Prax;tice 



STATUTES RELATIVE TO DEGREE OF M.D. 37 

of a Dispensary, Physician, Surgeon, or Member of the London or 
Dublin Society of Apothecaries. 

Sect. III. Attendance on the Lectures of Teachers of Medicine 
in the Hospital Schools of London, or School of the College of 
Surgeons in Dublin, or of Teachers of Medicine in Edinburgh, re- 
cognised as such by the Royal Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Edinburgh (in accordance with regulations to be adopted by 
these Colleges jointly, and approved of by the Patrons of the 
University), shall, to the extent of one-third of the whole depart- 
ments required, by Section IL Clause 1, to be studied by Candi- 
dates, be held equivalent to attendance under Professors in this or 
in some other University, as already defined. And such attendance 
shall be available to Candidates to the extent of one of the four 
years of study required by Section I., provided it has embraced, in 
one year, at least two six months' Courses of Lectures, or one of 
these and two three months' Courses. 

Sect. IV. No one shall obtain the Degree of Doctor who has 
not studied, in the manner already prescribed, for at least one year 
previous to his Graduation, in the University of Edinburgh. 

Sect. V. Every Candidate must deliver, before the 31st of March 
of the year in which he proposes to Graduate, to the Dean of the 
Faculty of Medicine — 

1. A Declaration, in his own handwriting, that he is twenty-one 
years of age, or will be so before the day of Graduation ; and that 
he will not be then under articles of apprenticeship to any Surgeon 
or other master. 

2. A statement of his Studies, as well in Literature and Philo- 
sophy as in Medicine, accompanied with proper Certificates. 

3. A Medical Dissertation composed by himself, in Latin or 
English ; to be perused by a Professor, and subject to his approval. 

Sect. VI. Before a Candidate be examined in Medicine, the 
Medical Faculty shall ascertain, by examination, that he possesses 
a competent knowledge of the Latin language. 

Sect. VII. If the Faculty be satisfied on this point, they shall 
proceed to examine him, either viva voce or in writing, firsty on 



38 EDINBUEGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

Anatomy, Chemistry, Botany, Institutes of Medicine, and Natural 
History, bearing chiefly on Zoology ; and, secondly^ on Materia 
Medica, Pathology, Practice of Medicine, Surgery, Midwifery, and 
Medical Jurisprudence. 

Sect. YIII. Students who profess themselves ready to submit 
to an examination on the first division of these subjects, at the end 
of the third year of their studies, shall be admitted to it at that 
time. 

Sect. IX. If any one, at these private examinations, be found 
unqualified for the Degree, he must study during another year two 
of the subjects prescribed in Section II., Clause 1, in this or in 
some other University, as above defined, before he can be admitted 
to another examination. 

Sect. X. Should he be approved of, he will be allowed, but not 
required, to print his Thesis ; and, if printed, forty copies of it 
must be delivered before the 25th day of July to the Dean of the 
Medical Faculty. 

Sect. XI. If the Cfindidate have satisfied the Medical Faculty, 
the Dean shall lay the proceedings before the Senatus Academicus, 
by whose authority the Candidate shall be summoned, on the 31st 
of July, to defend his Thesis ; and, finally, if the Senate think fit, 
he shall be admitted, on the first lawful day of August, to the 
Degree of Doctor. 

Sect. XII. The Senatus Academicus, on the day here appointed, 
shall assemble at ten o'clock, a.m., for the purpose of conferring the 
Degree ; and no Candidate, unless a sufficient reason be assigned, 
shall absent himself, on pain of being refused his Degree for that 
year. 

Sect. XIII. Candidates for Graduation shall be required to pro- 
duce evidence of their having conformed to those Regulations which 
were in force at the time they commenced their medical studies in 
a University. 



STATUTES RELATIVE TO DEGREE OF M.D. 39 

III. Regulations «s to Lecturers whose Courses of Lectures are to 
qualify for the Degree of M.D., in the University of Edinburgh, 
approved of on 26th January 1847. 

1. That no Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, or of the 
Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, shall be recognised, by 

■ the College to which he belongs, as a public Lecturer or Teacher 
of any of the Medical Sciences, until his qualifications shall have 
been tried in the particular branch which he professes, by exami- 

' nation before a Board appointed by the Royal College of which he 
: is a member. 

2. That in the case of Lecturers on Chemistry, and on Natural 

■ History, who, according to the practice of this School of Medicine, 
i do not require to be Fellows of the Colleges, or to possess a medical 
1 status, the examination, with a view to recognition, shall be con- 
i ducted by a joint Board, consisting of an equal number of persons 
' appointed by each of the two Colleges. 

3. That the Lecturers who have delivered courses of Lectures in 
j Edinburgh, which Lectures have constituted a part of the course of 
I study required for the Surgical qualifications conferred in this city, 

! shall be exempted from the necessity of qualifying in the manner 
; above described, in regard to future courses on the same subjects. 
\ But this regulation shall not be applicable to Lecturers on depart- 
ments which may in future be added to the course of study for the 
degree of M.D. 

4. That no Lecturer shall be recognised, who, at the same time, 
i teaches more than one of the prescribed subjects of study, excepting 
^ in those cases where Professors in the University are at liberty to 

teach two branches. 

5. That for every Ticket of a Lecturer, recognised in terms of 
these Regulations, to be ultimately presented as evidence of at- 

i tendance with a view to Graduation, there shall be paid a fee of 
' the same amount with that exigible by the Medical Professors in 
the University. 

THE SCOTCH BAR. 
The Regulations having reference to admission to the Scotch 
Bar may be obtained from the Librarian, Advocates'^ Library, 
Edinburgh. So far as the University is concerned, it is important 



40 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

only to state that the Classes which are necessary are, Civil Law, 
Scots Law, Conveyancing, and a Course of Lectures on Medical 
Jurisprudence. 

WRITERS TO THE SIGNET. 

Students intending to become Writers to the Signet must attend 
two full Winter Courses at the University — the Humanity Class 
being attended during one of these. 

Further information regarding the Course of Study and the 
Examinations may be obtained from John Hamilton, Esq., W.S., 
Signet Office, Register House ; or 7, Great Stuart Street, Edin- 
burgh. 

THEOLOGICAL STUDENTS. 

The following are the Regulations of the principal Ecclesias- 
tical Bodies regarding the University Course to be followed by 
their Students : — 

1. Church of Scotland. — Students must " produce Certificates 
of having attended all the Classes required of such as apply for 
the Degree of Master of Arts, viz., Greek, Latin, Logic, Mathema- 
tics, Moral Philosophy, and Natural Philosophy, in such order that 
after Greek and Latin being attended during the first Session, the 
Classes of Logic, ]\Ioral and Natural Philosophy, must have been 
attended separately during three successive seasons, and that Ma- 
thematics shall have been studied in a University, at least during 
one Session, before entering the Class of Natural Philosophy." 

" That the course of attendance at the Divinity Hall shall be 
completed in four Sessions, provided that the Student's attend- 
ance during three of these Sessions shall have been regular ; but 
Students giving only two Sessions of regular attendance shall be 
required to give an additional attendance of three partial Sessions 
to complete their Course. All Students shall be required to give 
^at least two Sessions of regular attendance ; and every Student 
must attend the Classes of Church History, Hebrew, and Biblical 
Criticism, during at least two of the Sessions which he claims to be 
considered as regular, if such classes shall exist in the University 
or Universities at which he has prosecuted his Theological Course." 
— Act of Assembly, 1856. 



u 



GRADUATES IN ARTS. 41 

2. Free Church. — The Literary Course is the same as in the 
case of the Church of Scotland. 

3. United Presbyterian Church. — " Students, before being ad- 
mitted to the Theological Hall, must attend at least three Sessions 
at one of the National Universities, and their University Course 
must be duly certified to have included Latin, Greek, Logic, and 
Moral Philosophy. . . . Students who have not attended the 
Natural Philosophy Class of the University, before admission to 
the Hall, are required to do so immediately after their first Ses- 
sion. ... It is strongly recommended to Students to attend such 
Classes as they may have access to, for the study of Geology, 
Chemistry, and other branches of Natural Science." — From Pci'per 
on Theological Education issued hy Authority of the Synod. 

4. Reformed Presbyterian Church. — " Every Student shall 
prosecute his studies at one of the National Universities during 
four complete Sessions at least ; and shall comprise in that cur- 
riculum the usual Literary and Philosophical branches, viz., Latin, 
Greek, Mathematics, Logic, Ethics, and Natural Philosophy, to 
which, before entering the Hall, a knowledge of Hebrew must be 
added. The Student is recommended to add to this Course of study, 
Natural History, Chemistry, Anatomy, and the German language.*^ 
— From Synopsis of Studies issued hy Authority of the Synod. 

5. Congregational Union op Scotland. — Students are required 
to go through the ordinary College curriculum of four years. It 
is not necessary that this should be done before entering the Theo- 
logical Hall. 



GRADUATES IN ARTS, 1858. 

[List of Graduates arranged in the order of merit in the several departments, p. 56.] 

On the 23d day of April 1858, the Senatus Academicus con- 
ferred the Degree of Master of Arts on the following 
Gentlemen : — 



James Anderson. 
John Barbour. 
William Bell. 
Alex. Crum Brown. 
James Smith Candlish. 
Thomas H. Core. 
Alexander Cusin. 



Alex. H. Drysdale. 
John Duncan. 
James Johnstone. 
John Machar. 
John Ross. 
Robert W. Walker. 
Wm. Whitfield. 



42 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

The Honorary Degree of iM.A. has been conferred on, — 
J. K. Isbister. I G. R. R. Coekhurn. 

Rev. T. Smith. | John M. D. Meiklejohn. 

The Degree of Bachelor of Arts has been conferred on the 
following Gentlemen : — 



John Edgar. 
Alex. IMackeuzie. 
John Mackenzie M'Lean. 
Benjamin Martin. 
Andrew Melville. 



Robert R. Monteath. 
Wm. C. Shearer. 
Josiah Thomas. 
Richard Welford. 
James Wells. 



The Honorary Degree of B.A. has been conferred on John Ogle. 
The Degree of D.D. has been conferred on Rev. John Cairns and 
Rev. John Taylor. And the Degree of LL.D. on J. F. Ferrier, Esq., 
Professor of Moral Philosophy in St. Andrews. 



NOMINA EORUM QUI GEADUM JMEDICIN^ DOCTOEIS IX 
ACADEMIA JACOBI SEXTI REGIS, QU^. EDINBURGI 
EST, ANNO MDCCCLVIII ADEPTI SUNT. 

§ Those who have obtained Prizes for their Dissertations, f Those deemed worthy of 
competing for the Dissertation Prizes. * Those commended for their Dissertations. 

Adamsou, Eduardus, Anglus. On some points connected 
with the Physiology and Pathology of Fibrine. 
t Allan, Alexander, M.A. Abredon., Scotus. Notes of Surgical 
Cases in the Edinburgh Hospital. 

Allan, Donaldus, INI. A. Abredon., Scotus. On Diarrhoea, con- 
sidered as a Symptom of Disease. 

* Aitken, Thomas, Scotus. On the General Paralysis of the 

Insane. 
5* Barraut, Adolphus Rodrigues, ab Insula Mauritii (Port 
Louis). On the Presumptions of Survivorsbips. 

* Bell, Thomas Vernon, Scotus. On the Construction of the 

Stethoscope in accordance with the principles of Acous- 
tics. 
Blair, Henricus Ritchie, Scotus. On Typhus and Typhoid 
Fevers. 



GRADUATES IN MEDICINE. 43 

* Carruthers, Jacobus Bell, Scotus. On Cannabis Indica. 
Cookson, Joannes Fowler, Anglus. On Pneumonia. 

10 Crosbie, Alexander, Scotus. On Hereditary Influence. 
Crumpe, Hammerton, Anglus. On Rachitis. 
Davie, Georgius Scott, Scotus. On Scorbutus, its Pathology 
and Treatment. 

* Davies, Bartholomseus Watson, Jamaicensis. On Plural 

Births. 
Dewar, Gulielmus, Scotus. On Excision of Joints. 
5* Dubuc, Emilius Gulielmus, Scotus. On Urajmic Convulsions. 
^ Edie, Carolus, Scotus. Observations on Medical Practice. 
Farquharson, Robertus, Scotus. On the Parasitic Diseases 

of the Skin, 
Fettes, Carolus Gulielmus, Scotus. On Habitual Constipation. 
Graham, Adolphus Fredericus, Anglus. On Tolerance of 
Remedies in Disease. 
I 20 Greene, Georgius, Scotus. On Icterus and its Causes. 
Hardie, Thomas, Scotus. On Typhoid Fever. 
Hoile, Edmondus, Scotus. On Retained Placenta. 
Hunter, Jacobus Dickson, ab America SeptentrionalL On 
Psoriasis and Lepra. 

* Jameson, Thomas, Scotus. On the Liver and its Diseases. 
^5* Langstaff, Carolus, Anglus. On the Minor Agencies now 

employed in the Diagnosis of Chest Disease. 
Little, Jacobus, Scotus. On Insanity. 

Lockie, Stewart, Anglus. On some of the Secondary Conse- 
quences of Bright's Disease of the Kidneys. 
^ Lorimer, Joannes, Scotus. On Syphilization. 
. Tilacartney, Samuel Halliday, Scotus. On the Pathology of 
Phthisis, and its relation to Fatty Liver. 
30* M'Nab, Joannes, Scotus. Pathological Commentary on a 

case of Clinical Medicine. 
' § Maingay, Alexander Carroll, Anglus. Monograph on the 
British Parmeliacese. 
t Maxwell, Jacobus Laidlaw, M.A. Edin., Scotus. On the 
Chemistry and Physiology of the Spleen. 
Medd, Joannes, Anglus. On Traumatic Tetanus. 
t Messer, Adamus Brunton, Scotus. Description of an Abnor- 
mal Foetus. 
35 Metcalfe, Robertus Ives, Anglus. On Puerperal Fever. 



44 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

Miller, Andreas, Scotus. On Diseases of Nutrition, in rela-i 

tion to the periods of life at which they appear. 
Morgan, Gulielmus Taylor, Camhro-Britannus. On Syphilis. 
Morkel, Gulielmus, a Promontorio Bonse Spei. On the dif- 
ferent Modes of Dying, 
t Moxey, David Anderson, Scotus. On the Mechanism of Par- 
turition. 

40 Murray, Joannes Ross, Australensis. On "Wounds of Arteries 
and their Treatment, special and general. 

* Myburgh,Franciscus Gerhard, a Promontorio Bonse Spei. Od 

Placenta Praevia. 

* Orphoot, Joannes, Scotus. On Surgical Meteorology. 
Pearson, David Ritchie, Scotus, On the Maturation of the 

Seed. 
Quiroz, Rafael Leandro, a Costa-Rica. On Syphilis. 
45 Rayner, Thomas, Anglus. On the Skin as a Therapeutic i 
Medium. 
Rumney, Oswaldus Georgius, Anglus. On Medical Jurispru- 
dence in relation to Political Economy and Mortality. 
Schmitz, Carolus Theodorus, Anglus. On the Alteration oi 

the External Configuration of the Thorax in Disease. 
Scott, Stephanus, Scotus. On Teratology. 
Stephenson, Gulielmus Henricus, Anglus. On Atonic Uterine 
Haemorrhage. 
50 Stewart, Thomas Grainger, Scotus. On some Diseases of the 

Reflex Functions. 
*■ Stirton, Jacobus, Scotus. On the Disorders of Digestion in 

Infancy. 
§ Thomson, Murray, Scotus. On Sulphureous Mineral Waters. 

Walker, Robertus, Scotus. On the Ergot of Wheat. 
+ Whiteford, Jacobus, B.A. Edin., Scotus. On the Chemistry 
and Physiology of the Pancreas. 
. 55§ Wilson, Henricus Season, Braziliensis. Observations on the 
Nervous System of the Asterias. 
Wilson, Robertus, Scotus. On the Vascular System viewed 

normally. 
Wood, Thomas, Scotus. On Pericarditis. 
58* Yule, Joannes Alexander, Scotus. On Dystochia, 



LIST OF HONOURS 1857-8. 



45 



List of Honours awarded in the various Glasses for 
Session 1857-8. 

The name of the Student standing at the Head of each Class is 
rinted in Capitals ; other Prizemen have one asterisk prefixed to 
heir names ; where two prizes have been gained, two asterisks are 
refixed, and so on ; those who have received " Honourable Men- 
ion," have no asterisk prefixed to their names. 

Faculty of Arts. 

' I.— HUMAOTTY. 

Senior Class. *James Buchanan. 

James Glasgow. 
*=■ Alexander 0. Johnston. 
John Paton. 

Junior Class. 

DAVID EOSS. 
■'^Robert Rankin. 

Andrew K. M'Cosh. 
-David Millar. 
*«»W. Knox M'Adam- 

Jesse E. Glasgow. 
*John Simpson. 

Robert Ferguson. 

Alexander M'Master. 

Walter Young. 

John Robertson. 
^-Robert Patrick. 

Richard Blackwell. 

William Morrison. 

William A. P. Johnman. 



«-JOHN RUTHERFURD. 

^^^-Kenneth Moody Stuart. 
*"*D. Douglas Bannerman. 
*William Millar Nicolson. 

Robert C. Bell. 

Lewis Hoyes. 
*John Alexander Banks. 
^Alexander Gordon. 
■*' Andrew Cuthill. 
*'James Burness. 
*W. C. M'Donald. 

Adam Thomson. 
*Thomas Black. 
-William Affleck. 

David Sproat. 

John M'Beath. 

James Blyth. 

Peter M'Farlane. 

J. P. Long. 
*Edward Rolland. 



II.— GREEK. 



First Class. 

DANIEL CAMERON. 

'■=^'John Creigbton. 
^Robert Rankin. 
*'John Simpson. 
^"Walter W. Young. 
*George Elder. 
■^David Miller. 
"'■^Alexander Stodart. 
*John M. Robertson. 
*Andrew Smith. 
*Daniel Cameron. 



James Blyth. 
Jesse Glasgow. 
William Johnman. 

Second Class. 

«-*JAMES BURNESS. 
**Kenneth M. Stuart. 

^George Smeaton. 

■•■Jobn Lightbody. 

*'''James Oliver. 

*John Macbeath. 



46 



EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 



*George Grim. 
^Gilbert Laurie. 
"-■D. Douglas Bannermari. 
-William Coldstream. 

Roderick Macdonald. 

Jolin Eutherf'urd. 

John G. Dalgliesh. 
*'Clietwode Drumraond Pringle. 
-•James D. Thomson. 
^'■Edward Kolland. 



Third Class. 

*-JOHN MACMOELAXD. 

-•''"•••Daniel Forbes. 
*" William Nicolson. 
*■ James Meagle. 
•'•Thomas M. Mure. 

Eobert Wright. 
*Adam S. Matheson. 

Alexander Gordon. 



III.— MATHE:\rATICS. 



Third Class. 

AN DEE W MAC KAY. 

*John M. Sloan. 
^"Robert Cram. 

Thomas Duncan. 

James S. Symon. 

Second Class. 

JAMES GEAXT. 
*"John Peter MacMorland. 
*John Matheson. 
*A. Hutton Burgess. 
** William Stenhouse. 

-■■Andrew Kirkwood M'Cosh. 
*"''-John W. Gibson. 
"-•"George P. Hunter.. 
*James Ogilvie. 
^Alexander ]Matheson. 
■■■R. Lindsay Oliphant. 
"^•"M'Taggart Cowan. 
"^'Alexander Finlayson. 
"-■•Francis Deas. 
^■■Piichard R. M'Queen. 
*Samuel Maverick. 

John Scott. 

Colin Campbell Livingston. 

John Ross. 

Alexander Walker. 

Thomas M. Mure. 

William- M'Alpine. 

John Lightl)ody. 

David Tavlor Walker. 

Emile S. Rolland. 

J. Dempster Ferguson. 

Roderick Morison. 



First Class. 

WILLIAM M'GOWAX 

•■■Robert Miller. 
^'"John George Dalgliesh. 
*"-'-"John C. Johnstou. 
■••Peter Stewart. 
-■•Alexander Anderson. 
•••George Elder. 
**James Halket. 
*James Gordon. 
••'Robert Heron. 
■*■•■■ John T. Crawford. 
"■••'James Henry George HilL 
*'Petcr Maury Deas. 
"^William Thomas "Williams. 
'•■"John Russell. 
■■■■"Alexander M'Millan. 
"■^■'Alexander Robertson. 
'■■"D. Douglas Bannerinau. 
-•■James Wilson. 
*"*Samuel Barclay. 
"*George Brown. 
■*John Wilson. 

Matthew Charteris. , 

Joseph Phillips. 

Xurman M'Liesh. 

John M'Leod. 

Robert M'Moran. 

Duncan Macrae. 

Lewis Hoyes. 

Archibald Xeilson ]Mackray. 

James Ohver. 

Charles Fraser. 

Andrew Mitchell. 

Georsre Robertson. 



LIST OF HONOfURS 1857-8. 



47 



Jolin Eutherfurd. 
William Coldstream. 
Thomas Watson. 



William Aitchison, 
David Couper. 
-■■John C. Reid. 



IY._LOGIC AXD METAPHYSICS. 

I.— BUSINESS OF THE SESSION, 



Senior Division. 
DAVID SOMERVILLE. 
'•■Daniel Cameron. 
•-William E. Adam. 
*"Janies Graham. 
*David Blacli. 
*Emile S. Eolland. 
*"John Edgar, 
*"John Machar. 
I 

Junior Division. 

FRANCIS S. JOHNSTONE. 
*John Peter MacMorland. 



"-■•■Archibald Neilson Mackray 
'•'William Dickson, 
■^Alexander Gordon. 
-^John G. Smieton. 
-■■'Peter Stewart. 
*William Mackintosh. 
^Andrew Taylor. 
*'John George Dalgliesh. 
"*John C. Johnston. 
•'•Alexander Anderson. 
'•■■William Coldstream. 
-■•Eobert Heron. 



il.— BUSINESS DURING THE VACATION, 1857. 
Senior Division. i Junior Division. 

HENRY LAURIE. «-David Somerville. 

i^" An drew Melville. 



v.— RHETORIC AND BELLES-LETTRES. 



WILLIAM C, SHEARER. 

*'James S. Candlish, 
-**R. J. Stevenson, 

'■Richard A. Gillespie. 

*John Ross. 

*David Ross. 

*John Marquis. 
'•-•'■Alexander Cusin. 
■'•■-■■■John Comrie Thomson. 

-^William Bell. 

"^William Wedderhurn. 

-John Tweedie. 



'■•William G. Core. 
-'•John Machar. 
'••John Duncan. 
"* William Nicolson. 
-'^James Gibson Starke. 
■'•■Robert Mathewson. 

James Hillhouse. 

Thomas Bell, 

John C. Bell. 

George Morrice. 

Thomas M'Kie. 

Robert Lindsay Oliphant. 



VI.— MORAL PHILOSOPHY. 

I. BUSINESS OF THE SESSION. 



Senior Division. 

HENRY LAURIE. 
^■David Ross. 
*■ James Buchanan. 



"'■•■William Anderson. 
'■■■John M. Sloan. 
'■•David Somerville. 
-'■'Andrew Melville. 



48 



EDINBURGH UNIVEHSITY CALENDAR. 



*Robert Mathewson. 
*William Pt. Adam. 
*Robert Pat on. 
*Eicliard M'Queen. 
*JosiaL Thomas. 
*Alexander Matheson. 



Ju^-IOR DmsioN. 

JOHN ■V\'ALLACE FOYEPw 

Andrew Paton. 
George Morrice. 
John MacGregor. 



II. BUSINESS DTTEING VACATION 1857. 
i-'William Nicolson. | ^'James S. Candlish. 

\ai.--XATUEAL PHILOSOPHY. 



First Division. 

THOMAS H. CORE. 
*John Ross. 
*Robert Cram. 

Second Division. 

WILLIAM G. CORE. 

*George Douglas. 
*John Scott. 
*James Johnstone. 
*James Wells. 
*Andrew Hutton Burgess. 
*Eobert "William Walker. 



Third DmsiON. 

MALCOLM M'LEAX. 
HENRY C. STANLEY. 

"^R. Lindsav Oliphant. 
<=--Johu C. 'Bell 
*^Peter M. Deas. 
*James Lamb. 

James Andei-son. 

James S. Candlish. 

Alexander Cuvsin. 

John Machar. 

William Wedderburn. 

Thomas Bell.^ 

Alexander W. Cunningham- 
James H. G. Hill. 



VIIL— TECHNOLOGY. 



FREDERICK H. BOWMAN. 
**Hewens Walton. 



*W. Dingwall Fordyce. 
*"Charles Scott Moucrieff. 



Faculty of Divinity. 
IX.— HEBREW. 



Junior Class. 

JOHN BARBOUR, 

*'George Purves. 
*"George Burnett. 
*Robert Henderson. 



Senior Class. 

JAMES JOHNSTON'S. 
^William Bell. 
"*"John Johnstone. 



X.—BIBLICAL CRITICISM AND ANTIQUITIES. 

A. H. CHARTERIS. i 

*A. Davidson. ol'mmer Exercises. 

*James Adam. j *Richard Gillespie. 



LIST OF HONOURS 1857-58. 



49 



*James Eorie. 
George Hill. 

XII.- 

JAMES STIRTON. 
^George Scott Davie. 

XIII 

PETER MACPHERSON. 
^Robert Brown. 
*B. W: Davies. 



Faculty of Medicine. 

XI.—PRACTICE OF MEDICINE. 

AVilliam Tumbull. 



•MIDWIFERY. 

*■ James Robertson. 
'■^"Francis G. Myburgh. 

SURGERY. 

-■•Alexander Allan. 
^Jobn R. Murray. 
* James Henderson. 



Senior Division. 
JAMES EORIE. 



XIV.—ANATOMY. 

Junior Division. 

ALFRED SMITH. 

*W. C. MTntosh. 
'••William Stevenson. 

XV.—CHEMISTRY. 
MMES DAVIDSON". { -Thomas Gray. 

«- William Robson. | -Archibald Hamilton. 



G. LINDLEY CARSTAIRS. 
■^Alexander Kirk Mackie. ' 
*John Scott. 

Hugh Logan. 

Thomas D. Thow. 

E. Hope Robertson. 

Alex. M. Barrie. 

John Smart. 

John Cowan. 

William Christie. 

Robert Blair, jun. 

John Latta Christie. 

George Duflfus. 

Alexander Macbeth. 

Douglas M. Brown. 

Alex. Philip. 
. Thomas Gordon. 



Faculty of Law. 
XVT.—LAW OF SCOTLAND. 



Eobert Menzies. 

John Thomas Sim son. 

J. G. DaAadson. 

Andrew H. Ballingall. 

Thomas More. 

John Innes. 

James F. Edwards. 

William Bonnar Darling. 

James Barton. 

James Romanes. 

J. B. W. Lee. 

George Kinloch Livingstone. 

Henry Gibson. 

Thomas Grier. 

David Andrews. /• 

William C. Murray. 



D 



50 



EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 



XVII.— CIVIL LAW. 



JOHN BLAIR BALFOUK. 

*-*Hubert Hamilton. 
**Henry Graham Lawson. 
**Adam B. Bannatyne. 

XVIIL— CONVEYANCING 



*-*Thomas M'Kie. 
:^*William D. Fordyce. 
*-Jolin H. A. Macdonald. 



DAVID SHAW. 

^Robert U. Stracban. 
*James R. Jamieson. 
*Robert Smitb. 
^Alexander Lade. 
*John Hay Clarke. 
*J. B. L. Birnie. 

Andrew Marshall. 

John G oldie. 

Andrew Watt Gumming. 

William Archibald. 

Robert L. Henderson. 

Charles B. Steven. 

Robert Blair, jtm. 



Michael Bruce Cowan. 
Robert Burns Begg, jun. 
Robert Macandrew, jun. 
Ninian EUiot. 
J. B. W. Lee. 
Thomas Dowie. 
Alex. Kirk Mackie. 
John D. Bruce. 
Dngald J. Bannatyne, jun. 
Thomas Hart. 
Henry Tod, jun. 
William Robson. 
Alex. Gallie. 



List of Honours awarded for Summer Session 1857. 

I.-PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY 
GEORGE SHEARER. | '=^Jobn Hope. 



*Robert Somerville 

IL— MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE. 
ADOLPHE R. BARRAUT. 



WILLIAM TURNBULL. 

*David Lyell. 

Charles Craik. 

^neas M'Leod Ross. 
*John Wilson Johnston. 

Senior Division. 

GEORGE COWIE. 
CHARLES CRAIK. 

Frederick de Fabeck. 

Junior Division. 

*Jame8 T. Tulloch. 
^•Thomas S. Clouston. 
*Peter Macpherson. 



III.— BOTANY. 

-Thomas Burnie. 
* James Saidler. 
■■•'George Shearer. 

Alexander Ballantyne. 

Wallace Lindsay. 

Robert Reid. 

Frederick Lockwood Logan. 

James Munro. 
''•Robert Reid. 
■•'•Arthur Moren. 
■:i'William Coldstream. 
■*James Rorie. 

James Ritchie. 

Alex. Johnstone Macfarlane. 

Thomas Ainslie. 



ABSTRACT OF THE UNIVERSITIES BILL. 51 

The following Grentlemen have been appointed to the Straton 
Scholarships for the Session 1857-58: — 

Robert Rankin. 



John Ross. 

David Ross. 

John P. MacMorland. 



William Core. 



ABSTRACT OF THE "UNIVERSITIES BILL," 

' ' IN so FAR AS IT APPLIES TO THE EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY. 

I. There shall be a Chancellor, who shall be elected by the 
University Council. The Chancellor shall have power to appoint 
a Vice-Chancellor to discharge his office, in so far as the conferring 
of Degrees is concerned. 

II. The Principal shall not as such be, or be deemed, a Profes- 
sor of Divinity, but may be a Layman. He shall be bound to 
undertake such duties of teaching or lecturing as may be assigned 
to him by the Commissioners. 

III. University Council. — There shall be a University Council, 
which shall meet twice a year, composed of — 1. The Chancellor. 
2. The Members of the University Court (see IV.) 3. The Pro- 
fessors. 4. The Masters of Arts of the University. 5. The Doc- 
tors of Medicine of the University, who shall have, as Matriculated 
Students, attended Classes in any of the Faculties for four com- 
plete Sessions. 6. Of all who, within three years from the passing 
of the Act, can establish that they have, as Matriculated Students, 
attended the University for four Sessions, or three complete Ses- 
sions and a fourth at some other Scottish University, the attend- 
ance for at least two of these Sessions having been on Classes in 
the Faculty of Arts. 

All Members must be above twenty-one, have their names registered in a book kept 
for the purpose, paying such annual Fee as shall be fixed upon. No Student can be a 
Member. The President shall be the Chancellor ; whom failing, the Rector ; whom 
failing, the Principal ; whom failing, the Senior Professor. 

Powers of Council. — The Council shall take part in the election 
of Office-bearers of the University, and take into consideration all 



52 EDINBURGH UNIVEESITY CALENDAR. 

questions affecting its wellbeing and prosperity, making their re- 
presentations to the University Court, who shall return a deliver- 
ance thereon. 

IV. University Court^ of whom to consist. — The University Court 
of the University of Edinhuj^gh shall consist of the following Mem- 
bers, viz. — 1. A Rector to be elected by the Matriculated Students, 
voting in such manner as shall be determined by the Commis- 
sioners ; 2. The Principal ; 3. An Assessor to be nominated by 
the Chancellor ; 4. The Lord Provost of Edinburgh for the time 
being ; 5. An Assessor to be nominated by the Lord Provost, 
Magistrates, and Town- Council oi Edinburgh ; 6. An Assessor to 
be nominated by the Rector ; 7. An Assessor to be elected by the 
General Council of the University ; 8. An Assessor to be elected 
by the Senatus Acaderaicus. No Principal or Professor of any 
University shall be eligible to the ofBce of Rector or Assessor ex- 
cept in the case of the Assessor to be elected by the Senatus 
Academicus ; and the Rector and Assessor nominated by him shall 
continue in office three years, and the other Assessors shall con- 
tinue in office for four years ; and five Members of the University 
Court shall be a quorum. 

V. Powers of University Courts. — The University Court of each 
University shall, subject to the provisions of this Act, have the 
following powers, viz. : — 

1. To review all decisions of the Senatus Academicus, and to be a Court of Appeal 

from the Senatus in every case except as herein otherwise provided for. 

2. To effect improvements in the internal arrangements of the University, after due 

communication with the Senatus Academicus, and with the sanction of the 
Chancellor ; provided that all such proposed improvements shall be submitted 
to the University Council for their consideration. 

3. To require due attention on the part of the Professors to regulations as to the 

mode of teaching and other duties imposed on them. 

4. To fix and regulate from time to tiTiio the Fees in the several Classes. 

5. Upon sufficient cause shown, and after due investigation, to censure a Principal 

or Professor, or to suspend him from his office and from the emoluments thereof, 
in whole or in part, for any period not exceeding one year, or to require him to 
retire from his office on a retiring allowance, or to deprive him of his office; 
and during the suspension of any Professor, to make due provision for the 
teaching of his Class : Provided alway.'^, that no such sentence of censure, sus- 
pension, or deprivation, or requisition on a Professor to retire from office, shall 
have any eflFect until it has been approved by Her Majesty in Council. 

6. To inquire into and control the administration by the Senatus Academicus or 



ABSTRACT OF THE UNIVERSITIES BILL. 53 

Principal and Professors of any College, of the revenue, expenditure, and all 
the pecuniary concerns of the University and of any College therein, including 
funds mortified for Bursaries and other purposes. 

N.B. — During the subsistence of the Commission, the powers 
of the Court shall be exercised in subordination to, and so as not 
to conflict with, those of the Commissioners. 

VI. Patronage. — The power of appointing to the office of Prin- 
cipal, and to all Professorships in the University hitherto held 
by the Town-Council, or others in conjunction with them, shall be 
transferred to seven Curators, four to be nominated by the Town- 
Council, and three by the University Court. These Curators to be 
nominated within two months after this Act comes into operation. 

The date at which the Act shall come into operation to be fixed 
by the Commissioners ; and until then the University shall be 
conducted according to the existing law and practice. 

VII. Commissioners. — The following persons shall be Commis- 
sioners for the purposes of this Act, and shall have a common 
seal, viz. : The Duke of Argyle ; the Earl of Aberdeen ; Earl Stan- 
hope ; Earl of Mansfield ; Lord Justice- General M'JSTeill ; Sir W. 
Gibson-Craig, Bart. ; Lord Justice-Clerk Inglis ; .James Craufurd 
(Lord Ardmillan) ; W. Stirling of Keir, Esq., M.P. ; James Mon- 
creiff, Esq., M.P. ; Alexander Hastie, Esq., M.P. ; and A. Murray 
Dunlop, Esq., M.P. They may elect one of their number to be 
permanent Chairman, and four shall be a quorum. Their powers 
shall be in force till 1st January 1862, but may be extended till 
1st January 1863. 

VIII. Powers of Commissioners. — 

1. To examine the Principal, Professors, Regents, Masters, and others hearing office 

in the University, as to all rules and ordinances now in force, and to require 
the production of all documents and accounts. 

2. To revise the respective Foundations, Mortifications, Bursaries, and Donations ; 

and vrhen the interests of religion and learning and the design of the donor 
shall be thereby better served, to alter the conditions or directions affecting 

■■: such gifts or endowments. 

; 3. Subject to the provisions of this Act, to regulate by ordinance the powers, juris- 
dictions, and privileges of Chancellors, Rectors, Assessors, Professors, and all 
other Members or Office-bearers in the said Universities and Colleges, as also of 
the Senatus Academicus, the General Council, and the University Court, and 
their meetings, as well with respect to the government, policy, and discipline of 
the University, as to the management and disposal of the revenues and endow- 



54 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

ments thereof, with power to abolish unnecessary offices ; and to regulate the ' 
time, place, and manner of elections. 

4. To regulate the course of study, the fees, the manner of teaching, the manner of 

examination, with the qualifications, appointment, and number of examiners, 
and the amount of their remuneration ; also the granting of Degrees of all 
kinds. 

5. To make ordinances in order to found Professorships, and provide for assistants 

where such are necessary, and for their remuneration. 

6. To provide for the due administration of revenues and endowments, the preserva- 

tion of fabrics, the management of museums, &c. &c. 

7. To provide for the extinction of debt by means of any of the property of the 

University. 

8. To report on expediency of founding a National University ; and in the event of 

such being founded, to make arrangements for converting existing Universities 
into Colleges. 

If a Charter for a National, University is granted, the Univer- 
sities rtiay surrender their power of granting Degrees, the surrender 
being signified in writing by the Chancellors and University Courts, 
and having been approved by the Senatus and Council of each 
University, 

All rules, statutes, and ordinances, made by the Commissioners, to be published in the 
Edinburgh Gazette for four successive weeks, and be laid be.''ore Parliament, if it be 
sitting ; and if not, then before the next Parliament ensuing, and thereafter submitted 
for the approval or disapproval of Her Majesty in Council. It shall be lawful for any 
University, or any person affected by these Rules and Statutes, to petition Her Majesty, 
who may refer such Petition to the Commissioners, directing that the Petitioner shall 
be heard by Counsel, and a Report be made to Her Majesty. 

N.B. — Any of the Rides or Statutes of the Commissioyiers may be 
afterwards altered or revoked by the University Court, but only with 
consent of the Chancellor, and of Her Majesty in Council. 

IX. The Commissioners shall further have power to pay money 
out of the Parliamentary Grant, — 

1. For providing retiring Allowances to aged and infirm Principals and Professors. 

2. For providing additional Teaching by moans of Assistants' to the Professors in 

any Professorships already established, or to be established. 

3. For providing Remuneration to the Examiners appointed in pursuance of this 

Act. 

4. For increasin'.^ the Salaries presently attached to existing Professorships and to 

any other Ofijces in the University. 
6. For the Endowment of new Professorships. 

The Acts of the Commissioners in these respects require the 
approval of Parliament, and Her Majesty in Council. 



ABSTRACT OF THE UNIVERSITIES BILL. 55 

X. Senatus Academicus. — The Senatus Academicus shall possess 
the powers heretofore belonging to them, in so far as these are not 
modified or altered by the Act ; and shall superintend and regulate 
the idiscipline and teaching of the University, and administer its 
property and revenues, subject to the review and control of the 
University Court ; the Principal to be the ordinary President, 
with a deliberative and casting vote. 

Nothing in this Act shall be construed to affect any Trusts 
now vested in, and administered by, the Senatus Academicus, or 
Principal, or any of the Professors, for purposes unconnected with 
the University. 






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AUTHORIZED. 



©trxnbxirglj Oakiixir^rsitg Caltaxtiar 



FOR SESSION 

1859-60. 



^, INCLUDING 

OUTLINES OF THE COURSES IN THE VARIOUS CLASSES, 

THE MEDICAL AND ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, LISTS OF GRADUATES 

AND DISTINGUISHED STUD£NTS OF THE PREVIOUS SESSION, 

AND MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL. 



PHOMAS CONSTABLE AND CO., EDINBUEGH. 

1859. 



CONTENTS. 



Chairs, with Date of Foundation, &c., 
Calendar, ...... 

Sketch of the History of the University, 
Universities' Bill and Ordinance, 

The Library, 

Matriculation, .... 

Opening of Classes, with Fees, &c., 

Courses of the various Professors, 

Anatomical Museum, . 

Museum of Natural Historj', 

Botanic Garden and Museum, 

Graduates in Arts for 1859, . 

Arts Examination Papers, . 

Graduation in Arts for 1860 (Intimation), 

Piegulations on Medical Graduation, Old and New Statutes, 

Medical Graduates for 1859, 

Medical Examination Papers for 1859, 

Prizemen of 1 859, 

Bursaries, ..... 

List of L^niversity Council, . 

Scotch Bar — "Writers to the Signet — Theological Students, 



FA.GB 

5 
6 

9 
13 
18 
19 
20 

22-48 
48 
49 
49 
51 
63 
65 

68-73 
77 
79 
86 
94 
101 
121 



WinxhnBxt^ 0f ®binburr)lj* 



(Siancellor, 

Rector, 

Principal, SIR DAVID BREWSTER, K.H., LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S., &c. 



Librarian, John Small, liLA. 
iSec. to the Seii. Academ., P. Kelland, M.A. 
Secretary and Registrar to the University, 
Alexander Smith. 



Regius Keeper of the Museum of Natural 
History, George James Allman, 51. D. 

Regius Keeper of the Botanic Garden^ 
John Hutton Balfour, M.A., M.D. 



<- . ; 1 


&- -^ 




O 3 . 




O C.J 






Chan-s. 


Trofessors. -^ c. i 


Patrons. 


1597 


Humanity i 


James PiUans, M.A. - . 1820 


Curators. 


1708 


Greek 1 


John S. Blackie, M.A. 1852 


Curators. 


167i 


Mathematics 


Philip Kelland, M.A., . 1838 


Curators. 


1708 


Logic and Metaphysics . . 


A.C.Fraser,M.A.,LL.D. 1856 


Curators. 


1708 


Moral Philosophy 


Pat. C. MacDougaU . . 


1852 


Curators. 


1708 


Natural Philosophy .... 


Jas. D. Eorbes, D.C.L. 


1833 


Curators. 


1762 


Rhetoric & Belles Lettres ■■ 


W. E. Aytoun, D.C.L. 


1845 


Crown. 


1786 


Practical Astronomy . . . . ' 


C. Piazzi Smyth 


1845 


Crown. 


1719 


Universal History 


Cosmo Innes i 1846 


Curators. 


1790 
1839 


Asriculture 


John Wilson 1 J 854 

John Donaldson 1845 


Curators. 
Principal and 


Music 








Professors. 


1855 


Technology 


Georce Wilson, M.D. . . 1855 


Crown. 


1620 


Divinity 


T. J. Crawford, D.D. . . 1859 


Curators. 


1695 


Divinity and Ecclesiastical 








History 


James Robertson. D.D. 1843 


Crown. 


1846 


Biblical Criticism and 






1 Biblical Antiquities .... 


Robert Lee, D.D 


1846 


Crown. 


1642 ' K ebvew 


David Listen, M.A 


1848 


Curators. 


1707 


Public Law 


Arch.C. Swinton.LL.B 
John Shank More .... 


1842 
1843 


Crown. 

Curators. 

Curators. 


1710 
1722 


Civil Law 


Law of Scotland 


1825 


Conveyancing; 


Alex. Montgomerie Bell 1856 


C urators. J 


1686 


Institutes of Medicine . . 


John H. Bennett, M.D.i 1848 


Curators. 1 


1768 


Dietetics, Materia Medica, 








and Pharmacy 


Robert Chrirtison, M.D. 


1832 


Curators. 


1807 


Medical Juiispradence 






/ 




and Police 


T. Stewart Traill, 5LD. 


1832 


Crown. 


1713 


Chemistry and Chemical 










Pharmacy 


L. Playfair, C.B., PIi.D. 


1858 


Curators. 


isr.i 


Surgery 


James Miller, 


1842 


Curators. 


1685 


Practice of Physic 


Thomas Laycock, M.D. 


1 855 


Curators. 


1705 

1806 


Anatomy 


John Goodsir 


1846 


Curators. 
Crown. 


Military Surgery 


1831 


General Pathology 


Wm. Henderson, M.D. 


1842 


Curators. 


1726 


Midwifery and Diseases of 










Women and Children . . 


J. T. Simpson, M.D. . . 


1840 


Curators. 


1741 


Clinical Medicine 


( J. H. Bennett, M.D. . . 
\ Thos. Laycock, M.D., 


1848 
1855 




1803 


Clinical Surgery 


James Syme 


1833 


Crown. 


1676 
1767 


Botany 


John H. Balfour, M.D. 
Geo. J. Allman, M.D. 


1845 
1855 


Curators. 
Crown. 


Natural History 



1859.— NOVEMBER, 30 Days. 


DECEMBER, 31 Days. 


1 


Tu 


College Session opens. 


1 


Th 


Class of Medical Jurisprudence opens. 


2 


W 


Classes in Arts and Medicine meet. 


2 


Fr 




3 


Th 




3 


Sa 




i 


Fr 




4 


s 




5 


Sa 




5 


IVI 




6 


s 




6 


Tu 


Class of Practical Astronomy opens. 


7 


M 




7 


W 




8,Ta 




8 


Th 




9 W 




9 


Fr 




lO'Th 


Theological Classes opai. 


10 


Sa 




11 Fr 


Martinmas Term. 


11 


S 




]2Sa 


Election of Rector. Court of Session 


12 


M 




13S 


[sits. 


13 


Tu 




14;m 


Law Classes open. 


14 


W 




ISiTu 




15 


Th 




lejW 




16 


Fr 




17Th 




17 


Sa 




18Fr 




18 


S 




19'Sa 




19 


M 




20IS 
21 M 




20 
21 


Tu 
W 




22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 


Tu 
W 
Th 
Fr 
Sa 
S 

Tu 
W 




22 Th 
23, Fr 
24Sa 


Christmas Holidays commence. 




25!S 


Nativity of our Lord. 


Statutory Meeting of Senaitus. 


26, M 
27iTu 

28 \y 

29Th 
30|Fr 
31,Sa 


Holiday in Faculty of Ai'ts. 
Statutory Meeting of Senatus. 


I860.— JANUARY, 31 Days. 


FEBRUARY, 29 Days. 


1 


S 




I'w 




2 


M 




2Th 


Candlemas Tcraa. 


3 


Tu 




3,Fr 




4 


W 




4Sa 




5 


Th 




5S 




6 


Fr 




6M 




1 


Sa 




7Tu 




8 


S 




8 


W 




9 


M 




9 


Th 




10 


Tu 




10 


Fr 




11 


W 




11 


Sa 




12 


Th 




12 


S 




13 


Fr 




13 


M 




ll4 


Sa 




14 


Tu 




i5 


S 




15 


W 


1 


16 


M 




16 


Th 




17 


Tu 




17 


Fr 




IS 


W 




18 


Sa 




19 


Th 




19 S 




20 


Fr 




20'm 




21 


Sa 


Statutory Meeting of Senator. 


21 Tu 




22 


S 




22; W 




23 


J[ 




23,Th 


24 


Tu 




24 Fr' 


25 


W 




2.5 ;Sa Statutory Meeting^ of Seuatus. 


26 


Th 




26'S 




27 


Fr 




27 iM 


Holiday in Faculty of Arts. 


28 


Sa 




28 Tu 




29 


S 




29 W 




3f 


M 


Holiday in Faculty of Arts. 






•^ 


T.. 





















MARCH, 31 Days. | 


APRIL, 30 Days. 


1 


Th 




1 


s 




2 


Fr 




2 


M 


. 


3 


Sa 




3 


Tu 




4 


s 




4 


W 




5 


M 




5 


Th 


6 


Tu 




6 


Fr Good Friday. 


7 


W 




7 


Sa 


8 


Th 




8 


S Easter Sunday. 


9 


Fr 




9 


M Examin. for Degrees in Arts begins. 


10 


Sa 




10 


Tu 


11 


S 




11 


W 


12 


M 




12 


Th 


13 


Tu 




13 


Fr Faculty of Arts Session closes. 


14 


W 




14 


Sa 




15 


Th 




15 


S 




16 


Fr 




16 


M 




17 


Sa 


Candidates for a Degree in Ai-ts must 


17 


Tu 


General Council meets. 


18 


S 


[give in their names. 


18 


W 




19 


M 




19 


Th 




20 


Tu 


Court of Session rises. 


20 


Fr 


Medical Session closes. 


21 


W 




21 


Sa 




22 


Th 




22 


s 




23 


Fr 




23 


M 


Examination for Medical Degrees 


24 


Sa 




24 


Tu 


[begins. 


25 


s 




25 


W 




26 


M 


Holiday in Faculty of Arts. 


26 


Th 


Sacramental Fast-day in Edinburgh 


27 


Tu 




27 


Fr 


[and Leith. 


28 


W 




28 


Sa 


Statutory Meeting of Senatus. 


29 


Th 




29 


s 


Communion Sunday in Edinburgh and 


30 


Fr 


Theological and Law Session closes. 


30 


M 


[Leith. 


31 


Sa 


Intending Med. Grad. give in their Declara- 
tion and Theses. Stat, Meeting of Senatus. 








MAY, il Days. 


JUNE, 30 Days. 


1 


Tu 


Summer Se.sion commences. 


1 Fr 




2 


W 




•2Sa 




3 


Th 




3S 




4 


Fr 




4M 




5 


Sa 




6Tu 




6 


S 




6W 




7 


M 




7|Th 




8 


Tu 




8jFr 




9 


W 




9 


Sa 




10 


Th 




10 


S 




11 


Fr 




11 


M 




12 


Sa 


Court of Session sits. 


12 


Tu 




13 


S 




13 


W 




14 


M 




14 


Th 




15 


Tu 


Whitsunday Term. 


15 


Fr 




16 


W 




16 


Sa 




ITiTh 


General Assembly meets. 


17 


S 




IBFr 




18 


M 




19 


Sa 




19 


Tu 




20 


s 




20 


W 




21 


M 




21 


Th 




22 Tu 




22 


Fr 




23iW 




23 


Sa 




24 


Th 




24 


s 




25 


Fr 




25 


M 




26 


Sa 




26 


Tu 




27 


S 




27 


W 




28'M 




28 


Th 




29'Tu 




29 


Fr 




SOW 




30 


Sa 




31 Th 











JULY, 31 Days. 



IS 

3Tu 

4rw 



9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



AUGUST, 31 Days. 



Statntory Meeting of Senatus. 



Court of Session rises. 



Summer Session ends. 



Defence of Medical Theses, and List of Gra- 
duates submitted to Senatus. 



w 

Th 
Fr 

Sa 

5|S 
6'M 
7|Tu 
8jW 
9jTh 
10 Fr 



Medical Degrees conferred. — Lammas 
[Day. 



15 W 
16jTh 
17|Fr 

Sa 

S 

M 
Tu 
W 
Th 



18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



SEPTEMBER, 30 Days. 



OCTOBER^ 31 Days. 




26'W 

27 Th 

28 Fr 
29'Sa 

3o!s 



I'M 




2Tu 




3W 




4Th 




5Fr 




6 8a 




7iS 




8M 




9Tu 




low 




ll:Th 




12 Fr 




13 Sa 




14|S 




15 !m 




16iTu 




17 W 




18 Th 




19 Fr 




20 Sa 




21 'c; 




'22 M 




2H 


Tu 




24 


W 


TLcith. 


25 


Th Sacramental Fast-day in Edinburgh and 


26 


Fr General Council meets. 


27 


Sa 




28 


S 


Communion Sunday in Edinburgh and 


29 


M 


fLeith. 


30 


Tn 




81 


W 


Medical Latin Examination held. 



EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 



FOUNDATION AND HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

The University of Edinburgh was founded in 1582. 
The funds were drawn from three sources — a bequest of 
Eobert Keid, Bishop of Orkney (1558), an endowment 
by Queen Mary, afterwards increased and confirmed by 
James vi., and the revenues of the Town-Council. 
James vi. granted the Charter of Erection, constituting 
the Lord Provost, Magistrates, and Town-Council of the 
Burgh of Edinburgh, with the advice of the City Mini- 
sters, electors of all the Professors, with the power of 
removal as well as of appointment. To the same parties 
was also committed the regulation of the teaching, 
discipline, fees, and accommodation of the Students, 
who originally resided in Collegiate chambers. The 
Charter contemplated an extensive school of learning — 
" Humanity, Languages, Philosophy, Theology, Medicine, 
Law, and all other sciences whatsoever." 

The first teacher was Mr. Eobert Kollock, who had 
acquired so great a reputation at St. Andrews as to at- 
tract the notice of influential men in Edinburgh. As 
sole Regent or Professor, he, in accordance with the cus~ 



10 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

torn of the period, carried the Students, whom his fame 
quickly gathered together, through the whole curriculum 
of University study. Ere long, however, he was allowed 
colleagues, and at the beginning of the seventeenth cen- 
tury the University staff seems to have consisted of four 
Eegents or Professors and a Principal, Bollock being the 
first to hold the latter office, in conjunction with the Pro- 
fessorship of Divinity, to which he had been appointed 
in 1585. 

In the beginning of the 17th century the course of 
study for all Students extended over four years, and 
embraced Latin, Greek, Hebrew, Logic, Khetoric, Arith- 
metic, Physics, and, to a limited extent. Divinity. 

The first Professor of Medicine, Sir Robert Sibbald, 
was appointed in 1685. 

The rapid extension of the University will be best 
seen by a comparison of the Members of Senatus in 1700 
and 1750 with the corresponding list of the present 
year on pp. 20, 21. 

In 1700, the Senatus comprised Dr. Gilbert Rule, 
Principal ; George Campbell, Professor of Divinity ; 
Alexander Rule, Professor of Hebrew ; Andrew Massie, 
William Law, John Row, William Scott, Professors of 
Philosophy ; Lawrence Dundas, Professor of Humanity ; 
James Gregory, Professor of Mathematics ; and James 
Sutherland, Professor of Botany. 

The first Professorship of Law was instituted in 1707, 
and held by Charles Erskine. 

In 1708, as afterwards in the other Scottish Univer- 
sities, the present Professorial system was substituted in 
the Faculty of Arts, for the previous system of Regent- 
Tutors, in accommodation to the growth of modern 



HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY. 



11 



knowledge. With that year the history, iu their present 
form, of the three Chairs of Philosophy, viz., Logic 
and Metaphysics, Ethics, and Natural Philosophy, pro- 
perly speaking, commenced. After this date the vari- 
ous Faculties rapidly extended themselves, the Medical 
School especially acquiring a high reputation towards 
the middle of the century, mainly in consequence of the 
celebrity of Alexander Monro. 

In 1756, the Senatus Academicus consisted of the fol- 
lowing members : — 

Principal, Dr. John Goldie. 
I. — Literature and Philosophy. 



Humanity or Latin, 

Greek, 

Mathematics, 

Logic, 

Moral Philosophy, 

Natural Philosophy, 



George Stewart. 
-Hobert Hunter. 
Matthew Stewart. 
Jolin Stevenson. 
James Balfour. 
John Stewart. 



11. — Theology. 
Divinity, ...... Robert Hamilton. 

Ecclesiastical History, . . . Patrick Gumming. 
Hebrew, James Robertson. 

III. — Law. 
Civil Law, ..... 

Scots Law, ..... 

Universal History and Public Law, . 

IV. — Medicine. 
Practice of Medicine, . . . . 
Chemistry, ..... 

Theory of Physic, 

Anatomy, 

Botany and Materia Medica, 
Midwifery, .... 

Among the many distinguished men who, as Professors, 



Robert Dick. 
John Erskine. 
William Wallace. 

. John Rutherford. 

William Cullen. 
, Robert Wlajte. 
( Alex. Monro, primus, and 
\ A. Monro, secundus. 
. Charles Alston. 
Robert Smith. 



12 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

have adorned the University of Edinburgh, those who 
were most widely known during their incumbency, and 
many of whose names are still fresh, were — Rollock, 
Charteris, Carstairs, Erskine, the Gregorys, the Monros, 
Maclaurin, Cullen, Eobertson, Ferguson, Blair, Black, 
Stewart, Tytler, Playfair, Robison, Jameson, Leslie, 
Brown, Bell, Chalmers, Wilson, and Hamilton. 

The University, as it at present stands, comprises four 
Faculties, viz., — 1. Arts, — consisting, strictly speaking, 
of the Chairs of Latin, Greek, Mathematics, Logic and 
Metaphysics, Natural Philosophy, Moral Philosophy, 
and Rhetoric, but also embracing Practical Astronomy, 
Agriculture, Universal History, Theory of Music, and 
Technology. 2. Theology, — comprising Systematic 
Theology, Biblical Criticism, Ecclesiastical History, and 
Oriental Languages. 3. Law, — comprising Medical 
Jurisprudence, Civil Law, Law of Scotland, and Convey- 
ancing. 4. Medicine, — comprising Dietetics, Materia 
Medica and Pharmacy, Theoretical and Practical Chemis- 
try, Theoretical and Practical Surgery, Institutes of Me- 
dicine, Midwifery and Diseases of Women and Children, 
Clinical Surgery, Clinical Medicine, Anatomy Theoretical 
and Practical, General Pathology, Natural History, Prac- 
tice of Physic, Botany, and Medical Jurisprudence. 

A College Winter Session extends over about fi ve months 
and a half. The Summer Session extends over three 
months, during which the Medical School alone is open. 

By a recent Act of Parliament, great alterations have 
been introduced into the Universities of Scotland. In 
these circumstances it is of importance to give the fol- 
lowing abstract of the Act, in so far as it is applicable to 
the University of Edinburgh : — 



ABSTRACT OF THE UNIVERSITIES BILL, 13 

ABSTEACT,OF THE " UNIVEESITIES BILL," 

IN SO PAR AS IT APPLIES TO THE EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY. 

I, There shall be a Chancellor, who shall be elected by the Uni- 
versity Council. The Chancellor shall have power to elect a Vice- 
Chancellor to discharge his office, in so far as the conferring of 
Degrees is concerned. 

II. The Principal shall not as such be, or be deemed, a Professor 
of Divinity, but may be a Layman. He shall be bound to under- 
take such duties of teaching or lecturing as may be assigned to him 
by the Commissioners. 

IIL University Council. — There shall be a University Council, 
which shall meet twice a year, composed of — 1. The Chancellor. 
2. The Members of the University Court (see IV.) 3. The Profes- 
sors. 4. The Masters of Arts of the University. 5. The Doctors 
of Medicine of the University, who shall have, as Matriculated 
Students, attended Classes in any of the Faculties for four com- 
plete Sessions. 6. Of all who, within three years from the passing 
of the Act, can establish that they have, as Matriculated Students, 
attended the University for four Sessions, or three complete Ses- 
sions and a fourth at some other Scottish University, the attend- 
ance for at least two of these Sessions having been on Classes in 
the Faculty of Arts. 

All Members must be above twenty-one, have their names registered in a book kept 
for the purpose, pajing such annual Fee as shall be fixed upon. No Student can be a 
Member. The President shall be the Chancellor ; whom failing, the Rector ; whom 
failing, the Principal ; whom failing, the Senior Professor. 

Powers of Council. — The Council shall take part in the election 
of Office-bearers of the University, and take into consideration all 
questions affecting its wellbeing and prosperity, making their re- 
presentations to the University Court, who shall return a deliver- 
ance thereon. 

IV. University Court, of whom to consist. — The University Court 
of the University of Edinburgh shall consist of the following Mem- 
bers, viz. — 1. A Rector to be elected by the Matriculated Students, 
voting in such manner as shall be determined by the Commis- 
sioners ; 2. The Principal ; 3. An Assessor to be nominated by the 
Chancellor ; 4. The Lord Provost of Edinburgh for the time being ; 
5. An Assessor to be nominated by the Lord Provost, Magistrates, 
and Town-Council of Edinburgh ; 6. An Assessor to be nominated 



14 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

by the Rector ; 7. An Assessor to be elected by the General Coun- 
cil of the University ; 8. An Assessor to be elected by the Senatus 
Academicus. No Principal or Professor of any University shall be 
eligible to the office of Rector or Assessor except in the case of the 
Assessor to be elected by the Senatus Academicus ; and the Rector 
and Assessor nominated by him shall continue in office three years, 
and the other Assessors shall continue in office for four years ; and 
five Members of the University Court shall be a quorum. 

V. Powers of University Courts. — The University Court of each 
University shall, subject to the provisions of this Act, have the 

following powers, viz. : — 

1. To review all decisions of the Senatus Acadeniicus, and to be a Court of Appeal 

from the Senatus in every case except as herein otherwise provided for. 

2. To effect improvements in the internal arrangements of the University, after due 

communication with the Senatus Academicus, and with the sanction of the 
Chancellor; provided that all such proposed improvements shall be submitted 
to the University Council for their consideration. 

3. To require due attention on the part of the Professors to regulations as to the 

mode of teaching and other duties imposed on them. 

4. To fix and regulate from time to time the Fees in the several Classes. 

5. Upon sufficient cause shonn, and after due investigation, to censure a Principal 

or Professor, or to suspend him from his office and from the emoluments thereof, 
in whole or in part, for any period not exceeding one year, or to require him to 
retire from his office on a retiring allowance, or to deprive him of his office ; 
and during the suspension of any Professor, to make due provision for the 
teaching of his Class : Provided always, that no such sentence of censure, sus- 
pension, or deprivation, or requi.sition on a Professor to retire from office, shall 
have any effect until it has been approved by Her Majesty in Council. 

6. To inquire into and control the administration by the Senatus Academicus or 

Principal and Professors of any College, of the revenue, expenditure, and all the 
pecuniary concerns of the University and of any College therein, including funds 
mortified for Bursaries and other purposes. 

N.B, — During the subsistence of the Commission, the powers of 
the Court shall be exercised in subordination to, and so as not to 
conflict with, those of the Commissioners. 

VI. Patronage. — The power of appointing to the office of Prin- 
cipal, and to all Professorships in the University hitherto held by 
the Town-Council, or others in conjunction with them, shall be 
transferred to seven Curators, four to be nominated by the Town- 
Council, and three by the University Court. These Curators to be 
nominated within two months after this Act comes into operation. 

The date at which the Act shall come into operation to be fixed 
by the Commissioners ; and until then the University shall be con- 
ducted according to the existing law and practice. 

VII. Commissioners. — The following persons shall be Commis- 
sioners for the purposes of this Act, and shall have a common 
seal, viz. : The Dukeof Argyle ; the Earl of Aberdeen ; Earl of Had- 



ABSTEACT OF THE UNIVERSITIES BILL. 15 

dington ; Earl of Mansfield ; Lord Justice- General M'Neill ; Sir W. 
Gibson- Craig, Bart. ; Lord Justice- Clerk Inglis ; James Craufurd 
(Lord Ardmillan) ; W. Stirling of Keir, Esq., M.P. ; James Mon- 
creiff, Esq., M.P. ; Alexander Hastie, Esq., M.P. ; and A. Murray 
Dunlop, Esq., M.P. They may elect one of their number to be 
permanent Chairman, and four shall be a quorum. Their powers 
shall be in force till 1st January 1862, but may be extended till 
1st January 1863. 

VIII. Powers of Commissio7iers. — 

1. To examine the Principal, Professors, Regents, Masters, and others bearing office 

in the University, as to all ruJes and ordinances now in force, and to require the 
production of all documents and accounts. 

2. To revise the respective Foundations, Mortifications, Bursaries, and Donations ; 

and when the interests of religion and learning and the design of the donor shall 
be thereby better served, to alter the conditions or directions affecting such gifts 
or endowments. 

3. Subject to the provisions of this Act, to regulate by ordinance the powers, juris- 

dictions, and privileges of Chancellors, Rectors, Assessors, Professors, and all 
other Members or Office-bearers in the said Universities and Colleges, as also of 
the Senatus Academicus, the General Council, and the University Court, and 
their meetings, as well with respect to the government, policy, and discipline of 
the University, as to the management and disposal of the revenues and endow- 
ments thereof, with power to abolish unnecessary offices ; and to regulate the 
time, place, and manner of elections. 

4. To regulate the course of study, the fees, the manner of teaching, the manner of 

examination, with the qualifications, appointment, and number of examiners, 
and the amount of their remuneration ; also the granting of Degrees of all 
kinds. 
0. To make ordinances in order to found Professorships, and provide for assistants 
where such are necessary, and for their remuneration. 

6. To provide for the due administration of revenues and endowments, the preserva- 

tion of fabrics, the management of museums, &c. &c. 

7. To provide for the extinction of debt by means of any of the property of the 

University. 

8. To report on expediency of founding a Jfational University ; and in the event of 

such beins founded, to make arrangements for converting existing Universities 
into Colleges. 

If a Charter for a National University is granted^ the Univer- 
ities may surrender their pov^er of granting Degrees^ the surrender 
being signified in writing hy the Chancellors and University Courts, 
and having been approved by the Senatzis and Council of each Uni- 
versity. 

All rules, statutes, and ordinances, made by the Commissioners, to be published in the 
Edinburgh Gazette for four successive weeks, and be laid before Parliament, if it be 
sitting ; "and if not, then before the next Parliament ensuing, and thereafter submitted 
for the approval or disapproval of Her Majesty in Council. It shaU be lawful for any 
University, or any person affected by these Rules and Statutes, to petition Her Majesty, 
who may refer such Petition to the Commissioners, directing that the Petitioner shall be 
heard by Counsel, and a Report be made to Her Majesty. 

N.B. — Any of the Rules or Statutes of the Commissioners may be 



16 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

afterwards altered or revoked by the University Court, but only with 
co7isent of the Chancellor, and of Her Majesty in Council. 

IX. The Commissioners shall further have power to pay money 
out of the Parliamentary Grant, — - 

1. For providing retiring Allowances to aged and infirm Principals and Professors. 

2. For providing additional Teaching by means of Assistants to the Professors in any 

Professor.-hips already established, or to be established. 

3. For providing Remuneration to the Examiners appointed in pursuance of this 

Act. 

4. For increasing the Salaries presently attached to existing Professorships and to 

any other Offices in the University. 

5. For the Endowment of new Professorships. 

The Acts of the Commissioners in these respects require the ap- 
proval of Parliament, and Her Majesty in Council. 

X. Senatus Academicus. — The Senatus Academicus shall possess 
the powers heretofore belonging to them, in so far as these are not 
modified or altered hythe Act ; and shall superintend and regulate 
the discipline and teaching of the University, and administer its 
property and revenues, subject to the review and control of the 
University Court ; the Principal to be the ordinary President, v»'ith 
a deliberative and casting vote. 

Nothing in this Act shall be construed to aftect any Trusts now 
vested in, and administered by, the Senatus Academicus, or Prin- 
cipal, or any of the Professors, for purposes unconnected with the 
University. 

The following Ordinance, issued by the University Commissioners 
and approved by Her Majesty in Council, brings the University 
under the Act on 15th October 1859 : — 

Ordinance by the Scottish Universities' Commissioners 

with Reference to the University of Edinburgh.— 12^/i 

March 1859. 

At Edinburgh, the Twelfth day of March, Eighteen 
Hundred and fifty-mne Years ; 

The Coramissioners appointed and acting under the authority of a 
Statute passed in the twenty-first and twenty-second years of Her Ma- 
jesty's reign, chapter eighty-three, intituled, " An Act to make provision 
for the better Government and DiscipUne of the Univex'sities of Scotland, 
and impi'oving and regulating the Course of Study therein, and for the 
Union of the two Universities and Colleges of Aberdeen ;" — 

Statute and ordain as follows, viz. : — 

Frimo, That the provisions of the said statute shall, as regards the 
University of Edinburgh, come into operation and receive effect from and 
after the fifteenth day of October in this present year. 



ORDINANCE OF 12TH MARCH 1859. 17 

And whereas, by the said Statute it is enacted, that from and after the 
date at which the said Statute shall come into operation at the said 
University of Edinburgh, there shall be constituted therein a University 
Court, consisting of, among other members, a Rector, to be elected by 
the Matriculated Students, voting in such manner as shall be deter- 
mined by the said Commissioners ; and whereas, by the said Statute it 
is also enacted, that there shall be in the said University a General 
Council, which shall assemble twice every year, on such days as may be 
fixed by the said Commissioners, subject to alteration thereafter from 
time to time by resolution of the said Council, with the approval of the 
University Court ; and whereas, by the said Statute it is also enacted, 
that in time coming there shall be a Chancellor of the said University, 
to be elected by the other members of the General Council ; and where- 
as the said Commissioners are empowered by the said Statute, subject 
to the provisions thereof, to make regulations as to time, place, and 
manner of presenting and electing all University Officers. 

The said Commissioners further statute and ordain : — 

Secundo, That the election of Rector by the Matriculated Students in 
the said University of Edinburgh shall be determined by a General Poll 
of such Students ; and in case of an equality of votes between two or 
more candidates, then, by the choice between such candidates of the 
Chancellor, intimated personally, or by letter addressed, to the Senatus 
Academicus of the said University within twenty-one days from the day 
of election, and failing such intimation, then by the choice between such 
candidates of the Principal. 

Tertio, That the day for the election of Rector by the Matricvdated 
Students in the said University of Edinburgh shall, in the present year, 
and thereafter so often as a vacancy in the office of Rector shall occur, 
take place on the second Saturday after the commencement of the 
Winter Session in the said University. 

Quarto, That the two annual meetings of the General Council of the 
said University of Edinburgh shall, subject to such alteration as by the 
said Statute is provided, be held respectively on the first Tuesday after 
the fourteenth day of April, and on the last Friday of October, in each 
year. 

Quinto, That at the meeting of the General Council of the said Uni- 
versity of Edinburgh, which shall be held on the last Friday of October 
in the present year, to wit, on the Twenty-eighth day of October in the 
present year, the General Council shall proceed to elect, and shall elect, 
a Chancellor of the said University. 

In witness whereof, these presents are sealed with the seal of the Com- 
missioners, and signed by the Commissioners present at a meeting 
of the Commission held time and place aforesaid. 

John Inglis, Chairman. Dun. M'Neill. 

Argyll. W. Gibson-Craig. 

Mansfield. Jas. Craufurd. 

Alex. Hastie. J. Moncreiff. 




18 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

LIBRARY. 

The University Library owed its origin to a bequest in 1580 by 
Mr. Clement Little, Commissary in Edinburgh, who left his library 
to Edinburgh and the kirk of God. This library, consisting of 
about 300 volumes, chiefly theological, was transferred by the 
Town-Council a year or two afterwards to the University, which 
they were then forming. The Library was augmented by dona- 
tions from the citizens, and from the alumni of the University 
itself. Among the latter may be specified, for the extent and 
value of their benefactions. Dr. Robert Johnston, the Rev. James 
Nairne, and above all, the celebrated Drummond of Hawthornden. 
Drummond bequeathed his whole library, about 500 volumes, to 
the University ; and the gift is very valuable, both from the 
eminence of the bestower's name, and from the rare specimens ot 
our early literature with which the collection is enriched. _ 

The University Library now contains about 110,000 printed 
volumes, and about 500 volumes of MSS., several of which are of 
great interest and value. 

The ordinary management of the Library is vested m seven 
Curators appointed annually by the Senatus. ^ 

The Library is open every lawful day during the Winter Session 
from 10 o'clock a.m. to 4 o'clock p.m., except on Saturdays, when 
it is shut at 1 o'clock precisely. Luring Summer, the hours for 
public business are from 10 o'clock a.m. to 1 o'clock p.m 

The rules applicable to the borrowing of books from the Library 
are as follow : — 

1. Professors. 

Every Professor is entitled to borrow to the extent of twenty- 
five volumes (not works) at a time, but on a written application to 
the Curators, and their leave obtained, the number may be in- 
creased. The books must be returned after the expiry of six 
weeks from the date of their being borrowed, and an annual return 
of all the books borrowed from the Library in the hands of the Pro- 
fessors, is called for by printed circulars in the last week of August. 

2. Memhers of the College of Surgeons. 

The rules applicable to them are similar to the above. 

3. Students. , i r xu^ 
Every student, before being entitled to borrow books from tHe 



LIBRARY. 19 

University Library, must have inscribed his name in the record of 
matriculations or general album, and been enrolled in the class of 
at least one Professor. 

On applying for the loan of any book, he must present his 
matriculation ticket, and also the ticket of at least one Professor, 
to the Librarian, who, on receiving from him a deposit of <£l, gives 
him a receipt for the same, and enters his name in the deposit- 
receipt book. 

Every student is entitled to borrow two volumes at a time for 
the deposit of £l. 

On applying for the loan of books, every student must fill up a 
schedule, containing his name, address, the number of his deposit- 
receipt, and the titles of the books he wishes to borrow. 

The books must be returned uninjured at the end of a fortnight 
from the date of their being borrowed, but may again be lent out 
for another fortnight if not previously called for by another appli- 
cant. 

There is a Reading- Room for the purpose of affording to students 
an opportunity of reading and consulting books which do not cir- 
culate, such as Dictionaries, Encyclopasdias, Atlases, and Works 
of reference in general. 

It is open to all Matriculated Students ; and on asking for books 
to be consulted, every student must fill up a schedule containing 
his name, address, number of matriculation ticket, and the titles 
of the books he wishes to consult. 

4. Graduates, 

Graduates of the University, on producing their diplomas to the 
Secretary, may, on payment of a fee of ten shillings annually, be 
furnished with a ticket entitling them to the use of the Library, 
from October to October. 

They are not allowed to borrow books by deputy, but are 
required personally to transact business at the Library. 



MATRICULATION. 

The Session of 1859-60 will be opened on Tuesday, the 1st November. 
All Students are required to matriculate at the Secretary' s Office., in the 
University, before entering any of the Classes. 
Matriculation Fee for General Album, . .£100 

Summer Session, . . 10 

Divinity Hall, . . . 10 



Inibu'sxtg 0f (Kbhtburg^. 



Prmapal-STR DAVID BREWSTER, K.H., D.C.L., F.E.S., &c. &c. 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 



Classes. 



Junior Humanity ... 

Senior Humanity ... | 

First Greek 

Second Greek • 

Third Greek 

First Mathematical .. 
Second Mathematical. 
Third Mathematical .. 
Logic & Metaphysics.. 

Moml Philosophy 

Natural Philosophy •• 

Rhetoric and Belles 1 

Lettres J 

(English Language and 
Literature.) 

Practical Astronomy.. 

Agriculture 

Universal History.... 

Theory of Music .... 

Technology 



Days and Hours of 
Attendance. 



Nov. 2, 12 & 2 o'ck. 
Nov. 2, 9 o'clock. | 
(8h. 45m.), J 
iNov. 2, 10 & 1 o'ck. 
iNov. 2, 11 o'clock. 
Nov. 2, 2 o'clock. 
JNov. 2, 12 o'clock. 
Nov. 2, 10 o'clock. 
Nov. 14, 9 o'clock. 
Nov. 2, 1 o'clock. 
Nov. 2, 12 o'clock. 
Nov. 2, 11 o'clock. 



Nov. 2, 4 o'clock. Mr. Aytoun 



Professors. 
Mr. Pillans. 
Mr. Blackie. 
Mr. Kelland. 



Mr. Eraser. 

Mr. Macdougall. 
Mr. Forbes. 



Class 
Fee. 



Small 
Fees. 



£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


3 3 5 


8 3 




3 3 




3 3 




3 3 




3 3 




3 3 




3 3 




3 3 




3 3 




3 3 


1 
1 



Dec. 6, 12 o'clock. 
, Nov. 10, 3 o'clock. 
, Nov. 9, 2 o'clock. 
.'Nov.2, 10&12o'ck. 
.iNov. 2, 12 o'clock. 



Mr. Smyth. 
Mr. J. Wilson. 
Mr. Innes. 
Mr. Donaldson. 
Dr. G. Wilson. 



3 


3 


1 


3 


3 





4 


4 





4 


4 





Free. \ 


3 


3 


0| 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 



Hebrew — 

Junior Class 

Advanced Class — "I 
Hebrew & Arabic / 

Divinity 

Divinity and Church ) 

History i. 

Biblical Criticism & 1 '-^^^^ ;^q_ i o'clock. 

BibUcal Antiquities J i 



Nov. 10, 9 o'clock. Rev. D. Listen 
Nov. 10, 10 o'clock. 
Nov. 10, 11 o'clock. 
Nov. 10, 12 o'clock. 



Rev. Dr. Crawford. 
Rev. Dr. Robertson. 



Rev. Dr. Lee. 
FACULTY OF LAW. 



2 2 

2 2 

2 2 

2 2 

Free. 



Medical Jurisprn- "J 
deuce (for Students > 
of Law) ) 

Civil Law 

Law of Scotland 

Conveyancing 



Dec. 1, 2 o'clock. 

Nov. 14, 3 o'clock. 
Nov. 14, 3 o'clock. 
Nov. 14, 4 o'clock. 



Dr. Traill. 

Mr. Swinton. 
Mr. More. 
Mr. M. Bell. 



4 4 

4 4 

4 4 

4 4 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 



21 



FACULTY OF [MEDICINE. 



Classes. 



Days and Hours of 
Attendance. 



Professors. 



Class 
Fee. 



Small 
Fees. 



etetics,Materia Me 
dica, & Pharmacy, 

hemistry Nov. 2, 10 o'clock 

urgery JNov. 2, 10 o'clock. 

astitutes of Medicine jNov. 2, 11 o'clock, 
[idwifery and Dis- 
eases of Women and 

Children 

linical Surgery — \ 
{Mon. and Thurs.) / 
linical Medicine — ") 
{Tues. and Frid.) ] 

natomy 

ractical Anatomy, ... 
.natomical Demon- > 

strations,* j 

-eneral Pathology ... 

atural History 

ractice of Physic 



iNov. 2, 9 o'clock. 



Nov. 2, 11 o'clock. 

Nov. 3, 12 o'clock. 

Nov. 4, 12 to 2 o'ck, 
2 o'clock. 



Dr. Christison. 

Dr. Plavfair, C.B. 
Mr. Miller. 
Dr. Bennett, 

Dr. Simpson. 

Mr. Syme. 
TDrs. Bennett & ") 



4 4 



4 4 



4 4 



Nov, 
Nov 



4 o'clock. 



( Lay cock, 
Mr. Goodsir. 
Mr. Goodsir. 

Mr. Goodsir. 



/ 



4 4 



2 2 



Nov. 2, 
Nov. 2, 
Nov. 2, 



4 o'clock. Dr. Henderson. 4 4 
1 o'clock. Dr. Allman. 4 4 

3 o'clock. Dr. Laycock. 4 4 

Royal Infirmary at Noon, Daily. — Perpetual Ticket, £10; Annual Ticket, £5, 5s.; Half- 
early Ticket, £3, 3s. Separate payments of 2 J years entitle the Student to a Perpetual 
icket. A Half- Yearly Ticket can be procured only by Students who have previously had an 
nnual Ticket. 

Practical Chemistry, under the superintendence of Dr. Lyon Playfair. Analytical 
Chemistry, under the superintendence of Dr. Lyon Playfair. The Chemical Labora- 
tory -will be opened on 1st November for Pupils who desire to practise Analytical 
Chemistry, or to practise Chemical investigations under the immediate superintend- 
ence of Dr. Lyon Playfair, C.B , aided by Dr. Guthrie and Dr. Wauklj-n. 

The Hope Prize, of the annual value of £50, will be awarded to the authors of the best 
Chemical Investigations, according to the conditions which may be prescribed by the 
Principal and Professors of the Universitj'. 



SUMMEE COUPtSES. 



Class Fee. Small Fees. 
£4 4 5s. (Garden) 



Botany, Professor Balfour. May 1, 1860. 8 a.m.,. 

[Second Course, £3, 3s. Third Course, free. Perpetual 
Ticket, £6, 6s.] 
Practical Chemistry and Pharmacy, Professor Playfair, . 
Natural History, Professor AUman. May 1. 1 p.m.. 
Medical Jurisprudence, Professor Traill. May 1. 11 a.m., . 

Clinical Lectvires on Medicine. May 1. 12 a.m 

Clinical Lectures on Surgery, Professor Sj-me. May 2. 12 a.m.. 
Practical Anatomy, Professor Goodsir. May 1, . . . 

Medical Psychology. May 1, 

Medical Psychology, with Practical Instruction in Mental Diseases, 

Histology, Professor Bennet, 

Comparative Anatomy, Professor Goodsir, .... 
Chemical Technology, Professor G. Wilson, .... 

GEADUATION FEES. 
In Medicine (Stamp-Duty of £10 included), £25. In Arts, £3. In Divinity, £10, 10s. 

* If with Practical Anatomy, £"1, Is. 



4 


4 





4 


4 





3 


3 





3 


3 





2 


2 





2 


2 





3 


3 





3 


3 






22 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 



SUBJECTS TREATED BY THE VARIOUS PROFES- 
SORS, AND TEXT-BOOKS RECOMMENDED. 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 

PHILIP KELLAND, M.A., Dean. 

1. Humanitv. 

PROFESSOR PILLANS. 

In both Classes a Trial Exercise will be written in the Class- 
room on the first Saturday of the Session.* 

Junior Class. 

From November till Christmas. — First Principles of Latin Gram- 
mar, for a week, and continued, where necessary, by the Class- 
Assistant ; — text-book, Mair's Introduction ; Readings in Curtius, 
and in the Fasti and Tristia of Ovid. 

After Christmas. — Curtius, Ovid, Odes of Horace, and a portion 
of Livy, lib. vi., Leipsic ed., with notes by Professor Pillans. 

Throughout the Session weekly, written Exercises, and on Wed- 
nesday, at 12 o'clock, lessons in Ancient Geography. Text-booh^ 
" First Steps," &c. On Friday, at 2 p.m.. Lectures on Roman Li- 
terature. 

Books required for Junior Class. — 1. Curtius, Leipsic edition (Teubner's), with Latin 
notes by the German Editor, and Enghsh Preface and Notes by Professor Pillans, 
Edinburgh. (Williams & Norgate.) 2. Selections from the Fasti and Tristia of Ovid. 
(Maclachlan & Co.) 3. Horace. (Leipsic.) 4. Livy, with English Preface and Notes. 
5. Mair's Introduction. 6. First Steps in Physical and Classical Geography. (A. & C. 
Black.) 

Recommended. — Adam's Grammar and Antiquities. 

Senior Class. 

Fro7n Noveynher till Christmas. — Livy, lib. vi. ; Horace's Satires 
and Epistles. On the Wednesdays, at 9 o'clock. Geographical De- 
monstrations, with illustrative readings in Lucan, Statius, Silius 

* This Exercise is to test the actual proficiency of the Students at the time of entering 
the Classes, that it may be compared with a similar one to be done in March 1860. 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 23 

Italicus, Martial, Claudian, &c., from passages of these authors 
appended to the text-book, entitled "Elements of Physical and 
Classical Geography." 

After Christmas, — Tusc. Disp. Cicero, B. i. ; Tacitus, Annals ; 
Horace or Juvenal. 

On the Wednesdays, at 9 a.m., a course of Lectures on General 
Grammar, and on alternate Fridays, Examinations, conducted 
chiefly in Latin, on Adam's Roman Antiquities. 

Throughout the Session, written Exercises in Prose and Verse, 

Books for Senior Class. — Curtius and Livy, as above, Tacitus' Annals, Horace, and 
Juvenal. Adam's Roman Antiquities. Elements of Physical and Classical Geography 
(Blackwood). 



2. Greek. 

PROFESSOR BLACKIE. 



Entrance Examination on the Greek Grammar and the first 
fifteen Chapters of Luke's Gospel. 

First Class. 

Edward's first Greek Reader ; a Book of Homer read by the 
Students, and one expounded by the Professor ; Dr. Clyde's Greek 
Syntax ; Exercises on Greek Composition, 

N.B. — Those who are found deficient in elementary knowledge 
will be drilled in a separate Class, taught by a University Tutor. 

Second Class. 

Plutarch's Life of Nicias ; a Play of Euripides or Sophocles ; a 
Book or two of Homer ; once a week Selections from the Lyric 
Poetry of Greece expounded by the Professor : text-hook, Donald- 
son's Lyra Grceca. 

Third Class. 

Plato's Laws. Twice a week a course of Lectures on Homer's 
Iliad, Critical and Philological. Exercises in Greek Composition. 



24 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

3. Mathematics. 

PROFESSOR KELLAXD, 

First Class. 

Theory of Arithmetic ; Six Books of Euclid and part of the 
Eleventh Book ; Plane Trigonometry, with its Applications ; Men- 
suration ; the Elements of Perspective ; and Geometrical Conic 
Sections. 

Text-books. — Playfair's Geometry and Trigonometry indispensable, Elliott's Mensu- 
ration and Wallace's Conic Sections are recommended and largely drawn on. 

Second Class. 

Introductory Lectures. Algebra, with its Applications to Analy- 
tical Trigonometry, Analytical Conic Sections, and Solid Geometry, 

Text-hooks. — Kelland's Elements of Algebra, indispensable. Colenso's Examples, 
Wrigley's Examples, or Bland's Equations, referred to and recommended. Snowball's 
Trigonometry, 

Third Class. — Nine to Ten, three days a week. 
The Differential Calculus with its Branches and Applications, 

Text-books. — Hall's Differential Calculus. As the aim is, as completely as possible to 
read through the book, no other works are recommended, 

For the advanced Students, Lectures are given on the higher 
portions of Definite Integrals, and on Finite Differences, 

Examinations, viva voce, are carried on daily in all the Classes. Written Examina- 
tions take place on alternate Saturdays, Exercises for solution at home are given out 
on Fridays. The Prize List is made out from a summation of the whole work. Extra 
Prizes are adjudged by competitions on Arithmetic, Equations, Trigonometry, &c., against 
time. Extra Prizes are also awarded for original Solutions of Problems, Essays, &c. 



4. Logic and Metaphysics. 

PROFESSOR FEASER. 

The doctrine and discipline of Rational Psychology or Rational 
Philosophy, in its two departments of Pure and ]\Iixed Logic (the 
latter including Metaphysics), is the province of this class. Ra- 
tional Psychology is founded on a preparatory survey of the 
phenomena of human consciousness. By this path Logic, alike 
on its formal and real side, may be most philosophically approached. 
Hence the arrangement of the course, which includes — 

A. Preparatory or Phsenomenal Psychology, i.e., an experi- 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 25 

mental review of that conscious experience of man, for which, as 
manifested in thought, Logic legislates. 

B. Rational or Critical Psychology, in both of its special depart- 
ments, viz., — 

I, Pure Logic, or the Analytic of the Logical Forms of Thought. 

II. Mixed Logic, or theory of the interpretation of the objects 
of conscious experience in thinking. Under this head are treated, — 

1. The theory of Error, i.e., misinterpretation of the immediate 
objects of consciousness. 

2. The science of Science, or a metaphysical interpretation of 
the immediate objects of which we are conscious. 

The Lectures and Course of Study for this Session are arranged 
with reference chiefly to the First and Third of these three depart- 
ments, viz., the preparatory Psychology and Mixed Logic. 

With the psychological doctrines of the First Part, Stewart's "Elements" (vol. i.). 
Hamilton's "Lectures on Metaphysics" (especially vol. i.), or (by advanced students) 
Locke's Essay, b. ii., may be compared. The Novum Organum (especially b. i.), Mill's 
Logic, books iii. and v., or Descartes on Method, may be associated, by advanced 
students, with the theory of Error; and the Thesetetus of Plato, or Locke's Essay, b. iv., 
with the science of Science, which involves the problems of Ancient and Modern Meta- 
physics. The Professor's Tract on " Rational Philosophy" may be referred to for some 
of the principles on which the course is arranged. The lessons of the Session may be pre- 
ceded or accompanied by the study of an elementary manual of Pure Logic, e.g., Whatelys 
" Elements," the Port-Royal Logic, or Thomson's " Outlines of the Laws of Thought." 

The class meets daily at one o'clock, on five days in each week. 
The hours are devoted to the Lectures of the Professor, and also 
to a Discipline, by means of Conversations, short Exercises, and 
Essays, meant to train the members to logical habits and a reflec- 
tive life. General Examinations, at which answers are returned 
in writing to questions proposed by the Professor, are held at in- 
tervals in the course of the Session. Prizes are adjudged to Senior 
and Junior Students for eminence in the business of the class, and 
also for success in study during Summer. 



5. Moral Philosophy. 

PROFESSOR MACDOUGALL. 

The course of Lectures will comprehend mainly the following 
subjects : — 

Introductory. — The aims, province, and methods of Ethical 



26 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITF CALENDAE. 

study. The relations of Ethics or IMoral Philosophy to Psycho- 
logy. 

Division I. — General view of the mental constitution, or powers 
to be regulated by the sense of Duty. Particular examination of 
the powers usually denominated Active, — including detailed con- 
sideration of the Emotions, Desires, and Affections ; with discus- 
sion of the more important philosophical questions relating to 
them. 

Division II. — Ethics, more properly, and strictly so called ; or 
the system of ethical truth, and the philosophy of that system ; 
including (1.) Exposition of Duties, with their grounds ; and (2.) 
Inquiry into the nature and faculty of Moral Approbation, or the 
Theory of j\Ioral Perception and Moral Sentiments. Review of 
leading Ethical Theories. Examination, in particular, of the views 
of Bishop Butler on both the preceding Divisions. 

Division III. — Inferential, and consummative ; as to the exis- 
tence, moral government, and character of Deity ; the immortality 
of the soul ; and future retribution. Duties thence arising, and 
reflex influence on Morality generally. Comparison of Natural 
and Christian Ethics. 

The Class meets from twelve to one o'clock each day, for five 
days of the week. The time is devoted in part to the Lectures 
and in part to examinations, written and oral, on these and on 
prescribed portions of Ethical authors. Subjects are also prescribed 
for elaborate Essays, as well as for briefer occasional exercises ; 
and prizes are awarded at the close of the Session for general in- 
dustry, proficiency, and ability. 



6. Natural Philosophy. 

PROFESSOR FORBES. 

The subjects embraced in the Course of Natural Philosophy are 
the following : — 

Properties of Bodies, Mechanics (including Statics and Dyna- 
mics, and their application to Civil Engineering), Hydrostatics, 
Pneumatics (including the Steam-Engine), Ileat, Acoustics, Optics, 
Astronomy, Electricity and Magnetism (including Terrestrial i\Iag- 
netism). All these subjects are not, however, gone over in a single 
Session : but while the JNIechanics of Solid and Fluid Bodies forms 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 27 

an invariable part of the Course, the other subjects are altered 
more or less from year to year. It is intended that, in the Session 
1859-60, the Properties of Bodies, Heat, Acoustics, and Optics (or 
portions of those subjects) shall be included in the Course. 

The works on which the two principal written Examinations will 
be held are — 

Third or Junior Division. 

In January — Potter's Mechanics — the Statical part (except 
Chapters iv. and ix.), and i\\e first and third Chapters of Dynamics. 
In March — HerscheFs Astronomy in Lardner's Cyclopaedia. 

For the Second or Middle Division. 

In January — Potter's Mechanics generally. In March — Pot- 
ter's Elementary Optics. 

For the First or Highest Division. 

In January — Jackson's Mechanics, the Dynamical part. In 
March — De Pambour's Theory of the Steam-Engine. 

At the close of each Examination, the names of the whole of the regular Students who 
have entered the Examination will be suspended in the Class in the order of merit, de- 
termined by a system of marks. Prizes (of which the chief is the Straton Prize) will be 
awarded by combining the results of these Examinations with others to be afterwards 
announced. 



7. Rhetoric and Belles-Lettres. 

{English Language and Literature}) 

PROFESSOR AYTOUN. 

The Students are taught and exercised, (1.) In the Principles 
of Vernacular Composition, a considerable portion of the lectures 
relating to the examination of style, as exhibited by eminent 
English authors. The history, formation, and development of the 
language are likewise comprehended in this branch. (2.) The 
leading rules for the framing and arrangement of spoken discourses 
are explained and illustrated. (3.) A critical review of British 
Literature, from the Anglo-Saxon period downwards, in its con- 
nexion with external history and social development. (4.) Occa- 
sional Lectures tending to illustrate remarkable epochs in Ancient 
and Mediaeval Literature will be delivered in the course of the 
Session. 



28 EDINBUKGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

Written exercises are prescribed, from time to time, with a view 
to the improvement of the Students in English Composition. 
These are returned to the Students after being revised and cor- 
rected by the Professor. 

Prizes are awarded for composition in prose and verse, and for 
accomplishment in elocution. 



8. Practical Astronomy. 

PROFESSOR SMYTH. 

These lectures are confined strictly to the subject of Practical 
Astronomy, and are intended to illustrate the best methods of ap- 
plying instrumental measurement to celestial phenomena, for the 
purpose of deducing their nature, and ascertaining their bearing 
on astronomical theory. 

They will commence with the simplest estimations of angle and 
distance req\iired in first approximations ; and will then show how 
rapidly, as well as securely, the true arrangement of the universe 
may be arrived at by any one who, observing independently for 
himself the successive phenomena presented by the skies, is able, 
as he proceeds, to strengthen his means of observation and refine 
his methods of computation, up to the limits which the present 
advanced condition of Optics, Mechanics, and Mathematics place 
within his reach. 



9. Agriculture. 

PROFESSOR J. WILSON. 

The Lectures extend over two Sessions ; the first course treat- 
ing of the Principles, and the second of the Practice of Agricul- 
ture. 

First Course. — History of Agriculture. General purposes of 
Agriculture ; conditions aflfecting it ; and principles on which it 
is based. The Chemistry of Agriculture. The Geology of Agri- 
culture. The Botany of Agriculture. The Physics of Agriculture. 

Second Course. — The Mechanics of Agriculture and their appli- 
cation. Sequence of Agricultural operations. Economical Division 
of Labour. Rotations of various districts discussed and explained. 
Improvement of the Soil by Draining, Manuring, &c. Live stock. 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 29 

The Economics of Agriculture. Farm Engineering and Construc- 
tion. Agricultural Policy. General Management and Improve- 
ment of Landed Property. 



10. Universal History. 

PROFESSOR INNES. 



11. Theory of Music. 

PROFESSOR DONALDSON. 



In accordance with the Deed of Foundation* the Lectures 
embrace the following subjects : — 

The phenomena and philosophy of sound ; the nature and pro- 
duction of musical sounds, accordant and discordant. 

The Theory of Music. 

General rules for the composition of Music, including methodical 
composition in the different counterpoints, with a critical analysis 
of the works of the great masters. 

The laws of harmonics, with an exposition of how far the theory 
of Music, as taught by the best theorists, is deducible from, and in 
accordance with, these laws. 

Occasional Lectures are given on the Structure, Compass, and Propeilies of Musical 
Instruments, as shown by Weber, Cbladni, Savart, Wheatstone, and others, having for 
their object to discover the true principles on which musical instruments ought to be 
constructed, and which may lead, and have led, to the invention of new ones. 

All the topics included in these branches are illustrated with diagrams, musical instru- 
ments, and philosophical apparatus. 

Lectures are delivered occasionally on the history of the science. 
Three courses of Lectures are given during the Session ; tvjo for 
gentlemen, and one exclusively for ladies. 



* This Chair was founded by General John Reid, for the teaching of Music as a Scien- 
tific Art, on a wide and comprehensive scale ; or, to use the Testator's own words, so to 
teach it as to give " stability, respectability, and consequence to the establishment." 



30 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

12. Teclinology. 

PROFESSOR GEORGE WILSON. 

The full Course of Technology or Industrial Science extends over 
three Sessions ; the general principles being treated in each Session.* 
A full Syllabus can be procured from the Professor. 

I. — Mineral Technology. 

Industrial Relations of the Atmosphere, the Waters, and the 
Solid Crust of the Globe. Building-stones, Mortars ; Coal and 
other solid fuels. Glass-making, Pottery, and Porcelain, Metallo- 
techny and Metallurgy. 

II. — Vegetable Technology. 

The Plant as a manufacturing agent. Gum. Sugar. Amyla- 
ceous Substances, Albuminous Substances, and Fermentation, 
Bread-making, Brewing, Distillation and Gas-making. Wood, its 
Mechanical and Chemical applications. Paper, Linen, Cotton. 
Collodion, Bleaching, Dyeing, Calico-printing. Caoutchouc. Gutta 
Percha, the Resins, Fats, Oils, Candles, Soaps. 

III. — Animal Technology. 

Bones, Horns, Shells, Corals, their Mechanical and Chemical 
applications. Skins, Glue-making, Tanning Leather, Fur, Wool, 
Silk Hat-making, Brush-making. 

At intervals the Graphic Industrial Arts — Writing, Printing, 
Painting, Engraving, Photography, Telegraphy, &c., — in con- 
nexion with the raw materials and products most prominently 
related to them, will be discussed. 

The Lectures will be illustrated by Experiments and Drawings, 
and by Specimens and Models from the Natural History and In- 
dustrial Museums. Occasion will be taken throughout the Course 
to visit, at intervals, Manufactories and Workshops in Edinburgh 
or the neii^hbourhood. 



* Vegetable Technology, and a portion of Animal Technology, will form the subject of 
prelection during this Session. 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 31 

FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 
1. Divinity. 

PROFESSOR CRAWFORD, D.D. 

In the Class of Systematic Theology, the Law of the Church of 
Scotland requires that every Student be enrolled at least four 
Sessions, three of which must be years of regular or constant 
attendance — or if he attend only two full Sessions, the Course must 
be extended to five Sessions. In every case, six Discourses must 
be delivered with approbation, before the Professor can be entitled 
to give such a certificate as shall warrant a Presbytery to take the 
Student on trials for license. Every Student, in the last year of 
his course, is expected to have delivered all the discourses required 
at the Divinity Hall before the end of December, as about that 
period it is desirable that every document necessary for entitling 
Presbyteries to take on trials the candidates for license should be 
satisfactorily prepared. 

The subject of the Lectures during the Session 1859-60 will be 
the Evidences of Revealed Religion. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, 
the Students of the first year will be examined on Paley's Evi- 
dences of Christianity, and Hill's Lectures in Divinity, books I. and 
II. ; the Senior Students will, on the same days, be examined on 
Hill's Lectures, books III., IV., and V. The Fridays will be 
devoted to the hearing of Discourses. 



2. Divinity and Church History. 

PROFESSOR ROBERTSON, D.D. 

Session 1859-60. — Subject of Lectures — History of the Christian 
Religion and Church from the beginning of Constantine's un- 
divided sovereignty, a.d. 324, to the time of Gregory VII., a.d. 1073. 

First Division : To Council of Chalcedon, a.d. 451. — 1. Ex- 
ternal History ; Final Struggle with Paganism, and relations of 
the Church to the Roman Empire. 2. History of Theology and 
Doctrinal Controversies. 3. History of Hierarchy ; of Monachism ; 
of Ritual : of Morals. 



32 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

Second Division : To the Beginning op the Monotheletig 
Controversies, a.d, 622. — Subdivisions as before, with an account 
of the spread of Christianity beyond the limits of the Roman 
Empire, and of the character and relations of the newly planted 
Churches. 

Third Division : To the Commencement of the Controversy 
concerning the Worship of Images, a.d, 726. — 1. Rise and pro- 
gress of the Muhammedan Apostasy. 2. History of the Greek 
Church, including history and fate of Monotheletism. 3. History 
of the Western Church, with further accounts of the spread of 
Christianity, particularly among the Germans. 

Fourth Division : To the Appearance of the Pseudg-Isido- 
rian Decretals, a.d. 858. — 1. History of the Greek Church ; 
Controversy on the Worship of Images ; Sect of the Paulicians, 
2. History of the Western Church : Signal success of Boniface's 
Mission among the Germans ; Papacy before and after the time 
of Charlemagne ; Church of the Frank Empire ; Worship and 
Discipline. 

Fifth Division : To the Accession of Hildebrand (Gre- 
gory VII.), A.D. 1073. — 1. History of the Western Church ; 
Papacy ; Episcopal Hierarchy ; Theology and Morals ; Mona- 
chism ; Wx)rship and Discipline ; Missions. 2. History of the 
Greek Church ; Controversies with the Pontiffs of Rome, to the 
final separation of the two Churches, a.d, 1054; Internal Re- 
lations ; Missions. 

In the Divinity and Church-History Class, four days of the 
week are devoted to Lecturing, and one to Examination. All Stu- 
dents of the first and second years are required to write short Essays 
on such subjects, connected with the course of Lectures, as shall 
be preflcribed to them. 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. ^3 

3. Biblical Criticism and Biblical Antiquities. 

PROFESSOR LEE, D.D. 

This class is now included in the curriculum required by the 
Church of Scotland of Students in Divinity. 

The Lectures are comprehended in two courses, which are 
delivered during alternate Sessions. One of these courses relates 
to the Criticism of the Old Testament ; the other to that of the 
New. 

Subjects of First Course. — 1. Canon of Old Testament ; Con- 
dition and History of Hebrew Text ; Account of principal Versions, 
particularly Septuagint, Vulgate, and Targums ; Modern efforts 
to improve Hebrew Text ; Account of printed Editions, &c. 
2. Hermeneutics, or Principles of Interpretation, as applicable 
to Sacred Scriptures. 

Subjects of Second Course. — Manuscripts of New Testament ; 
different systems of classification ; accounts of particular MSS. ; 
disputed passages ; quotations in New Testament, &c. &c. ; mo- 
dern editions of New Testament — their characteristics and merits. 
On these subjects Lectures are delivered on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays ; Monday's Lectures are devoted to Biblical Antiqui- 
ties ; on Wednesday the Professor prelects on some portion of the 
Greek New Testament, and on Fridays he hears expositions by the 
Students. 

The Course of Lectures on the Old Testament Criticism falls to 
be delivered Session 1859-60. 



4. Hebrew. 

professor liston. 

Junior Class. 
Grammar (Tregelles' Heads of Hebrew Grammar) ; first twenty 
chapters of Genesis, and eight or ten Psalms. 

Senior Class. 
Grammar, The Psalms and a Historical Book on alternate 
weeks. 

Arabic will form extra study. (Elements of Grammar, and 
Selections.) 

c 



34 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

FACULTY OF LAW. 
AECHIBALD SAVINTON, LL.B., Dean. 

1, Medical Jurisprudence, 

PROFESSOR TRAILL. 

Part I. — Forensic Medicine. 

Section 1. Qhestioks affecting the Civil or Social Rights of Individuals. — 
Duration of Human Life. Personal identity. Marriage. Divorce. Pregnane}'. Par- 
turition. Impotence. Paternity and affiliation. Survivorship. Mental alienation. 
Rights of Deaf and Duir.b. Exemption from public duties. Simulated diseases. 

Section 2. Injuries to Property.— Nuisances. Arson. Forgery. Coining. 

Section 3. Personal Injuries. — Defloration. Rape. Mutilation. Infanticide. Ho- 
micide. Starvation. Death from extremes of temperature. Wound.s. Toxicology, or 
poisoning by inorganic, vegetable, and animal substances. Imaginary and pretended 
poisonings. 

Part II. — Medical Police. 

Section 1, Health of Individuals as affected by Cleanliness and Ventilation. 
Aliment. Exercise. Celibacy. Marriage. Lactation. Professions and trades. 

Section 2. Health of Communitiks as affected by Climate. Sites of towns and 
habitations. Drainage and sewerage. Paving and care of public roads. Cemeteries. 
Construction of hospitals, schools, and prisons. Lazarettos. Punishments. 

Two Courses are annually given ; one adapted for Students of 
Law during the Winter, and another for Medical Students during 
the Summer. 



2. Civil Law. 

PROFESSOR CAMPBELL SWINTON. 



General principles of Roman Law treated very much in the 
order of Justinian's Institutes, with references to the Laws of 
Modern Nations. 

The Students are examined on the contents of the Lectures, 
and the Institutes of Justinian ; and subjects are prescribed for 
four or five Essays in the course of the Session. Cumin's 
Manual of Civil Law, and Sanuars' Institutes of Justinian, are 
recommended. Students intended for the Scotch Bar must make 
themselves acquainted with either Warnkoenig's Institutiones 



FACULTY OF LAW. 35 

Juris Romani Privati, or Mackeldey's Systeriia Juris Romani 
hodie usitati. 

A Prize of ten guineas is awarded for an Essay written during 
the Summer recess. 



3. Law of Scotland. 

PSOFESSOR MORE. 



1. Introductory. 2. Social or Domestic Relations. 3. Contracts 
or Obligations. 4. Quasi or implied Contracts. 5. Obligations 
arising from Delinquency or Quasi Delinquency. 6. Assignation 
of Personal Claims. 7. Discharge or Extinction of Obligations, 
including Prescription. 8. Distinction between Heritable and 
Moveable Rights, 9. Heritable or Real Rights. 10. Deeds of 
Transmission, particularly Entails. 11. Burdens upon Real Pro- 
perty, including Heritable Debts and Leases, Teinds, and Parochial 
Burdens. 12. Succession, Heritable and Moveable, Testate and 
Intestate. 13. Election Law. 14. Actions and Diligence, in- 
cluding Defences against Actions. 15. Bankruptcy and Insol- 
vency. 16. Criminal Law. 

Note. — A full printed Syllabus of the Course is delivered to 
every Student, of which the above is a mere abstract. 



4. Conveyancing^. 

PROFESSOR MONTGOMERIE BELL. 

The Lectures are intended to assist Students of Law in the pre- 
paration of Deeds and Instruments, and in judging of their legal 
efficacy, and adaptation to the objects of the parties. 

The Course is divided into three branches ; the Jirst, relating to 
the particulars applicable to all or most deeds ; the second and 
third, to those peculiar to personal or moveable, and to heritable 
or real rights, respectively. 

Under Branch First are explained — (1.) The solemnities of 
authentication of deeds. (2.) The necessity of delivery and 
acceptance. (3.) That the parties must be competent, and the 
Bubject-matter lawful. (4.) There must be deliberate consent ; 



36 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

under which head are noticed shortly the general rules applicable 
to essential error, fraud, and force and fear, as grounds of reducing, 
and to homologation, and rei inter ventus, as grounds of supporting 
deeds. (5.) The Stamp Laws in their relation to Conveyancing. 
(6.) The parts or clauses common to all or most deeds, being the 
narrative or introductory ; the warrandice, registration, and testing 
clauses. (7.) The general rules as to the effect of blanks in deeds. 

Branch Second. — (1.) The personal bond, and other personal 
obligations, transmissions thereof inter vivos, and discharges. 
Personal contracts, and deeds relating to corporeal moveables, 
including maritime writs. (2.) Bills and promissory-notes, their 
authentication, structure, transmission, and extinction. (3.) 
Writs of personal diligence. 

Branch Third. — (1.) The Avrits constituting a feudal estate, and 
the rights of the Superior and Vassal. (2.) The writs of trans- 
mission, voluntary or judicial, of such estate, and of burgage lands. 
(3.) The marriage- contract, bond of provision, and relative writs, 
as affecting either personal or real estate, or both. (4.) Testa- 
mentary deeds, applicable to either or both classes of estate. (5.) 
The entail and disentail, and relative deeds. (6.) The completion 
of titles, by executors or next of kin, or heirs, of persons deceased, 
to personal or real estate. (7.) Heritable securities ; their con- 
stitution, transmission, and extinction, (8.) Writs of real dili- 
gence ; and lastly. Leases. 

Class hour 4 to 5 o'clock p.m. every lawful day, except Saturday, 
iuring Session time. 

Class-Hour, Four to Five, p.m. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE, 

JOHN HUTTON BALFOUR, M.A., M.D., Dean. 

1. Materia Medica. 

PROFESSOR CHRISTISON. 

Introductory. — jMateria Medica comprises the subjects of 
General Therapeutics, Special Therapeutics, and Pharmacy ; and 
Diet and llegimen equally with Remedies ordinarily so called. 
Arrangement of the Course under that view of its objects. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 37 

General Topics. — On Pharmacopoeias. On General Thera- 
peutics, or the Actions of Remedies. 1. Physiological, or Actions 
on the Healthy Body, viz., their kinds of action, their modes of 
action, and the circumstances which modify their actions. 2. 
Therapeutic, or Actions on Disease ; their several kinds of action 
on disease. 

Special Topics. — I. The Natural History, Pharmacy, Thera- 
peutic actions, Uses, and mode of administering Remedies, ordi- 
narily so called. 1. Mineral Substances, arranged according to 
their chemical constitution, viz., Non-metallic oxidable elements ; 
acids ; ordinary metals and their compounds ; alkalis and earths, 
and their compounds ; cornpouud inflammables ; mineral waters. 
2. Vegetable substances, arranged according to the natural fami- 
lies of plants, as this arrangement also classifies them in some 
measure according to their actions on the body. 3. Animal sub- 
stances. 4. Imponderables, or Qualities of matter, viz.. Heat, cold, 
electricity, galvanism, magnetism ; appendix on acupuncture. 5. 
Blood-letting, general and local. 

I II. On Diet and Regimen. — 1. Food, viz., its relative diges- 
tibility and nutritiveness ; the effects of improper food on man ; 
the proper food for man in various circumstances of life ; such as 
for maintaining the athletic constitution ; for persons under ordi- 
nary vigorous exercise ; for those in confinement ; for children ; 
for hospitals. Dietetic treatment of diseases in detail, according 
to their nosological arrangement. — 2. Drink ; its kinds ; its effects, 
when erroneous ; proper drink for health ; regulation of drink in 
the treatment of diseases. 3. Condiment; its kinds : their actions 
in health, and their applications to the treatment of diseases. 4. 
Exercise. 5. Climate. 6. Clothing. 7. Cleanliness. 8. Moral 
discipline. 



2. Chemistry. 

PROFESSOR PLAYFAIR. 

The Course of instruction consists — 

1. Op Lectures. — In the Course of Lectures the general sub- 
jects of Theoretical Chemistry, including a detailed description of 
Elementary Bodies and their Compounds, are considered with 
especial reference to their useful applications to Medicine and 



38 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

the Industrial Arts. The subjects of Chemical Physics are also 
fully discussed in their bearing on the general laws which govern 
the union of the different bodies. Examinations of the Students, 
both oral and written, are frequently held. The Chief and Second 
Assistant conduct Tutorial Classes in connexion with the Lectures, 
in order to discipline the Student on the subjects treated of. 

2. Laboratory. — The Laboratory is open for the reception of 
Pupils who desire to study Analytical Chemistry, or to undertake 
Chemical Investigations. The Hope Prize, of the annual value of 
£50, is awarded to the author or authors of the best Investiga- 
tions, if approved by the Senate. The fee for the Laboratory is 
ten guineas for six months, or six guineas for" three months. It 
is open during all the Winter Session, and for three months in the 
Summer Session. The Professor is aided in the Laboratory by 
Dr. Guthrie as Chief Assistant. 

3- Practical Classes. — The instruction in these is chiefly de- 
voted to practice in Qualitative Analysis, with the view of 
enabling the Student to test unknown substances, poisons, urine, 
&c. They are taught by the Demonstrator, Dr. AYauklyn, under 
the superintendence of the Professor. The fee is three guineas. 

Text-books. — Any of the following, viz. : — Fowne's Manual of 
Chemistry : Churchill, Loudon. Gregory's Hand-Book of Chemis- 
try : Taylor & Walton, London. Miller's Elements of Chemistry. 
3 vols. : Parker & Sons, London. 



3. Surg-ery. 

PROFESSOR MILLER. 

I. — The Princijdes of Surgery. 

1. Elementary Diseases, including especially — 

The inflammatory process; congestion; the healing process; suppuration; ulcers; 
mortification; hypertrophy, atrophy, and absorption; tumours; hemorrhage. 

2. Diseases in certain tissiie'!, — 

In the integument ; serous and mucous membranes ; peristeum and bone : joints ; 
arteries; veins; lymphatics; nerves. 

3. Injuries, — 

Wounds; effects of heat ; effects of cold ; frp.cture ; dislocntion; sprain, and ruj;ture of 
muscle and tendon; bruise ; suspended animation. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 39 

II. — The Practice of Surgery. 

1. The subject of operations in general. 

2. Injuries and diseases of the head; 3. affections of the orbit and its contents; 4. 
affections of the nose ; 5. affections of the upper jaw ; 6. affections of the face ; 7. affec- 
tions of the lips; 8. of the palate; 9. of the teeth; 10. of the lower jaw; 11. of the 
tongue; 12. of the uvula and tonsils; 13. of the pharynx; 14. of the oesophagus; 15. 
of the ear; 16. of the neck; 17. of the arm, forearm, wrist, and hand; 18. injuries of 
the upper eKtremity ; 19. affections of the spine; 20. affections of the chest ; 21. of the 
mamma; 22. of the abdomen; 23. hernia; 24. affections of the rectum; 25. stone; 
26. affections of the bladder and prostate; 27. the venereal disease ; 28. affections of the 
urethra; 29. of the te-ticle; 30. of the scrotum and penis; 31. of the female genital 
organs; 32. diseases and injuries of the lower extremity ; 33. amputation. 

The Professor uses his own work on the Princi^Jles and Prac- 
tice of Surgery as the text-book. 



4. Institutes of Medicine. 

PROFESSOR BENNETT. 

This Course of Lectures is divided into three parts. I. His- 
tology, or a Systematic Account of the Doctrine of the Tissues. 
II. Physiology, or a Systematic View of the Functions of the 
Animal Body, arranged in three groups. 1. Function of Nutri- 
tion ; 2. Function of Innervation ; and 3. Function of Reproduc- 
tion. III. Pathological Physiology, in relation to the three 
groups of functions referred to ; but more especially the general 
doctrines of congestion, fever, inflammation, tubercle, cancer, 
naorbid growths, and degenerations of texture, parasitic growths, &c. 

These Lectures are illustrated by diagrams, preparations, and occasional experiments. 
Every Saturday a demonstration is given from 11 to 12, a.m., under a series of micro- 
scopes, illustrative of the properties, mode of development, and functions of the various 
tissues and organs of the animal body. Examinations of the Class will also be held at 
stated periods. 

Text-hook. — Outlines of Physiology. By John Hughes Bennett, M.D., &c. Small 8vo, 
woodcuts. Edinburgh. 

Summer Course. 
Practical Histology, and the use of the Microscope. 

This Course is divided into, — I. Lectures on the construction of 
Microscopes, as instruments of Physiological and Pathological re- 
search, and as a means of diagnosis at the bedside. 2. The mode 
of employing the various parts of the apparatus. 3. The prac- 



40 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

tical demonstration, examination, and description, by each Student, 
of all the textures and fluids of the animal body, in health and 
disease ; examination of an extensive histological collection of 
objects, and experimental investigation into the phenomena of 
contractility, ciliary action, inflammation, &c. 

This Course is an Appendix to that of the Institutes, and an introduction to the 
higher kinds of Clinical Stud\'. 

Text-book. — An Introduction to Clinical Medicine, &c , Lectures it. and v. By John 
Hughes Bennett, M.D., &c. TBird Edition. Edinburgh, 1857. 



5. Midwifery and Diseases of Women and Children, 

PROFESSOR SIMPSON. 

The Course of Instruction comprises, — 

I. 1st, The anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive 
organs, and their products ; 2d, Natural and morbid parturition ; 
3d, The pathology of the puerperal state ; 4th, The physiology and 
pathology of pregnancy ; 5th, The special pathology of the female 
sexual organs ; and 6tk, The hygiene and diseases of infancy and 
childhood. 

II. Clinical Lectures are given once a week during the Session, 
on Diseases of Women, in connexion with Ko. 12 AVard, Royal 
Infirmary, which the Managers of that Institution have placed at 
Dr. Simpson's disposal for this purpose. 

III. Weekly Examinations and Demonstrations in Obstetric 
Operations will be conducted on Saturdays in the Class-room, at 
the usual Lecture hour, by the Class Tutor, under the superintend- 
ence of the Professor. 



6. Clinical Medicine. 

PROFESSORS BENNETT AND LAYCOCKL 

This Course, as dire^^ted by Dr. Bennett, is composed of two 
parts, — 1. Lectures on Tuesdays and Fridays, in which the Stu- 
dent's attention is first directed to the methods of examining the 
patients by interrogation, observation of symptoms, percussion, 
auscultation, the use of the microscope, and of chemical tests ; 
subsequently to the history and treatment of cases in the wards. 
2. Visits on the other four days of the week to the Clinical Wards 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 41 

of the Infirmary, at which the Student is taught to examine for 
himself the condition of the patient, form a diagnosis, and suggest 
a treatment. 

Text-hooks. — Introduction to Clinical Medicine, third edition, 
12mo, numerous woodcuts, Edinburgh ; or Clinical Lectures on 
the Principles and Practice of Medicine. By John Hughes 
Bennett, M.D., &c. Third edition, 8vo, 500 woodcuts. Edinburgh. 

This Course, as conducted by Professor Laycock, comprises : — 

1. Bedside instruction in physical, physiognomical, and diathetic 
diagnosis. 2. The examination and treatment of cases by the 
student under the guidance of the Professor. 3. Small evening 
classes for the special training of the students in the use of the 
Stethoscope, and other means of Clinical research. 

Text-hook. — Dr. Laycock's Principles and Methods of Medical 
Observation and Research. 



7. Clinical Surgery. 

PROFESSOR SYME. 



The objects of this Course are to teach the discrimination of 
Surgical diseases, by pointing out their distinctive characters in 
the living body ; and to impress the principles of treatment, by 
showing their application in practice. With these views, all the 
patients whose cases come under consideration are placed before 
the Students in the theatre of the hospital, when, with due regard 
to their feelings, the opinions entertained as to the seat and nature 
of the malady are freely expressed, and the means of remedy 
deemed requisite are administered, either at the same time, or 
upon some other more convenient occasion. The Lectures are de- 
livered at 12 o'clock on Mondays and Thursdays, and the hospital 
is visited daily. 

The Text-Book is the Professor's " Principles of Surgery." 



8. Anatomy. 

PROFESSOR GOODSIR. 

Winter Courses. 
I. Lectures on Anatomy, at 2 p.m. — The objects of this Course 



42 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

are the Demonstration and Description of the Structure of the 
Human Body, from the physiological point of view ; the parts 
being displayed and explained with reference to their actions 
and functions. 

The members of tbe Junior Division of the Class meet in sections under the Demon- 
strators for the study of Microscopic Structure, and of parts which cannot be distinctly 
seen in the Theatre during lecture. 

Specimens of Elementary Anatomy are arranged for yirivate study in an apartment 
provided for this purpose, and open from 9 a.m. to 4 p..m. 

Microscopic Structure is examined and demonstrated in a special class-room, pro- 
vided with sircple and compound microscopes. 

One Gold and two Silver r\Ieda]s are awarded to First Year Students for written 
answers to a series of questions proposed in the Theatre. The first competition takes 
place a" the end of November, the three following at the end of each succeeding month, 
the final one at the end of the Winter Session. 

A Gold Medal will be awarded in the Senior Division of the Class for the best Dissec- 
tion, or series of Dissections, of the Ganglia and Nerves in the Mammalian Heart, 
accompanied by a Description of the Nervous Arrangement displayed. Tlie dissection 
must extend not only over the surface, but also into the substance of the organ. The 
most important points to be investigated are the relations of the gan;.;lia to the coronary 
vesse's and muscular substance, but more especially to the auricular and ventricular 
portions of the organ. The dissections must be conducted throughout in alcohol, and 
with the assistance of a dissecting lens. Each Dissection, or series of Dissections, with 
the Description, must be given in on or before the 15th March 1S60, accompanied by an 
envelope enclosing the author's name. 

The following works may be consulted in connexion with the Lectures : — Quain's 
Elements of Anatomy, edited by Dr. Sharpey and Mr. Ellis ; Jleyer's Lehrbuch der 
Physiologischen Anatomic ; Henle's Handbuch der Systematischen Anatomic des 
Menschen. 

Fee ....... 

Second Course, ...... 

Tliird Course, ...... 

Perpetual Ticket, ...... 

II. Anatomical Demonstrations, by Mr. Turner, at 4 p.m. — 
In this Course, which is conducted in the Theatre, the Structure 
of the Human Body is displayed and demonstrated topographically, 
from the surface inwards, and with reference, moi'e particularly, to 
the relative position of parts. Mr. Turner gives Demonstrations 
of the minute Anatomy of the Viscera to the Senior Division of 
this Class, in the class-room for Microscopic Anatomy, instead 
of the Demonstrations in the Theatre, every Friday after the 
Christmas recess, from 3 to 5 p.m. 

Fee, . . . . . . .£220 

AVhen taken along with Practical Anatomy, . . 110 

Third Course, ...... Free. 



£i 4 





3 .S 





Free. 




6 6 






FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 43 

III. Practical Anatomy, under the superintendence of the 
Professor, assisted by the Demonstrators, AVilliam Turner, M.B., 
London ; John Cleland, M.D., Edinburgh ; and Henry S. Wilson, 
M.D., Edinburgh. 

The Dissecting-rooms are open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and on 
Saturdays from 9 to 12 noon. 

The Manuals employed are Deinonstrations of Anatomy bj' Professor Ellis, aud 
Holden's Manual of the Dissection of the Human Body. 

Fee, . . . . . . .£330 

No Perpetual Ticket for this Course. 

Summer Courses. 

I. Lectures on Comparative Anatomy, by Mr. Goodsir. — This 
Course, in Summer 1860, will be devoted to the organs of Circula- 
tion and Respiration in their Morphological and Physiological 
aspects. The Course is open to those engaged in Practical Ana- 
tomy during the Summer. 

II. Practical Anatomy, as in Winter. 

Fee, . . . . , . .£220 

III. Anatomical Demonstrations in the Theatre and Class- 
room for Microscopic Anatomy, by Mr. Turner, as in Winter. 

This Course is open to those engaged in Practical Anatomy 
during the Summer. 



9. JJeneral Pathology. 

PROFESSOR HENDERSON. 



In these Lectures the Causes, Processes, and Phenomena of 
Diseases are treated of as separate and distinct subjects of study, 
with the view of exhibiting the general facts or laws proper to 
each of these departments of Pathology. Accordingly, the Course 
is divided into three Sections, as follows : — 

1. Etiology, or the Causes of Disease, e.g., the operation of cold 
and heat ; nature, &c., of morbid poisons. 

2. General pathology of the functions morbidly affected, in 
Pathological Physiology, as of digestion, respiration, &c., &c., or 
disease. 

3. General Pathology of the Symptoms and Signs of Disease, 
each considered by itself, e.g., pain, haemorrhages, convulsions, 
&c. 



44 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

10. Natural History. 

PROFESSOR ALLMAN. 

The Zoological Lectures will embrace a general view of the 
Animal Kingdom, an exposition of the principles which should 
guide us in its study, and of the laws of a philosophical classifi- 
cation. They will be occupied with the demonstration of the five 
great plans recognisable among animals, namely, Vertebrata, 
Annulosa,' Mollusca, Radiata, and Protozoa ; the subordinate 
groups into which each of these admits of being divided will be 
defined and illustrated, and the laws of their Distribution in Time 
and space examined. 

The Geological Lectures will be occupied with an examination 
of the physical forces which have brought about the present con- 
dition of the earth's crust considered under two distinct aspects : 
1. Its mode of formation ; 2. The successive periods of time which 
have elapsed during its formation. Under this second head the 
earth's crust will be considered more particularly with reference 
to the remains of organized beings which are entombed in it, and 
the students' attention will be specially directed to the value of 
zoological laws in the interpretation of geological phenomena. 

In the Mineralogical Lectures it is proposed to embrace the 
general principles of Crystallography, when the six great systems 
of Crystals will be explained, and their laws demonstrated. The 
various physical properties of minerals, and the value of these pro- 
perties in the diagnosis of species will be considered, and the more 
important mineral species will be described. 



11. Practice of Physic. 

PROFESSOR LAYCOCK. 

The entire Course extends over two Winter Sessions. 

1. Introductory. At the commencement of each Session the 
attention of the Class is carefully directed to the nature, diagnosis, 
and management of constitutional diseases, and to the influence of 
diathetic states on local affections. 

2. Special diseases are then discussed as they afiect the blood, 
the nervous system, and groups of organs. 

The subjects of the ensuing Session will be inflammatory and 
structural diseases of the heart and lungs, the alimentary canal 
and abdominal viscera, and the cerebro-spinal centres. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 45 

12. Medical Jurisprudence. 

PROFESSOR TRAILL. 
[See Faculty of Law, p. 34.] 



13. Medical Psychology : 

With Practical Instruction in Mental Diseases. 
PROFESSOR LAYCOCK. 

This Course is divided into two distinct parts — systematic 
and practical. 

I. Medical Psychology. — A systematic Course, open to gentle- 
men of all professions. In this Course, — 1. So much of Psychology 
and of the Laws of Life will be considered as may be necessary to 
set forth the Principles of a science of Mental Physiology, based 
on the Anatomy and Physiology of the Nervous System. The 
doctrines of this division will be introductory to the succeeding 
practical divisions of the course. 2. Mental Pathology. 3. 
Mental Therapeutics, or the principles of the Medicinal and Moral 
Treatment of Insanity, and of analogous affections of the feelings 
and judgment. 4. Mental Hygiene, or the Prevention of Insanity 
and of nervous affections in general. This division will include 
an examination of the means suitable for maintaining a sound 
mind in a sound body. 

Gentlemen, not medical, who may propose to attend the Course, 
are recommended to acquire a general knowledge of the Anatomy 
and Physiology of the nervous system in man and animals, and of 
the instincts of animals and vegetables, if not already acquainted 
therewith. 

Books recommended. — Sir W. Hamilton on the Philosophy of Common Sense, Jfote 
A. to Reid ; Mill's Logic, Book iii. ; Herbert Spencer's Psychologj', Part iv. ; Morell's 
Psychology ; Sir H. Holland's Chapters on Mental Physiology ; Rymer Jones' Manual of 
Zoology ; Solly on the Human Brain, Parts i. to x. 

II. Practical Instruction. — This practical division of the 
Course can only be attended by Members of the Systematic Class. 
The Students of this division are instructed in a course of twelve 
lectures at an asylum in the diagnosis and treatment of mental 
diseases, and in the general management of Hospitals for the 
Insane. 

A Prize, value three guineas, is offered by Dr. W. A. F. Browne, 



46 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

one of Her Majesty's Commissioners in Lunacy, for the best Essay, 
by a member of the Class, On morbid iniiDulse as a form of In- 
sa^iitij ; its nature^ causes^ diagnosis, and treatment. 



14. Botany. 

PROFESSOR BALFOUR. 



The Course of Botany is a general one, open to all Students. 
It consists of — 

1. Vegetable Organography, or an Account of the Tissues and Organs 
of Plants, illustrated by Specimens, Drawings, and Microscopical Dissec- 
tions. 

2. Vegetable Physiology, or an Account of the Functions of Plants, 
illustrated by the Microscope and Experiments on Livini; Plants. 

3. Classification of Plants, or an Account of the different IModes of Ar- 
rangement, with illusti'ation of the Classes and Orders of the Vegetable 
Kingdom by means of Living Specimens and of Plants from the University 
Herbarium. 

4. Geographical Botany, or an Account of the Distribution of Plants 
over the Globe. 

5. Paleeontological Botany, or a description of Fossil Phmts, of their re- 
lation to each other and to the preseut Flora, illustrated by Specimens 
from the Museum. 

The work used as a text-book is Professor Balfour's Class-Book 
of Botany. 

Lectures at the Royal Botanic Garden every Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, at 8 a.m., from the beginning 
of May till the end of July. Examinations take place in the 
Mathematical Class-room at the College every Wednesday, at 
3 P.M. Demonstrations are given (from 9 to 10 a.m.) on the 
Natural Orders, in the open ground of the Garden ; on the Pre- 
parations, in the Museum of Economic Botany ; and on the Plants, 
in the Hot-houses. Saturdays are occupied with Excursions and 
Demonstrations in the fields. The rooms at the Garden are open 
to pupils for the consultation of Botanical Works, for the exami- 
nation of Specimens, and for the use of the Microscope. Prizes 
are given for Herbaria, Essays, Museum Preparations, and Com- 
petition Examinations. 

Prizes offered in the Botanical Class in Summer Session 1860. 

1. Gold Medal for the best and approved Herbarium of Phanerogam- 
ous Plants and Ferns collected within twenty miles of Edinburgh. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 47 

2. A Prize of Two Guineas is offered by Dr. W, A. F. Browne for tlie 
"best and approved Essay on the Relations of Insects and Plants, il- 
lustrated by the connexion of the Lepidoptera with species of Salix, Popu- 
lus, Ahuis, Corylus, and Urtica, in the district round Edinburgh. The 
Essay to be accompanied by Specimens. 

3. A Prize will be given for the best and approved Essay on the 
Spontaneous Movements which take place in Plants, such as those ob- 
served in sensitive Plants of various kinds, in cells, in the reproductive 
organs of some Cryptogams, in Oseillatoria, and in Diatoms. The Au- 
thor is expected to make original observations on the subject. Experi- 
ments mav be conducted in the Botanic Garden. For references, see 
Class-Book of Botany, pages 321, 356, 493 to 500. 

4. A Prize will be given for the best and approved Analysis of the 
British Plants in the natural order Rosaceae, illustrated by specimens 
and dissections. 

5. A Prize will be given for the best and approved Essay on the For- 
mation of the Placenta in Plants, illustrated by microscopic dissections, 
and by other specimens or models. 

All these Essays to be sent to the Botanic Garden on or befoi-e 
1st July 1860, and to be accompanied by mottoes and sealed 
notes as usual. 

6. A Prize is offered by Dr. Gilchrist, Dumfries, for the best and ap- 
proved Collection of Fcssil Plants from Mid-Lothian. (To be given in 
on or before 1st July 1860.) 

7. A Prize will be given for Large Models illustrating the Composition 
of the Seed, with its coverings and contents ; also the relation between 
the Cotyledons and the Radicle in the Embryo of Cruciferee. (To be 
given in on or before 1st July 1860,) 

8. A Book or Books of the value of Three Guineas will be given by 
Messrs. P. Lawson and Son fur the best and approved Dissections of ten 
named varieties of Cultivated Wheats. Specimens of Wheats for dissec- 
tion may be had from Messrs. Lawson. 

9. A similar Prize is offered by Messrs. P. Lawson and Son for Dis- 
sections illustrating the Structure and Germination of the following 
Grasses : — Festuca pratensis, Triticum repens, Briza media, Lolium itali- 
cum, Holcus lanatus, Bromus sterilis, Glyceria aquatica, Psamma arena- 
ria, Aira csespitosa, and Arrhenatherum avenaceum. 

These two sets of Dissections to be given in about the middle of 
June 1860. It is understood that the successful Collections 
shall be placed at the disposal of Messrs. Lawson. 

The Specimens to be fastened on paper similar to that used 
in the Dissections exhibited in the Museum at the Botanic 
Garden. Complete Specimens of the Grasses to be shown along 
with the Dissections. The Latin names and authorities to be 
given along with the English name.<5. 

10. A Medal is offered by John M'Nab, M.D., Bunessan, near Oban, 



48 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

for the best and approved Collection of ^^^^^ rToTe^gi vfn 
with remarks on their economical and medicinal pi opei ties. ^ t o „ ^ 

in at the end of June 1860 ) ^. . . c ^.-i 

1 A pLe will be ■-Iven to the Pupil in the Senior D.v.s.on of the I 

12. A similar Prize will be givea in the Junior Dms.on o the Class. 
!^ A Prize will be given in the Junior Division ol the Class for Dis^ 
.ec'tL^xeclU'duriul .he Course. The nature of the Dtssecttons to 
be intimated in May or June 1860. 

For particulars in regard to all these Frizes, see Notice at the 
^ Botanic Garden. 

Tvr « Tt is understood that the successful Essays, Models Prepara- 
tiof^tlDiSe^Jit: (unless otherwise specified) shall be added to the 
Public Collection at the Botanic Garden. 

smallest in tbe Clova trip, 13. 

1 Anatomical Museum.-By a Jf ^^'f ^.^^^"^.^ ;/ ,^^^ 
Patrons and the Senatus Academicus of the University, of 28th 

June 1826, it was agreed,— , . r .i, 

.'1 That£l is be required of each Candidate for Graduation for the 
"1. J-ha\*l, IS. ue 1 H _itbein'^ at the same time understood, 

support of the Anatomical Muen,,^U^ ^^ ^^^^ University, 

that if he pays tins mone> on li s ^iBt M.^^ entrance 

Z r "iVirnrilJir ™:'fL: :S plia, to be .e.ucte. fron. the 
fee for Graduation. pomnelled to contribute to the 

^^, z Z^.^ ^^S"b-ht ^^r:;is 

'^;;at„Ti;:ic\asl":ha'llle^:a^i:tU";'o^;e1lurn,withoutsuehT.l<ets:" 

Tbe Museum will be open on Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, 

frnm Two to Four o'clock, P.M. ^ m ^ 

Tcklts of admission will be issued at the Museum, at Three 

o'clock, on the days on which the Museum is open. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 49 

2. The Museum of Natural History. — The Museum of 
Natural History will afford to the Student an invaluable aid in 
his studies. 

It contains Zoological, Geological, and Mineralogical Collections, 
all of which it has been the special object of the Regius-Keeper to 
develop in their educational aspect, so as to enable the Student to 
derive from them the greatest amount of advantage. 

The attention of the Zoological Student is particularly directed 
to the British and Typical Collections. 

The British Collection is intended to illustrate, as far as possible, 
HhQ fauna of the British Isles. It is arranged and displayed so as 
to afford ample facility for the comparison and identification of 
British Species ; and it is certain that the use of such a Collection, 
correctly labelled and arranged, will enable the Student of British 
Zoology to pursue his researches with immeasurably less labour 
than would be possible without the assistance thus afforded. 

The Typical Collection of Animals is intended to illustrate the 
leading types of animal form, and consequently does not aim at 
the accumulation of mere species. Its object is to bring before 
the Student in broad outlines the fundamental truths of Animal 
Morphology, and render him acquainted with those relations upon 
which alone a Natural Classification can be based. 

In the Geological Section the Student's attention may be more 
particularly called to the Typical Collection of Fossils, where he 
will find the characteristic fossils of the various geological forma- 
tions arranged in the order of their appearance on the earth's 
surface, thus illustrating the Distribution of Orga7iized Beings in 
Time, and enabling him to form a correct idea of some of the 
most striking features in the form and succession of the past life 
of the globe. 



3. Botanic Garden and Museum. — The Royal Botanic 
Garden is only connected with the University, in so far as the 
Professor of Botany is Regius-Keeper of it, and delivers his Lec- 
tures in the Class-R-oom at the Garden. The Garden was founded 
in 1670, and the Chair of Botany in connexion with it is one of 
the oldest in the University. The Garden extends to 17 acres, and 
it contains an extensive range of Greenhouses and Hothouses, with a 

D 



50 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

large Palm-house 70|- feet high, 90 feet long, and 57 broad. 
There is an arrangement of British plants according to the natural 
system. There is also a general collection of hardy plants of all 
countries, according to the same system ; and a series of medi- 
cinal plants, of which a Catalogue has been published. Students 
have ample facilities of studying the plants in this Garden, and 
they are examined on Specimens in the British Collection, which 
are selected for their determination. 

The Botanical Museum is open at all times to Students, and the 
Specimens contained in it are used for illustrating the Lectures. 
The University Herbarium is also kept at the Garden, and it can 
be consulted by Students under the direction of the Professor. 



GRADUATES IN ARTS. 



51 



GRADUATES IN ARTS, 1859. 

On the 26tli April 1859, the Senatus Academicus conferred the 
Degree of Master of Arts on the followiog Gentlemen : — 



William Adam. 
William Bell. 
John Edgar. 
John Macgregor. 
Benjamin Martin. 
James Meagle. 
Andrew Melville. 
Robert A. Mitchell. 



Robert R. Monteath. 
Emile S. Rolland, 
David Ross. 
John M. Sloan. 
David Somerville. 
J. Gibson Starke. 
Josiah Thomas. 
James Wells. 



The Degree of Bachelor op Arts was conferred on the follow- 
ing Gentlemen : — 



William Coldstream. 
Francis Deas, 
Alexander Gordon. 
George T. Hunter. 
Robert Mathewson. 
Robert Mitchell. 



Alexander Neilson. 
George Robertson. 
William Smith. 
James P. Steele. 
Richard M. Stewart. 



The Examination in Classics, preparatory to a Degree, was 
passed by the following Gentlemen : — 
James Burness. 



John Alexander Banks. 
David Black. 

William Macmillan Black. 
James Colquhoun. 
John Crawford. 
John Forrest. 
John W. Foyer. 
Matthew Galbraith. 
Robert Heron, 
Cumberland Hill. 



James Hope. 
William F. Hunter. 
Matthew Kinnaird. 
William C. Macdonak 
William Mackintosh. 
Adam Macintyre. 
Archibald Mackray. 
John T. Macmorland. 
James Wilson Morrison. 
Robert Wright. 



The following Oentlemen were apjpointed to the Straton Scholar- 
ships for the Session 1858-59 : — 



A. Wallace Milroy. 
William Millar Nicolson. 
Francis S. Johnston. 



William Mackintosh. 
Andrew Melville. 



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EXAMIMTION PAPERS FOR DEGREES IN ARTS. 

GIVEN IN APRIL 1859. 



I. LATIN. — For the Minimum. 

I. 

Translate into English the following passages : — 

Nondum perfunctos cura Privernatis belli tumultus Gallici fama atrox 
invasit, hand ferme unquam neglecta Patribus. Extemplo igitur con- 
sules novi, eo ipso die, Calendis Quinctilibus,''- quo magistratum inierunt, 
comparare inter se provincias jussi ; et Mamercinus, cui G-allicum bellum 
evenerat, scribere exercitnm sine ulla vacationis venia. Quin opificum 
quoque vulgus et sellularii, minime militiae idoneum genus, exciti dicun- 
tur : Veiosque ingens exercitus contractus, ut inde obviam Gallis iretur. 
Longius discedi, ne alio itinere hostis falleret ad urbem incidens, non 
placuit. Pai;cos deinde post dies, satis explorata temporis ejus quiete, a 
Gallis Privernum omnis conversa vis. Duplex inde fama est : alii vi 
captam urbem, Vitruviumquef vivum in potestatem venisse : alii, prius- 
quam ultima adhiberetur vis, ipsos se in ditionem consuHs caduceum 
praeferentes permisisse, auctores sunt, Vitruviumque ab suis traditum. 
Senatus, de Vitruvio Privernatibusque consultus, consulera Plautium, 
dirutis Privernimuris, praesidioque valido imposito, ad triumphum arcessit ; 
Vitruvium in carcerem asservari jussit, quoad consul redisset ; turn ver- 
beratum necari. AedesJ ejus, quae essent in Palatio, diruendas, bona 
Semoni Sanco censuerunt consecranda : quodque aeris ex eis redactum 
est, ex eo aenei orbes facti, positi in sacello Sanci versus aedemj Quirini. 
— Liv. Lib. vui. Cap. 20. 

11. 

Si omnia fugiendae tnrpitudinis adipiscendaeque honestatis causa 
faciemus, non modo stimvilos doloris, sed etiam fulmina fortunae, contem- 
namus licebit, praesertim quum paratum sitillud ex hestema disputatione 
perfugium ; ut enim, si cui naviganti quern praedones insequantur deus 
quis dixerit, " ejice te de navi, praesto est qui excipiat," vel delphinus, ut 
Arionem Metbymnaeum, vel equi Pelopis illi Neptunii qui per undas 
currus suspenses rapuisse dicuntur, excipient te, et, quo velis, perferent, 
omnem omittat timorem ; sic, urgentibus asperis et odiosis doloribus, si 
tanti sint ut ferendi non sint, quo sit confugiendum vides. — Gic. Tusc. 
Lib. u. 

III. 
Nullus argento color est, avaris 
Abditae terris inimice lamnae, 
Crispe Sallusti, nisi teraperato 
Splendeat usu. 

* Name day and month according to our Calendar. t Who was Vitruvius ? 

t Aedes and Aedem — state the difference. 



54 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

Yivet extento Proculeius aevo, 
Notus in fratres animi paterni : 
Ilium aget penna raetuente solvi 

Fama superstes. 
Latius regnes avidum domando 
Spiritum, quam si Libyam remotis 
Gadibus juiigas, et uterque Poenus 

Serviat uni. 
Crescit indulgens sibi dims hydrops, 
Nee sitim pellit, nisi causa morbi 
Fugerit venis, et aquosiis albo 

Corpore languor. 
Kedditum Cyri solio Phraaten, 
Dissidens plebi, nuraero beatorum 
Eximit virtus, populumque falsis 

Dedocet uti 
Vocibus, regnum, et diadema tutum 
Deferens uni, propriaraque laurum, » 

Quisquis ingentes oculo irretorto 

Spectat acervos. — Hor. Carm. ii. 2. 

Name the kinds of verse, and of what feet they consist. 
Neve minor, neu sit quinto productior acta 
Fabula, quae posci vult, et spectata reponi. 
Nee Deus intersit, nisi dignus vindice nodus 
Incident : nee quarta loqui persona laboret. 
Actoris partes chorus, officiumque virile 
Defendat : neu quid medios intercinat actus, 
Quod non proposito conducat, et haereat apte. 
Ille bonis t'aveatque, et consilietur amice : 
Et regat iratos, et amet peccare timentes. 
Ille dapes laudet mensae brevis : ille salubrem 
Justitiam, legesque, et apertis otia portis. 
Ille tegat commissa, Deosque precetur, et oret, 
Ut redeat miseris, abeat fortuna superbis. 

Bor. De Art. Poet. 189. 

IV. 

The following narrative to be translated into Latin prose : — 

The two lines of battle being in sight of each other, Sulpicius Gallus, 
a military Tribune, delivered the Roman army from great fear. For he, 
as he knew beforehand that there would be an eclipse of the moon the 
following night, summoned the soldiers to an assembly and said: "The 
ensuing night, — let not any of you take it for a prodigy, — there is to be 
an eclipse of the moon from the second on to the fourth hour. And, 
because that takes place by an arrangement of nature, and at stated times, 
it can be both known beforeliand and predicted. Accordingly, as nobody 
is surprised that the moon at one time shines with a full disc, at another, 
waxing old, with a slender horn, so it is not wonderful that she is obscured, 



DEGKEES IN ARTS. 55 

when slie is hid by the shadow of the earth." Wherefore that eclipse did 
not effect the Romans ; but the Macedonians it alarmed as a sad prognos- 
tic of evil. 

I. LATIN.— For the Maximum. 

I. 

Translate into English the following passages : — 

Ne temperantiam quidem propter se expetendam esse dicemus, sed quia 
pacem animis afferat, et eos quasi concordia quadam placet ac leniat. 
Temperantia est enim quae, in rebus aut expetendis aut fugiendis, rationem 
ut sequamur monet ; nee enim satis est judicare, quid faciendum non 
faciendumve sit, sed stare etiam oportet in eo, quod sit judicatum. Pleri- 
que autem, quod tenere atque servare id quod statuerunt non possunt, 
victi et debilitati, objecta specie voluptatis, tradunt se libidinibus con- 
stringendos, nee quid eventurum sit provident ; ob eamque causam propter 
voluptatem et parvam et non necessariam et quae vel aliter pararetur, et 
qua etiam carere possent sine dolore, turn in morbos graves, tum in damna, 
tnm in dedecora incurrunt ; saepe etiam legum judiciorumque poenis ob- 
ligantur. Qui autem ita frui volunt voluptatibus, ut nuUi propter eas 
dolores consequantur, et qui suum judicium retinent, ne voluptate victi 
faciant id quod sentiunt non esse faciendum, — hi voluptatem maximam 
adipiscuntur, praetermittenda voluptate : iidem etiam dolorem saepe per- 
petiuntur, ne, si id non faciant, incidant in majorem. Ex quo intelligitur, 
nee intemperantiam propter se fugiendam esse, temperantiamque ex- 
petendam, non quia voluptates fugiat, sed quia majores consequatur. — 
Cic. de Fin. i. 14. 

II. 

Si tibi sancta cohors comitum, si nemo tribunal 
Vendit Acersecomes, si nullum in conjuge crimen, 
Nee per conventus et cuncta per oppida curvis 
Unguibus ire parat, nummos raptura, Celseno : 
Tunc, licet a Pico numeres genus ; altaque si te 
Nomina delectant, omnem Titanida pugnam 
Inter majores, ipsumque Promethea, ponas : 
De quocunque voles proavum tibi sumito libro. 
Quod si praecipitem rapit ambitio atque libido, 
Si frangis virgas sociorum in sanguine, si te 
Delectant hebetes lasso lictore secures ; 
Incipit ipsorum contra te stare parentum 
Nobilitas, claramque facem praeferre pudendis. 
Omne animi vitium tanto conspectius in se 
Crimen habet, quanto major qui peccat habetur. 
Quo mihi te, solitum falsas signare tabellas 
In templis quae fecit avus, statuamque parentis 
Ante triumphalem ? quo, si, nocturnus adulter, 
Tempera Santonico velas adoperta cucullo ? 

Juv. Sat. VIII. 127. 



56 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

III. 

Si quis pionim manibus locus ; si, ut sapientibus placet, non cum cor- 
pore exstinguuntur mac^nae animae ; placide quiescas, nosque domum 
tuam ab infirmo desiderio et muliebribus lamentis ad contemplationem 
viiiutum tuanim voces, quas neqne lugeri neque plangi fas est ; admira- 
tione te potiiis temporalibus laudibus, et si natura suppeditet, si militiidine 
decoremus ; is verus honos, ea corijunctissimi cnjusque pietas ; id filiae 
quoque uxorique praeceperim, sic patris, sic mariti rDemoriam venerari, ut 
omnia facta dictaque ejus secum revolvant, famamque ac figuram animi 
magis quam corporis complectantur. Non quia intercedendum putem 
imaginibus quae marmore aut aere iinguutur : sed ut vultus bominum, 
ita simulacra vultus imbecilla ac mortalia sunt ; forma mentis aeterna, 
quam tenere et exprimere non per alienam materiam et artem, sed tuis 
ipse moribus possis. — Tac. Agric. 46. 

IV. 

Convert the Latin of tbe Speech of Sulpicius, in No. IV. of the Mini- 
mum, from the Direct into the Reported form. 

II. GEEEK.— For the Minimum. 

I. Translate : — (Author chosen at random) 

O S' ovv Ntyos ix€Ta Toaavrrjs dvpa/xeus arparevcras ec? ttjv ^aKTpLavrjy, 
ijvayKa^eTO, SvskoXoji^ tcvp tqttwv Kai areviov ovtuv, Kara fiepos aycLU r-qv 
Zvvap.LV. 'H yap BaKTpiavrj xw/)a TroXXais Kai /xeyaXaLS oiKOvp^evT] TroXeai. 
p.iav fiev €Lxev eTTKpaveaTaTTjv, ev -tj avve^aivev ecvaL Ta /SacriXeta" avTij 5' 
e/caXeiTO p.ev Ba/crpa, p.eye'^ei 5e Kai rrj Kara ttjv aKpoiroXiv oxvpor-r^Tt. 
TToXv waawv 8i€(f>epe. BaaLXevuv 8' avTrjs O^vaprrjs, icareypa^pev aTravras 
Tovs ev TjXiKiq. arparetas ovras, ol tov api'^ixov rj'irpoLa'^crav eis TerTapaKovTO. 
fj.vpi,a8as. 

And (Author prescribed) 

Tijs 5' (XTTepov eTnjKoXov'^Kvlas ei^Saifxovias ttj trSXei p.vrip.ovevov<7i ri 
(rrj/xe'Lov Kara ttjv VTroypoj(pr]v tov Kricp-aros avp.^dv tQv yoLp apxLTeKTOvwv 
yrj XevKrj 8ia(T7jp.aLvopLevu}v rrjv tov vepi^oXov ypaf.i.p.rjv, ^TnXi.irovar}s ttjs 
yijs Kai TOV ^apiXiojs iwiovTOS, oi 8iOLKr]Tal tuiv dXcpiTcov p.epos tuv Trapecr- 
Kevaap-ivajv toIs epyaTacs irapiaxov, 8l S)v Kai al l8ol KaTeTpij'b-qcav els 
irXelovs' tout' ovv oicjvicr'^ai X^yovTai irpbs dya%ov yeyovbs. 

II. Give a philological analysis of the following words : — 

(1.) dpTLffTop-ov. (2.) rpLTToXos. (3.) dvayuryr). (4.) aTddp.ij. (5.) ayK(hv. 
(6.) (nrelpov. (7.) Siaixa. (8.) K0TvXr}8iiiv. (9.) fa^y. (10.) aTrocrTatrts. 
(11.) k4X7)s. (12.) epLirbpLov. 

III. (1.) What was the principal characteristic of Greek intellect when 
transferred from Athens to Alexandria? and mention some of the most 
distinguished men of the Alexandrian epoch. 

(2.) When did Plato flourish? What are his principal works ? What 
is the character of his style ? 



DEGREES IN ARTS. 57 

(3.) Contrast Tliucydides and Herodotus as historical writers. 

IV. Strabo states that the breadth of Egypt at the widest pai-t is 1300 
stadia. From what extreme points is this measurement reckoned ; and 
what will be about its equivalent in English measure ? 

V. What sciences were principally cultivated by the Egyptians? 

VI. Give a topographical account of the city of Alexandria. 

VII. In what respects does the Hexameter verse of Homer differ from 
that of Virgil and the Latin poets ? 

II. GREEK For the Maximum. 

I. Turn into Greek : — 

I am very much delighted with the account which Strabo gives of the 
city of Alexandria, with its harbours, temples, libraries, academy of 
learned men, palaces, piers, aqueducts, cemetery, and whatsoever belongs 
to a beautiful, complete, and magnificent city. — Generally, indeed, Strabo 
is a most accurate, lucid, and agreeable writer ; and if you were to ask 
me what five famous writers of ancient Greece I should wish to see saved 
from a general conflagration, I should certainly reply — having a great 
appetite for facts — Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristotle, and Strabo. 

II. Taking the wrath of Achilles, and the promise of Jove to Thetis in 
the first book, as indicating the subject of the Iliad, show how far the 
action is advanced in the first twelve books, and what yet remains to be 
done. 

HI. Give a philological analysis of the following words : — 

(1.) 7rpoTfj.7]aLS. (2.) a\v(poS). (3-) rpiXKicrTos. (4.) (njKa^u}. (5.) 

UTTcpweoj. (6.) 7}9eLos. (7.) reyeos. (8.) fxaifjiau}. (9.) axj/is. (10.) ^/ca. 

(11.) Kopc>}pis. (12.) dai/xuip. 

III. MATHEMATICS.— For the Minimum. 

1. If a straight line falls upon two parallel straight lines, it makes the 
alternate angles equal, and the exterior angle equal to the interior op- 
posite angle, upon the same side, and likewise the two interior angles 
together equal to two right angles. 

2. Equal triangles on the same side of bases which are equal and in 
the same straight line are between the same parallels. 

3. If a straight line be divided into two equal and also into two unequal 
parts, the rectangle contained by the unequal parts together with the 
square of the line between the points of section is equal to the square of 
half the line. 

4. Equal straight lines in a circle are equally distant from the centre ; 
and conversely. 

5. If two straight lines cut one another in a circle, the rectangle con- 
tained by the segments of the one is equal to the rectangle contained by 
the segments of the other. 

6. To describe a circle about a given triangle. 



58 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

7. If two triangles have the first angle of the one equal to the first 
angle of the other, and the sides about the second angles proportionals, 
the third angles shall either be equal or supplementary angles. 

8. In a given straight line to find a point such that the lines drawn 
from it to two given points shall make equal angles with the given line. 

9. Prove that R sin (A + B) = sin A cos B -\- cos A sin B. 

10. The sides of a triangle are proportional to the sines of the angles 
opposite to them. 

11. Muhiply x^ — ^x-\-ihjlx + 3. 

12. Extract the square root of 

4a;'' + 8aa^ + Aa^x^ + I6&2 x"^ + Wa¥'X + 16&*. 



X 



13. Find the two fractions which make up -„ - 

^ a;2 — 3x + 2 

14. Solve the following equations : — 

(1.) x-^-=l + "iZll^^-x. 
5 6 

(2.) a:2 + _L+2 (x^l\='i. 
X* V x/ 

(3.) V« + 3 + s/lcT^ = 5. 

15. A farmer bought some sheep for £72, and found that, if he had 
bought six more for the same money, he would have paid £1 less for each. 
How many sheep did he buy ? 

16. In all the conic sections the perpendiculars from the point of inter- 
section of two tangents upon corresponding generating lines are equal. 

III. MATHEMATICS.— For Honours. 

1. Prove the logarithmic Theorem. 

2. Prove that proposition in continued fractions on which their value as 
a means of approximation depends. 

3. Prove that (a^ + 62 _|_ ^2 ^ &(,_ ^o ^ terms) X (x- + if + z- + &c. 
to n terms) ^> {ax -\- by -\- cz -\- &c.) ^. 

4. Solve, by Trigonometry applied to the results of Cardan's rule, the 
equation x^ — 6a: + 5 = 0. 

5. Prove Taylor's Theorem. 

6. Determine the multiple points of the curve whose equation is 
(a;2 + 2/2)3 = 4ah;Y. 

7. In a parabola, the area included between the curve, its evolute and 
its radius of curvature is 



||a2+|„3,4 1^2 I 



2 V-i«'+l«a:4 
a C 

8. Enunciate and prove the form which connects the equation to the 

tangent to a conic section with the equation to the curve itself. 



DEGREES IN ARTS. 59 



IV. LOGIC AND METAPHYSICS.— For the Minimum. 

1. (a) "What is known of tlie history of Logic before the time of Aris- 
totle ? (&) Enumerate the Treatises which constitute the Organon, (c) 
Mention any of the Greek, Latin, and Arabian commentators on Aristotle. 

2. (a) What is meant by Conception ? (&) Distinguish Conception from 
Perception, and also fi-om mere Imagination. 

3. Enumerate and criticise the Five Predicables. 

4. (a) Give the old analysis of Prepositional Forms, (h) Give Hamil- 
ton's, (c) State the principle on which the latter is founded. 

5. Extract from the judgment, " all men are rational beings," as many 
propositions as you can, by opposition, conversion, and other modes of 
logical manipulation. 

6. State the logical function of each proposition in the Categorical 
Syllogism, and give the various technical names of each. 

7. (a) How many sorts of Categorical Syllogism are there according to 
the old analytic ? (&) Describe the steps by which this doctrine is reached ? 
(c) How many of the 19 syllogistic formulas give conclusions in A, E, T, 
and respectively ? 

8. Give the rules, moods, and principles of the second Figure. 

9. Construct a Syllogism in Darapti, and reduce it. 

10. Is EAE a valid Syllogistic mood? Give your reason. 

11. Give a symbolic example of a Sorites of ten propositions. Extend 
the same into a series of Syllogisms. 

12. («) Distinguish Fallacy, Sophism, and Paralogism. Explain and 
illustrate the Fallacies of (6) Ignoratio Elenchi, and (c) Petitio Frincipii. 

13. Eeduce all the subjoined reasonings to the syllogistic form. Are 
the reasonings real or only apparent f (If the latter, indicate the violations 
of logical rule). 

(a) Two and three are even and odd : five are two and three : therefore 
five are even and odd. (b) Every one desires happiness : Virtue is 
happiness : therefore every one desires virtue, (c) All that glitters 
is not gold : tinsel glitters : therefore it is not gold, [d] Distinction 
may be reasonably expected, because what is not uncommon may 
be reasonably expected, and distinction is not uncommon. 

14. (a) Distinguish Pure and Mixed or Applied Logic. (6) Indicate 
some of the topics which belong to the latter. 

15. Explain the nature, and mention the chief occasions of Error. 

16. (a) Distinguish observation and experiment. (6) Give rules for 
observation, (c) Mention some of the special uses of experiment as dis- 
tinguished from observation. Illustrate. 

17. (a) State and illustrate the difference between induction j^er enu- 
merationem simplicem, and a really valid induction, (b) Distinguish 
formal and real induction, (c) Mention various opinions concerning the 
former. 

18. Explain the right use and abuse of hypothesis in inductive research. 

19. Explain the nature of Metaphysical research, and its relation to 
Logic. 



60 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

20. State Berkeley's metaphysical theory of Matter. 

21. Compare Berkeley's theory of Sense-perception with those of Male- 
branche, Eeid, and Hamilton. 

22. Give various lists of the primary qualities of Matter, and of the 
marks by which they are distinguished. 

IV. LOGIC AND METAPHYSICS.— For Honours. 

1. State various views concerning the Province of Logic. Indicate your 
own view. Explain the relations of Logic to the other Philosophical 
Sciences. 

2. Describe any subsequent modifications or developments of the analy- 
sis of Syllogistic forms as given by Aristotle. 

3. How does Aristotle apply the term i/'I'Xtj ? Distinguish '^vxv from 
vovs. In what part of his " De Anima " does Aristotle treat of the povs? 

4. Explain the general design of the Treatise " De Anima." Mention 
any other cognate Treatises by Aristotle or others. 

5. What, according to Aristotle, were the opinions of Thales, Heraclitus, 
Diogenes, Democritus, Anaxagoras, and Plato, irepl ^vxfjs? 

6. In what part of tbis Treatise does Aristotle examine the Senses? 
State the order in which they are treated by him. Give his doctrine 
regarding Touch. 

7. Give an outhne of the matters discussed in the third book. 

8. Translate the following : — 

Aiyefiiv Sw yivos 'Iv ti tuv ovrwv Trrj olffictM, Tccvrr,; oi to f4.iv a; vXr,v^ o 
x«9-' avTo f/Xv ovK 'ierri Tohi ti, iTioov oi /u.o^^hv Kce.) uoos, xetB-' i^v '/j^yi XiyiToci 

TO^i Tlj XUI To'tTOV TO I'lC TOilTUI' i(TTt d 'A /^£V !>X>J OVVCtfJLIi, TO o' UOOi IvTiXi' 

X,^ioc, xoci TOVTO di^co;, TO fiiv coi I'TTiffTVifJ-r,, TO uj; TO iriai^iiv. ovffiat di (jlo,- 
XiffT uvcci ^oKovffi TO, <rojfJt.ct,Ta., xa) tovtuv tv. (^vvtxa,' TavTO, yce.^ tuv cikXuv 
a^^al. TU'j Je (puirixaiv to. julv 'ix,-' K'^^^, "^^ °' "^^ '^X-' ^i^hv ol XiyofZiv Triv 
S/' uliTou Tffo(pvv Ti xoci 01.1/^rjriv xol) (pBiffiv, ihiTTi iciv GU[Jt.a. (pvtrixov fiSTixov 
^aiyj; ovfr'toc, ccv ti*i, ovirioe, V ovtu; uc ffvvB'iTti. Ittu o IffTi ffuy-a. xou toiovoi, ^cutiv 
yap 'iXi^^i *^* '*" -"'' '''* (TojfjLo, ^pv^^' 0^ y^i laTi toiv xccB- ii'To'ciifiivo'j to 
<ru//.oc, fiZXXov 5' &/; vTroxiifcivov xou v\r,. oLvxyxoLiov olooc t'ai -^vx/it obcriocv 
tivxi u; i^o; erufjt,a,TOi (pua-ixov ^vvcc/lch ^euiiv £;(^ovt3;. fi o olcrlcc \vriXixitoc,. 
ToiovTov ciocc ire!ifia.To; £vt£X£;^£/«. ocuTt) Ol XiyiTa.1 Oix^i, « jwsv &rj \?ti>rT%fjc.7]j 
*l y eu; TO S-iuoiTv. diavi^ov ouv or/ u; l'ri<rTr,f/.n' Iv yao tm iircioxiiv t^v •^'V^nv 
xoi) vTvo; xcci lypnyopffl; eitt/v, uiocXoyov o h f^'-v ly^riyo^ffi; tco 3-tu^-iv, o o 
v'Tvos TM £;^£/v xa.) /ah ivtoyuv. T^oTi^ot, oi Tr, yiviaii It) tou clItou yi I'rtff- 
TYiftfi. %io •4^vx''l icTTiv ivTiXix^'"- ^ T^uT)] tTuf^otTo; (pu(rixov ^vvdcfin Z^o^hv 
'ixovroi. 

9. Explain and illustrate Aristotle's use of hvvaixLs and iuipyeia. Dis- 
tinguish first and second energy. 

10. Explain the distinction between ivipyeia and ivreKix^ia. 

11. What is Aristotle's use of the term ddos. Mention any other uses 
of the term. 

12. Give a brief analysis of the first book of the Novum Organum. 



DEGREES IN ARTS. 61 

13. State precisely what Bacon teaches concerning the function of doubt 
in philosophy. Compare his doctrine with that of Descartes. 

14. Explain and illustrate Bacon's distinction of latens schematismus 
and latens processus. Eefer to cognate distinctions. 

15. What does Bacon mean by Instantiae positivae and Instantiae 
negativae ? What is the function of each in Inductive comparison. Illus- 
trate. 

16. ^\Tiat is Bacon's "First Vintage ?" 

17. Explain what is meant by the Instantiae Prerogativae. Illustrate 
one or more kinds. 

18. Enumerate the chief philosophers of the Cartesian School, with 
their more important works. Give the dates of their publication. 

19. Explain the design and leading doctrine of Locke's Essay. Men- 
tion any of the critics of Locke, and the general scope of their criticism. 

20. Mention any philosophical names to which Scotland can lay claim 
previously to the publication of Eeid's "Inquiry." Give a brief account 
of the metaphysical scepticism of Hume, and of the objections which have 
been made to it. 



V. MORAL PHILOSOPHY.— For the Minimum. 

1. By what arguments does Stewart combat the theory that the Appe- 
tites and Desires are selfish in their origin and aim ? 

2. What previous philosopher had taken up the same ground? State 
the doctrine of both, as to the true aim of those principles. 

3. Offer any observation that occurs to you, on that doctrine or its 
supports. 

4. How do Emulation and Envy differ ? 

5. What is meant by the principle commonly called Self-love ? 

6. Is it properly so called, or improperly ? if the latter, in what respect ? 

7. What use was made of it by the ancient philosophers in explaining 
the origin and aim of our particular determinations? 

8. How is the sense of Duty proved to be distinct from a rational regard 
to our own interests ? 

9. What are the two main questions to be answered by every Ethical 
theory ? 

10. Give a short account of the controversy among British philosophers, 
as to the source and import of our moral notions. 

11. Show the difficulty of resolving the notion of Moral Obligation into 
any other, more unquestionably simple and ultimate. 

12. (a) What -was meant hy the Sionmum Bonum? (&) What was the 
end in view in attempting to determine it? and what were the opinions 
entertained regarding it, by (c) the Epicureans, (d) the Stoics, and (e) the 
Peripatetics respectively ? 

13. How does Stewart prove the inadequacy of Hume's explanation of 
the casual judgment? 

14. What is Hume's objection to the major premiss of the Teleological 
argument ? 



62 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

15. What is the substance of Stewart's (and Eeid's) reply? 
] 6. What is Hume's objection to the minor premiss of the same argu- 
ment? 

17. Give the answer of Stewart ; and any other known to you. 

18. State our primary and fundamental ground or grounds for believing 
in the goodness of the Deity. 

19. ^Vhat is the proper place and value of the consideration of the 
mind's immateriality, in the proof of a future life ? 

20. On what other natural evidence does that doctrine mainly rest? 

V. MORAL PHILOSOPHY.— For Honours. 

Plato's Eepublic, with Pkof. Archer Butler's Lectures. 

i. State either exactly or approximately (a) the date of Plato's birth ; 
(6) of his death ; (c) his age at the time of the death of Socrates ; and {d) 
when he finally settled at Athens to profess philosophy. 

2. Lito how many great periods may the entire history of Greek specu- 
lation be divided ? Mention the scene of each, and its limiting dates or 
events. 

3. What was the common characteristic of ante-Socratic speculation ? 

4. How was the character of speculation in the Ionic and Italic schools 
contrasted ? 

5. Who first introduced explicitly the principle of Intelligence as a 
cosmological cause ? about what date ? 

6. What was the distinctive character of speculation in the Eleatic 
school ? And who were its most eminent leaders ? 

7. By what later school were its views taken iip and continued? 

8. What relation had the teaching of Socrates to that of the Sophists? 
What traits or doctrines distinctively marked them as professional in- 
structors ? And to what causes can their own rise be traced ? 

9. What discoveries or improvements in the method of philosophical 
investigation are due to Socrates ? 

10. Describe Plato's scheme of psychology as given in the fourth Book 
of the Eepublic, mentioning the Greek name for each part, and the virtue 
or best state of each. 

11. Translate: — 

Tcuruv yacp 5s7, cH cipiim, (pwo//-iv, tcov <ro\'kai¥ kciXuv f/.uv t/ tffriv, o ovk 

aitrp^fiOV <pa,Mr,(TlTXl\ KOH TUV dllCCCICdV, O OUK CCOIKOV : XCCt TajV OffiMV, O OVK OCVOfflOV '. 

Ovx, aXX' avccyK'/i, iip*l, x«i xjtXa crwj etura kcci UKr^oa, <peiv>ivoci, kki ocra. a,X- 
Xa, iouTus. T/ oi ; tu, toXXo, oixXd.o'ta. 'Jjttov -ri '/if/.i(rici ?) dtTrXdcnx (pociviToci ; 
Ovhiv, Ka/ f/Aya.Xa, d>) ku.) afJUKPot, kui kov^o, ko.) (ioc^'ioc fj>,n n (/.aXXov^ as «y 
(pyi(ruft(.\i, roiuTCt, ■?r^oi^v)B-r,(Tiroci 'h rxva,\i7ia. ; Ouk, kXX ccn^ £ip>j, "tKa-arov a,(i.(^o- 
Tipuv i^trxi. lloTipov ouv iffTi fixXXov h oux itrriv iKccffTov Tuv <yroXXb>v tovto, 
civ T/j ^'/7 ai/ro I'lvai ; To7; Iv tuT; iffTiKincnv, i^py], iyrecf^(poTipi^ovffiv 'ioiKi, x.a,) 
TM ruv Tcf/tduv aiviyfiCOiTi rcjj <jrip\ rou ilvou^ou rTi; [ioX'/i? Tipi Ttj; vuKTipido;, 
o>; KOt,) lip' oi cci/Tov uvr'/iv aiviTTovTxi (ixXiiv' x.ai yocp tccvtu STaf/,(poTS^i^iiv, 
KO.) out' i'lvoci ouTi /Xij iivoit ovdiv ocliTuv 'hvvocrov To-ytoji voTiffcci, ouTt eif£(port^et 
etlrt ou^'iTi^ov. "E^ti; ovv KvroTs^ ?» 5' tyc^, o fi ;^J»50'£»» '/i O'Toi 9-r,<riis KuXXiu 



DEGREES IN ARTS. 63 

Bitriv tTi; fiira?,h evfias ti x,») roZ (jLti sTva/; oun ya,^ <rov ffxorud'iffn^a, fih 
0V70S '^po; TO fi.ZXXov *ih i'lvoci (^avriffira,), ovrt (pavori^tt ovro; 'T^o; to (iccWov 
uvcti' ^AX'/iB^i(TraTce,j 'i(pn- E,ii^^»a,fisv cc^a, ui sotfisv, on to. tuv ^okXuv vo'kXot. 
vofii[/.ix. xetXou Ti TiPt KOit Tuv aXXuv (/.itx^u tov KvXivd-7Ta,i tov ti fjt,Yi o'vto; 

ilXtX^IVMS. 'Ev^YiKO. [Jt.lv. 

12. What doctrine is this extract intended to establish? 

13. Specify the various objects of possible knowledge or contemplation 
to man, as described tcwards the close of Book 7th ; together with the 
corresponding states of mind or apprehension by which they are met. 

14. Translate : — 

'A^' ovv oh xx) viXms o^is /tt£v oix itrTiv, bc'i'tios o uv uvTyis eouTeci vT^ auTtis 
Toi.vTn; ; OuTCus, n V o;. Tourov toivuv, r,v B' lyt^, <pa.vcci f/.- Xiyiiv tov tov 
uyaB-ou sxyovov, Sv TOiyaB-ov lyi-zWiffiv a,va,Xoyov iuutm' o ti "tti^ uvto iv tu 

VOVITM t'oTOO 'TTo'oi Tl VOVV XO.) TO. VOOVfllVOL^ TOUTO TOVTOV iV T!0 O^CiTCO (T^aj T£ 

e\ptv xai TU o^ufMva. Tlu; ; 'i(p>]' 'Iti B/sX^e f/.oi. '0(pBoik/u,oi, 'h ^ iycd,oiir9-' 
on, oTocv i^nxiTi l?r' ixiTvci ti; alrous T^i-rxi, oi>v av Taj ;^^oaj to ^fit^tvov (pui 
iirix'^^ ci-XXa, Siv vvxTipiva, (piyyyi, Kf/t,(iXvcoTTov(ri ti xcci lyyvs. (pctivovTui 
TV^Xaiv, a;<n^ ovx hovcrtj; xetBxox; o^ius ; Ka< (ji.a,Xci, 'i^n. "Otccv oi y , 
etftcci, uv riXio; xoiTccXa.fi'rii, ffaipcui oouffi, xa.) to7; auToTg tovtoi; ofjt,fjia,<riv 
ivoZffa. (puiviTKi. Tl fjLnv ; O'vToi Toivvv xa) to Tfi; ^v^t^; uoi voir OTav (iiv, 
ev xocTO.XafJt.'rii ocX'^B-nix. ti xa) to ov, u; tovto aTi^iifftiTOii, ivoriffi Ti xui '^yvu 
etVTO xa) VOVV ^x,^iv (pociviTcci' OTctv %i u; to tS trxoTM xix^cc/xivov^ to yiyvofis- 
vov T£ xoci a,ToXXviJt,ivov^ ^o^xZii ti xa) uufiXvcoTTiT avu xoCi xcctoo tx; oo^Ki 
fCiTccfidiXXov, xai 'ioixiv ocv vovv ovx '4^ovti. "Eoixi ya,^, Tovto toivvv to rrtv 
aXri^iixv "JTocpi^ov to7; yiyv&Krxoftivoii xa.) t(S yiyvuffxovTi t'/]v ovvocfiiv uTooidov, 
vhv TOV kyu^ov IViav (pdS-i ilvui, aiTiav T iTrnrTyifiriS ovffxv xoc) uX'/j^itei;' a? 
yiyv6Jcrxof/.ivy!; fiiv ^lavoov, ovtu Ss xocXaiv ufcipoTi^uv o\>TCk/v, yvutricj; ti xcci 
uXtjB-iixs, ciXXo xa.) xdXXiov bti tovtuv yiyovfiivo; avTO ooB-u; rtyriTii' I'TiffT'/ifinv 
Tl xa.) u,X'/i^iittv, uiTTio ixi7 (pu; ti xa.) o-<^iv 'hXioiitri /u.iv vof^i^iiv 0^9-ov, 'aXiov Tl 
viyua-^ai ovx o^S-a; 'ix^h ovTai xa.) ivTuvS-a, uya^oiihy^ fAv vof/,i^iiv toZt a,f/,<po- 
Tipci op9-ov, uyaB-ov Tl 'hyi7(r^a,i ottoti^ov avTuv ovx o^S-oVj uXX sti fiii^ovu; 
Tifi-nTiov Triv TOV ayxBov i^iv. 

15. ^\Tiat is the construction or rationale of (})dvaL in the clause <pdvaL 
fjL€ Xeyeiv ? 

16. State clearly the relation asserted in the preceding passage between 
the good on the one hand, and on the other hand truth, and knowledge or 
science, as well as the knowing/ctcwZ^?/. 

17. "WTiat was the science conversant with Ideas called in the Platonic 
philosophy ? and why was it so named ? 

18. What is the precise object of the allegory of the Cave, in the open- 
ing of the 7th Book ? 

19. ^Tiat studies did Plato conceive the best for gradually training the 
mind to the contemplation of supersensible reahties?^ 

20. Were the Platonic Ideas mere conceptions in the Divine Intel- 
ligence ? or what else ? 

21. "N^Tiat is Prof. Butler's view of their relation (a) to the human reason? 
(&) to the sensible universe ? and (c) to the Supreme Being ? 

22. What does he conceive to have been the chief defects of the Platonic 
system of humanity ? 



64 EDINBUKGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

23. Describe briefly the two gi'eat subsequent developments of the 
philosophy of Plato, vpith the causes or occasions of each, and the leading 
features by which they were respectively characterized. 

VI. NATURAL PHILOSOPHY.— Mechanics. 

1. Demonstrate the first part of the Proposition of the parallelogram of 
forces. 

2. Find the centre of gravity of a polygonal plate, and also that of the 
surface of a right cone. 

3. Given forces act obliquely on the arms of a lever, find the position 
of the fulcrum' and the pressure there. 

4. Explain how to weigh correctly with a false balance. 

5. State the three laws of Motion, and describe Atwood's Machine. 

6. How far and how long must a body fall under gravity [g = 32) to 
have a velocity of 125 feet per second? 

7. How rapidly must a tumbler of water, suspended by a cord four feet 
long, revolve in a vertical plane, so that none of the water may be spilt ? 

Hydrostatics, Optics, Astronomy. 

1. A body weighs 16 pounds in air, and only 9 in water. "What is its 
specific gravity ? 

2. What is the theoretical velocity of efflux of water from an aperture 
16 feet below its level ? Why is the real velocity less than this ; and by 
what circumstances is it modified ? 

3. Trace geometrically the course of parallel rays falling on a spherical 
reflecting surface of given radius, and find the focus, 

4. Explain (with figures) the construction of the Astronomical Tele- 
scope, and the compound Microscope. 

5. Enunciate Kepler's Laws, and explain their significance in the theory 
of Gravitation. 

6. Write a short essay on Comets. 

VL NATURAL PHILOSOPHY.— For Honours. 

Jackson's Mechanics. 

1. Prove the general formulfe for finding the centre of gravity, and 
apply them to find the centre of gravity of a circular arc and of a para- 
bolical area. 

2. Illustrate either of Guldinus's Theorems. 

3. Compare the strength of a hollow and solid cylindrical beam. 

4. Give the Theory of the motion of a body rolling in a cycloid, and 
find the law of the force by which it is urged towards the lowest point. 

5. Define the centre of oscillation, and investigate its position. Find 
the moment of inertia of a sphere with reference to a diameter. 

Astronomy, Optics. 
1. Trace historically the discovery of the Facts and the Theory of the 



DEGREES IN ARTS. ^5 

Precession of the Equinoxes and of the Aberration of Light. Give a 
general description of the causes of these phenomena, and" of their precise 
effects on the apparent position of the Fixed Stars. 

2. Give the history of the explanation of the Moon's secular acceleration. 

3. Give the Newtonian Theory of the Eainbow, and state in what 
respects it is defective. 

4. Account for the colours of thin plates by the Wave Theory. 



VII. EHETOEIC AND BELLES LETTEES. 

1. Give a succinct account of the formation of the English language. 

2. What are its capabilities for oratorical and poetical expression? 

3. What are the chief causes of Obscurity in Style ? 

4. What are the proper divisions of a spoken discourse? 

5. Define Hyperbole, Personification, and Apostrophe ; and give an 
example of each. 

6. T\Tiat were the peculiar characteristics of the literature of England 
during the reign of Queen Elizabeth ? 

7. What were its leading features in the time of Queen Anne ; and 
who were the principal authors of that age ? 

8. What are the qualities requisite for a perfect Delivery ? 

9. The arrangement of Arguments ? 

10. The leading rules for the structure of a sentence ? 



BACHELOR AND MASTER OF ARTS EXAMINATION. 
Intimation fob 1860. 

The Faculty of Arts give notice, that the following 
are the Kegulations to be observed by Candidates for the 
Degrees of Bachelor and Master of Arts : — 

1. It is required that Candidates for the Degree of Master of 
Arts shall have completed four years of Academical Study, and 
attended the following Classes : — Latin, Greek, Mathematics, 
Logic and Metaphysics, Moral Philosophy, Natural Philosophy, 
and Rhetoric ; of which Greek, Logic and Metaphysics, Moral 
Philosophy, and Natural Philosophy, must have been attended 
during separate Sessions. 

2. It is required that Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of 
Arts shall have completed three years of Academical Study, and 
attended the following Classes: — Latin, Greek, Mathematics, Logic 



66 EDINBUKGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

and Metaphysics, and Moral Philosophy ; of which Greek, Logic 
and Metaphysics, and Moral Philosophy, must have been attended 
during separate Sessions. 

3. The Books and Subjects upon which the Candidates are to 
be examined are specified below. 

4. The names of intending Candidates for the year 1860 must 
be announced to the Dean of the Faculty before the 18th of March 
1860, and the Tickets and Certificates of the requisite Classes, to- 
gether with Matriculation Tickets, must be lodged with him 
before the 14th of April, 

5. The Examinations for the year 1860 will take place on the 
seven following days : — Monday the 9th of April, Tuesday the 
10th, Wednesday the 11th, Friday the 13th, Saturday the 14th, 
j\Ionday the 16th, and Tuesday the 17th. 

6. The Examinations will be conducted by requiring from the 
Candidates written answers to questions and translations, and, at 
the option of the Examiners, viva voce answers to questions arising 
out of the books or subjects prescribed. The written answers and 
translations are to be given in to the respective Professors at tlie 
close of each Examination. 

7. For the Degree of M.A., the days of Examination are fixed 
as follows : — 

First Dai/, Monday, A'pril 9. — Latin : for the minimum qualifi- 
cation, from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

Second Day, Tuesday, April 10. — Greek : for the minimum, 
from 10 to 1 ; for the maximum, from 2 to 4. 

Third Day, Wednesday, April 11. — Mathematics: for the 
minimum, from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

Fourth Day, Friday, April '\^. — Logic and Metaphysics: for 
the minimum, from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

Fifth Day, Saturday, April 14. — Moral Philosophy: for the 
minimum, from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

Sixth Day, Monday, April 16. — Natural Philosophy : for the 
minimum, from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

Seventh Day, Tuesday, April 17. — Rhetoric : from 10 to 1. 

8. For the Degree of B.A., the Examinations will take place at 
the hours above announced, on the First, Second, Third, Fourth, 
and Fifth Days. 

9. Those Candidates who may be found entitled to the Degrees 
of B.A. and M.A. will be classified in the order of their profi- 



ARTS EXAMINATION. 67 

ciency, as ascertained by the results of the Examinations : and 
the List of Graduates affixed to the College Gates, suspended in 
the Library, and advertised in the Newspapers. 

10. The following are the subjects of Examination in the dif- 
ferent departments for 1860 : — 

Latin. — Translation of English Narrative into Latin Prose ; 
Livy, Books xxi, and xxii.; Cicero De Senectute and De Amicitia; 
Horace, Odes, Book iii., with the principal metres ; Epistles, First 
Six of Book i. For honours, in addition to the above, the Second 
Book of Tusculan Disputations; the Fourteenth Satire of Ju- 
venal ; and the Agricola of Tacitus. 

Greek. — ^ ox ih^ minimum: Herodotus, Book ii. ; and the Two 
last Books of the Iliad ; History of Greek Literature (Brown, Miiller, 
Mure, or Dr. Smith's Dictionary) ; Laws of Hexameter and 
Iambic Verse ; For the maximum : First Twelve Books of the 
Odyssey ; Greek Composition. 

N.B. — Besides the above, the Candidates for both Grades will 
be required to translate some passage of an easy prose author 
which they have not seen before, ad aperturam. 

Mathematics. — The First Six Books of Euclid, Elementary 
Algebra, and the Rudiments of Trigonometry and Conic Sections, 
for the tninimiim. Higher Algebra, Plane Trigonometry, Conic 
Sections, Analytical Geometry, and the Differential Calculus, for 
honours. 

Logic and Meta])hysics. — For the minimum : The Professor's 
Lectures ; with the Port-Royal (or Whately's) Logic. For honours, 
in addition, Bacon's Novum Organum and Hamilton's Lectures 
on Metaphysics. 

Rhetoric and Belles Lettres {English Language and Literature). 
— The Professor's Lectures, with Spalding's History of English 
Literature. 

Moral Philosophy. — For the minimum : The Professor's Lec- 
tures, with Dugald Stewart's " Philosophy of the Active and Moral 
Powers." For honours, add the Phaedo and Philebus of Plato ; 
with Cousin's " Lectures on the True, the Beautiful, and the 
Good." 

Natural Philosophy. — For the minimum : Potter's Mechanics ; 
and Questions on at least two of the following subjects : — Ele- 
ments of Astronomy, Optics, and Hydrostatics, as given in the 
Lectures, or in such elementary works as those of Herschel and 



68 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

Lardner. For honours, Jackson's Mechanics ; Grant's History of 
Astronomy ; and the Theory of Optics. 

It is recommended that Students, at the close of the Third Year 
of the regular Curriculum in Arts, should offer themselves for that 
part of the Examination which relates to Classical proficiency. 
Those who avail themselves of this recommendation will undergo 
the Examination in Mathematics and Philosophy at the close of 
the Fourth Year of their Studies, as usual. 

Students, therefore, for whom the Session 1859-60 is the Third 
of the Curriculum, will be entitled to join the Classical Examina- 
tion in April 1860, and also to take the Bachelor's Degree. 



PHILIP KELLAND, D.F. 



UNivERsrrY OF Edinbukgh, 
Ajpril 1859. 



STATUTES of the University of Edinburgh, relative 
to the Degree of M.D., Sanctioned on 27th October 
1846. 

Sect. I. No one shall be admitted to the examinations for the 
Degree of Doctor of Medicine who has not been engaged in medical 
study for four years, during at least six months of each, in the 
University of Edinburgh, or in some other University where the 
Degree of M.D. is given ; unless, in addition to three Medical 
Sessions so constituted, he has attended, during at least six winter 
months, the Medical or Surgical Practice of a General Hospital, 
which accommodates at least eighty patients, and during the 
same period a course of Practical Anatomy. 

Sect. II. No one shall be admitted to the Examinations for the 
Degree of Doctor who has not given sufiicient evidence — 

1. That he has studied, once at least, each of the following de- 
partments of Medical Science, under Professors of Medicine, in 
this or in some other University, as already defined, viz, : — 



STATUTES RELATIVE TO DEGREE OF M.D. 



69 



ANATOMY, 

CHEMISTRY, 

MATERIA MEDICA and PHARMACY, . . , , 

INSTITUTES of MEDICINE or PHYSIOLOGY, 

PRACTICE of MEDICINE, ; 

SURGERY, . . • • 

MIDWIFERY and the DISEASES peculiar to WOMEN 
and CHILDREN, 

GENERAL PATHOLOGY, or in Schools where there is no 
such Course, a Three Months' Course of Lectures on Mor- 
bid Anatomy, together with a supplemental Course of 
Practice of Medicine, or Clinical Medicine, 

PRACTICAL ANATOMY (unless it has been attended in 

the year of extra-academical Study allowed by Sect. I.), 

* 
CLINICAL MEDICINE, that is, the Treatment of Patients 

in a Public Hospital, under a Professor of Medicine, by 

whom Lectures on the Cases are given, .... 



Dnrir Courses oi 
Six ivjcaithi. 



CLINICAL SURGERY, ..... 
MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE, . 

BOTANY, 

NATURAL HISTORY, including ZOOLOGY, 



"l During Courses of Sir 
VMonths, or 2 Courses 
) of Three Months. 



During Courses of 

at least Three 

Months. 



2. That, in each year of his Academical Studies in Medicine, he 
has attended at least two Six Months' Courses of Lectures, or one 
of these and two Three Months' Courses. 

3. That, besides the Course of Clinical Medicine already pre- 
scribed, he has attended, for at least six months of another year, 
the Medical or Surgical practice of a General Hospital, either at 
Edinburgh or elsewhere, which accommodates not fewer than 
eighty patients. 

4. That he has been engaged, for at least six months, by Ap- 
prenticeship or otherwise, in Compounding and Dispensing Drugs 
at the Laboratory of an Hospital, Dispensary, Member of a Surgical 
College or Faculty, Licentiate of the London or Dublin Society of 
Apothecaries, or a professional Chemist or Druggist. 

5. That he has attended, for at least six months, by Apprentice- 
ship or otherwise, the Out-practice of an Hospital, or the Practice 
of a Dispensary, Physician, Surgeon, or Member of the London or 
Dublin Society of Apothecaries. 

Sect. III. Attendance on the Lectures of Teachers of Medicine 
in the Hospital Schools of London, or School of the College of 
Surgeons in Dublin, or of Teachers of Medicine in Edinburgh, re- 
cognised as such by the Royal Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Edinburgh (in accordance with regulations to be adopted by 



70 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

these Colleges jointly, and approved of by the Patrons of the 
University), shall to the extent of one-third of the whole depart- 
ments required by Section II., Clause 1, to be studied by Candidates, 
be held equivalent to attendance under Professors in this or in 
some other University, as already defined. And such attendance 
shall be available to Candidates to the extent of one of the four 
years of study required by Section I., provided it has embraced, in 
one year, at least two Six Months' Courses of Lectures, or one of 
these and two Three Months' Courses. 

Sect, IV. No one shall obtain the Degree of Doctor who has 
not studied, in the manner already prescribed, for at least one year 
previous to his Graduation, in the University of Edinburgh. 

Sect. V, Every Candidate must deliver, before the 31st of 
March of the year in which he proposes to Graduate, to the Dean 
of the Faculty of Medicine — 

1. A Declaration, in his own handwriting, that he is twenty- 
one years of age, or will be so before the day of Graduation ; and 
that he will not be then under articles of apprenticeship to any 
Surgeon or other master. 

2. A statement of his Studies, as well in Literature and Philo- 
sophy as in Medicine, accompanied with proper Certificates, 

3. A Medical Dissertation composed by himself, in Latin or 
English ; to be perused by a Professor, and subject to his ap- 
proval. 

Sect, VI. Before a Candidate be examined in Medicine, the 
Medical Faculty shall ascertain, by examination, that he possesses 
a competent knowledge of the Latin language. 

Sect, VII, If the Faculty be satisfied on this point, they shall 
proceed to examine him, either viva voce or in writing, — -Jirst, on 
Anatomy, Chemistry, Botany, Institutes of Medicine, and Natural 
History, bearing chiefly on Zoology ; and, secondh/^ on Materia 
Medica, Pathology, Practice of Medicine, Surgery, Midwifery, and 
Medical Jurisprudence. 

Sect. VIII, Students who profess themselves ready to submit 
to an examination on the first division of these subjects, at the end 
of the third year of their studies, shall be admitted to it at that 
time. 

Sect. IX. If any one, at these private examinations, be found 
unqualified for the Degree, he must study during another year two 



STATUTES RELATIVE TO DEGREE OF M.D. 71 

of the subjects prescribed in Section II. Clause 1, in this or in some 
other University, as above defined, before he can be admitted to 
another examination. 

Sect. X. Should he be approved of, he will be allowed, but net 
required, to print his Thesis ; and, if printed, forty copies of it 
must be delivered before the 25th day of July to the Dean of the 
Medical Faculty. 

Sect. XI. If the Candidate have satisfied the Medical Faculty, 
the Dean shall lay the proceedings before the Senatus Academicus, 
by whose authority the Candidate shall be summoned, on the 31st 
of July, to defend his Thesis ; and, finally, if the Senate think fit, 
he shall be admitted, on the first lawful day of August, to the 
Degree of Doctor. 

Sect. XII. The Senatus Academicus, on the day here appointed, 
shall assemble at Ten o'clock a.m., for the purpose of conferring the 
Degree ; and no Candidate, unless a sufficient reason be assigned, 
shall absent himself, on pain of being refused his Degree for that 
year. 

Sect. XIII. Candidates for Graduation shall be required to pro- 
duce evidence of their having conformed to those Regulations 
which were in force at the time they commenced their Medical 
Studies in a University. 

J. H. Balfour, A.M., M.D., 

Prof, of Botany, Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. 



*;!;* Candidates who commenced their studies before 1825, will be 
exempted from the fourth year of attendance (Sect. I.), from the additional 
Hospital attendance (Sect. II., Art. 3), from the necessity of a year's study 
in Edinburgh (Sect. III.), and from attendance on 

Clinical Surgery. Practical Anatomy. 

Medical Jurisprudence. Pathology, and 

Natural History. Surgery distinct from Anatomy. 
Military Surgery. 

Those who commenced between 1825 and 1831 will be exempted trom 
attendance on General Pathology, and also on Surgery distinct from 
Anatomy. 

Those who commenced between 1825 and 1833, will be required lo 
attend only two of the foUowing Classes, viz. : — 



72 EDINBURGH UNI7EESITY CALENDAR. 

Clinical Surgery. Military Surgery. 

Medical Jurisprudence, Practical Anatomy. 

Natural History. 
And tliose who commenced before 1833 will be exempted from the 
attendance specified in Sect II., Arts. 4 and 5. 

Regulations as to Lecturers whose Courses of Lectures are to 
qualify for the Degree of M.D. in the Unwersity of Ediiihurgh^ 
Approved of on 26th January 1847. 

1. That no Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, or of the 
Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, shall be recognised by 
the College to which he belongs, as a Public Lecturer or Teacher 
of any of the Medical Sciences, until his qualifications shall have 
been tried in the particular branch which he professes, by exami- 
nation before a Board appointed by the Royal College of which he 
is a member. 

2. That in the case of Lecturers on Chemistry, and on Natural 
History, who, according to the practice of this School of Medicine, 
do not require to be Fellows of the Colleges, or to possess a medi- 
cal status, the examination, with a view to recognition, shall be 
conducted by a joint board, consisting of an equal number of per- 
sons appointed by each of the two Colleges. 

3. That the Lecturers who have delivered Courses of Lectures in 
Edinburgh, which Lectures have constituted a part of the course 
of study required for the Surgical qualifications conferred in this 
City, shall be exempted from the necessity of qualifying in the 
manner above described, in regard to future Courses on the same 
subjects. But this regulation shall not be applicable to Lecturers 
on departments which may in future be added to the course of 
study for the degree of M.D. 

4. That no Lecturer shall be recognised, who, at the same time, 
teaches more than one of the prescribed subjects of study, except- 
ing in those cases where Professors in the University are at liberty 
to teach two branches. 

5. That for every Ticket of a Lecturer, recognised in terms of 
these regulations, to be ultimately presented as evidence of at- 
tendance with a view to Graduation, there shall be paid a fee of 
the same amount with that exigible by the Medical Professors in 
the University. 



KEGULATIONS — GRADUATION IN MEDICINE. 73 

The Latin Examination on the last Wednesday of Octoler 1859, 
which is open to all Matriculated Students of Medicine, will be con- 
fined to the folloioing works : — 

1. Life of Agkicola, by Tacitus. 

2. First Book op Cicero de Officus. 

3. Horace's Ars Poetica. 

Students must give in their Names and Schedules of preliminary 
education to the Secretary, at least a fortnight hefore the days fixed 
for Examination. Each Candidate must inscribe his Name and 
Address, and the number of his Matriculation Ticket in a book ke'pt 
for the purpose at the Secretary's Office. 



NEW KEGULATIONS OF THE UNIVEESITY OF EDINBURGH 

WITH EEFERENCE TO GRADUATION IN MEDICINE * 

\Ordinance of Commissioners.'] 

I. The preliminary branches of extra-professional education shall 
be English, Latin, Arithmetic, the Elements of Mathematics, and 
the Elements of Mechanics ; and it is highly desirable that pro- 
ficiency in these branches should be ascertained by Examination 
prior to the commencement of Medical Study. 

II. No Candidate shall be admitted to a Professional Examina- 
tion who has not passed a satisfactory Examination on at least 
two of the following subjects (in addition to the subjects men- 
tioned above : — Greek, French, German, Higher Mathematics, 
Natural Philosophy, Logic, Moral Philosophy. It is desirable that 
the Examination on these latter subjects also should be undergone 
before the Candidate has entered on his Medical Curriculum. The 
Examinations to be conducted by Examiners in Arts, together with 
some of the Medical Examiners. 

III. A Degree in Arts, acquired by Examinations from any one 
of the Universities in the United Kingdom, mentioned in section 
4 of " The Medical Act," shall exempt from all preliminary Exa- 
mination, and it is strongly recommended that intending Graduates 
in Medicine should become Graduates in Arts, 

* These Regulations are based on the Ordinance of 6th August 1859— not yet passed 
into Law. 



74 



EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 



IV. No one shall be admitted to a Degree who has not been 
engaged in Medical and Surgical Study for four years — the Medical 
Session of each year, or A7i7ius Afedicus, being constituted by at 
least two courses of not less than one hundred Lectures each, or 
by one such course, and two courses of not less than fifty Lectures 
each ; with the exception of the Clinical Courses, in which Lec- 
tures are to be given at least twice a week during the prescribed 
periods. 



V. No one shall be admitted to the examination for a degree who 
has not given sufficient evidence by certificates — 

1. That he has studied each of the following departments of 
Medical Science, viz. : — 



ANATOMY 

CHExMISTRY, . 

MATERIA MEDICA and PHARMACY 

INSTITUTES of MEDICINE or PHYSIOLOGY, 

PRACTICE of MEDICINE, 

SURGERY, 

MIDWIFERY, and the DISEASES peculiar to WOMEN and 
CHILDREN; two Courses of Midwifery, of Three Months 
each, being reckoned equivalent to a Six Months' Course, 
provided different departments of Obstetric Medicine be 
taught in each of the Courses, 

GENERAL PATHOLOGY, or, in Schools where there is no 
such Course, a Three Months' Course of Lectures on 
Morbid Anatomy, together with a Supplemental Cour.se 
of Practice of Medicine, or Clinical Medicine, 

PRACTICAL ANATOMY 

PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY, 



\ 



During Courses 

including not less 
/ than One Hundred 
Lectures. 



PRACTICAL MIDWIFERY, 



Six Months. 
Three Months. 

Three Months at a 
Midwifery Hospi- 
tal, or a Certificate 
of Attendance on 
six Cases from a 
Registered Medi- 
cal Practitioner. 

(During Courses of 
SixMonth.s, or two 
Courses of Thi-ee 
Months : Lecture.^ 
being given at least 
twice a week. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE, ( During Courses in- 

BOTANY, \ eluding not less 

NATURAL HISTORY, including ZOOLOGY, . . . ( Ju?S. ' ^^ ^^' 



CLINICAL MEDICINE, 
CLINICAL SURGERY, 



REGULATIONS GRADUATION IN MEDICINE. 75 

2. That he has attended, for at least two years, the Medical 
and Surgical Practice of a General Hospital, either at Edinburgh 
or elsewhere, which accommodates not fewer than eighty Patients, 
and possesses a distinct staff of Physicians and Surgeons. 

3. That he has been engaged, for at least three months, hj Ap- 
prenticeship or otherwise, in compounding and dispensing drugs 
at the Laboratory of an Hospital, Dispensary, Member of a Surgical 
College or Faculty, Licentiate of the London or Dublin Society of 
Apothecaries, or a member of the Pharmaceutical Society of Great 
Britain. 

4. That he has attended, for at least six months, by Apprentice- 
ship or otherwise, the out-practice of an Hospital, or the practice 
of a Dispensary, Physician, Surgeon, or Member of the London or 
Dublin Society of Apothecaries. 

VL No one shall obtain a Degree who has not studied, in the 
manner already prescribed, for at least one year in the University 
of EdinbiLrgh. 

VII. Every Candidate must deliver, before the 31st of March of 
the year in which he proposes to graduate, to the Dean of the 
Faculty of Medicine — 

1. A Declaration, in his own handwriting, that he has completed 
his twenty-first year, and that he will not be, on the day of gra- 
duation, under articles of Apprenticeship to any Surgeon or other 
master. 

2. A Statement of his Studies, as well in Literature and Philo- 
sophy as in Medicine, accompanied with proper certificates. 

3. A Thesis composed by himself, to be approved by the Medical 
Faculty. 

VIII. Each Candidate shall be examined both in writing and 
■viva voce, — First, on Chemistry, Botany, and Natural History ; 
Secondly, on Anatomy, Institutes of Medicine, and Surgery ; and, 
Thirdly, on Materia Medica, Pathology, Practice of Medicine, 
Clinical Medicine, Clinical Surgery, Midwifery, and Medical Juris- 
prudence. The Examinations on Anatomy, Chemistry, Institutes 
of Medicine, Botany, and Natural History shall be conducted, as 
far as possible, by demonstrations of objects placed before the 



76 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR, 

Candidates ; and those on Medicine and Surgery, in part by 
Clinical demonstrations in the Hospital, 

IX. Students who profess themselves ready to submit to an 
Examination, on the first division of these subjects, at the end of 
their second year, may be admitted to it at that time. 

X. Students who have passed their Examination on the first 
division of these subjects, may appear for their Examination in 
the second division at the end of their third year. 

XI. The Examination of the third division shall not take place 
until the Candidate has completed his fourth Ajimis Medicus. 

XII. Candidates may be allowed, if they choose, to appear for 
their Examination on the first two of these divisions at the end of 
their third year, or to appear for the three Examinations at the 
end of their fourth year. 

XIII. If any one, at these Examinations, be found unqualified 
for the Degree, he must study, during another year, two of the 
subjects prescribed, in the University, or in some other School of 
Medicine, before he can be admitted to another Examination. 

XIV. If the Candidate has satisfied the Medical Examiners, the 
Dean shall lay the proceedings before the Senatus Academicus, by 
whose authority the Candidate shall be summoned, on the 31st of 
.July, or, if such day shall be Sunday, on the preceding day, to 
defend his Thesis ; and, finally, if the Senate think fit, he shall be 
admitted, on the first day of August, or, if such day shall be 
Sunday, on the following day, to his Degree. 

XV. The Senatus Academicus, on the day here appointed, shall 
assemble at ten o'clock, a.m., for the purpose of conferring Degrees; 
and no Candidate, unless a sufficient reason be assigned, shall 
absent himself, on pain of being refused his Degree for that year. 

XVI. Candidates for Graduation shall be required to produce 
evidence of their having conformed to the Regulations which were 
in force at the time they commenced their Medical Studies. 



GRADUATES IN MEDICINE. 77 

NOMINA EOKUM QUI GKADUM MEDICINE DOCTOEIS IN 
ACADEMIA JACOBI SEXTI EEGIS, QU^ EDINBURGI 
EST, ANNO MDCCCLIX ADEPTI SUNT. 

§ Those who have obtained Prizes for their Dissertations, t Those deemed worthy 
of competing for the Dissertation Prizes. * Those commended for their Dissertations. 

* Ainslie, Thomas Alexander, Anglus. On Infanticide. 
Alston, Gulielmus Evelyn, Anglus. On Excision of the 

Knee Joint. 
Anderson, Izett Gulielmus, Jamaicensis. On Menstruation, 
Healthy and diseased. 

* Bell, Josephus, Scotus. On Epithelial Cancer, 
5 Bell, Gulielmus, Scotus. On Hgematocele. 

* Bree, Carolus Robertus, Anglus. On the Types and Treat- 

ment of Continued Fever. 
§ Brown, Joannes, Scotus. Notes on the Surgery of the Indian 
Campaign of 1857-58. 

* Dewar, Jacobus Alexander, Scotus. On Scarlet Fever. 

* Dignum, Henricus Graham, Jamaicensis. On Exostosis. 
10 Dods, Georgius, Scotus. On Belladonna. 

Doig, Carolus David, Scotus. On Lithotomy. 
Douglas, Gulielmus, Scotus. On Urea and Uric Acid. 
"^ Duke, Allen Abraham, Anglus. On Cutaneous Parasitical 
Affections. 
Farie, Robertus, Scotus. On the Means to be adopted to 
prevent the spread of Epidemic Disease. 
15 Fawssett, Fredericus, Anglus. On the Nature and Treatment 
of Cholera. 

* Fayrer, Josephus, Anglus. On Amputation at the Hip 

Joint.^ 
Ferguson, Jacobus, Scotus. On Diabetes Mellitus. 
Garrington, Arthurus Merrifield, Anglus. On Compression 

as a Cure for Aneurism. 
Gossip, Carolus Joannes, a Nova Scotia. On Conception. 
20 Grant, Jacobus Georgius Garrow, ab India Orientali. A brief 

view of the Immediate Causes of the Circulation of the 

Blood. 

1 Dr. Fajrer graduated on Sth March 1858. 



78 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

* Hill Georgius, Scotus. On Rheumatic Fever. 

Horne, Joannes, Scotus. On Preventive measures to be em- 
ployed against Epidemic Disease. 
Horniblow, Gulielmus Robertus, Auglus. On Iodine. 

* Horton Jacobus Africanus Beale, a Sierra Leone. On the 

Medical Topography of the West Coast of Africa, in- 
cluding Sketches of its Botany. 
2.5 Johnston, Jacobus, Scotus. On Femoral Hernia 

* Johnston, Joannes Wilson, Scotus. On Pemphigus Intra- 

Uterinus. . r ^i r. 

Johnston, Gulielmus, Scotus. On complications of the Puer- 
peral State. 

* Incrlis, Andreas, Scotus. On Infantile Convulsions. 
Inman, Gulielmus, Anglus. On the Position and Presentation 

of the Foetus. . t^ i 

*30 Lethbridge, Tyndall, Scotus. On the Successive Develop- 
ments of Pontia Brassicse. 
Little, Samuel, Hibernus. On Inguinal Hernia 
Lorimer, Gulielmus, Scotus. On the Mutual Relation of 
Cardiac and Pulmonary Diseases, 
t Maclagan, David Philippus, Scotus. On Foetal Nutrition. 
I M'Gown, Thomas Cochrane, Scotus. On Pelvic Cellulitis. 
35 Madden, Carolus Gulielmus Carter, ab India Orientali. On 
the Causes of Predisposition to Epidemic Disease. 
Miller, Jacobus, Scotus. On the Mode of Action of Medi- 

cines. . p ,i tt • 

Mitchell, Robertus, a Nova Scotia. Retention of the Urine, 

its Causes and Treatment. -n- ^x, • 

* Moir, Robertus, Scotus. On the Evidence of Live Birth m 

questions of Infanticide. ^ 

t Moore, Joannes Daniel, Anglus. On Vagitus Utermus. 
40 Munro, Jacobus, Scotus. On the Urine 

Norman, Joannes, Anglus. On Ergot of Rye 

Orr, Joannes Henricus, Scotus. On the Intimate Nature of 

Pearse, Arthurus, Anglus. On Saliva and its Influence on 

Digestion. ^ . , a 

Picard, Petrus Kirkpatrick, Scotus. On Surgical Aneurism 
M5 Pougnet, Franciscus Voley, ab Insula Mauntu (Port Loui.). 
Clinical Observations on Diphtheria. 



MEDICAL DEGREE. 79 

§ Rorie, Jacobus, Scotus. On the Anatomy of the Sympathetic 
System of ^Nerves. 
Roy, Gulielmus, Scotus. On Puerperal Convulsions. 
Rutherford, David Joannes, Hibernus. On the Nature and 

Etiology of Phthisis Pulmonalis, 
Savile, Robertus, Anglus. On Uterine Haemorrhage. 
50 Scianders, Alexander, A.M. Abredon, Scotus. On Yesico- 
Yaginal Fistula, its Causes and Cure. 
"^ Shearer, Georgius, Scotus. On the Neuroses of Sensibility. 

* Sisson, Ricardus Samuel, Anglus. On Medical Jurispru- 

dence, 
t Somerville, Robertus, Scotus. On Sugar in the Animal 
Economy. 

* Stewart, Joannes Edmondstoune, Jamaicensis. On the Gene- 

ral Pathology of the Stomach. 
55 Traill, Gulielmus, Scotus. On Carbuncle. 

* Tulloch, Jacobus Tulloch, A.M. Abredon, Scotus. On Stric- 

ture. 
Turnbull, Alexander, Anglus. On the Topical Application of 

Belladonna in Affections of the Mammary and Salivary 

Glands. 
Turnbull, Gulielmus, Scotus. On Delirium Tremens. 
Williamson, Georgius, Australensis. On Scurvy, 
60 Willis, Gulielmus, Hibernus. On the Theory of Ulceration. 



EXAMINATION PAPERS FOR MEDICAL DEGREE. 

Given in 1858-59. 

LATm. — Wednesdaij, October 27, 1858. 

C. Corn. Taciti. Germania. Cap. xvi. ^ 

Nullas Germanorum populis urbes habitari, satis notum est : ne pati 
quidem inter se junctas sedes. Colunt discreti ac diversi, ut fons, ut 
campus, ut nemus placuit. Vices locant, non in nostrum morem, con- 
nexis et cohserentibus aedificiis ; suam quisque domum spatio circumdat, 
sive adversus casus ignis remedium, sive inscitia aedificandi. Ne caemen- 
torum quidem apud illos, aut tegularum usus ; materia ad omnia utuntur 
informi, et circa speciem aut delectationem. Qusedam loca diligentins 
illinunt terra, ita pura ac splendente, ut picturam ac lineamenta colorum 
imitetur. Solent et subterraneos specus aperire, eosque multo insuper 
fimo onerant, suffugium hiemi et receptaculmn frugibus : quia rigorem 



80 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

frigorum ejusmodi locis molliunt ; et, si quando hostis advenit, aperta 
populatur: abdita autem et defossa, aut ignorantur, aut eo ipso fallunt, 
quod quserenda sunt. 

C. Crlspi Sallustu Bellum Catilinarium. Cap. xxvi. 

His rebus comparatis, Catilina nihilo minus in proximum annum con- 
sulatum petebat ; sperans, si designatus foret, facile se ex voluntate 
Antonio usurum. Neque interea quietus erat, sed omuibus modis insidias 
parabat Ciceroni. Neque illi tamen ad cavendum dobas aut astutiae 
deerant. Namque a principio consulatus sui, multa per Fulviam poUi- 
cendo, effecerat, ut Quintus Curius, de quo paulo ante memoravi, consilia 
Catilinse sibi proderet. Ad hoc, collegam suum Antonium pactione pro- 
vincipe perpulerat, ne contra rempublicam dissentiret, circum se prpesidia 
amicorum, atque clientum occulte habebat. Postquam dies Comitiorum 
venit, et Catilinse neque petitio, neque insidipe, quas consuli fecerat, pros- 
pere cessere, constituit bellum faceve, et extrema omnia experiri; quoniam, 
quae occulte tentaverat, aspera, fcedaque evenerant. 

Q. HoRATii Flacci Carminum, Lib. i. Ode xxii. 

Ad Aristium Fuscum. 

Integer vitae scelerisque purus 
Non eget Mauris jaculis, neque arcu, 
Nee venenatis gravida sagittis, 
Fusee, pharetra ; 

Sive per Syrtes iter aestuosas, 
Sive facturus per inhospitalem 
Caucasum, et quae loca fabulosus 
Lambit Hydaspes. 

Namque me silva lupus in Sabina, 
Dum meam canto Lalagen, et ultra 
Terminum curis vagor expeditis, 
Fugit inermem : 

Quale portentum neque militaris 
Daunias latis alit aesculetis, 
Nee Jubac tellus generat, leonum 
Arida nutrix. 

Pone me pigris ubi nulla campis 
Arbor aestiva recreatur aura, 
Quod latus mundi nebulae malusque 
Jupiter urget ; 

Pone sub curru nimium propinqui 
Solis, in terra doniibus ncgata : 
Dulce ridentem Lalagen amabo, 
Dulce loquentem. 



MEDICAL DEGREE. 31 

LATIN.— Jfoncfa^/ 18?A April 1859. 
Gregory. Conspectus Medicinse Theoretics, Cap. XI., cccxlvii. 

Curiositas alia,^ et baud levis inotiis aniraalis causa, hie quoque* fortasse 
debet annumerari ; scihcet quae ad res novas, i-notas contempkndas et 
esplorandas, hominem vix opinantem, sed conscium semper impellit • in- 
fanti maxima et utihssima est, quippe qua ad organa sua exercenda 
eorumque usus discendos, incitetur, et sic multa sine magistro discat' 
mehus et certius quam opiimus magister docuisset. Prjeterea, hoc modo 
intans ipse propriis_ manibus futuras sufe scienti^e fundamenta iacit. 
l.adem adulto hommi saepe minor, seni decrepito fere nulla est. Allicit 
natura hommem certa voluptate, tanquam pr^emio, ut organa sua turn 
sensus tummotus, probe exerceat, quo utraque roborentur, et ipse simul 
multa sic discat quae sui intersint. Hoc quoque stimulo impellitur hoc 
prsemio mvitatur, ad res remotiores, et quas densa caligo teo-at p'erse- 
quendas, donee tandem multas, quas Natura visibus humanis nel^abat 
ocuhs demum pectoris hauriat. ' 

Cicero. De Natura Deorum, Lib. I., 41. 

At etiam de sanctitate, de pietate adversus deos, libros scripsit Epicurus. 
At quo modo m his loquitur ? ut Coruncanium, aut Sc^evolam, pontifices 
maximos, te audire dicas : non eum, qui sustulerit omnem funditus reli- 
gionem : nee manibus, ut Xerxes, sed rationibus, deorura immortalium 
templa et aras everterit. Quid est enira, cur deos ab hominibus colendos 
dicas, cum du non modo homines non colant, sed omnino nihil curent, 
nihil agant ? At est eorum eximia qua?dam prasstansque natura, ut ea 
debeat ipsa per se ad se colendam elicere sapientem. An quidquam 
eximium potest esse in ea natura, quae sua voluptate l^etans, nihil nee 
actura sit imquam, neque agat, neque egerit? QucB porro pietas ei debetur 
a quo_ nihil accepens? Aut quid omnino, cujus nullum meritum sit, ei 
deberi potest ? Est enim pietas, justitia adversum deos : cum quibus quid 
potest nobis esse juris, cum homini nulla cum deo sit communitas? Sanctitas 
autem, est scientia colendorum deorum : qui quamobrem colendi sint, non 
intelligo, nullo nee accepto ab iis, nee sperato bono. 

ViRGiLius. ^neidos, Lib. I., 418-440. 

Corripuere viam interea, qua femita monstrat ; 
Jamque adscendebant collem, qui plurimus urbi 
Imminet, adversasque adspeetat desuper arces. 
Miratur molem ^neas, magalia quondam : 
Miratur portas, strepitumqne, et strata viarum. 
1^ Instant ardentes Tyrii : pars ducere muros, 

■ Molirique arcem, et manibus subvolvere saxa : 

Pars optare locum tecto, et concludere sulco. 
Jura magistratusque legunt, saiicturaque senatum. 
Hie portus alii efFodiunt : hie alta theatris 
Fundamenta locant alii ; immanesque columnaa 
Eupibus excidunt, scenis decora alta futuris. 
F 



82 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

Qualis apes sestate nova per florea nira 

Exercet sub sole labor ; qiium gentis adultos 

Educunt fcetus, aiit qmim liquentia mella 

Stipant, et dulci distendiint nectare cellas : 

Aut onera acoipiunt venientuni, nwt, agmine facto, 

Ignavuin fncos pecns a prsesepibus arcent. 

Fervet opus, redolentque thymo fragrantia mella. 

fortunati, quorum jiim moenia surgunt ! 

^^iieas ait, et fastigia suspicit urbis. 

Infert se septus nebula (niirabile dictu) 

Per medios, miscetque viris ; neque cernitur ulli. 

FIRST EXAMINATION.— J/owtZa//, 25th April 1859. 

Anatomy. — 1. Describe the Intercostal Muscles; indicating, in parti- 
cular, those anatomical relations to the ribs and costal cartilages, ou 
which their inspiratory and expiratory actions depend. 

2. Enumerate the Scapular Arteries ; give their origins ; and describe 
their courses, ramifications, and anastomoses. 

3. Describe the Iris, including its textural characters ; and state pre- 
cisely the relations of its peripheral margin and posterior surface to 
neighbouring parts. State also in what respects the anatomical relations 
and general configuration of the Iris diiier during the dilated and con- 
tracted conditions of the pupil. 

Chemwtry. — 1. Show your knowledge of Equivalents by an answer to 
the following question : — In making nitric acid, how much sulphuric acid 
(HO SO 3) should a druggist add to 8 ounces nitrate of potash, and to 
10 ounces nitrate of soda, and how much nitric acid (HO NO5) should he 
obtain from them. K = 39, Na = 23, N = 14, = 8, S = 16, H_=: 1. _ 

2. What are the respiratory and what the flesh-forming ingredients in 
food? What supply of flcKh-forniers should an adult man, with fair labour, 
receive ^"Jr diem; and how many ounces of carbon should he consume in 
the same time? 

3. In the ventilation of a room, how many cubic feet of air should you 
allow per man every hour? Describe exactly the conditions which cause 
an inhabited room, with a deficient supply of air to be oppressive. 

FIRST EXAMINATION.— We^/jiesffay, 27th April 1859. 

Indilides of Medicine. — 1. What are the functions of the different 
Fibrous tissues of the animal body ? 

2. What is the general theory of Secretion? State particularly the 
chemical composition and uses of any three secretions. 

3. Give the theory of Chromatic Aberration, and state by what means 
that aberration is prevented in the eye. 

Botany. — 1. Describe a spikclct of wheat, mentioning its composition, 
and the different parts which constitute the flower. 



MEDICAL DEGREE. 83 

2. Mention the sub-classes and sections of Monocotjledons, and give 
tlie characters which distinguish each division. 

Natural History. — 1. Contrast the course of the circulation in the fish 
and the serpent. 

2. Give the distinguishing characters of the following classes of 
Mollusca : — 

1. Acephala. 2. Cephalopoda. 

SECOND EXAMINATION.— Wednesday, 1st June 1859. 

Materia Medica. — 1. State the sources, mode of preparation, and dis- 
tinguishing characters, of Tannin. 

2. State the actions, poisonous and medicinal, of Hyoscyamus, the 
principal purposes for which it is used, and the forms, and their doses, 
usually administered. 

3. Describe the treatment, local and constitutional, of Eczema. 

Surgery. — 1. Nature and treatment of Cirsocele. 
2. Retention of Urine — its causes and treatment. 

Clinical Surgery. — 1. For what sorts of ulcers is the application of 
Blisters useful ? 

2. In what bones is Necrosis most frequently met with? 

Uldwifery — 1. In what cases of labour is the operation of Version, or 
turning of the child, practised ? State the mode or modes in which the 
operation is performed. 

2. The diagnosis and treatment of Inversion of the Uterus. 

3. The symptoms, course, and management of Carcinoma Uteri. 

SECOND EXAMINATION.— T/iMrscZay, 2d June 1859. 

Practice of Physic. — 1. Describe the various forms of Chronic Laryn- 
gitis, and the treatment adapted to each. 

2. The etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of Gastric Ulcer. 

3. The diagnosis and treatment of the various forms of Erythema. 

General PatJiology. — 1. State the circumstances under which excess 
of fat is present in the lungs, liver, and kidneys. 

2. What are the several sources of spurious Melanosis of the Lungs ; 
and how is it distinguishable from true Melanosis ? 

3. What is the cause of prolonged fluidity of the blood in certain 
diseases ; and also, when blood is included between ligatures in living 
blood-vessels ? 

Medical Jurisprudence. — 1. Detection of spots of blood on Garments 
and on Weapons. 

2. Whether a child has been still-born, or bom alive? and precautions 
necessary with the Hydrostatic test. 

3. Antimonial poisons : — symptoms, treatment, detection. 



k 



84 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

PltESCElPTIONS. 

(The names, quantities, and directions to he written in Latia words, 

tcithout contractions.) 
1. Prescribe for a case of Gastric Ulcer in wliicli paiu and vomiting 
come on shortly after taking food. 

2 Prescribe Colcbicum for Acute Ebeumatism. 
3. Prescribe a diuretic iu a case of Eenal Dropsy. 

PIKST EXAMINATION.— TAurscZay, 30th June 1859. 

Anatomrj.—l. Poscribe the Hip-Joint, and enumerate methodically the 
Muscles on which its movements depend. , , i . „„ 

2 S^te the relative positions of the parts .vhich come m view between 
the ori^n of the Soleus and tbe Internal Annular Ligament, when the 
Soieus is raised, and the subjacent aponeurosis removed. 

3. Give the distinctive anatomical characters of Articular Cartilage. 

Chemistrn -1. What is the Composition of Air bv Weight and Volume ; 
and of what use is each of the ingredients in its action on Eespn-ation? 

2 What is the Composition and Chemical Action of Gastric Juice > 

l Describe the differences between the processes of Decay and Putre- 
faction. 

FIRST EXAMINATION.— i^ri^Za?/, Ut July 1859. 

r n ,ioo nf Mpdicine —1. What are the Functions of the Liver ? State 
paScld^Hyltts in which the doctrine of its glucogenic function is 

^'T'^What portion or portions of the Brain are considered to be more 
especiallv connected with the manifestation o intellect and why ? 

?S ate the more important theories which have been put forth to 
exSain the local stoppage of the capiHavy circulation in inflammation, and 
which is the one most consistent with tacts. 

j^^fan, -1. Give the characters of Papaveracep. as regards their juice, 

are;iiSrnI.uuLrMe,nioAmc<lici„aUpcciesofeacl,anJthe,rproper,es. 

T TT- i 1 "Hr^flnp lhp f^roun Ilvdrozoa as a class of (Ccelen- 

.e.S Kac.S'STi'n.^oSr"s:lf 'to tl,osl characters ,y ...ich the H,a.o. 

^l^'ittt^t^lM^curSes of the Brachiopoda i,. .0 fa. as .egarJ, 

''■f sTrt7>-cSrNvhich have inducea .oologi.ts to assign to the 
Sponges a place among the Rhizopoda. 

SECOND EXAMINATION.— T7mrsia7/, 14/7^ July 1859. 
Materia Medica.-l. The medicinal Actions of Chloroform given 



MEDICAL DEGREE. 85 

internally ; tte principal purposes for whicli it is given ; and the dosea 
and manner of administration. 

2. The preparations of Iodine in which it exists in the free state ; their 
distinctive characters, sensible or chemical ; and their doses. 

3. The nature and evidence of the Action of Lead as a slow poison ; 
the precautions to prevent it ; and the means of cure. 

Midwifery — 1. The diagnosis, mechanism, and treatment of a cranial 
presentation in the occipito-posterior position. 

2. The causes and treatment of complete lacertition of the perineum. 

3. The diagnosis and treatment of a case of intra-uterine polypus. 
Surgery. — 1. The general points in diagnosis between fracture and 

dislocation. 

2. The affections of the Antrum ; their diagnosis and treatment. 

Clinical Surgery. — I. State the different causes of Wry Neck, with 
their diagnosis and treatment. 

2. Explain the production cf Emphysema from fractured rib. 

SECOND EXAMINATION.— i^/-?Way, Ibtli July 1859. 

Practice of Fhysic. — 1. State what you know as to the nature, symp- 
toms, physical diagnosis, and couise of Angina Pectoris ; and lay down 
rules for treatment, prophylactic av.d curative. 

2. Enumerate the varieties of Variola and Varioloid, setting forth the 
differential diagnosis of each. 

3. To what class of diseases is the term " Self-limited" applicable ? and 
state the general principles of treatment applicable to the class. Give an 
illustration of the treatment. 

General Pathology. — 1. State the grounds on which it is denied that 
a sudden change can occur in the quantity of the blood contained within 
the cranium. 

2. What are the pathological consequences of intermittent and of con- 
tinued pressure? Give examples and explanations. 

3. What are the reasons given for the greater frequency of Endocarditis 
on the left than on the right side of the heart ? 

Legal 3£edicine. — 1. Poisoning by Salts of Copper ; how generally 
produced ; treatment ; detection of the poison ; how to obtain it from the 
contents of the stomach. 

2. Indications of Drowning ; means of restoring suspended animation 
in such cases. 

3. Simulated Pregnancy ; how detected. 

PKESCRIPTIONS. 

{The names, quantities, and directions, to be written in Latin words, 
without contractions.) 

1. Prescribe a combination of Acetate of Potass and Spirit of Nitric 
Ether as a diuretic mixture. 

2, A set of prescriptions for Astringents in Menorrhagia. 



86 



EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 



List of HonoTirs awarded in the various Classes for 
Session 1858-9. 
The Bame of the Student standing at the Head of each Class is 
printed in Capitals ; other Prizemen have an asterisk prefixed to 
their names ; where two prizes have been gained two asterisks 
are prefixed, and so on; those who have received "Honourable 
Mention," have no asterisk prefixed to their names. 

Faculty of Arts. 

I.— HUMANITY. 



Senior Class. 
*«*AND. WALLACE MILEOY. 
*-Thomas Gray. 
*Ebenezer Barton. 
*\Villiain A. C. Macfarlane. 
*Charles H. Cay. -^ 

*Alan Cadell. 

James Haswell. 

John Shand. 

W. M. Banks. 
**«William Knox Macadam. 
**-*Edward RoUand. 

John Wilson. 

Alex. Macmaster. 
*William Anderson. 

Alex. Millingen. 
**R. W. C. Patrick. 
*-*M. Galbraith. 

*T. P. Henderson. 

♦Alexander Black. 



Junior Class. 
STODAPT MACDONALD. 

**-William Carter. 
*»A. M. Dalrymple. 
*George Marjoribanks. 
*J()bn Craw. 

Robert jManson. 

Charles R. Straton. 

A. M'Kinnell. 

James Cochrane. 
^William Melville. 
*Bland G. Brown. 

Charles Blair. 

William Macdonald. 
^Thomas Neave. 
"•■■Cbarles Jerdan. 

Huch Elder. 



II_GREEK. 



Advanced Class. 
*WILLIAM NICHOLSON. 
**James Bm-ness- 

*John Rutherford. 
**Douglas Bannerman. 
*Thonias Gray. 
James T. Smith. 
William Coldstream. 

Second Class. 
**A. WALLACE MILROY. 
**George Elder. 



*James Oliver. 
*James Haswell. 
*James Kilgour. 
*Donald Cameron. 
•^Robert Rankine. 
^Robert Heron. 
*Jobn Simpson. 
•*William Affleck. 

Andrew Smith. 

William M. Banks. 

Alan Cadell. 

Alexander Millingen. 
*Alex. Cadell. 



LIST OF HONOURS 1858-59. 



87 



Junior Class. 
***STODAET MAGDONALD. 

^William Cowan. 
*'Charles Cook. 
*John W. Leith. 
*Williara .T.Young. 
*Francis Mudie. 
*Alexander Gibson. 



* James Cameron. 
*Hugh Gordon. 
■••John Sinclair. 

Augustus Fraser. 

Herbert Bell. 

Jobn Finlajson. 

George Marjoribanks. 



III.—MATHEMATICS. 



FiKST Class. 
*HENEY FITZGERALD, \ , 
*JOHN A. HALKET, /P 

^Michael Johnson White. 
*Ilobert Brockley. 
'•■Robert Rankin, ") ^ •, 
*John Simpson, / " 
"■Kenneth Moody Stuart. 
*Donald Cameron. 
**James Jeffrey. 
^Francis Braidwood. 
^William Cowan. 
*Wm. Millar Nicolson. 
*Wm. A. C. Macfarlane, \ -r. 
^*William Russell, /-^^• 

** James S. M'Gregor. 
"•'George H. Main. 
*James Dunlop. 
*Julius John Wood. 
"^M'Kenzie Ferguson, \ -j-, 
«-Hugh W. M'K. Gordon, Z^^" 
*John W. Leith. 

Robert R. Finlay. 

Henry B. Johnstone. 

Norman MacDonald. 

James Haswell. 

William L. A. Niven. 

George R. Ewart. 

James Dawson. 

William Morrison, 1 -p j 

Geoi'ge Murray, / ^ 

Edward Rolland. 

John Steel. 

Daniel M'Kerchar. 

William M. Banks, "> 

William Kerr, >-Equal. 

Robert Baton, j 



Robert Walter Weir. 
George T. Stoddart. 
John Moffat. 

Allan Connal, *) -p ^ 
Arthur Davidson, / ^ 



Second Class. 

GEORGE D. LOW, \ ^^ , 
JOHN M'BEATH, Z^^"^'- 

^William L. Ker. 

^Charles Hope Cay, "l j, j^ 

~James Russell, / ^ 

*Peter Stewart. 

*W. A. P. Johnman. 

*J. Ewing Glasgow. >- 

"•David K. Miller. 

*John T. Crawford. 

*"James Halket. 

*James Law Walker. 

*Donald Shearer. 

^Robert Munro. 

"■Francis Barclay. 
Lewes Hoyes. 
James Paterson. 
George Romanes. 
John Macrae. 
William Fraser, \ -ri i 
Walter W. Young, / ^^l"^'' 
James Wilson, 1 -p , 
John Rutherfurd, J ^ 
Robert L. Dymock, \y , 
George Robertson, / ^ 
Robert Thorbui-n, ") p. • 
James E. Gillespie, / ^ 



88 



EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 



Thikd Class. 
WILDIAM EADIE. 

*George Lee. 

*A. Hutton Burgess. 



-•■'.Tohn Matheson. 
■••David Ross. 
■*Jolin Munro. 



IV.— LOGIC AND METAPHYSICS. 



I. — BUSINESS OF THE SESSION. 



Senior Division. 

FRANCIS S. JOHNSTON. 
*William Mackintosh. 
^Alexander Gordon. 
*William Dickson. 
*James Hope. 
*John G. Smieton. 
*George Smeaton. 
•^Frederick H. Rnbarts. 
^Andrew Beveridge. 
*Mattliew Kinnaird. 

JuNiou Division. 

ROBERT FINLAYSON. 

^Alexander Smith CopUiiid. 



■•^'"Gilbert Laurie. 
•••'Thomas Dunlop. 
■^•"D. Douglas Ban Herman. 
•-William R. Campbell. 
'•■'George W. Thomson. 
■••'George D. Low. 
'■•'James Ross. 
■nVilliam Affleck. 
■*David K. Miller. 
■•■'Kenneth Moody Stuart. 
•»Wmiara B. Whittet. 
■■■■'John MacBeath. 
'••John Rutherfurd. 
•••William M. Nicolson. 
■•■'■John Creighton. 
■•^■William A. P. Johnman. 



II. — BUSINESS during THE VACATION, 1858. 

Junior Division. 
ALEXANDER GORDON. 



Senior Division. 

DAVID SOMERVILLE 
■*'Daniel Cameron. 



••'Peter Stewart. 
'■'•'Alexander Anderson. 
"*John G. Smieton. 



v.— RHETORIC AND BELLES-LETTRES. 



JAMES P. STEELE. 

*John Douglas. 
*^''Henry Laurie. 

■*James Buchanan. 
**'Archibald N. Mackray. 

"''■'Robert Beateoii. 

^'Andrew Melville. 

*John M. Sloan. 

■^•James Douglas. 

■*John Neilson. 

-David P>lack. 
♦*Alex. AV. Cunningham. 



'*Count Waltber von Hallwyl. 
'-'■'Robeit Smith. 
■*John Goldie. 
■=nViIli:im R. Adam. 
•»David M'Rae. 

Archibald H. Stein. 
■^Thomas Davidson. 

Count Hims von Hallwyl. 

Patrick M. Fleury. 
'••■James Burness. 
"*James M. Dunlop. 



LIST OF HONOURS 1858-59. 
VI.-MOPtAL PHILOSOPHY. 

I.— BUSINESS OF THE SESSION. 



89 



Senior Division 
FEANCIS S, JOHNSTON. 
^William Mackintosh. 
*■ James Simpson. 
*Daniel Cameron. 
^Archibald N. Mackray. 
*John Macrae. 
*Jolm C. Johnston, ") -r- , 
-William Dickson, /Equal. 
^Robert Miller. 
*John G. Smieton. 

II. — BUSINESS DURING VACATION 1858. 

Jg^f^/tJi^^e. I *DavidEoss. 

-itichard Morns Stewart. 



■■■Andrew Tavlor. 
*Eobert Mitchell. 

Junior Division. 

J. P. MACMORLAND, ) ^ 
ALEX. GORDON, /^n- 

■|-John G. Dalgliesh. 

yWilliara Coldstream. 

*James Patterson. 

■■•John Russell. 



VII.—NATUEAL 

First Division. 
JOHN HILLS. 
*John M. Sloan. 
*David Eoss. 

Second Division. 

ANDREW MELVILLE. 
■'■■Donald Shearer. 
*George Ross, ) -^ . 

^-Alexander Walker, /-"^l^^^- 
'^George Romanes. 

A. W, Cunningham. 

George Lee. 

Thomas M. Mure. 

John Ross. 

J. B. Young. 



PHILOSOPHY. 

Third Division. 
'*JAMES BUCHANAN. 
•■■'William Logan. 
■^^James Meagle. 
^George Paterson Hunter. 
*George H. Main. 
*James Torrj. 
■••'John Edgar, ) -r, , 
-*'JohnMacleod,|^^'^^l- 

Thomas Barr. 

J. E. Gillespie. 

Alexander Matheson. 

J. Macgregor. 

E. Mathewson. 

Andrew Paton. 

E. S. Eolland. 



S. H. WALTON. 
*John Milne. 



VIIL— TECHNOLOGY. 

I *John Swanston. 



Senior Class. 
JOHN BARBOUR. 

*George Purves. 
*James Johnstone. 



Faculty of Divinity, 
IX.— HEBREW. 

Junior Class. 
JAMES JOHNSTONE. 
^Robert Wm. Walker, 
-*A. B. M'Culloch, 
"■••"Alex. Bryson, ) t^, , 
*WilIiam Menzies, ^"^"^^^ 



Equal. 



90 



EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 



X.— BIBLICAL CRITICISM AND ANTIQUITIES. 
ADAM DAVIDSON. 



Faculty of Medicine. 

XL— PRACTICE OF MEDICINE.— J. A. B. HORTON. 
XII— MIDWIFERY. 



JAMES MUNRO. 
*Thomas S. Ciouston. 

XIIL- 

GEORGE SHEARER. 
*W. Pringle Dickson. 
*James Munro. 



^George Shearer. 
^Robert Somerville. 



-SURGERY. 



"•■■Alex. Ballantyne, ) y , 
^"Kenneth Macleod, / ^ 



XIV.— ANATOMY. 

Senior Division. i Junior Division. 



JAMES PETTIGREW— Gold Medal. 

For the liest <lesfription of the arrangeinent of the 
Slusciiliir Filjres of the Ventricular Portion of 
the Heiirt, illustrated by 115 Dissections, and 
120 Drawings. 



For Answers in Writing to Anatomical Questions 
in Five Competitions in the Class-room. 

JAMES DAVIDSON— Gold Medal. 

*Alexander Davidson, ) c,^^„, tvt^^.,, 

*Ai r. ~ -D-^. ySiLVEK Medals. 

*Alex. Crum Brown, ) 



XV.— CHEMISTRY. 



ARCHIBALD DICKSON. 
*W. Paget Jervis, ^ 
-Robert Reid, [-Equal. 

*P. ]\Iauvv Deas, ) 
^Alexander Davidson. 
*A. H. Retry. 
*J. Grant, ) 
*W. Ketcben, >-Equal. 
*J. Simpson, ) 

^'A. J. Reid, ) 

^Thomas Yool, >- Equal. 

*-W. Rutberfurd,) 

*J. Gentle. 

*'J. Ferguson. 

*A. Dewar, ) -p , 

*A. C.Watt, l^^"^'- 

William Miller. 

W. W. Campbell. 

J. S. Livintrstone. 



E. T. Tborold, ") ^ 



al. 



Jobn Ligbtbodj, 
J. Geikie. 

C. Miiirbead, > 

G. Alexander, >-Equal. 

J. Hanlie, ) 

J. S. Hope. 

A. W. Cunningham. 

J. Neilson, ~i 

S. Neatby, >-Equal. 

A. S. Coubrough,} 

D. J. Simpson, | r;, , 
W. P. Drummond, / ^"l"^^" 
R. B. Finlay. 

J. G. AVhite, ) 

F. A. B. Hains, ^ Equal. 

J. Duncan, ) 

R. l\Iaiquis, ) -p. i 

J. R Crosby, Z^^^^^- 

J. Williams. 

P. Maxwell. ) 

J. H. G. Hill. V-Equal. 

James Cameron, J 



LIST OF HONOURS 1858-59. 



91 



Faculty of Law. 

XVI.— LAW OF SCOTLAND. 



ALEX. KIRK MACKIE. 
*John Wisliart. 
■^Alexander Thompson. 

John Rhind. 

William Anderson. 

James Grant. 

Thomas Smyth. 

John H. A. Macdonald. 

James Paterson. 

John Young. 

William Caldwell. 

Thomas M'Laren. 

John Campbell. 

Andrew Jamieson. 



John T. Sawers. 
James Keir. 
John Duif Bruce. 
David Andrews. 
William Smith. 
John Thomas Simson. 
James Smith Farmer. 
A. Ellison Eoss. 
John Macmillan. 
John TurnbulL 
James Spalding. 
Alex. D. Campbell. 
John Allan. 
John Pollock. 



XVIL— CIVIL LAW. 



*THOMAS WHITE. 
**David Crichton. 
^■•■Francis Deas. 
«-^'John M'Farlane. 

*James Brace. 
** William Reid. 



**Robert Smith. 
^"'•'■Peter Gardner. 

••■R. Lindsay Oliphant. 

^Archibald C. Lawrie. 

*Robert Maclean. 



XVIIL— CONVEYANCING. 



WILLIAM ROBSON, ) -p 
WM. B. DARLING, j -^^• 

*John Hendry. 

*James Keir. 

•^Douglas M. Brown, ■) J, , 

*John Allan, j-J^quai. 

Henry Gibson. 
Charles B. Logan. 
Alexander K. Mackie. 
William Rintoul. 
John Gill. 

William Stuart Eraser. 
John TurnbulL 



John Cowan, Jun. 
John Thomas Simson. 
Alexander Gallic. 
Thomas Grier. 
George Miln. 
Somerville Craig. 
Alexander Robertson. 
James H. Dun. 
John Lidgate. 
Arthur Dickson. 
William Christie. 
John Steedman. 
W. B. Leech. 



L 



List of Honours awarded for Summer Session 1858. 

i.— medical jurisprudence. 
ja:mes rorie. 



92 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 



II.— BOTANY.— Summer Session- 1859. 

1. — For Herbarium collected icithin Twenty Miles of Edinburgh. 

1. — John Linton, Edinburgh {Silver Medal). 

This Herbarium contained 4fi4: species and varieties, collected between 

18th July 1858 and 18th July 1859. 

2. William P. Druraraond, Stirling. 

This Herbarium contained 282 species and varieties, collected between 
18th May and 18th July 1859. 

II Prize offered by Professor Simp-:on for Experiments on the Effects of 

Ancesthetic Agents on Sensitive Plants. 

1. William Coldstream, Edinburgh (Silver Medal). 

Additional Prizes given by Professor Balfour. 

2. John S. Livingston, "Edinburgh. 

3. Stephen James Meintjes, junior, Cape of Good Hope. 

III. — Prize for Experiments on the Effects of Narcotic and Irritant 

Gases on Plants. 

John S. Livingston, Edinburgh. 

IV — Prize given by Dr. W. A. F. Browne /or an Essay on. the Com- 
parative Merits of the Linnean and Natural Systems of Classif cation. 

1. Robert 0. Cunningham, Prestonpans. 

2. David Murray, Montrose. 
Additional Prizes given by Professor Balfour. 

.3. Robert Brown, Caithness. 

4. W. B. Davies, M.D., Sierra Leone, 

Certificate of Merit. 
5. Thos. K. Renwick, Edinburgh. 

V. — Prize given by Messrs. P. Lawson & Son for Dissections of ten 
named varieties of Cultivated Oats. 

1. Archibald Hamilton, Edinburgh [Three Gdineas). 

2. William Coldstream, Edinburgh [One Guinea). 
Additional Prizes given by Professor Balfour. 

3. John Drummond, Melbourne, Australia. 

4. Peter White, Haddington. 

VI. — Priz' given by Messrs. P. Lawson & Son /or Dissection? illustrating 
the Structure and Germination of ten named Species of Grasses. 

1. .John S. Livingston, Edinburgh (One Guinea and a Half). ) -p, , 

2. Peter White, Haddington (One Guinea and a Half). \ " 

Additional Prize given by Professor Balfour. 
3. John W. Brown, Glasgow. 



LIST OF HONOURS, SUMMER SESSION, 1859. 93 

VII. — Foi' Monthly Competitive Examinations, conducted hy Written 

Exercises in the Class-room, without the aid of Books or JSJotes. 

Senior Division, 

(Number of Competitors, 12 ; Total Value of Answei's, 246.) 
Archibald Dickson, Edinburgh {calue 236). 

Junior Division. 

(Number of Competitors, 58 ; Total Value of Answers, 226.) 

1. Kenneth M'Leod, M.A., Inverness-shii-e {value 206). 

2. William C. M'Intosh, St. Andrews (196). 

3. William Pringle Dickson, Bengal (194). 

4. Thomas Brisbane, Dumfries (170). 

5. David Ross, Portree, Skye (162). 

6. Alexander Dewar, Kincardine-on-Forth (155). 

Certificates of Merit. 

7. John Nairne, Perthshire (147). 

«. Arthur G. Reid, Fochabers (143). 

9. Colville Brown, Northumberland (141). 

10. Robert B. Finlay, Edinburgh (115). 

11. Robert O. Cunningham, Frestonpans (110). 

12. John Wallace, Aberdeenshire (100). 

VIII. — For a Series of Dried Specimens illustrating the Conformation and 
Venation of Leaves, with a Tabular View of their arrangement. 

1. Colin S. Valentine, Brechin. 

2. Kenneth M'Leod, M.A., Inverness-shire. 

3. William James Dickson, Fifeshire. 

IX. For Assistatice in conducting the Duties of the Class, more especially 

in the Histological part of the Course. 

1. R. J. B. Cunynghame, Edinburgh. 

Certificates of Merit. 

2. S. H, Ramsbotham, Leeds. 

3. Colin S. Valentine, Brechin. 

4. Richard Lord, Cheshire. 

5. David Murray, Montrose. 

6. James Middleton, Edinburgli. 

7. John Anderson, Colinsburgh, 

8. Archibald Hamilton, Edinburgh. 

9. James Africanus Beale Horton, Sierra Leone. 

X. Certificate of Merit for a Collection of Plants gathered during the 

l„ Weekly Excursions. 

I William Sinclair, Leith. 



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MEMBERS 



OF THE 



EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

CORRECTED UP TO 19th OCTOBER 1859. 



J. G. M. Burt, M.D,, 88, George Street, Edinburgh. 
J. Govan, W.8., 13, Walker Street, do. 

J. Starke, Advocate, 34, Heriot Row, do. 

D. R. Haldane, M.D., 5, Shandwick Place, do. 
J. Eaton, M.D., 8, Alva Street, do. 
T. G. Stewart, M.D., 7, Frederick Street, do. 
J. R. Stoddart, W.S., 2, Drummond Place, do. 
W. Stuart, W.S., British Linen Bank, Peebles. 
J. Thorburn, Writer, Assembly Street, Dumfries. 

10 W. R. M'Diarmid, Editor, Dumfries Courier Office. 

A. Currie, Advocate, 43, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 

W. R. Sanders, M.D., 15, Duke Street, do. 

G. Govan, M.D., H.E.I.C, Pilmuir Cottage, St. Andrews. 

A. L. Simpson, D.D., Parish Minister, Kirknewton Manse. 

J. M. Bell, Jun., W.S., 11, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

C. Douglas, W.S., 17, Drummond Place, do. 

W. Smiles, M.D., 43, Bedford Square, London, W.C. 

G. Steel, Merchant, Hopetoun Place, Annan. 

T. V. Bell, M.D., 17, William Street, Lowndes Square, London. 
20 T. Barclay, Sheriff-Clerk of Fife, Cupar-Fife. 

P. D. Handyside, M.D., 11, Hope Street, Edinburgh. 

J. D. Hunter, M.D., Middletield House, Portobello. 

T. Williamson, M.D., 40, Quality Street, Leith. 

J. Robertson, W.S , 69, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

A. Peterkin, Short-hand Wiiter, 46, Cumberland Street, do. 

A. Wood, M.D., F.R.C.S.E., 9, Darnaway Street, do. 

E. Mill, S.S.C, 12, Atholl Place, do. 

G. Dickson, Advocate, 3, Royal Circus, do. 
J. Coldstream, M.D., 51, York Place, do. 
30 G. A. Mitchell, Surgeon, Thorburn, Carnwath, Lanarkshire. 
W. J. Whyte, M.D., of Towiebeg, Banff. 
R. Black, Writer, Kirkcaldy. 

W. Robertson, M.D., 28, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 
A. F. Adam, W.S., 19, Claremont Crescent, do. 



102 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

J Kirk, W.S., 12, Clareraont Crescent, Edinburgh. ^ „ , . 
Eev A Balfour, Mir.ister of the Free Church, Forglen, Banff.hire. 
Sir John Melville, W.S., 15, Heriot Eow, Edinburgh. 
S. SomerviUe, M.D , 17, Hart Street, do 
G J. IVIurray, W.S., 7, Melville Street, do. 
40 J. Skelton, Advocate, 20, Alva Street, do. 
W. Brown, Surgeon, 25, Dublin Street, do. 
W. Eraser, W.S , 54, Castle Street, do. 
P P. Aitken, Writer, 20, Reform Street, Dundee. 
J M'Laren, Advocate, 12, Dublin Street, Edinburgh. 
C. F. Shand, Advocate, 6, St. Colme Street, do. 
R. Huie, M.D., 8, Georo^e Square, do _ 

Rev W. Dill, Parish Minister, Colnrionel, Ayrshire. 
Rev AV. Peddie, D.D., Min. of the U. P. Ck 57, George Sq Edni. 
J Youno- M.A. Min. of the U. P. Ch., 28, Thornhill Cres. London. 
50 W. Nicolson, Min. of the Indep. Ch., 128, Nicolson Street, Edm. 
W. S. Carmichael, M.D., 3, Annandale Street, do. 
J. 0. Burns, Gentleman, Smith's Place, Leith A\ alk, do. 
J Tavlor, M.A., Teacher, Parliament Square, do. 
p" S. K. Newbigging, M.D., 29, Heriot Row, do. 
W. Mason, S.S.C., 6, Frederick Street, do. 
M. Thomson, M.D., 8, Meadow Place, do. 
W. Smith, Minister of Trinity Col. Parish, Abbey Mount, do. 
T. Cleghorn, Advocate, 26, Queen Street do. 

J. Grant, D.D., D.C.L., Min. of St. Mary's Par., 11, ^orth'J- St., do. 
60 A. Grant, Merchant, Bombay. 

J. Begbie, M.D., 3, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 

J. M.^M'Candlish, W.S, 18, Moray Place, do. 

G. Webster, Advocate, 56, Northumberland Street, do. 

e' Spence, Shoe Manufecturer, LinUthgow. 

J J. A. Moir, M.D., 52, Castle Street, Edinburgh. 

\. Urquhart, Advocate, 5, St. Colme Street, do. 

J. Little, Parish Minister, Manor Manse, Peebles. 

F R. Macdonald, M.D., Inverary, Argyleshire. 

R. Renton, M.D., 26, Howe Street, Edinburgh. 
70 A. R. Simpson, M.D., 52, Queen Street, do. 

C. Hill, Advocate, 2, Picardy Place do. ^ . ^ .. ^, ,^ 

The Hon. Sir George Deas, U.A., Lord of Session, 3, Moray 1 1., do. 

D A Pearson, North CHft", North Queensferry 

E. Logan, W.S., Ul, George Street, Edinburgh. 

H. Logan, Advocate, Castle Malgewyn, Llcchryd, Caermarthen. 

J, Vei'tch, M.A., Peebles. . 

P Scarth W S. 37, Bernard Street, Leitli. 

W. Cunningham, d'd., Prin. of F. C. Col., 17, Salisburj^Road, Edin. 

G A Panton F. C. Minister, 242, St. Vincent Street, Glasgow. 
80 D Maclagan, M.D., 129, George Street, Edinburgh. 

G Fyfe teacher, Jedburgh Academy, Jedburgh. 

W. Waddell, AV.S., 20, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

J Haldane, Accountant, 34, Drummond Place, Edmburgli. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 103 

D. Cairns, Minister of U.P. Churcb, Stitchel, Kelso. 
J. Cadell, Advocate, 20, Picardy Place, Edinburgh. 
J. Gairdner, M.D., 52 Northumberland Street, do. 
J. M. Pagan, M.D., 8, Melville Street, do. 

R. Johnston, W.S., 8, Broughton Place, do. 
J. Swinton, Minister of Free Church, Portmoak, Kinross. 
90 W. J. Mitchell, Proprietor, Throwburn, Carnwath. 

E. Bartholomew, M.D., Inverkeithing. 

R. Blain, Teacher, 9, Brighton Street, Edinburgh. 

J. A. Smith, M.D., 7, West Maitland Street, do. 

A. L. Simpson, Librarian of U.P Church, 28, Buccleuch Place, do. 

R. Eiddell, Advocate, Letham House, Haddington. 

A. Ross, M.D., Waterloo, Portsmouth. 

J. M. Pagan, M.D. and Professor, 83, West Regent St., Glasgow. 

D. Christison, M.D., 40, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

A. Christison, Min. of the Ch. of Scot., Foulden, Berwick-on-Tweed. 
100 J. Christison, W.S., 40, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

R. Christison, M.D. and Professor, do. do. 

J. Christison, M.A., Min. of the Church of Scotland, Biggar Manse. 

J. Keir, Preacher of the Gospel, Broughty Ferry. 

R. Pridie, M.D., 10, Roxburgh Street, Edinburgh. 

J. G. Lorimer, D.D., Minister of F. C, 6, Woodside Place, Glasgow. 

G. Scott, M.D., Denmark Hill, London. 

J. Hutton, Teacher, 1, Nicolson Square, Edinburgh. 

J. S. Muschet, M.D., Birkhill, Stirling. 

H. A. Stewart, Minister of F. C, Free Manse, Penicuik. 
110 R. Lee, Advocate, 1, Albyn Place, Edinburgh. 

S. H. Munro, M.D., Kilsyth, Stirlingshire. 

W. Henderson, M.D., 49, Scboolhill, Aberdeen. 

J. Howden, Accountant, 6, Anne Street, Edinburgh. 

T. E. Macritchie, W.S., 4, Gayfield Square, do. 

J. Robertson, M.A., Licentiate of F. C, 1, South Charlotte St., do. 

W. Bennet, Probationer of F. C, Moffat, Dumfriesshire. 

G. Chancellor, W.S., 1. Chalmers Street, Lauriston. 

J. S. Candlish, M.A., 4, South Charlotte Street, Edinburgh. 

F. W. Scott, 3, Gayfield Square, do. 

120 H. M. Liglis, Principal Clerk of Session, 4, Coates Crescent, do. 
D. Maclagan, M.D., 28, Heriot Row, do. 

C. W. M. S. Graham, M.D., Dalkeith. 

F. C. Henderson, M.D., United Service Club, 14, Queen St., Edin. 

G. Logan, W.S., Her Majesty's General Register House, do. 
A. Wood, M.D., 10, St. Colme Street, do. 

J. Brown, M.D., 23, Rutland Street, do. 

R. Nasmyth, Surgeon, 5, Charlotte Square, do. 

D. C. A. Agnew,"Minister of Free Church, Wigtown. 
J. Cook, W.S., 32, Abercromby Place, Edinburgh. 

130 L. M. Macara, W.S., 58, Northumberland Street, do. 
J. Watt (of Meathie), St. Andrews. 
W. Macdonald, M.D., Prof, of Civ. and Nat. His., United College, do. 



104 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

J. Inglis, M.D., 10, Walker Street, Edinburgh. 

R. Blackwell, Wharton House, do. 

J. Macalister (of Chapeltown), Stewarton, Kilmarnock. 

A. Dymock, i\I.D., Louth, Lincolnshire. 

J. Struthers, M.D., 102, Lauriston Place, Edinburgh. 

A. R. Dick, Advocate, 5, Rutland Place, Edinburgh. 

F. Thomson, M.D., 8, Athole Crescent, Perth. 
140 P. C. Macdougall, Prof, of Moral Phil., 6, Clarendon Crescent, T:: din. 

A. Scott, jun., 13, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 

W. Martine, M.D., Haddington. 

J. J. Bonar, Minister of Free Church, Greenock. 

William Seller, M.D., 18, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Marshall, Advocate, 11, Wemyss Place, do. 

R. A. Veitch, Merchant, 1, Hill Square, do. 

John M'Xab, M.D., Killin, Perthshire. 

W. Laughton, Minister of Free Church, Greenock. 

W. G. Smith, Minister of Church of Scotland, Fintry Manse, Glasgow. 
150 D. Home, Student of Literature, the Manse, Corstorphine. 

R. D. Home, Student of Divinity, 30, Abercromby Place, Edinburgh. 

A. Graham, M.D., Caledonian U.S. Club, 14, Queen St., do. 

R. Thomson, Minister of Free Church, Earlston, Melrose. 

J. D. Ferrie, Solicitor, 6, Nelson Street, Edinburgh. 

C. S. Boog, M.A., Merchant, 21, Virginia Street, Glasgow. 
S. Spence, Minister of Free Church, Kilbirnie, Ayrshire. 
W. N. Brown, M.D , St. John's, Melrose. 

J. Newton, W.S., 33, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

D. S. Peddie, Accountant, 1, George Street, do. 

160 D. Williamson, Minister of United Pres. Church, North Queensferry. 

C. T. Ramage, LL.D., M. A., Teacher, AVallace Hall, Dumfriesshire. 

J. Simson, M.D., 3, Glenfinlas Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Guthrie, M.D., Newburgh, Fife. 

A. Arthur, Min. of Church of Scotland, 135, Renfrew St., Glasgow. 

J. Berry, of Tayfield, Advocate, Tayfield, by Newport, Fife. 

J. Ker, Parish Minister, Polmont. 

S. F. M'Lauchlan, Minister of Free Church, Cawdor, Nairne. 

H. Scott, Minister of Church of Scotland, Anstruther Wester. 

J. Thomson, Minister of Free Church, Prestonkirk. 
170 P. B. M. Macredie, Advocate, Perceton House, Irvine. 

J. J. M'Culloch, Licentiate of F. Ch., 1, Buccleuch St., Edinburgh. 

J. D. Burns, M.A., Minister of Free Church, Hampstead, London 

E. Clarkson, M.D., 18, Broughton Place, Edinburgh. 
R. Kinnear, Minister of Free Church, Moffat. 

J. M'Laren, Parish Minister, Larbert, Falkirk. 
A. Maxwell, Preacher of the Gospel, Ceres, Cupar Fife. 
R. H. Arbuckle, Probationer of Free Ch., 69, King St., Kilmarnock. 
W. Walkinshaw, Minister of Church of Scot., Lyne Manse, Peebles. 
J. Gardner, M.A., Minister of F. Church, 9, Argyle Sq., Edinburgh. 
180 F. Hallard, Advocate, 29, Scotland Street, ' do. 

A. Munro, M.D., 14, Queen Street, do. 



MiiMBERS OF COUNCIL. 105 

A. C. Swinton, Advocate, 7, Darnaway Street, Edinburgh. 

W. Brvce, M.D., Dalkeith. 

E. S. Orr, M.D., 9, Albany Place, Glasgow. 

G. Mitchell, M.A., D.D., Parish Minister, the Manse, Whitburn. 

J. Adam, Advocate, 49, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

W. A. Forrester of Barns, Peebles. 

D. M'Laren, Minister of Free Church, Dunning, Bridge of Earn. 
A. B. Bell, Advocate, 20, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

190 W. J. Menzies, W.S., 10, Hill Street, do. 

J. Cleland, M.D., 5, Pitt Street, do. 

R. L. Dymock, Proc.-Fiscal for the City, 19, George Sq., Edinburgh. 
J. Edwards, M.D., Cullen House, Banflshire. 
J. A. Don, Licentiate of Church of Scotland, Hillside, Lasswade. 

E. B. Blyth, M.A., Miss, with F. C, 9, Bruntsfield Place, Edinburgh. 
J. M'Lachlan, Teacher, 21, Gardner's Crescent, do. 

J. Struthers, Parish Minister, the Manse, Prestonpans. 

E. P. Paterson, Schoolmaster, Parish of Duddingston. 

W. Steele, teacher, 3, Eldon Place, Glasgow. 
200 H. E. Blair, M.D., Maybole, Ayrshire. 

E. Gordon, Minister of F. C, 14, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

G. A. Walker, M.D., Dollar, Stirlingshire. 

T. M. Dickson, Minister of Church of Eng., 54, Castle St., Edinburgh. 

W. Graham, Teacher, Cottage, West Princes Street Gardens, Edin. 

E. Ferguson, Teacher of Mathematics, 59, Lauriston Place, do. 

J. M'Kinnell, Teacher, Free Ch. School, Old Cumnock, Ayrshire. 

J. B. Eobertson, Min. of the Gospel, 7, Salisbury Street, Glasgow. 

J. H. Balfour, M.A., M.D., Prof, of Medicine and Botany, 27,"lnver- 
leith Eow, Edinburgh. 

W. Skinner, W.S., 41, Northumberland Street. 
210 W. H. Murray of Geanies, Advocate, Tain. 

W. Gulland, W.S., 16, Nelson Street, Edinburgh- 

J. Christison, Advocate, 3, Great Stuart Street, do. 

A. Anderson, Probationer of F. C, 26, Cumberland Street, do. 

J. Bonar, W.S., 15, York Place, do. 

E. Todd, M.D., Dysart, Kirkcaldy. 

J. Bridges, W.S., Belfield House, Musselburgh. 

P. C. Campbell, M.A., D.D., Prin. of Univ. and K. Col, Aberdeen. 

J. M. Austin, Parish Minister, Clerk Hill House, Dumfries. 

W. Balfour, Free Church Minister, 3, St. John's Hill, Edinburgh. 
220 J. Eonaldson, Banker, Somerset Cottage, Mary's Place, do. 

A. J. Stewart, W.S., 27, Pitt Street, do. 

J. Stothert, E. C. Clergyman, Bruges, Belgium. 

J. W. Mackenzie, W.S , 16, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

G. W. Spence, M.D., Greenfield Place, Lerwick, Shetland. 

A. Cameron, M.D., Keighley, Yorkshire. 

J. B. Balfour, M.D., 37, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Cochrane, M.A., Parish Minister, Manse of Cupar-Fife. 

W. L. Lindsay, F.L.S., M.D., Pitcullen House, Perth. 

J. Cay, F.E.S.E., Advocate, 5, S. E. Circus Place, Edinburgh. 



106 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

230 J. Duncan, M.D., 12, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 

A. Buist, M.D , County and City Infirnivarv, Perth. 

G. W. Bell, M.D., 16, Alva Street, Edinburgh. 

T. B. Bell, Min. ofF. C, Kirkland Cottage,"Leswalt, Stranraer. 

A. E. Lockhart, of Clegliorn, M.P., Borthwick Brae, Hawick. 

J. M. Jarvie, Min. of the Gospel, 85, Regent Street, Greenock. 

J. H. Bennett, Prof, of Inst, of Medicine, 1, Glenfinlas St., Edin. 

J. P. Wilson, Advocate, 20, Abercromby Place, do. 

G. Murray, Wimbledon Common, London. 

J. Macpherson, Slinister of Free Church, Lairg. 
240 J. S. Robertson, W.S., 11, Claremont Crescent, Edinburgh. 

T. Scott, M.D., 46, Rankeillor Street, do. 

W. Paul, M.A., ]\Iinister Whitkirk, Prestonkirk, E. Lothian. 

J. Struthers, M.D., 22, Charlotte Street, Leith. 

J. Murray, Minister of Free Church, Newburgh. 

J. Macmillan, M.A., Classical Teacher, 15, Buccleuch Place, Edin. 

J. G. Lyel, M.D., South Bell Street, St. Andrews. 

P. Blair, Advocate, 2 Nelson St., Edinburgh. 

Simon S. Laurie, M.A., Sec. to the Educ. Com. of Ch. of Scot., do. 

J. M. D. Meiklejohn, M.A., Bowdon, Manchester. 
250 W. Middleton, Rector, Grammar School, Falkirk. 

A. Webster, M.D., Dundee. 

T. A. G. Balfour, M.D., 5, George Square, Edinburgh. 

J. Tait, Advocate, 2, Park Place, do. 

J. C. Tait, W.S., do. do. 

J. Smith, M.D., 20, Charlotte Square, do. 

J. H. Watkins, Writer, 170, Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow. 

J. D. Forbes, Prof, of Nat. Phil., 3, Park Place, Edinburgh. 

W. C. Rose, Parish Minister, Cargill, Perth. 

J. Robertson, W.S,, 11, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 
260 Js. Bell, one of the Ministers of Haddington, the Manse, Haddington. 

J. Guthrie, M.A., Minister of Evangelical Union, Greenock. 

T. M'Kie, Student of Law, 4, Albyn Place, Edinburgh. 

H. Blair, W.S., 15, Randolph Crescent, do. 

J. Eraser, M.D., Kilsyth. 

J. Cuthill, M.D., Denny. 

G. S. Thomson, M.D., Row, Helensburgh. 

A. Watson, Classical Teacher, 10, Catherine Street, Edinburgh. 

H. Cowan, Advocate, 4, Ainslie Place, do. 

D. Munro, Teacher, Totteridge Park, Herts. 
270 C. Stuart, M.D., Chirnside, Ayton, Burmouth. 

J. Wilson, M.D., Lavansdown, Berwick-on-Tweed. 
H. Bruce, Advocate, 10, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 
W. Lee, Minister of Church of Scotland, Roxburgh. 
A. Smollet, of Bonhill, Cameron House, Dumbartonshire. 
A. T. Boyle, Advocate, 124, George Street, Edinburgh. 
T. Anderson, Advocate, Fairlie House, Kilmarnock. 

E. S. Gordon, Advocate, 2, Randolph Crescent, Edinburgh. 
E. Baxter, W.S., 9, Rutland Square, do. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 107 

J. Forman, Advocate, 6, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 
230 A. B. Macallan, W.S., 26, Eutland Square, do. 
Eev. J. Currie, M.A., Normal School, do. 
Eev. "W. Scott, Laurelbank, Partick, Glasgow. 
W. A. Parker, Advocate, 81, Princes Street, Edinburgh. ; 

J. D. Peddie, Architect, 21 Claremont Crescent, do. 
J. Macallan, W.S., 26, Eutland Square, do. 
J. Dunsmure, M.D., 53, Queen Street, do. 
A. Thomson, M.D., 8, Teviot Eow, do. 
W. Gumming, M.D., 18, Ainslie Place, do. 

D. Cowan, Writer, 17, Moray Place, do. 

290 J. S. More, Professor of Municipal Law, 19, Great King Street, do. 
A. Peddie, M.D., 1.5, Eutland Street, do. 
H. S. Anderson, M.D., Selkirk. 

C. J. Sheriff, Advocate, 10, Hope Street, Edinburgh. 

W. Strauchon, M.A., Chap., Eoy. Infirmary, 100, Lauriston PL, do. 
A. W. Brown, Minister of Free Church, Dean Bank Lodge, do. 
M. C. Mackenzie, Minister of the Church of Scotland, Lasswade. 
T. Gordon, Parish Minister, Newbattle, Dalkeith. 
A. D. Tait, Parish Minister, Kirkliston, Winchburgh. 
J. H. Tait, Student of Theology, do. do. 

300 J. Ehenius, M.A., Minister of Free Ch., Tongland, Kirkcudbright. 

E. Eutherford, W.S., 64, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 
G. Napier, Advocate, Coates Hall, do. 

Sir J. M'Neill, G.C.B. and K.L.S., Granton House, do. 
J. Young, M.D., 36, North Castle Street, do. 
J. Berwick, Minister of U.P. Church, Eathillet, Cupar-Fife. 
J. B. Eitchie, Minister of the U.P. Church, Aberdeen. 

D. Bell, Minister of the Ch. of Scot., Manse of Kennoway, Markinch. 
W. M. Mackenzie, M.D., Kelso. 

E. Omond, M.D., 43, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 
310 E. B. Crowe, Teacher, 5, Lothian Eoad, do. 

A. Nicolson, M.A. Assist. Statist, Eeg. House, 12, Warriston Cresc. 
E. C. H. Macduff, Minister of the Ch. of Scot., Manse of Falkland. 
G. "Wright, Min. of the C. Scot., Manse of Kingsbarns, St. Andrews. 
J. T. Mowbray, W.S., 15, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 
H. G. Gibson, W.S., 38, Moray Place, do. 

J. Cullen, M.A., Minister of the Church of Scot., Links, Kirkcaldy. 
J. Dodds, Minister of Free Church, Dunbar. 
A. Muir, Head-Master of Prop. School, Hexham. 
J. G. Starke, M.A., Student of Law, 34, Heriot Eow, Edinburgh. 
320 J. Eobertson, Minister of Ch. of Scot., Whitsome Manse, Chiruside. 
J. A. Eobertson, Student of Divinity, do. do. 

D. Sturrock, M.D., 2, Park Place, Dundee. 
A. Anderson, M.D., 40, Minto Street, do. 
W. Scott, M.D., Dumfries. 

J. Burns, Teacher, 306, Bath Crescent, Glasgow. 
G. Bayley, W.S., 13, Eegent Terrace, Edinburgh. 
P. Blair, W.S., 15, Eandolph Crescent, do. 



108 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

F. Pitman, "W.S., Chamhers, 50, Castle Street, Edinburgli. 
A. Stewart, Minister of the Church of Scotland, "^niithorn. 

330 A. Hunter, M.D., 18, Abercrcmiby Place, Edinburgh. 

J. A. Hunter, M.D , do. do. 

P. Orphoot, M.D., 113, George Street, do. 

T. H. Orphoot, do. do. 

E. Chapman, M.D., Hawkfield House, Leith. 

D. H. Somerville, M.D., Ayton, Berwickshire. 

J. Millar, Minister of the Church of Scot., Largo-ward, St. Andrews. 

J. Laidlaw, M.A., Licentiate of Free Ch., 14, Parkside St , Edinr. 

W. Jeffrey, Min. of Ch. of Scot., Manse of Eiccarton, Kilmarnock. 

J. Chisholm, M.D., Buccleuch Street, Dumfries. 
340 J. Little, M.D., Dumfries and Galloway Royal Infirmary. 

D. M. Home, M.A., Advocate, Milne-Graden, Coldstream. 

J. J. Trotter, Teacher, St. Andrews. 

R. Logan, 29, India Street, Edinburgh. 

A. Inglis, M.D., 33, Albany Street, do. 

J. M. Clingan, M.A., Licentiate of Free Ch., Moffat, Dumfriesshire. 

J. Elder, W.S., 3, South- West Circus Place, Edinburgh. 

W. T. Gairdner, M.D., 45, Northumberland Street, do. 

J. Logan, Min. of Church of Scotland, Manse of Swinton, Coldstream. 

J. Murray, Minister of Church of Scotland, Moonzie, Cupar-Fife. 
350 A. Wilson, Minister of the Abbey Parish, Abbey Manse, Paisley. 

A. Gilmour, Teacher, 8, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

J. Stark, M.D., 21, Rutland Street, Edinburgh. 

W. Eraser, M.A., Minister of Church of Scotland, Manse, Blairgowrie. 

J. Brown, Accountant, 4, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 

J. E. Oniond, Minister of Free Church, Monzie, Crieff. 

J. Donaldson, M.A., Parish Minister, Kirkconnel Manse, Sanquhar. 

.J. Henderson, M.D., 26, Charlotte Street, Leith. 

J. Sime, M.A., Rector, F. C. Nor. Sch., 40, Blacket PI., Edinburgh. 

G. Bickerton, Teacher, 28, Torphichen Street, do. 
360 H. H. Crichton, W.S., 13, Nelson Street, do. 

H. Calderwood, Minister of U. P. Church, 1, Mansfield PI., Glasgow. 
A. Reid, LL.D., M.A., Teacher, 19, York Place, Edinburgh. 
W. P. Dundas, Advocate, 16, Tuverleith Row, do. 

AV. Symington, M.D., Penicuik. 

T. Oliphant, Teacher, 33, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 
•L Ferguson, W.S., 1, Regent Terrace, do. 

C. Gordon, Preacher of the Gospel, 18, Brunswick Street, do. 
J. Watt, do. do. 46, S. Clerk Street, do. 

W. Home, M.D., care of J. Cook, AV.S., Abercromby Place. 
370 A. H Charteris, M.A., Min., C. of Scot., New Abbey Manse,Dumfrics. 
W. Bell, M.D., Braehead, Canonbie. 
T. Leckie, M.D., 11, Carlton Terrace, Edinburgh. 
R. W. Macaulay, M.D., 16, Castle Street, do. 
J. Lorimer, Advocate, 21, Hill Street, do. 

J. 0. Dykes, M.A., Minister of Free Church, East Kilbride. 
A. T. Innes, M.A., 2, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 



MEMBERS OF COUKCIL. 109 

D. "Wedderspoon, M.A., Solicitor, Perth. 

G. Cotton, S.S.C, 7, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 
W. Eeid, M.D., St. Andrews. 
380 J. W. Begbie, M.D., 21, Alva Street, Edinburgh. 

A. Torrence, Minister of Church of Scot., Manse of Glencross, Eoslin. 

E. Mercer, W S., Eamsay Lodge, Portobello. 

G. T. Chiene, Chart. Accountant, 27, Northumberland St., Edinburgh. 
A. Craig. M.A., Min. Church of Scot., Manse of Bedrule, Jedburgh. 
J. Dick, M.D., Broombank, Midcalder. 
J. C. Christie, W.S., 4, Duncan Street, Newington, Edinburgh. 

A. Elliot, M.D., Goldielands, by Hawick. 

W. Makellar, B.A., Minister of Free Church, Ascog, Eothesay. 

C. E. Scott, Teacher, 83, Canning Street, Liverpool. 
390 W. S. Dalgleish, M.A., Teacher, Grange House School. 

D. Wilson, M.D., 12, Dean Terrace. 

B. Bell, Surgeon, 8, Shandwick Place. 

J. Anderson, M.A., Minister of the Church of Scotland, Dalkeith. 
W. Eitchie, D.D., do., Longforgau Manse, Dundee. 

W. Traill, M.D., Maygate Street, Dunfermline. 
W. B. Cunningham, Minister of Free Church, Prestoupans. 
Joseph Grant, W.S., 30, Drummond Place. 
W. Knox, M.D., 11, Hart Street. 
G. E. Ogilvie, M.A., Advocate, Bankhead, Forfar. 
400 J. Adamson, Min. of Church of Scotland, Newton Manse, Dalkeith. 
G. Jeffrey, Minister, Whitevale, Glasgow. 

E. F. Maitland, Advocate, 3, Ainslie Place. 

J, A. Crichton, Esq., Advocate, 13, Nelson Street. 

T. D. Kirkwood, Minister of the Church of Scotland, Bridge of Earn. 

A. Paterson, M.D., Bridge of Allan. 

J. Kerr, M.A., Gifford Bank, Haddington. 

A. J. Napier, W.S., 23, Albany Street. 

J. Mackenzie, W.S., 16, Eoyal Circus. 

J. Gilchrist, Minister of the Ch. of Scotland, Dumbog, Newburgli. 
410 J. Small, M.A., Librarian, University Edin., 16, Duncan St., Ediii. 

J. Johnston, M.D., 34, Queen Street, do. 

J. Fairbairn, Minister of Free Church, Newhaven. 

J. Y. Simpson, M.D., Prof, of Midwifery, 52, Queen Street, Edin. 

W. Blair, Gentleman, Marionville, Merchistoa. 

L. Playfair, C.B., Prof, of Chemistry, 14, Abercromby Place, Edin. 

T. Davidson, Minister of Ch. of Scot., Abbey St. Bathans, Dunse. 

P. Kelland, Prof, of Mathematics, 20, Clarendon Crescent, Edin. 

W. Ziegler, M.D., 47, George Square, do. 

E. C. M'Watt, M.D., Dunse. 
420 J. Murray, Min., Ch. of Scot., Morton Manse, Thornhill, Glasgow. 

W. Moffat, M.A., High School, 12, Mansion House Eoad, Edinburgh. 

J. Peddie, W.S., 36, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

H. Aird, Minister of the Ch. of Scot., Neilston Manse, Glasgow. 

A. Peddie, W.S., 36, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

E. P. Eitchie, M.D., Bethwall House, Cambridge Heath, London. 



lie EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

J. M. Balfour, W.S., 4, Thistle Court, Edinburgh. 
M. M'Gregor, Student in Theology, 5, North Junction Street, Leith. 
W. Glover, M,A., Minister of the Ch. of Scot., 8, Forth St., Edinr. 
D. Smith, Minister, Parish of Wiston and Eoberton, Biggar. 
430 G. Meikle, Minister of the U.P. Church, Inverary. 

G. Campbell, Minister of the Ch. Scot., Manse, Eastwood, Glasgow. 

T. Davis, C.E. and Arch., 1, Banner Place, Morningside, Edinr. 

J. Stormonth, Student of Divinity, 9, Roxburgh Street, do. 

D. Landall, Min. of the Ch. of Scot., Manse of Auchtergaven, Perth. 

W. Macfarlane, M.D., 21, St. Bernard's Crescent, Edinburgh. 

G. Seton, Advocate, St. Bennet's, Greenhill, do. 

J. Buchanan, Student of Theo., Willow Bank Cottage, Murrayfield. 

C. Muirhead, Junior, Student of Divinity, 7, Heriot Bow, Edinburgh. 
A. H. Cowan, Minister of Free Church, Troon, Ayrshire. 

440 T. H. Core, M.A., Teacher, 3, Lothian Street. 

A. K. Morison, S S.C, 14, Pitt Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Eamsay, M.A., Parish Minister, Gladsmuir, by Tranent. 

J. W. Thomson, Minister of Free Ch., Pitcairn Green, Perthshire. 

A. White, M.A., Minister of Free Church, Harray, Orkney. 

A. Thain, Minister of Free Church, New Machar, Aberdeen. 

G. Scott, Min. of Ch. of Scotland, Manse of Dairsie, Cupar-Fife. 

W. F. Irvine, M.A., Min. of Ch. of Scotland, Manse of Arbroath. 

J. H. Aldridge, M.D., Southampton. 

J. Oliver, Writer and Bank-agent, Hawick. 
450 W. L. Young, Solicitor, Auchterarder. 

A. Brunton, Minister of U. P. Church, Oban. 

W. Limont, Minister of U. P. Church, Alnwick. 

J. Noble, Preacher of Gospel, 7, Scotland Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Russell, M.A., Min. of Ch. of Scotland, the Manse, Yarrow. 

W. G. Boag, Licen. of Ch. of Scot., Manse of Uphall, Winchburgh. 

J. M'Farlane, W.S., 9, Athole Place, Edinburgh. 

J. M'Murtrie, M.A., Min. of Ch- of Scot., Manse of Mains, Dundee. 

J. M. Sloan, M.A., Stud, of Theo., Commonside, Tarbolton, Ayrshire. 

F. B. Douglas, Advocate, 21, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 
460 D. M'Gibbon Burr, 33, Renheld Street, Glasgow. 

G. Whittet, Factor, Whitehouse, Cramond, Edinburgh. 

J. Milroy, M.A., Min. of Ch. of Scotland, Dreghorn, Ayrshire. 
W. Shaw, M.A., Min. of Ch. of Scotland, the Manse, Ayr. 

D. L. Foggo, Min. of Ch. of S., Manse of Abercrombie, St. Andrews. 
R. Menzies, Min. of Ch. of Scot., Manse of Hoddam, Ecclefechan. 
A. B. Douglas, Min. of Ch. of S., Manse of Carnock, Dunfermline. 
J. Thomson, M.A., Min. of F. C, 13, Bonnington Place, Leith. 

D. Somerville, M.A., Theo. Stud., F. C , 22, Pilrig St., Edinburgh. 
J. Martin, W.S., 32, Great King Street, do. 
470 R. A. Mitchell, M.A., Student of Divinity, 25, Barony Street, do. 
A. Macduff, Bonhard, l*erth. 

A. M'C. Forrester, Min. of C. of S., Manse of W. Linton, Penicuik. 
W. Main, M.D., Bonnyrigg, Lasswade. 
G. H. B. Monilaws, Min. of Ch. of Scotland, the Manse, Peebles. 



/ 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. Ill 



J. Thomson, Licentiate of Ch. of Scotland, Ladykirk, Coldstream, 

J. Donaldson, M.A., Parish Minister, Kirkconnel Manse, Sanquhar. 

H. Callender, Accountant, 8, St. Vincent Street, Edinburgh. 

A. C. Chalmers, M.D., Thornhill, Dumfriesshire. 

A. Kirkwood, M.D., Palace Street, Berwick-on-Tweed. 
480 D. Young, Minister of U. P. Church, Chatton, Belford. 

G. G. Eobertson, M.D., 50, Coney Street, York. 

P. Borrowman, Minister of Free Church, Glencaim, Moniaive. 

J. Willins, Teacher, Peebles. 

E. Ferguson, M. A., Min. of F. C, 19, Lauriston Street, Edinburgh. 

A. Ferguson, M.A., Parish Schoolmaster, Dryfesdale, Lockerbie. 

J. Gardner, Parish Minister, the Manse, Livingstone, Midcalder. 

E. Wilson, Parish Minister, Tynron, Thornhill. 

P. H. Watson, M.D., 10, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 

J. S. Miller, Min. of Ch. of Scotland, Stewarton, Ayrshire. 
490 W. Johnston, Senior Master, Free Abbey School, Dunfermline. 

W. Wood, Minister of Free Church, Elie, Fife. 

M. B. Gardner, M.D., Crieff. 
. A. S. Menteath, M.A., 39, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 

C. Wilson, M.D., 43, Moray Place, do. 

J. Bonar, Minister of Free Church, 17, York Place, do. 

E. G. Ogilvie, W.S., 14, Cumberiand Street, do. 

G. More, W.S., 5, Fettes Eow, Edinburgh. 

C. M'Dowell Wilson, 43, Moray Place, do. 

J. D. Wilson, Advocate, 43, do. do. 

500 D. A. Eisdale, 6, St. Patrick Street, do. 

H. Johnston, retired Surgeon, H.E.I.C.S., 32, Heriot Eow, do. 

J. Gordon, H.M. Inspector of Schools, 21, E.Claremont St., do. 

L. H. Irving, Min. of Free Church, Arnothill, Falkirk, 

C. Macdonall, LL.D., Prof, of Greek, Queen's College, Belfast. 

A. H. Drysdale, Student of Divinity, Bridge of Allan, Stirlingshire. 

T. Mun-ay, LL.D., 13, Dean Terrace, Edinburgh. 

K. B. Malcolm, M.D., 126, George Street, do. 

J. J. Eogerson, Teacher, 14, Clerk Street, do. 

J. Douglas, Min. of Congregational Church, Alexandria, Glasgow. 
510 J. Laird, Minister of Free Church, Cupar, Fife. 

E. S. Hutton, M.A., Manse of Cambusnethan, Wishaw. 

M. Paterson, B.A., Teacher, Blairlodge Academy, Polmont. 

J. Pillans, Professor of Latin, 43, Inverleith Eow, Edinburgh. 

A. Brown, Min. of Ch. of Scot., the Manse, Legerwood, Earlston. 

E. Bell, 3, Airlie Place, Dundee. 

G. Ferguson, Prof, of Humanity, M.A., King's College, Aberdeen. 

J. Black, M.A., Advocate, 37, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

E. L. Stuart, W.S., Dick Place, Grange, do. 

W. Stobbs, M.A., Parish Minister, Gordon, by Kelso. 
520 T. Brown, Minister of Free Church, 8, Comely Bank, Edinburgh. 

A. M'Farlane, D.D., Minister of U.P. Church, Greenock. 

J. Carmichael, Classical Master, Edin. Acad., 33, W. Claremont St. 

P. Hope, Minister of Free Church, Wamphray, Dumfriesshire. 



112 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

A. A. Walker, M.D., Clifton Terrace, Rotherham, Yorkshire. 

P. Steele, Teacher, M.A., 33, Buccleuch Street, Edinburgh. 

.T. G. Glover, M.D., South Shields. 

R. Hunter, Student of Divinity, 1, George Place, Leith Walk. 

D. Pioss, M. A., Student of Di\-inity, 5, Morrison Street, Edinburgh. 

A. H. B. Murdoch, B.A., Edin., Min. of F. C., Gartincaber. Stirlg. 
.530 J. Paterson, M.A., B. at Law, 2, Churchyard Court, Temple, Lond. 

J. C. Paterson. Min. of F. C, 56, Cecil Street, Manchester. 

J. Boe, Min. of Church of Scotland, The Manse, Dunblane. 

J. Miller, Head Master, Watson's Hospital, Edinburgh. 

W. Lees, M.A., Lecturer on Nat. Philosophy, 15, Dublin St., Edin. 

J. Russell, M.A. & M.D., 15, Lynedoch Place, do. 

W. Govan, Advo. and B. at Law, 8, Albert R., Regent's P., London. 

D. Grant, 26, Hamilton Place, Edinburgh. 

L. MacBeth, Min. of C of Scotland, 22, Hans Place, London, S.W. 

D. Macgregor, M.A., Min. of Free Ch., 11, W. Princes St., Glasgow. 
540 J. E. Macdougall, Min. of Ladyloan Church, Ladyloan, Arbroath. 

T. M. Monro, MD., Benrig. 

A. C. Brown, M.A., Student of Med., Arthur's Lodge, Newington. 

J. Lorimer, M.D., Murray's Asylum, Perth. 

A. W. Goldie, W.S., 8, York Place, Edinburgh. 

W. Tait, Minister of Church of Scotland, St.^Madoes, Perth. 

J. Tait, Preacher of the Gospel, Wells, Jedburgh. 

C. G. Spittal, M.A., 3, Minto Street, Edinburgh. 

.T. Donaldson, Professor of Music, Marchfield. 

W. M'Lean, Min. of the Church of Scotland, Askkirk, Hawick. 
550 J. W. S. Meiklejohn, M.D., H.M.S. Royal Albert. 

R. Paton, D.D., Min. of Church of Scot., 6, Newton Place, Glasgow. 

J. Smith, Min. of C. of Scot., Manse of Ecclesmachan, Linlithgow. 

A. Mure, M.A., Advocate, 35, Dublin Street, Ediubure,h. 

W. E. Aytoun, M.A., D.C.L., P. of Rh. & Bel. Let., 16, Gt. Stuart St. 

J. Sibbaid, M.D., Royal Edinburgh Asylum, Morningside. 

J. Young, M.D., do. do. 

.1. Dalziel, 10, Royal Terrace, Edinburgh. 

J. A. Sidey, M.D., 42, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

A. Brydie, B.A., Min. of Free Church, Dunfermline. 
5G0 G. Anderson, Lie. of Church of Scotland, Greenlaw, Berwickshire. 

A. Brown, Advocate, 40, Druramond Place, Edinburgh. 

J. Ritchie, Min. of United Original Seceders, Shottsburn, Holvtown. 

W. Russell, M.A., liic. of Ch. of Scot., 1, Claremont PI., Edinburgh. 

R. Walker Mackersy, Student of Divinity, 24, London St., Edin. 

G. Handyside Pattison, Advocate, 18, Duke Street, do. 

W. Husband, M.D., 28, Clarence Street, do. 

J. Bannerman, M.A., Prof, of Div., Free Col., 7, Clarendon Cres., do. 

J. Taylor, M.A., D.D., Minister of U. P. Ch., Oakfield _Hou.se, Glas. 

R. Thomson, M.A., Teacher, Leitli High School, 12, LTnion St., Edin. 
570 G. A. W. Arnott, M.A., LL.D. Reg. Prof, of Bot., 2, Vict. Ter., Glas. 

W. Roddam Adam, M.A., 14, Dundas Street, Edinburgh. 

W. Leishman, Minister of the F. C, 1 Claremont Place, do. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 113 

J. Carmichael, M.A,, Teacher, High School, 16, London St., EcHii. 
J. Middleton, M.D., 4, St. John Street, do. 

G. B. Robertson, Deputy-Keeper of the Records, 28, Albany St., do. 
J. Murray, Preacher of the Gospel, Chapelton, Hamilton. 
H. Granger Stewart, M.D., Dumfries, 

J. Paul, D.D„ Minis, of the Ch. of Scot., 33, George Sq., Edin. 
J. Menzies, Clerk to the British Linen Co., 31, Windsor St., do. 
580 W. Menzies, Student of Divinity, 10, Windsor Street, do. 

€. Watson, M.A., D.D., Minister of F. C, 10, Charlotte Square, do. 

C. Dycer, M.D., 42, Great King Street, do. 

A. J. Murray, Minister of the Ch. of Scot., Eddleston. 

C. Douglas, M.D., Kelso. 

D. K. Guthiie, Minister of the F. C, Liberton, Edin. 
J. Elder, W.S., 5, Thistle Street, do. 

T. Smith, M.A., Minister of the F. C, 4, Kerr St., do. 

T. Laycock, Prof, of Practice of Physic, 4, Rutland St., do. 

L, Ramsay Thomson, M.D., Belmont, Dalkeith. 

J. Kippen, M.A., Minister of the F. C, Rasav, Inverness-shire. 
590 C. G. M'Cui, Student of Theology, 13, Pilrig Street, Edin. 

J, Milne, M.A., 1, Forres Sti-eet, do. 

A. M. Bell, Professor of Conveyancing, 11, Royal Circus, do. 

R. Rutherford, Minister of the U. P. Church, Peeblesshire. 

W. Johnston, M.D., 28, Pitt Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Smith, M.D., 12, Dundas Street, do. 

H. D. Littlejohn, M.D., 40, York Place, do. 

J. Downes, M.A., 20, Grove Street, do. 

J. Mackav, M.D., 11, Drummond Street, do. 
6tH3 W. Gilchrist, M.D., 23, George Square, do. 

R. Graham, Teacher, 14, Roxburgh Street, do. 

J. Gibson, Teacher, George Watson's Hospital. 

G. Carlile, M.A., 318, Bath Street, Glasgow. 

J. Forman, 8, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 

R. Forman, do. do. 

J. Andrew, M.D., 15, Queen Street, do. 

D. Cannan, Surgeon, 14, Ure Place, Glasgow. 

R. Cowe, M.A., Minister of the F. C., 36, Lansdowne Crescent, do. 

J. Purves M'Watt, Solicitor. Dunse. 
610 W. M. S. Hamilton, Abernethy, Perth. 

H. J. Rollo, W.S., 16, Dundas Street, Edinburgh. 

F. Da Craz M'Cowan, M.D., 2, Elder Street, do. 

J. M'Farlane, LL.D. Minister of IT. P. Church, Park Grove, Glas. 

W. Mackelvie, D.D., Minister of U. P. Church, Balgedie, Kinross. 

D. MacGibbon, Architect, 89, George Street, Edinburgh. 

T. G. Dick, Teacher, 25, West Nicolson. Street, do. 

J. S. Blackie, Professor of Greek, 43, Castle Street, do. 

A. C. Eraser, Prof, of Logic and Metaphysics, 12, Rutland St., do. 

C. Piazzi Smyth, Prof, of Practical Astronomy, 1, Hillside CVes., do. 
620 J. Wilson, Professor of Agriculture, ilo. 

C. Innes, Professor of Universal History, 15, Inverleith Row, do. 

H 



114 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

G. Wilson, M.D., Professor of Technology, Elm Cottage, Edinburgh. 

Rev. D. Liston, Professor of Hebrew, do. do. 

T. J. Crawford, D.D., Prof, of Divinity, 13, Great King St., do. 

J. Robertson, D.D., Prof, of Div. and Ch. His., 25, Ainslie PL, do. 

R. Lee, D.D., Prof, of Biblical Antiquities, 2-i, George Square, do. 

T. Stewart Trail], M.B., Prof, of Med. Juris., 29, Rutland Sq., do. 

J. Syme, Prof, of Clinical Surgery, 2, Rutland Street, do. 

J. Goodsir, Prof, of Anatomy. 
G30 W. Hendei-son, M.D., Prof, of Patboloo:v, 19, Ainslie Place, do. 

G. J. Allman, M.D., Prof, of Natural History. 

J. Miller, Prof, of Surgery, 29, Charlotte Square, do. 

J. Brodie, Jun., Dunkeld. 

J. H. "Wilson, M.A., Minister, F. C, FouRtainbridge Manse, Edin. 

J. Yule, W.S., Broughton Hall, do. 

E. Allan Hunter, W.S., 7, York Place, do. 

A. Halliday Douglas, M.D., 62, Northumberland Street,, do. 

J. Lucas, M.D., Buccleuch Street, Dalkeith. 

D. Dobbie, Minister of Free Church, Makerstown, Kelso. 
640 A. B. Webster, M.D., 13, Wan-iston Crescent, Edinburgh. 

P. Fairbairn, M.D., 53, George Square, do. 

J. B. Blyth, Professor of Chemistry, Cork. 

T. B. W. Niven, Preacher of the Gospel, 9, Hope Street, Edinburgh. 

G. Carfrae Hope, M.D. 

A. Pow, M.D., Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh. 
J. Bell, M.D., do. do. 

J. Crawford, Jun., W.S., 12, Duke Street, do. 

J. Ross, Teacher, Albany Lane, do. 

J. Brash, Schoolmaster, Drumeklrie, Largo. 
650 G. C. Hutton, Minister of U. P. Church, "Mount Pleasant, Paisley. 

G. Burns, D.D., Minister of Free Church, Corstorphine. 

J. Cowan, Jun., 4, Ainslie Place, Edinburgh. 

R. Orr, Advocate, 15, Great King Street, do. 

S. Kerr, Minister of Ch. of Scot., ITie Manse, Yester, Haddington, 

W. Grant, Minister of Free Church, Ayr. 

J. Cappie, M.D., 18, Frederick Street, Edinburgh. 

M. J. Bryden, Minister of the Ch. of Scot., the Manwe, Kirkcaldy. 

D. Mackenzie, M.D., Advocate, 12, Great Stuart Street, Edinburgh. 

S. Richardson, M.A., Min. of Ch. of Scot., Penriughame, by Newton- 
660 M. J. Tunibull, M.D., Coldstream. [Stewart. 

D. Thorburn, M.A., Minister of Free Church, Leith. 

G. F. Knight, M.A., Minister of Free Churchy East Wemyss, Fife. 

E. C. Batten, M.A., 9, Old Square, Lincohi's-lnn, London. 

B. Martin, M.A., Student of Theology, 1, Clerk Street, Ediuburgh. 
A. M'Gregor, M.A., Teacher, 30, Castle Street, do. 

A. Fleming, M.D., Seagrove, by Leith. 
P. Young, M.D., 1, Dean Terrace, Edinburgh. 
A. J. Macfarlane, Student o£ Medicine, 4, Park Place, do. 
J. Ronton, M.D., Dalkeith. 
670 A. Cleghorn, Minister of Free Church, Leuchars. 



MEMBERS OF C50UNCIL, 115 

J. S. Tytler, W.S., 36, Melville Street, Edinburgh. 

W. R. Kermack, W.S., 22, York Place, do. 

P. M'Dougald, Younger of Gallamich, "W.S., 4, Great King St., do. 

Hon. C. Neaves, one of the Sen. of Col. of Jus., 7, Charlotte Sq., do. 

A. Cassels, W.S., 8, Northumberland Street, do. 

A. Murray of Crieff, W.S., 1.5, Ainslie Place, do. 

H. H. Brown of Newhall, Newhall, Penicuik. 

John C Swinton of Kimmerghame, Kiraraerghame, Berwickshire. 

John Forrester, W.S., 8, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 
680 J. Hope, Dep.-Keeper of the Signet, Bordeaux Cot., Liberton,. do. 

J. M. Melville of Hanley, W.S., Hanley, Corstorphiue. 

R. P, Newton of Drumcross, Keree, Falkirk. 

J. Anstruther, W.S., 42, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

Sir T. B. Hepburn of Smeaton, Bart., Smeaton, Haddingtonshire. 

W. Ogilvie of Chesters, Chesters, Jedburgh. 

A. Stevenson, W.S., 9, Heiiot Row, Edinburgh. 

J. Lindesay, W.S., 22, Regent Terrace, do. 

G. L. Fmlay.M. of Ed. Life As. Co., 17, Northumberland St., do. 

J. Stormonth Darling, Jun., "NV.S., 64, Northumberland St., do. 
690 J. Wilson, Min. of Church of Scotland, Manse of Edrom, Ayton. 

G. Tweedie Stodart, W.S., 16, Abercromby Place, Edinburgh. 

J. Gentle, W.S., 36, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

G. T. Kinnear, W.S., 28, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

R. Trotter of Mortonhall, Advocate, Mortonhall, Liberton. 

G. Benny, W.S., 9, Hart Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Benny, Student of Law, 9, Hart Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Hamilton, W.S., 7, Great Stuart Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Maitland, D.D., Min. of C. of S., Manse of Kens'; New Gnllowav. 

R. Nisbet, D.D., do. West St. Giles, 19, Lvnedoch PL, Edinr". 
700 T. E. 0. Home, W.S., 10, Atholl Crescent, Edinburgh. 

J. Tytler of Woodhouselee, W.S., Woodhouselee, Roslin. 

R. Stewart, of Carfin, W.S., 46, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

A. Campbell, Jun., AV.S., 12, India Street, Edinburgh. 

A. Young, Min. of C. of S., Manse of Westerkirk, Laneliolm. 

H. W. Smith, Min. of C. of S., Manse of Durisdeer, Thornhill. 

H. Pyper, Advocate, 15, Royal Crescent, Edinburgh. 

_G. Thomson of Burnhouse, Advocate, London. 

R. D. Kay, W.S., Lauriston Lodge, Edinburgh. 

G. Murray of Troquhair, Manse of Balmaclellan, New Galloway. 
710 H. A. M'Neil, AY.S., 8, Maitland Street, Edinburgh. 

A. M'Lellan, Min. of C. of S., Manse of Kirkholm, Wigtown. 

T. Smith, Min. of C. of S., Manse of Ewes, Hawick. 

H. Foi-syth, W.S., Forfar. 

M. Armstrong, Min. of C. of S., Manse of Skirlinsr, Bieear. 

The Rt. Hon. Sir G. Clerk of Penicuik, Bart., Penicuik H., Penicuik. 

P. Balfour, Min. of C. of S., Manse of Clackmannan, Alloa. 

D. Balfour, of Balfour and Trenabie, W.S., Balfour Castle, Kirkwall. 

A. Brown, Min. of Church of Scotland, The Manse, Alva. 

M. S. Johnstone, Min. of.C. of S., Manse of Monigaff, Newton-Stewart 



116 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR, 

720 W. Blair of Avontown, Advocate, Avontown, Linlitligow. 
G. Peat, Writer, Dunse. 

J. Spottiswoode, of Spottiswoode, Berwicksliire. 
J. Walker, W.S., 20, Rutland Street, Edinburgh. 
, Gef:rge CLancellor of Miieldljill, Advocate, Symington, Biggar. 
A. M. Crawford, Min. of Church of Scotland, Fullarton, Irvine. 
J. Dougall, Min. of Church of Scotland, Stonej'kirk, Stranraer. 

E. Smith, Licentiate of Church of Scot, 2, Haddington PL, Edinr. 
D. Reid, Licentiate of C. of S., Ballingling, Logierait, Dunkeld. 
Walter L. Colvin, Min. o-f Church of Scotland, The Manse, CramoncL 

730 R. W. Thomson, Min. of C. of S., The Manse, Ormiston, Tranent. 
T. G. Murray, W.S., 4, Glenfinlas Street, Edinburgh. 
J. Rose, W.S., 96, George Street, Edinburgh, 
P. Mitchell, Parochial Schoolmaster, Cockpen, Lasswade. 
D. Anderson of St. Germains, Advocate, St. Gerniains, Prestonpan*. 
J. S. Darling, W. S., Kelso. 

R. S. Darling, Licentiate of the Church of Scotland, Kelso. 
Sir D. Brewster, K.H., D.C.L., LLD., Prin. of the Univ. of Edijir. 
G. S. Davidson, Minister of Cliurch of Scotland, Kinfauns, Perth. 

F. y. Davidson, Gentleman, 31, Warriston Crescent, Edinburgh. 
740 A. Henderson, Clerk, 4, Hill Square, do. 

J. M'Gregor, M.A., Student of Theology, 30, Castle Street, do. 

J. P. M'Dougall, Assis. to Min. of Crichton, 9, S -E. Circus PL, do. 

A. R. Clerk, Advocate, 17, Great Stuart Street, do. 

J. Wright, W.S., 28, Forth Street, do. 

A. Mackintosh, Advocate, 31, Northumberland Street, do. 

T. M. Morris, Baptist Minister, Ipswich, Suffolk. 

J. Jeffrey, Min. of the Gospel, 9, Catherine Ter., Gateshead-on-Tjne. 

R. S. Thomson. M.A., Min. of Free Church, Free Manse, Arbirlott. 

W. M. Hetherington, M.A., Prof, of Theology in F. C. Col., Glasgow. 
750 P. L. Ban-, Student of Divinity, 14, Heriot Place, Edinburgh. 

A. Scott, M.A., Professor of Hebrew, King's College, Aberdeen. 

J. R. Davidson, M.A., 32, Rutland Square, Edinburgh. 

J. AV^ood, M.D., 19, Royal Circus, do. 

J. Hope, W.S., 31, Moray Place, do. 

J. Hope, Jun., W.S., do. do. 

■\7. Tait, Writer, 10, Moray Place, do. 

J. D. Wormald, Writer, 17, Scotland Street, do. 

D. Craigie, M.D., 23, Queen Street, do. 

J. Gibson, W.S., 53, Inverleith Row, do. 
7G0 T. Henderson, W.8., 8, Brunton Place, do. 

J. B. Johnstone, Minister of U. P. Church, 12, Ure Place, Glasgow. 

J. Muirhcad, Advocate, 61, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

D. S. Anderson, Pharmaceutical Chemist, 247, Canongate, do. 

G. Sang, Writer, 61, Great King Street, do. 
J. Cornfoot, M.I)., Leven, Fifeshire. 

A. Wallace, M.A., Assistant Astronomer, Royal Observatory, do. 
J. Gordon, 10, Windmill Street, do. 
R. H. Lundie, M.A., Birkenhead. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 117 

J. H. Macallan, 3, Scotland Street, Edinburgh. 
WO C. G. Wotherspoon, 18, Great Stuart Street, do, 

A. Eobertson, M.A., Teacher, 11, King's Place, Leith. 

A. Davidson, MA,, Preacher of the Gospel, 19, Salisbury St., Edin. 

G. Johnston, M.D., Fincrags, by Newport, Fife. 

R. Somervilie, M.D., Innerleithen. 

J. A. Couper, M.D,, 86, Nethergate, Dundee. 

R. Cunningham, M.A., Licentiate of F. C, N.-W. Castle, Stranraer. 

J. G.Cunningham, M.A., Licentiate of F. C, North-West Castle, do. 

A. Munro, M.A., Teacher, Middleby Street. Edinburgh. 

T. Guthrie, D.D., Minister of F. C, 1, Salisbury Road, Edinburgh. 
780 A. Macdonald, Student of Divinity, 24, Middle Arthur Pla<^, do. 

W. W. Aitken, Licentiate of F. C, Carlops, Penicuik. 

A. A. Hutchison, 18, London Street, Edinburgh. 

G. Espie, 12, Antigua Street, do. 

M. Leishman, Minister of Ch. of Scotland, Govan Manse, Glasgow. 

W. Porteous, 16, Broughton Place, Edmburgh. 

\V. H. Cairns, M.A., Master of Grammar School, KirkcudbTight. 

J. Lister, Advocate, Kilmux, Windygates, Fife. 

J. Angus, D.D., M.A., Pres. of the College, Regent's Park, London. 

H. Todd, W.S., 39, York Place, Edinburgh. 
790 J. Veitch, of Eliock, Hamilton. 

J. Macaulay, M.A., M.D., 23, Pelham Street, London. 

S. Hislop, Minister of the Free Church, 68, Gilmore Place, Edin. 

J. Christie, Minister of Ch. of Scotland, Manse of Arbirlot, Arbroath. 

P. R. Whitson, 11, Duncan Street, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 

J. M'Watt, M.A., Minister of the Church of Scot., Parish of Salton. 

A. Thomson, Professor of Anatomy, University, Glasgow. 

R. Foulis, M.D., 9, Alva Street, Edinburgh. 

M. Combe, M.D., Royal Artillery, Woolwich. 

J. Nelsoii, Minister of the Free Church, Greenock. 
800 J. Ellison, M.D., Wick. 

J. Barclay, Min. of C. of S., Manse of Bargrennan, Newton-Stewart. 

J. Hood, Kames, Coldsti'eam. 

J. N. Forraan, W.S., 8, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 

A. Gourlay, Minister of Ch. of Scot., Manse of Lilliesleaf, Selkirk. 

G. Robertson, W.S., 17, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

A. Turner, Minister of Ch. of Scot., Po-rt of Monteith, Stirling. 

W. Weir, Minister of Ch. of Scot., Manse of Longformacus, Dunse. 

A. B. Bogie, M.D., Annan, Dumfries. 

G. Weir, Minister of Church of Scotland, Humbie, Blackshiels. 
810 J. Cockburn, Wine Merchant, 5 Donne Terrace, Edinburgh. 

•L Colvin, Minister of Church of Scotland, Kirkmabreck, Creeto\\Ti. 

D. Runciman, D.D-, Minister of Ch. of Scot., 13, Annfield PL, Glas. 

T. Johnstone, Minister of Church of Scotland, An nworth, Gateshead. 

A. Ramage, Teacher, 18, Rankeillour Street, Edinburgh. 

H. Dobie, Minister of Church of Scotland, Kirkmichael, Dumfries. 

R. Somerville, Minister of the Ch. of Scot., the Manse, St. Boswells. 

J. Smith, Minister of the Ch. of Scotland, Manse of Aberlady, Drem. 



118 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

C. MacCulloch, Minister of the Ch. of Scot., tbe Manse, ^Montrose. 
M. Nicolson, Minister of tbe Ch. of Scot., 3, Kegejat Terrace, Edin. 

820 R. Landale, S.S.C., 18, Forth Street, do. 

J. Grieve, Minister of the Church of Scotland, Mertoa, St Bogwell. 

G. Mackenzie, W.S., 9, Hill Street, Edmburgh. 

A. Johnstone, Minister of Ch. of Scotland, tbe Manse, Muiikirk. 

T. M. Scott of AVauchope, W.S., Waucbope, Hawick. 

R. Blackstock, Minister of tbe Ch. of Scot., the Manse, Galashiels. 

Colonel W. Macdonald of Powderball, Powderhall. 

W. Burnet, Minister of the Ch. of Scot., the Manse, Canonbie. 

K. MacLea Phin, Minister of the Church of Scotland, Galashiels. 

J. Bruce, W.S., 38, Frederick Street, Edinburgh. 
830 J. H. Park, M.D., Broughty Ferry, Dundee. 

J. Halley, Min. of Ch. of Scotland, 6, Henderson Row,. Edinbui^b. 

A.Rutherford, Advocate, 47, Albany Street, do. 

J. Cary, jun., W.S., 3, Darnaway Street, do. 

N. M 'Vicar Gourlie, Writer, 113, Princes Street, do. 

J. W. M. Mackay, M.D., Elgin. 

G. Hughes, W.S., 10, Rutland Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Balfour Kirk, M.D., Bathgate. 

J. G. Syme, Advocate, 7, South Frederick Street, Edinburgh. 

E. Clarkson, M.D., Selkirk. 
840 T. M'Lauchlan, Teacher, 21, Gardner's Crescent, Edinburgh. 

D. IMilroy, M.D., 2(3, London Street, do, 
A. Jackson, 37, Howe Street, do. 
G. S. Keith, M.D.; 57, Northumberland Street, do. 
H. Watson, Minister, Free Church Manse, Ratho. 

W. S. Fraser, "Writer, 42, Melville Street, Edinburgh. 

W. Fraser, jun., W.S., do. do. 

R. Paterson, M.D., 32, Charlotte Street, Leith. 

G. Barlas, Min. of the U.P. Church, 19, St. Patrick Sq., Edinburgh. 

J. L. RutberforJ, 10, Windmill Street, do. 

850 G. Greig, W.S., 9, Abercromby Place, do. 

J. Ritchie, 13, Danube Street, do. 

J. Douglas, Teacher, 9, Great King Street, do. 

G. Robson, Minister of the Gospel, Lauder. 

A. B. Robertson, Minister of the U.P. Church, Coldingham, Ayton. 

J. M. Hunter, Teacher, 25, xYlbany Street, Edinburgh. 

J. C. Hislop, M.D. East Linton. 

P. H. M'Laren, M.D., Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh. 

T. R. Scott, M.D., Musselburgh. 

W. Yallange, M.D., Portobello. 
8G0 P. Dalniahoy, W.S., 69, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Maclaren, Teacher, Hamilton Place Academy, do. 

J. Maclaren, Teacher, 10, Hamilton Place, do. 

J. Richardson, W.S., 50, Northumberland Street, do. 

J. Blackwood, W.S, and Stockbroker, 19, St. Andrew Square, do. 

J. Peddie, jun., C.E., 30, Albany Street, do. 

A. Noble, M.A., Minister of the F. Church, Loudoun, Kilmarnock. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 119 

C Stewart, jun,, W.S., 8, Donne Terrace, Edinburgh. 

W, Kelly^ Min. of the Ch. of Scotland, Applegailh Manse, Lockerby. 

C. Stewart, W.S., 3, Albyn Place, Ediuburgk 

870 T. Marjoribanks, Min. of the Gpospel, Stenton Manse, Prestoaklrk. 
J. Taw«e, W.S., 11, Royal Terrace, Edinburgh. 
A. Barton, D.D., Min, oftheCh, of Scot., Castle tea Manse, Canonbie. 
R. Paton, W,S., Selkirk. 
H. J. Bum, W.S., Castlehill, Fifeshire, 

A. R. Bonar, Minister of the Grospel, 3, St. John Street, Edinburgh. 
R, Young, Min. of the Ch. of Scotland, Teviothead Manse, Hawick. 
X Thomson, Minister of the Church of Scotland, Hawick. 
J. O. Mackenzie, W.S., 7, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

D. Smith, W.S., Duddingston Cottage, Portobello, 

S80 J. Oswald, Parish Minister of Camelon, Doirator House, Falkirk. 

A. W, Mackie, Min. of the Ch. of Scotland, Kilnknowe, Galashiels. 

.J. W. Tawse, W.S., 49, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

R. Cowan, W.S., 9, Carlton Terrace, Edinburgh. 

R. B. Maconochie, W.S., 14, Great Stuart Street, Edinburgh, 

J. Brown, W.S., 2, Gayfield Place, Edinburgh. 

.J. Scott, W.S., 17, Duke Stixiet, do. 

J. Macknight, W.S., 12, London Street, do. 

J. Hunter, D.D., Min. of the Ch. of Scotland, 3, Regent Terraoe, do. 

D. Waddell, Minister of the Church of Scotland, Stow, 
S90 W. Watson, Surgeon, Midcalder. 

J. Wells, M.A., Student of Theology, 21, Salisbury St , Edinburgh. 

A. Cusin, M.A^, Student of Theology, 56, India Street, do. 

D. W. Hogue, M.D., 65, Queea Street, do. 

J. Rutherford, W.S., 14, Albany Street, do. 

W. B. Turnbull, 10, N.-W. Circus Place, do. 

A. J. Kinloch, M,D., Parkhouse, Deeside, Aberdeenshire. 

G. T, Moxey, M.D., Lauder Road, Grange. 

R. Wright, Min. of the Ch. of Scotland, 23, Downie Place, Edinburgh. 

J. M 'Carter, Student of Theology, 6, Scotland Street, do. 
900 C. R. Boyes, M.D., 23, Stafford Street, do. 

J. B. Carruthers, M.D., Craraond. 

W. Menzies, D.D.^ Pai-ish Minister, Keir Manse, ThornlulL 2 

C. C. Grant, 18, Great Iving Street, Edinburgh. 
R. Legat, WS., 46, Northumberland Street, do. 
G. Dakiel, W.S., 10, Regent Terrace, do. 

G. Williamson, M.D., Morningside Asylum. 

J- Stewart, M.D., 73, George Street, Edinburgh. 

R. Henderson, M.A., 16, Hart Street, do. • 

D. M'Millan, M.A., 50, Brunswick Street, do. 
910 J. Middleton, 5, Broughtoa Place, do. 

W. Wilson, 34, Great King Street, do. 

J. Young, Free Ch. Minister, 4, Newington Terrace, Preston St., do. 

J, French, W.S., 6, Graham Street, do. 

J. Walker, Minister of Free Church, Canawath, Lanarkshire. 

T. M. L. Walker, Minister of Free Church, Dysart. 



120 EDINBURGH UNIVEKSITY CALEXDAR. 

A. Young, Teacher, 22, Elm Row, EdmbHrgh. 
R. Mofl'at, M.D., King's Kettle, Fifeshire. 
J. Duns, Free Church Minister,. Torplnchen, Bathgate. 
W. H. Goold, D.D.. Min. of Eef. P. Ch., Grove Place, Edinbrn-gli. 
920 J. Auld, W.S., 10, Duke Street, do. 

H. Bremoer, W S., 26, Greenhill Gardens, do. 

R. B. Water, Chaplain to the Forces in India, 30, Royal Terrace, do. 

F. L. M. Heriot, Advocate, 18, Rutland Street, do. 
"VV. Ellis, 4, Royal Terrace, do. 

A. M. Wilson, S.S.C., 41, Great King Street, do. 

R. H. Muir, Min. of Ch. of Scot., Manse of Dalmeny, S. Queensferrv- 

G. Coventry, M.A., 33, Melville Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Deuchar, of Morningside, Lecturer on Chemistry, Morningsi*^'' Ho. 

J. G. G. Grant, M.D., 58, Hanover Street, Edinburgh. 
930 A. Young, Advocate, 22, Royal Circus, do. 

R. Hamilton, M.D., Sciennes House, do. 

J. M. Macqueen, S.S.C, Marionville, Merchiston Park, do. 

W. Gibson, Student of Theology, Gorebridge. 

J. Robertson, Minister of the Free Church, Saline, Dunfermline. 

J. D. Fordyce, M.A., Brucklay Castle, Aberdeenshire. 

J. Stark, M.D., Yiewbank, Auchtermuchty. 

W. Wallace, M.D., 7, Church Lane, Morningside. 

J. D. Gillespie, M.D., 45, Castle Street, Edinburgh. 

A. Stevenson, M.A., Morton Cottage, Portobello. 
940 D. Jamieson, M.D., 4, Brighton Place, Portobello. 

A. S. Myrtle, M.D., Falkirk. 

J. Y. Myrtle, M.D., 24, Rutland Street, Edinburgh. ■ 

W. Cousin, Minister of Free Church, Montrose. 

W. Heron, Teacher, 13, Gardner's Crescent, Edinbin\gh. 

W. Sinclair, M.A., Minister of the Free Church, Kirkwall. 

M. Dods, M.A., Minister of Free Church, 11, Castle St., Edinburgh. 

T. Gardner, Minister of Free Church. 64, Frederick Street, do. 

G. W. Absolom, M.D., 2, King Street, Perth. 

J. Miller, M.D., 28, Stafford Street, Edinburgh. 
950 C. Ferguson, Llead-Master of Industrial School, 56, High Street, do. 

J. Stuart, Minister of St. Andrew's Church, 13, Forth Street, do. 

W. Carson, Minister of the Church of Scotland, The Manse, Girvan. 

W. Scott, Min. of Ch. of Scotland, Whittingham Manse, Prestonkirk. 

T. Lowne, M.D., 46, Minto Stre<-t, Edinburgh. 

D. Johnston, Min. of the Ch. of Scotland, 2^6, Duke St., Glasgow. 

W. Taylor, W.S., 38, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 
" J. S. Hepburn, W.S., Colquhazie, Perth. 

D. Whigham, \V.S., Langlands Place, Dumfries. 

J. Eraser, IMinister of Free Church, Free Manse, Gord^in, Kelso. 
960 W, Coke, M.D., West Linton, Penicuik. 

J. L. Marr, Minister of the Free Church, Douglas, Lanarkshire. 

D. F. S. Cahill, M.D., Berwick-on-Tweed. 

W. Whitfield, M.A., Berwick. 

G. Macaulay, Minister of Free Church, Inverteil Manse, Kiikcaldy. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 121 

"W. Wilson, Licentiate of U. P. Church, York Lane, Edinburgh. 

H. Cheyne, W.S., 6, Royal Terrace, Edinburgh. 

A. M. Jarvie, Minister of U. P. Church, Woodhead St., Dunfermline. 

A. Inglis, M.D., 33, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

T. Eobertson, Minister of the Free Church, Dunipace, Denny. 
970 E. Johnston, B.A._, Classical Master, 51, Clerk Street, Edinburgh. 

W. Smith, Probationer of Free Church, 17, Scotland St. Edinburgh. 

R. Lorimer, M.D,, Tyne Park, Haddington. 

L. Mackersay, 24, London Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Blair, Student of Divinity, 1, Lord Russell Place, Edinburgh. 

T. Dods, Student of Divinity, 16, Buccleuch Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Craig, Student of Divinity, 7, Brown Street, Edinburgh. 

J. Bell, Minister of the Church of Scotland, Cumlodge, Dunse. 

S. Bell, Minister of the Church of Scotland, Eyemouth, Ayton. 

J. B. Balfour, Student of Law, 10, Hart Street, Edinburgh. 
980 W. A. White, M,D., 5, Buccleuch Place, do. 

R. B. Nichol, Minister of the Free Church, Galashiels. 

J. Eraser, M.D., 14, Clarence Street, Edinburgh, 

A. Rattray, M.A., Minister of Camlachie Church, Glasgow. 

J. Law, W.S., 32, Saxe Coburg Place, Edinburgh. 

D. Henderson, House-Governor of James Gillespie's Hospital, do. 

R. D. Brownlee, Student of Divinity, Ivybank, Midcalder. 

R. Cox, W.S., 25, Rutland Street, Edinburgh. 

W. T. Brown, Rector of Grammar School, l3unfermline. 

J. Lorn, M.D., Dunbar. 
990 G. Smeaton, Prof, of Theo., New Coll., 1, Lennox St., Eton Ter.,Edia 

J. Williamson, M.D., Burntisland. 

J. Copland, M.A., 5, Picardy Place, Edinburgh. 

J. Niven, Teacher, 31, Buccleuch Place, do. 

J. Goodall, Leslie, Markinch. 



THEOLOGICAL STUDENTS. 12t 



APPENDIX. 



THE SCOTCH BAR. 

The Regulations having reference to admission to the Scotch 
Bar may be obtained from the Librarian, Advocates' Library, 
Edinburgh. So far as the University is concerned, it is important 
only to state that the necessary Classes are, Civil Law, Scots 
Law, Conveyancing, and a Course of Lectures on Medical Juris- 
prudence. 

WRITERS TO THE SIGNET. 

Students intending to become Writers to the Signet must attend 
two full Winter Sessions at the University — the Humanity Class 
being attended during one of these. 

Further information regarding the Course of Study and the 
Examinations may be obtained from John Hamilton, Esq., W.S., 
Signet Office, Register House ; or 7, Great Stuart Street, Edin- 
burgh. 

THEOLOGICAL STUDENTS. " 

The following are the Regulations of the principal Ecclesias- 
tical Bodies regarding the University Course to be followed by 
their Students : — 

1. Church of Scotland. — Students must "produce Certificates 
of having attended all the Classes required of such as apply for 
the Degree of Master of Arts, viz., Greek, Latin, Logic, Mathemar- 
tics, Moral Philosophy, and Natural Philosophy, in such order that 
after Greek and Latin being attended during the first Session, the 
Classes of Logic, Moral and Natural Philosophy, must have been 
attended separately during three successive seasons, and that Ma- 
thematics shall have been studied in a University, at least during 
one Session, before entering the Class of Natural Philosophy." 

" That the course of attendance at the Divinity Hall shall be 
completed in four Sessions, provided that the Student's attend- 



124 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 

ance during three of these Sessions shall have been regular ; but 
Students giving only two Sessions of regular attendance shall be 
required to give an additional attendance of three partial Sessions 
to complete their Course. All Students shall be required to give 
at least two Sessions of regular attendance ; and every Student 
must attend the Classes of Church History, Hebrew, and Biblical 
Criticism, during at least two of the Sessions which he claims to be 
considered as regular, if such classes shall exist in the University 
or Universities at which he has prosecuted his Theological Course. 
— Act of Assembly, 1856. 

2. Free Church. — The Literary Course is the same as in the 
case of the Church of Scotland. 

3. United Presbyterian Church. — " Students, before being 
admitted to the Theological Hall, must attend at least three Ses- 
sions at one of the jS^ational Universities, and their University 
Course must be duly certified to have included Latin, Greek, Logic, 
and Moral Philosophy. . . . Students who have not attended 
the Natural Philosophy Class of the University, before admission 
to the Hall, are required to do so immediately after the first Ses- 
sion. . . . It is strongly recommended to Students to attend 
such Classes as they may have access to, for the study of Geology, 
Chemistry, and other branches of Natural Science." — From Paper 
on Theological Education issued by Authority of the Synod. 

4. Reformed Presbyterian Church. — " Every Student shall 
prosecute his studies at one of the National Universities during 
four complete Sessions at least ; and shall comprise in that cur- 
riculum the usual Literary and Philosophical l^ranches, viz., Latin 
Greek, Mathematics, Logic, Ethics, and Natural Philosophy, to 
which, before entering the Hall, a knowledge of Hebrew must be 
added. The Student is recommended to add to this Course of Stud}'^, 
Natural History, Chemistry, Anatomy, and the German Language." 
— From Synopsis of Studies issued hy Authority of the Synod. 

5. Congregational Union op Scotland. — Students are required 
to go through the ordinary College curriculum of four years. It 
is not necessary that this should be done before entering the 
Theological Hall. 



EDlNBl'KOn : T. CONSTABLE, PKIBTER TO UEE MAJiiSlT. 



THE EDINBURGH 



I 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 



1860-61. 



CORRECTED TO OCTOBER 15, 1860. 




^rhttcb Im S^l^omas Ctmstablie for lljc .§«tattts girabcmkus 

AXD SOLD BY 

EDMONSTON AND DOUGLAS, EDINBURGH. 



i860. 



CONTENTS. 



Calendar, 



University Officers, 

Part I. — Constitution op the University op Edinburgh — 

Origin and Growth of tlie University, 



OflSces of Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, Kector 

Professor, 
Senatus Academicus, . 
University Court, 
General Council, . 
Matriculated Students, 
Universities Commission, 



Principal, and 



11 
16 
17 
18 
19 
19 



Part II — University Library, Museums, and Botanic Garden — 

Library, . , 19 

Museums, 21 

Botanic Garden, . . . 23 

Part III. — Classes and Courses of Study — 

University Terms, . , 24 

Programme of Classes for 1860-61, 24 

Matriculation Fees, &c., ....... 26 

Synopses of the Courses in the Classes of Arts, Theology, 

Law, and Medicine for 1860-61, 27 

Class Prize Lists for 1860, . 52 

Part IV. — Graduation in Arts, Medicine, Law, and Theology — 
Eegulations for Degrees in Arts, . . . . . .61 

Graduates in Arts, 1860, 62 

Arts Examination Papers for 1860, ..... 65 
Intimation for 1861 in Faculty of Arts, .... 79 

Eegulations for Degrees in Medicine, . . ... .82 

Medical Graduates for 1860, 91 

Medical Examination Papers for 1860, .... 93 
Honorary Degrees in Law, 1860, 101 

Bursaries and Scholarships 102 

List of General Council of the University, .... 109 



APPENDIX. 

A. — Regulations applicable to Students of Law and Theology. 
B. — Ordinances of Universities Commissioners, 1860. 



I860.— NOVEMBER, 30 Days. 



ITh 
2!Fr 
3 Sa 

4S 
5M 

6Tu 
7 W 
STh 
9Fr 
lOJSa 

Ills 

12 M 

13 Tu 
14AV 
15Th 
16,Fr 
17iSa 

18iS 
19iM 
20 Tu 



Sim rises 7h. 23m. Sets 4h. Sim. 
Winter Session opens. — Principal's 
[Address. 

Classes in Arts, Law, and Medicine 
[open. 
Classes in Theology open. 



Martinmas Term. 
Court of Session sits. 



DECEMBER, 31 Days. 



Sun rises 7h. 52m. 
Sun sets 4h. 2m. 



Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 



I2;w 
13Tii 



Sun rises 8h. 23m. 

Advent Sunday. — Sun sets 3h. 40m. 

Class of Medical Jurisprudence opens. 



21 Fr 

22 Sa 
23S 

24 M 

25 Tu 

26 \V 
27;Th 
28Fr 
29, Sa 

so.s 

31 M 



Sun rises 8h. 41m. 
Sun sets 3h. 37m. 



Shortest Day. 

Christmas-day. 

Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 



1861.— JANUARY, 31 Days. 



Banli Holiday. — Sun rises 8h. 48m. 
Sun sets 3h. 47m. 



ITu 

2i'W 
SJTh 

4|Fr 
SjSa 

6S 

7iM 

8;Tu 

9,W 

lOTh 

11 Fr 

12 Sa 
13!S 

14 M 

luTu Sun rises 8h. 39m. 
l'';W Suu sets 4h. 9m. 
17 Th 

15 Fr 
19'Sa 

2o:s 

•21 M 
22jTu 

•2y,\vf 

24 Th 
2oFr 
•2i; Sa 

-IS 
M 
Tu 



Ordinary Meeting of Scnatu.'?. 
Holiday in Faculty of Arts. 



FEBRUARY, 28 Days. 



IFr 

2Sa 
3 S 
4M 
5Tu 
G W 
7Th 
Fr 



Sun rises 8h. 12m. 

Candlemas Term.— Sun sets 4h. 44m. 



18 M 
19iTu 

20|W 
21't1i 
22 Fr 
2.", Sa 
24 S 
2;-i'!M 
2(i Tu 



Queen married, 1840. 

Ash Wednesday. 

Sun rises 7h. 44ra 
Sun sets 5h. 14m. 



Ordinary Meeting of Senatua. 
Holiday in Faculty of Arts. 



28 



Th 



MARCH, 31 Days. | 


APRIL, 30 Days. 


IFr 


Sun rises 7h. 7m. 


1 

1 M 


Sun rises, oh. 46m. 


2Sa 


Sun sets 5h. 47m. 


2Tu 


Sun Sets 6h. 50m. 


3 


S 




3Wi 




4 


M 




4Th; 




5 


Tu 




5,Fr 




6 


W 




6Sa 




7 


Th 




7S 




8 


Fr 




8M 


Examin. for Degrees in Arts begins. 


9 


Sa 




9:Tu| 




10 


S 




low 




11 


M 




11 Th 




12 


Tu 




12 Fr 


Classes in Faculties of Ai-ts and Law 


13 


W 




13 Sa 


[close. 


14 


Th 




14S 


Sun rises 5h. 12m. 


15 Fr 


Sun rises 6h. 30m. 


15 M 


Sun sets Th. 17m. 


lelSa 


Sun sets 6h. 16m. 


16Tu 


General Council of the University 


175 




17 W 


[meets. 


18M 


Candidates for Degrees in Arts must 


18 


Th 




19|Tu 


[give in their names. 


19 


Fr 


Classes in Faculty of Medicine close. 


20 W 


Court of Session rises. — Day and Ni^ht 


20 


Sa 




21 Th 


[equal. 


21 


S 




22 Fr 




22 


M 


Laureation in Arts. 


23;Sa 




23 


Tu 




24 S 


[Day. 


24 


W 




25 51 


Holiday in Faculty of Arts. — Lady 


2"' 


Th 


Sacramental Fast-day in Edinburgl 


26 Tu 


Examination for Medical Degrees 


26 


Fr 


[and Leith. 


27iW 


[begins. 


27 


Sa 




28Th 




28 


S 


Communion Sunday in Edinburgh and 


29 Fr 


Good Friday. 


29 


M 


[Leith. 


30 Sa 


Intending Med. Grad. give in Declar. and Theses. 


30 


Tu 




31 S 


[Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 








Easter Sunday. 








MAY, 31 Days. 


JUNE. 30 Days. 1 


! 
1 "W ^ Summer Session commences. 


1 
ISa 


Sun rises Sh. 3Sm. 


2;Th Sun rises 4h. 30m. 


2S 


Sun sets Sh. 45m. 


3 


Fr Sun sets 7h. 52m. 


3M 




4 


Sa! 


4Tu 




5 


s 




6W 




6 


M 




6Th 


Second Med. Exam, begins. 


7 


Tu 




7Fr 




8 


W 




8Sa 




9 


Th 




9^ 




10 


Fr 




lO'M 




11 


Sa 




11 Tu 




12 


s 




12 W 




13 


M 


Court of Session sits. 


13 Th 




14 


Tu 


Sun rises 4h. 4m. 


14Fr 




15 


W 


"Whitsunday Term. — Sun sets 81i. IGm. 


15 Sa 


Sun rises 3h. 28m. 


16 


Th 


General Assembly meets. 


16'S 


Sun sets 8h. 5Sm. 


17iFr 




17:M 




18Sa 




18, Tu 




IfJS 


.Whitsunday. 


19 W 




20, M 




20iTh 


Bank Holiday.— Queen's Acces. 1837. 


21|Tu 




21;Fr 


Longest Day. 


22 W 




22Sa 




23 Th 




23!s 




24:Fr 


Queen's Birthday.— Bank Holiday. 


24tM 


Midsummer. 


25lSa 




25|Tu 




26!s 


Trinity Sunday. 


26lw 




27 M 




27T 




28Tu 




28lFh 


Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. — Bank 


29, W 




29 


S 


[Holiday. — Queen's Coron. 


30 Th 




30 


s 




31 Frj Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 









JULY, 31 Days. 


AUGUST, 31 Days. 


1 


M 


Sun rises 3h. 33m. 


1 


Th 


Medical Degrees conferred. — Lammas 


2 


Tu 


Sun sets Sh. 58m. 





Fr 


Sun rises 4h. 21m. [Day. 


3 


W 




3 


Sa 


Sun sets Sh. 15m. 


4 


Th 




4 


s 




5 


Fr 




5 


M 




6 


8a 




6 


Tu 




1 


S 




( 


W 




8 


M 




8 


Th 




9 


Tu 




9 


Fr 




10 


W 




10 


Sa 




11 


Th 




11 


s 




12 


Fr 




12 


M 




13 


Sa 




13 


Tu 




14 


s 




14 


W 




15 


M 


Sun rises 3h. 51m. 


15 


Th 


Sun rises 4h. 46m. 


16 


Tu 


Sun sets 8h. 45m. 


16 


Fr 


Sun sets 7h. 46m. 


17 


W 




17 


Sa 


1 


IS 


Th 




IS 


S 




19 


Fr 




IV 


M 




20 


Sa 


Court of Session rises. 


20 


Tu 




21 


s 




21 


W 




22 


M 




22 


Th 




23 


Tu 




2.3 


Fr 




24 


W 




24 


Sa 




25 


Th 




26 


s 




26 


Fr 


Summer Session ends.— Ordinary 


26 


M 




27 


Sa 


[Meeting of Senatus. 


•T- 


Tu 




28 


s 




2s 


W 




29 


M 




2D 


Th 




30 


W 




oO 


Fr 




31 


Tu 


Defence of Medical Theses. 


31 


Sa 




SEPTEMBER, 30 Days. 


OCTOBER, 31 Days. 


lis 


Sun rises oh. 19m. 


1 

ITu 


Sun rises 6h. 18m. 


SjM 


Sun sets Th. 4m. 


2W 


Sun set-- 5h. 46m. 


3iTu 




3Th 




4!W 




4Fr 




5Th 




5 Sa 




OFr 




6S 




rsa 




7,M 




8S 




STu 




9; 31 




9AV 




10 Tu 




10 


Th 




11 W 




11 


Fr 




12 Th 




12 


Sa 




13 Fr 




13 


s 




14 Sa 




14 


M 




15 S 


i^un rises 5h. 46m. 


15 


Tu 


Sunrises 6h. 47m. 


16 


M 


Sun sets 6h. 27ro. 


l(i 


W 


Sun sets 5h. 9m. 


17 


Tu 




17 


Th 




18 


W 




18 


Fr 




19 Til 




in 


Sa 




20 Fr 




20 


s 




21 Sa 




21' 


M 




22 S 


Day and Night equal. 


22 


Tu 




23 M 




23 


W 


[Leith. 


24Tu 




24 


Th 


Sacramental Fast-day in Edinburgh and 


25 IW 




25 


Fr^ 


General Council of the University 


26'Th 




2(1, 


Sa 


[meets. 


27 Fr 




27 


s 


Communion Sunday in Edinburgh and 


28 «a 




28 


M 


[Leith. 


29 S 


Michaelmas Day. 


29 


Tu 




.30iM 




3 (I 
81 


W 
Th 


Medical Latin Examination held. 



^ixiiri^rsitg #ffxars. 



Date of Cliancellor. 

Institution. Appointed . 

1859. The RiaHT Hon. LORD BROUGHAM and VAUX, D.C.L., LL.D.,.. 1859 



Vice-Cliancellor. 

1859. SIR DAVID BREWSTER, Pbincipal of the University, 



1860 



Rector. 

1859. The Right Hon. WILLIAM EWART GLADSTONE, D.C.L., LL.D., 1859 



Principal. 

1582. SIR DAVID BREWSTER, K.H., D.C.L., LL.D., 



1859 



University Court. 

The Rector, ex officio. 
The Principai,, ex officio. 

Alexander Wood, M.D., Assessor, Elected by Chancellor 1860 

The Lord Provost op Edinburgh, ex officio. 

R. S. Grieve, Esq , Assessor, Elected by Town-Council, . . 1859 

John Brown, M.D., Do. do. Rector, 1859 

E. F. Maitland, LL.D., Sol.-Gen., Do. do. General Council, 1859 
Professor Cheistison, Do. do. Senatus, 1859 



Date of 
Institution. 



Chairs. 



1597 Humanity 



Professors. 

Incumbents. 

James Pillans, M.A. 



Appointed. Patrons. 

. . 1820 Lords of Session, Cura- 
tors, Fac. of Advocates, 
Soc. of Writers to the 



1708 Greek 

1^7'^ Mathematics 

1708 Logic and Metaphysics . . 

1708 Moral Philosophy 

1708 Natural Philosophy 

1762 Rhetoric & Belles Lettres 

1719 Universal History 

1786 Practical Astronomy .... 
1790 Agriculture 

1839 Music 

1620 Divinity 

1695 Divinity and Ecclesiastical 

History 

1846 Biblical Criticism and 

Biblical Antiquities. . . . 



John S. Blackie, M.A. 
Philip Kelland, M.A.. 
Alex. C. Eraser, M.A., 
Pat. C. MacDougall . 
Peter G. Tait, M.A.. ., 
W. E. Aytoun, D.C.L. 

Cosmo Innes 

C. Piazzi Smyth . . . . 
John Wilson 



John Donaldson 

T. J. Crawford, D.D. 



1852 Curators. [Sigaet. 

18.38 Curators. 

1856 Curators. 

1852 Curators. 

1860 Curators. 

1845 Crown. 

1846 Curators. 
1845 Crown. 

1854 Lords of Session, Cura- 
tors, & Univer. Court. 

1845 University Court. 

1859 Curators. 



James Robertson, D.D. 1843 Crown. 
Robert Lee,D.D 1846 Crown. 



8 UNIVERSITY OFFICERS. 

Peofessoks — continued. 

l)ate of 
Institution. Chairs. Incumbent. .Appointed. Patrons. 

1*^42 Hebrew David Listen, M.A 1848 Curators. 

1707 Public Law Crown 

1710 CiTil Law Arch.C. Swinton.LL.D 1842 Faculty of Advocates, 

and Curators. 

1722 Law of Scotland J Schank 31 ore, LL D. 184-3 Do. do. 

1825 Conveyancing Alex. Jlontgomerie Bell 18o6 Curators, Dep. Keeper 

and Society of Writers 
to the Signet 
1685 Institutes of Medicine . . Jobn H. Bennett, M.D. 1848 Curators. ' 
1768 Dietetics, Materia Medica, 

and Pharmacy Robert Christisou, M.D. 1832 Curators. 

1807 Medical Jurisprudence 

and PoUce T. Stewart Traill, M.D. IS 32 Crown. 

1713 Chemistry and Chemical 

Pharmacy L. Playfair. C.B., Ph.D. 1858 Curators^ 

18-31 Surgery James Miller, 1S42 Curators. 

1685 Practice of Physic Thomas Laycock, M.D. 1^55 Curators. 

1705 Anatomy John Goodsir lS4'j Curators. 

1831 GeneralPathology Wm. Henderson, M.D. 1842 Curators. 

1806 Military Surgery Crown. 

1726 Midwifery and Diseases of 

Women and Children . . J Y. Simpson. M.D. . . 1840 Curators. 
i~ii r.1- • i-Kt A- ■ ( J. H.Bennett. 3I.D... 1848 

1<41 Clinical Medicme -^ ^hos. Laycock, M.D.. 1855 

1803 Clinical Surgery James Syme 1833 Crown. 

1676 Botany John H. Balfour, M.D. 1 845 Curators. 

1767 Natural History Geo J. Allman, M.D. 1865 Crown. 

Secretary to the Senatus Academicus. 

Professor Kell.\nd. 



Dean of the Faculty of Divinity. 

Professor Robertsok. 



Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 

Professor Balfofr. 



Dean of the Faculty of Law. 

Professor Swiston. 



Dean of the Faculty of Arts. 
Professor Fraser. 



Curators of the Library. 



Prixcipal Sir David Brewster. 
Proffssor Kelland. 
Professor Crawford. 



Professor More. 
Professor Playfair. 
Professor Frasee. 



Librarian. 
John S.mall, M.A. 



Eeeper of Museum of Natural History. 

PkiiFE.-SOR Ai.i..m.\.\. 

Keeper of the Anatomical Museum. 
Profe.~sor Goodsir. 

Keeper of the Botanic Garden. 

Professor Balfour. 



Secretary and Re^strar to University. 

Alex,\ndi:r ^mitii. 

Printer to the University. 
Thomas Constaclb. 

Janitor. 
James Cameron. 



PART I. 

CONSTITUTION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH. 

Charter. — The University of Edinburgh was founded in 1582, 
by a Royal Charter, granted by James vi. It has accordingly 
been called " Academia Jacobi Regis," " King James' College," 
and " King's College." The Charter contemplated a University 
on a wide basis, with the conditions necessary for liberal study, and 
arrangements suited to the progressive state of science. " Nos 
enixe cujjientes," are some of the terms which it employs, " ut in 
honorem Dei et commune bonum nostri regni, literatura indies 
augeatur, volumus et concedimus, quod licebit praefatis praeposito, 
■consulibus et eorum successoribus, edificare et reparare sufBcientes 
domos et loca, pro receptione, habitatione, et tractatione Profes- 
sorum, scholarum grammaticalium, humanitatis, et linguarum, 
philosophice, theologize, medicinae, et jurium, aut quarumcunque 
aliarum scientiarum liberalium." The Charter constituted the 
Lord Provost, Magistrates, and Town-Council of Edinburgh patrons 
and governors of the University. In 1621, an Act was passed 
by the Scottish Parliament, which ratified to the University of 
Edinburgh, in ample form, all the rights, immunities, and privileges 
enjoyed by other Universities in the kingdom. This ratification 
was renewed in the Treaty of Union between England and Scot- 
land, and in the Act of Security. 

University in 16th and 17th Century.— In the beginning of 
the 17th century, what is now called the Senatus Academicus con- 
tained a Principal and four Regents. The Principal was at first 
also the Professor of Theology. A separate Chair of Theology 
was founded in 1620. The Regents conducted the academical 
youth through the course of study in Philosophy necessary to 
a Degree in Arts. The Faculty of Arts, or Fundamental Faculty 
in the University, was in a measure organized early in the 17th 
century. Each Regent had charge of his Students from their en- 
rolment, in the first year of their attendance at College, to the end 
of their fourth session. It was his duty to teach them in succession 
the several branches of Philosophy, viz., Logic or Dialectic, Ethics, 
and Physics or Natural Philosophy, — with such kindred studies, 
literary and mathematical, as were most nearly connected with 
these fundamental parts of knowledge. It was especially the duty 
of the Regents to instruct their respective classes in Greek during 
the course in Philosophy. The Chair of Humanity was founded 



10 PROGRESS OF THE UNIVERSITY FROM 1582 TO 1858. 

before the close of the 16th century, in conseqiaence of the imperfect 
preparation of many students in Latin. The Chair of Mathematics 
was instituted in 1674. In 1642 and 1695 the Chairs of Hebrew 
and Church History were founded, and the Faculty of Theology 
was thus developed. The first Professor of Medicine was appointed 
in 1685 ; and the Chair of Botany was founded some years earlier. 

Graduation in 17th Century. — In the 17th century it was 
customary to print and publish the Philosophical Theses submitted 
to disputation on occasion of taking the Degree of Master of 
Arts. The leading doctrines in Logic, JMetaphysi'cs, Ethics, and 
Physics were discussed in the Theses. The examination for the 
Degree was rigorous, and was undergone by the students at large, 
who were graduated according to their proficiency, at the public 
ceremonial of Laureation. The ancient practice of taking Degrees 
in Arts gradually fell into disuse in the University of Edinburgh, 
soon after the close of the 17th century, and is only now beginning 
to revive. 

Parliamentary Commission in 1690. — After the Revolution of 
1688, the University of Edinburgh, along with the other Scottish 
Universities, was subjected to a Parliamentary Visitation. A Com- 
mission was issued in 1690, and the University was under the 
authority of the Commissioners until after the close of the century. 
Among other improvements, the Commission instituted a separate 
Chair for Greek, instead of intrusting the instructions in that 
language to the Regents in Philosophy, who had previously dis- 
persed the lessons over the successive years of the academical course. 
Accordingly, in 1708, as afterwards in the other Scottish Universi- 
ties, the present professorial arrangement in the Faculty of Arts 
was substituted for the previous system of Regent-tutors, in accom-' 
modatiou to the growth of modern knowledge. With that year 
commenced the history, in their jiresent distinctive form, of the 
three Chairs of Philosophy, viz.. Logic and Metaphysics, Moral 
Philosophy, and Natural Philosophy. 

Growth op Professoriate and Faculties. — After 1708 the 
professorial system was rapidly developed in the University ; the 
Faculties of Law and Medicine were organized, and Degrees were 
granted in both these Faculties. The Chair of Universal History was 
founded in 1719, and a separate Chair of Rhetoric was given to 
the Faculty of Arts in 1762. The Class of Natural History was 
founded in 1767. Professorships of Practical Astronomy and 



ACT OF PAKLIAMENT 1858. 11 

Agriculture were added in 1786 and 1790. In 1707 the foundation 
of the Faculty of Law was laid, by the institution of a Chair of 
Public Law, followed in a few years by Chairs of Civil and Scotch 
Law. In the Faculty of Medicine several new Chairs were founded 
in the course of the 18th century, long before the close of which 
the jNIedical School of Edinburgh was among the most renowned 
in Europe. In 1760 the Senatus Academicus contained eighteen 
Professors, besides the Principal. In the present century the 
Chair of Music has been founded in the Faculty of Arts ; Chaii-s 
of Clinical Surgery, Military Surgery, Medical Jurisprudence, 
Surgery, and General Pathology in the Faculty of Medicine ; the 
Chair of Conveyancing in the Faculty of Law ; and the Chair of 
Biblical Criticism in the Faculty of Theology. 

Universities Act and Commission or 1858. — From its found- 
ation in 1582, until 1858, the University was governed by the Lord 
Provost, Magistrates, and Town- Council of Edinburgh. In 185S an 
Act of Parliament Avas passed, by which the offices of Chancellor, 
Vice-Chancellor, and Rector were instituted, and by which the 
government of the University was withdrawn from the Town- 
Council, and placed in the Senatus Academicus and the University 
Court, in connexion with a General University Council. The patron- 
age of the Chairs in the gift of the Town-Council, was, by the same 
Act, transferred to seven Curators, — three to be nominated by the 
University Court, and four by the Town-Council.* The University is 
also, by this Act, placed under the regulation of a Parliamentary 
Commission until 1862. 

CHANCELLOR. 

The Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh is elected by 
the General Council of the L^niversity. The office is held for life. 
The Chancellor is the official head of the University. Changes in 
its internal arrangements, proposed by the University Court, must 
receive his sanction. It is through him, or through his deputy the 
Vice-Chancellor, that all Degrees are conferred. The Chancellor 
is President of the University Council. 

ClianoJlor in 1860. 
Hexry Lord Brougham axd Vaux. 

* The Curators for the present year are as follows : — Right Hon. W. E. Gladstone, M P., 
E. F. Maitland, Esq., Solicitor-General, and David Mure, Esq., M.P., nominated by the 
TTniversity Court ; Robert Johnstone, Esq.. Andrew Fyfe, Esq., David Peat, Esq., and 
John Mood, Esq., nominated by the Town-Council, 



12 irS'lVERSITY OFFICERS. 

VICE-CHANCELLOR. 

The Vice-Chancellor is nominated by the Chancellor. He may, 
in the absence of the Chancellor, discharge the duties of his Office 
in so far as regards conferring of Degrees. 

Vice-ChanceUor in li)SO. 
Sir David Bkewstee. 

RECTOR. 

The Rector is elected by a General Poll of the IMatriculated 
Students of the University. The Second Saturday after the com- 
mencement of the Winter Session is the day appointed for the 
election of the Rector. The term of office is three years. The 
last election was on November 12, 1859. The Rector is President 
of the University Court, 

Rector in 1860. 
Plight. Hon. "William Ewart Gladsto>-e, 

PRINCIPAL. 

The Principal is appointed by the Curators, and holds the office 
for life. He is the resident Head of the College, and President of 
the Senatus Academicus. 

Principals since 1582. 

1585. '^ohevt 'Ro^ook, First Becjent. 1690. Gilbert Rule. . 
15i:t9. Henry Charteris. ' 1703. William Carstares. 

1620. Patrick Sands. 1716. William Wishavt. 

1622. Robert Boyd. 

1623. John Adamson. 

1652. William Colville. 

1653. Robert Leigbton. 
1662. William Colville. 

. 1678. Andrew Cant. 
1685. Alexander Munro. 



1730. William Hamilton. 

1732. James Smith. 

1736. William Wisbart, secundus. 

1754. Jolm Gowdie. 

1762. William Eobertson. 

1793. George Husband Baird. 

1840. John Lee. 



1859. David Brewster. 

PROFESSORS. 

The Chairs of the University are thirty-three in number. Those 
of Public Law and Military Surgery are vacant. The Chairs are 
comprehended in four Faculties, viz. : — 

L Arts — the most ancient of the whole — contains, strictly 
speaking, only the chairs of Humanity (Latin), Greek, Mathematics, 



PROFESSORS. 



13 



^nf Rh.f .^^'7,';^^' ""'■''' PW'o^opl'y. Natural Philosophy, 

and Rhetoric Attendance on those classes only is required f^ 

he Degree of Master of Arts. The Faculty of Arts ako embraces 

trifutrTlXu 1""'^^'=^' «^^'-^' ^-="-' — ^T, 

m LAw,-which comprehends Public Law. Civil or Roman 
Law, Law ofScotland, and Conveyancing, and ^ith which MedTca" 

Jurisprudence is also connected. ^'-teuicdi 

IV Medicine, --which comprehends Institutes of Medicine 
Practice Physic Anatomy, Midwifery, Clinical Medicine, Mat rfa 

Pathology. The Chairs of Botany, Chemistry, and Natural His- 
tory also belong to this Faculty. 

CHRONOLOGICAL LISTS OF THE PROFESSORS IN THE 
VARIOUS CHAIRS. 
FACULTY OF ARTS. 
Professors of Humanity since 1708. 
1708. Laurence Dundas, one of 



the Megents. 
1728. Adam Watt. 
1734. John Ker. 
1741. George Stuart, 
1775. John Hill. 
1806. Alexander Christison. 
1820. James Pillans. 

Professors of Greek since 1708. 
1708. William Scott, 07ie of the 
Regents. 

1 1on* ^^^^^^"1 Scott, Secundus. 
17o0. Colin Drummond. 
1738. Robert Law. 
1741. Robert Hunter 
1772. Andrew Dalzel. 
1805. George Dunbar. 
1852. John Stuart Blackie. 

Professors of Mathematics 
since 1674. 

1674. James Gregory. 

1675. John Young. 



1683. David Gregory. 
1692. James Gregory. 
1725. Colin M'Laurin. 
1747. Mathew Stewart. 
1775. Dugald Stewart. 
1785. Adam Ferguson. 

1785. John Play fair. 
1805. John Leslie. 
1819. William Wallace. 
1838. Philip Kelland. 

Professors of Logic and Meta- 

2jhysics since 1708. 
1708. Colin Drummond, on£. of 

the Regents. 
1730. John Stevenson. 
1774. John Bruce. 

1786. James Finlayson 
1808. David Ritchie. 

1836. Sir William Hamilton. 
1856. Alexander C. Eraser. 

Professors of Moral Philosophy 

since 1708. 
1708. William Law, one of the 
Regents. 



14 



PROFESSORS. 



1729. William Scott. 

1734. John Pringle. 

1745. William Cleghorn. 

1754. James Balfour. 

1764. Adam Ferguson. 

1785. Dugald Stewart. 

1810. Thomas Brown. 

1820. John Wilson. 

1853. P. C. MacDougall. 
Professors of Natural Philosophy 
since 1708. 

1708. Robert Stewart, one of 
the Rer/ents. 

1742. John Stewart. 

1759. Adam Ferguson. 

1764. James Russell. 

1774. John Robison. 

1805. John Playfair. 

1819. Sir John Leslie. 

1833. James David Forbes. 

1860. Peter Guthrie Tait. 
Professors of Rhetoric and Belles 
Lettres since 1762. 

1762. Hugh Blair. 

1784. AVilliam Greenfield. 

1801. Andrew Brown. 

1835. George Moir. 

1840. William Spalding. 

1845. W. E. Aytoux. 



Professors of Practical Astronomy 
since 1786. 
1786. Robert Blair. 
1834. Thomas Henderson. 
1846. Charles Piazzi Smyth. 

Professors of Ar/riculture 
since 1790. 
1790. Andrew Coventry. 
1831. David Low. 
1855. Joux WiLsox. 

Professors of Universal History 

since 1719. 
1719. Charles Mackie. 

1753. John Gordon. 

1754. William Wallace. 

1755. John Pringle. 
1780. Alex. Fraser Tytler. 
1801. William Fraser Tytler. 
1821. Sir William Hamilton. 
1837. George Skene. 

1842. James Frederick Ferrier, 
1846. Cosmo Ixxes. 

Professors of the Theory of Music 
since 1839. 
1839. John Thomson. > 

1842. Sir Henry Rowley Bishop, 

1844. Henry Hugh Pearson. 

1845. JuHN DOXALDSOX. 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGy. 



Professors of Hebrew since 1642. 

1642. Julius Conradus Otto. 
1656, Alexander Dickson. 
1679. Alexander Amedeus. 
1681. Alexander Douglas. 
1 692. Patrick Sinclair. 
1694. Alexander Rule. 
1702. John Goodall. 
1719. James Crauford. 
1732. William Dawson. 
1751. James Robertson. 

1792. George Husband Baird. 

1793. William Aloodie. 

1812. Alexander Murray. 

1813. Alexander Brunton. 

1848. I) AVID LlSTON. 



Professors of Divinity since 1620. 
1620. Andrew Ramsay. 
1627. Henry Charteris. 

1629. James Fairley. 

1630. John Scharpe. 

1648. Alexander Colville. 

1649. Samuel Rutherford. 
1650 David Dickson. 
1662. Patrick Scougall. 
1664. W^illiam Keith. 
1675. Laurence Charteris. 

1682. John Menzies. 

1683. John Sti*achan. 
1690. George Campbell. 
1701. George Meldrum. 
1709. William Hamilton. 



PROFESSORS. 



15 



1715. William Dunlop. 

1732. James Smith. 

1733. John Gowdie. 

• 1754. Robert Hamilton. 
1779. Andrew Hunter. 
1809. William Ritchie. 
1828. Thomas Chalmers. 
1844. John Lee. 
1859. Thomas J. Crawford. 

Professors of Divinity and Church 
History since 1695. 
1702. John Gumming. 



1726. Matthew Crawford. 
1737. Patrick Gumming. 
1762. Robert Gumming. 
1788. Thomas Hardie. 
1799. Hugh Meiklejohn. 
1831. David Welsh. 
1844. James Robertson. 



Professor of Biblical Criticism <{r 
Biblical Antiquities since 1846. 
1847. Robert Lee. 



FACULTY OF LAW. 



Professors of Medical Jurispru- 
dence since 1807. 
1807. Andrew Duncan, ^S'ecwjicZiis. 
1820. William Pulteney Alison. 
1822. Robert Christison. 
1832. Thomas Stewart Traill. 



Professors of Civil Law 
since 1710. 

James Craig. 

Thomas Dundas. 

Kenneth M'Kenzie. 

Robert Dick. 

John Wilde. 
1800. Alexander Irving. 
1827. Douglas Cheape. 
1842. A. Campbell Swinton. 



1710 
1732 
'174i) 
1755 

1792 



Professors of the Law of Scotland 
since 1722. 

1722. Alexander Bayne. 
1737. John Erskine. 
1765. William Wallace. 
1 786. David Hume. 
1822. George Joseph Bell. 
1843. John Schank More. 

Professors of Conveyancing 
since 1825. 

1825. Macvey Napier. 

1847. Allan Menzies. 

1856. A. MoNTGOMERiE Bell. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 



Professors of Materia Medica 

since 1768. 
1768. Francis Home. 
1786. Daniel Rutherford. 
1798. James Home. 
1821. Andrew Duncan, Secundus. 
1832. Robert Christison. 

Professors of Chemistry 
since 1713. 
1713. James Crauford. 
1726. Andrew Plummer. 
1755. William Gullen. 
1766. Joseph Black. 



1795. Thomas Charles Hope. 
1844. William Gregory. 
1858. Lyon Playfair. 

Professors of Surgery since 1831. 
1831. John William Turner. 
1836. Sir Charles Bell. 
1842. James Miller. 

Professors of Institutes of Medicine 
since 1726. 
1726. John Innes. 
1747. Robert Whytt. 
1766. William Cullen. 
1773. Alex. Monro Drummond. 



16 



SENATUS ACADEMICUS. 



1776. James Gregory. 
1789. Andrew Duncan, 

1819. Andrew Duncan, secundiis. 
1821. William Fulteney Alison. 
1842. Allen Thomson. 

1848. John Hughes Bexxett. 

Professors of Midwifery 
since 172G. 
1726. Joseph Gibson. 
1739. Robert Smith. 
1756. Thomas Young. 
1780. Alexander Hamilton. 
1800. James Hamilton. 
1840. James Y. Simpbox. 

Professors of Clinical Surgery 

since 1803. 
1803. James Russell. 
1833. James Syme. 

Prof'ssors of Botanij since 1676. 

1676. James Sutherland. 

1706. Charles Preston. 

1712. George Preston. 

1738. Charles Alston. 

1761. John Hope. 

1 786. Daniel Rutherford. 

1820. Robert Graham. 

1845. John Hutton Balfour. 

Professors of Anafoim/ since 1705. 
1705, Robert Elliot.' 
1708. Adam Drnminond. 
1716. John MGill. 



1720. Alexander Monro. 
1754, Alexander Monro, secundus. 
1798. Alexander ]Monro, lertius. 
1846. John Goodsir. 

Professors of General Pathology 
since 1831. 
1831. John Thomson. 
1842, William Hexderson, 

Professors of Natural History 

since 1767, 
1770. Robert Ramsay, 
1779. John Walker. 
1804. Robert Jameson. 

1854, Edward Forbes. 

1855, George James Allmax. 

Professors of Practice of Physic 
since 1685, 

1685. Sir Robert Sibbald, 
1685, James Haiket. 
1685. Archibald Pitcaix"ne, 
1713. James Crawford. 
1726. William Porterfield. 
1726. Andrew St. Clair. 
1726. John Rutherford. 
1766. John Gregory 
1769. \A'illiara Culleu. 
1790. James Gregory. 
1821. .James Home. 
1842. William Fulteney Alison. 
1855. Thomas Laycock. 



SENATUS ACADEMICUS. 

The Principal and Professors constitute the Senatus Acade- 
micus. The Senatus is intrusted with the superintendence 
and regulation of the teaching and discipline of the University, 
and with the administration of its revenues and property, 
including the Library, Museums, and University Buildings. It 
is the executive and administrative body in the academical 
system. The Principal is President of the Senatus, with a 
deliberative and casting vote. In the absence of the Principal, 
the Senior Professor present acts as Chairman. The ordinary 
meetings of the Senatus are held on the last Saturday of 
November, December, January, February, and IMarch, at two 



UNIVERSITY COURT AND GENERAL COUNCIL. 17 

o'clock ; on the last Friday of May, June, and July ; on 1st of 
August (for conferring Degrees in Medicine) ; and in April (for 
conferring Degrees in Arts) and October, on days fixed at the 
preceding meetings. Extraordinary meetings may be summoned 
by the Principal or by three Professors. One third of the Senatus 
constitutes a quorum. The business is conducted by a Secretary. 
A Dean is nominated in each Faculty, by ^hom its special afi'airs 
are superintended. 

UNIVERSITY COURT. 

The University Court is the Court of appeal from the Senatus 
Academicus. It has power to effect improvements in the internal 
arrangements of the University, after due communication with 
the Senatus and University Council, and with the sanction of the 
Chancellor, — to regulate the Class Fees, — and (on certain con- 
ditions), when sufficient cause is shown, to cepsure, suspend, 
or deprive Professors. It consists of the following members, viz., 
1. The Rector. 2. The Principal. 3. An Assessor elected by the 
Chancellor. 4. The Lord Provost of Edinburgh for the time 
being. 5. An Assessor elected by the Lord Provost, Magistrates, 
and Town-Council of Edinburgh. 6. An Assessor elected by the 
Rector. 7. An Assessor elected by the General Council of the 
University. 8. An Assessor elected by the Senatus Academicus. 
The Rector and his Assessor continue in office for three years, and 
the other Assessors for four years. Five members of the Court 
constitute a quorum. 

GEN ERAL COUNCIL. 

The General Council is instituted to take into consideration all 
questions affecting the wellbeing and prosperity of the Univer- 
sity, regarding which they are to make their representations to 
the University Court, who are to return a judgment thereon. The 
Chancellor and one of the Assessors in the University Court are 
elected by the Council. When a Poll is demanded, the election is 
made by means of Voting Letters, issued to the Members, which 
must be returned to the Registrar within 21 days. 

The General Council is appointed to meet twice every year, 
viz., on the first Tuesday after the fourteenth day of April, and 
on the last Friday in October. It consists of the Chancellor, the 
Rector and other members of the University Court, the Principal 

B 



18 universities' commissioners. 

and Professors, the Masters of Arts of the University, the Doctors 
of Medicine of the University, who have, as matriculated students, 
attended classes in any of the Faculties for four complete Sessions, 
and of all who, within three years of the passing of the Scottish 
Universities Act (August 2, 1858), can establish that they have, 
a's matriculated students, attended the University for four Sessions, 
or three complete Sessions and a fourth in some other Scottish 
University, the attendance for at least two of these Sessions having 
been on classes in the Faculty of Arts. 

All members of Council must be above the age of twenty-one. 
Their names must be registered in a book kept for the purpose by 
the Registrar of the University. They must also pay an annual 
fee of 2s. 6d., which may be compounded for by payment of £l at 
entrance. No student can be a member. The Chancellor is by 
statute President of the Council; whom failing, the Rector; 
whcm failing, the Principal ; whom failing, the Senior Professor 
present. A list of the General Council is given at p. 109. 

MATRICULATED STUDENTS, 

Matriculated Students have the privilege of electing the Rector 
of the University. In case of an equality of votes, the Chancel- 
lor, or failing him the Principal, has the casting vote. Students 
Students also enjoy the right of admission to the University Library, 
and on certain days to the Museum of Natural History. Their 
names are preserved in the General Album, which is the legal re- 
gister of attendance at the University. The number of Students 
in 1859-60 (including Students of Theology) was about 1550. Of 
these 658 were enrolled in the Faculty of Arts ; 554 in the Faculty 
of Medicine ; and 243 in the Faculty of Law. 

UNIVERSITIES' COMMISSIONERS. 

During the term of the Universities' Commission, the supreme 
government of the University is vested in the Commissioners. 
Their powers are in force until 1st January 1862, and may be 
extended until 1st January 1863. Subject to the provisions of 
the Scottish Universities Act, they are empowered to regulate by 
Ordinances the powers, jurisdictions, and privileges of the Chan- 
cellor, Vice-Chancellor, Rector, Assessors, Principal, Professors, and 
all other office-bearers or members of the University ; as also of 
the Senatus AcademicuS; the University Court, and the General 



LIBRARY. 19 

Council ; the time, place, and manner of elections ; the course of 
study, fees, manner of teaching, and manner of examination ; 
the qualifications, appointments, and number of examiners, and 
the amount of their remuneration ; the granting of Degrees of 
all kinds ; the foundation and remuneration of Professorships ; 
the revision and due administr;ition of revenues and endowments ; 
and the preservation of the fabric of the University. 

All Ordinances made by the Commissioners must be published 
in the Edinburgh Gazette for four successive weeks, and be laid 
before Parliament if it be sitting ; and if not, then before the next 
Parliament ensuing, and thereafter submitted to Her Majesty in 
Council. 

The Universities' Commission consists of the following per- 
sons : — 

The Duke of Argyll. 

The Earl op Aberdeen. 

The Earl of Mansfield. 

The Earl of Haddington. 

The Lord Justice-General. 

Sir William Gibson-Craig, Bart. 

The Lord Justice-Clerk. 



Lord Ardmillan. 

William Stirling op Keir, Esq , 

M.P. 
James Moncreiff, Esq., M.P. 
Alexander Hastie, Esq., M.P. 
A. Murray Dunlop, Esq., M.P. 



The Lord Justice-Clerk is Chairman of the Commission, and 
Robert Berry, Esq., Secretary. The office of the Commissioners 
is at 36, Moray Place. 



PART II. 

UNIVEESITY LIBRARY, MUSEUMS, AND BOTANIC GARDEN. 

THELIBRARY. 

The Library originated in a bequest, in 1580, by Mr. Clement 
Little, Commissary in Edinburgh, a learned citizen, and brother 
to the Lord Provost, who left his library to " Edinburgh and the 
kirk of God." This library, consisting of about 300 volumes, chiefly 
theological, was transferred by the Town-Council a few years after- 
wards to the University. The University Library was afterwards 
largely augmented, by donations from the citizens of Edinburgh 
and from the alumni of the University, and by the annual con- 
tributions of students when they took the Degree of Master of 



20 LIBRAEY. 

Arts. Among the donors may be specified, for the extent and value 
of their benefactions, Principal Adamson, Dr. Robert Johnston, 
a physician in London, the Rev. James Nairne of Wemyss, in 
Fife, Dr. John Stevenson, Professor of Logic and Metaphysics in 
the University, and Dr. William Thomson, Professor of Anatomy 
in the University of Oxford. The celebrated Drummond of 
Hawthornden bequeathed his library to the University ; and the 
gift is valuable, both from the eminence of the donor's name, and 
from the rare specimens of our early literature with which the 
collection is enriched. 

The University Library contains about 120,000 printed volumes, 
and above 500 volumes of MSS., many of which are of great 
interest and value. The Library also possesses some valuable 
pictures and busts. The Library Hall, and the suite of rooms 
connected with it, occupy the south side of the College quadrangle. 

The ordinary management of the Library is vested in six 
Curators, appointed annually by the Senatus. 

The Library is open every lawful day, during the Winter Session, 
from 10 to 4 o'clock, except on Saturdays, when it is shut at 1 
o'clock. During the Summer Session the hours for public business 
are from 10 to 3 o'clock. 

The following regulations relate to the borrowing of books from 
the Library : — 

1. Professors. 

Every Professor is entitled to borrow to the extent of twenty- 
five volumes at a time, but by leave of the Curators the number 
may be increased. The books must be returned after the expiry 
of six weeks from the date of their being borrowed, and an 
annual return of all the books borrowed from the Library in the 
hands of the Professors, is called for by printed circulars in the last 
week of August. 

2. Members of the College of Surgeons. 

The rules applicable to them are similar to the above. 

3. Students. 

Every student, before being entitled to borrow books from the 
University Library, must have inscribed his name in the General 
Album of Matriculation, and been enrolled in the class of at least 
one Professor. 



MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 21 

On first applying for the loan of a book, he must present his 
matriculation ticket, and also the ticket of at least one Professor, 
to the Librarian, who, on receiving from him a deposit of £l, gives 
him a receipt for the same, and enters his name in the deposit- 
receipt book. 

Every student is entitled to borrow two volumes at a time for 
the deposit of £i. 

On applying for the loan of books, the student must fill up a 
Schedule, containing his name, address, the number of his deposit- 
receipt, and the titles of the books he wishes to borrow. 

The books must be returned uninjured at the end of a fortnight 
from the date of their being borrowed, but may again be lent out 
for another fortnight if not previously called for by another appli- 
cant. 

There is a Reading-Roomfor the purpose of affording to students 
an opportunity of study, and also of consulting books which do 
not circulate, such as Dictionaries, Encyclopaedias, Atlases, and 
Works of reference in general. 

The Reading- Room is open to all Matriculated Students. On 
asking for books to be consulted, the applicant must fill up a 
Schedule containing his name, address, number of matriculation 
ticket, and the title of the book he wishes to consult. 

4. Graduates. 

Graduates of the University, on producing their Diplomas to the 
Secretary, may, on payment of a fee of ten shillings annually, be 
furnished with a ticket entitling them to the use of the Library, 
from October to October. 

They are not allowed to borrow books by deputy, but are 
required personally to transact business at the Library. 

MUSEUMS. 
1. The Museum of Natural History. — The extensive 
Museum of Natural History will afford to the Student valuable 
aid in his studies. It was established in 1812, in connexion with 
the University. It receives a Government grant of £200 a year. 
A large part of it was collected by the exertions of the late Pro- 
fessor Jameson, who was fifty years Professor of Natural History 
in the University. The Museum occupies the greater part of the 
west side of the quadrangle of the College. 



22 ANATOMICAL MUSEUM. 

The Museum contains Zoological, Geological, and Mineralogical 
Collections, all of which it has been the special object of the 
Regius-Keeper to develop in their educational aspect, so as to 
enable the Student to derive from them the greatest amount of 
advantage. 

1, The Zoological Collection. — The Zoological Student is 
particularly directed to the British and Typical Collections. The 
British Collection is intended to illustrate, as far as possible, the 

fauna of the British Isles. It is arranged and displayed so as to 
afford ample facility for the comparison and identification of 
British Species. The Typical Collection is intended to illustrate 
the leading types of animal form, and consequently does not 
aim at the accumulation of mere species. Its object is to 
bring before the Student in broad outlines the fundamental 
truths of Animal Morphology, and render him acquainted with 
those relations upon which alone a Natural Classification can be 
based. 

II. The Mineralogical Collection. — This is very extensive, 
and contains mac}^ valuable specimens. It is arranged in a series 
of horizontal glazed cases, and is thus displayed in the best 
possible way for admitting an inspection of specimens. 

III. The Geological Collection. — In the Geological Section 
the Student's attention may be particularly called to the Typical 
Collection of Fossils, where he will find the characteristic fossils 
of the various geological formations arranged in the order of 
their appearance on the earth's surface, thus enabling him to 
form a correct idea of some of the most striking features in the 
succession of the past life of the globe. 

The Museum is open daily from 10 to 4 o'clock, admission 6d. 
Free admission is given to the Public on Saturdays and Holidays, 
and to Students on the first Monday of every month likewise. 
The number of visitors in 1859 was 88,350. Professor Allman 
is Regius-Keeper of the Museum, and Mr. J. B. Davies Assistant 
Conservator. 

2. Anatomical Museum. — By a Joint-Resolution of the 
Patrons and the Senatus Academicus of the University, of 28th 
June 1826, it was agreed, — 

" 1. That £1, Is. be reciuired of each Candidate for Graduation, for the 



BOTANIC GARDEN. 23 

support of the Anatomical Museum, — it being at the same time understood, 
that if he pays this money on his first Matriculation at the University, 
or at any time during his Studies, he shall be entitled to a free entrance 
to the Museum thereafter. This fee, when^aid, to be deducted from the 
fee for Graduation. 

" That no other Students shall be compelled to contribute to the 
Museum, but that Tickets of Admission shall be issued to all who wish 
for them, at 7s. for the Season ; and that none but the Students of the 
Anatomical Class shall be admitted to the Museum without such Tickets." 

The Museum is open on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays, 
from Two to Four o'clock. 

Tickets of admission are issued at the Museum, at Three 
o'clock, on the days on which the Museum is open. 

There are also valuable Museums in connexion with the Classes 
of Natural Philosophy, Agriculture, Materia Medica, Midwifery, 
and Botany. 



BOTANIC GARDEN. 

The Royal Botanic Garden, at Inverleith Row, is connected with 
the University, in so far as the Professor of Botany is Regius- 1 
Keeper, and delivers his Lectures in the Class- Pioora in the 
Garden. The Garden was founded in 1670, and the Chair of 
Botany in connexion with it is one of the oldest in the University. 
The Garden extends to 17 acres, and contains an extensive range 
of Greenhouses and Hothouses, with a large Palm-house 70 feet 
high, 90 feet long, and 57 broad. There is an arrangement of 
British plants according to the natural system. There is also a 
general collection of hardy plants of all countries, according to the 
same system ; and a series of medicinal plants, of which a Cata- 
logue has been published. Students have ample facilities for 
studying the plants in the Garden, and they are examined on 
Specimens, in the British Collection, which are selected for their 
determination. 

The Botanical Museum is open at all times to Students, and the 
Specimens contained in it are used for illustrating the Lectures. 
The University Herbarium is also kept at the Garden, and it can 
be consulted by Students under the direction of the Professor. 



24 

PART III. 

CLASSES AND COURSES OF STUDY. 



UNIVERSITY TERMS. 

There are Two Sessions in each year, viz. : — 

I. The Winter Session, which opens in the beginning of Novem- 
ber and ends with April ; during which the Classes in all the four 
Faculties are assembled. 

II. The Summer Session, v/hich opens in the beginning of 
May and ends with July, in which some of the Medical Classes 
are open. 

PROGRAMME OF CLASSES FOR 1860-61. 

The Session of 1860-61 will be opened on Friday, November 2, 
at Two o'clock, when an Address will be delivered by Principal 
Sir David Brewster. 

The Classes in the diiFerent Faculties will be opened for the 
Winter Session as follows : — 

FACULTY OF ARTS. 



Cla-sses. 



Junior Humanity , 

Senior Humanity ... < 

First Greek 

Second Greek 

Third Greek 

First Mathematical ... 
Second Mathematical 
Third Mathematical ... 
Logic & Metaphysics... 

Moral Pliilosophy 

Natural Philosophy ... 
Rhetoric and Belles- ") 

Lettres J 

(English Language and 

Literature.) 
Practical Astronomy.., 

Agriculture 

Universal History 

Theorv of Music 



Days and Hours of 
Attendance. 



Xov. 5, 12 & 2 o'ck. 
NTov. 5, 9 o'clock. \ 
(8h. 45m.), / 
Xov. 5, 10 & 1 o'ck. 
Nov. 5, 11 o'clock. 
Nov. 5, 2 o'clock. 
Nov. 5, 12 o'clock. 
Nov. 5, 10 o'clock. 
Nov. 12, 9 o'clock. 
Nov. 5, 1 o'clock. 
Nov. 5, 12 o'clock. 
Nov. 5, 1 1 o'clock. 

Nov. 5, 4 o'clock. 



Dec. 4, 12 o'clock. 
Nov. 8, 4 o'clock. 
Nov. 7, 2 o'clock. 
Nov. 5, 10 & 12 o'ck. 



Professors. 



Prof. Pillans. 



Prof. Blackie. 



Prof. Kelland. 



Prof. Eraser. 
Prof. Macdougall. 
Prof Tait. 

Prof. Avtoun. 



Prof. Smyth. 
Prof. Wilson. 
Prof. Innes. 
Prof Donaldson. 



Class 


Small 


Fee. 


Fees. 


£ s. d. 


£ g. dJ 


3 3 


5 Oi 


3 3 


' 


3 3 




3 3 




3 3 


1 


3 3 


i 


3 3 


1 


3 3 


1 

1 


3 3 


t 


3 3 




3 3 


i 
1 


3 3 




3 3 




4 4 




4 4 




Free. 





PROGRAMME OF CLASSES. 



25 



i 

Classes. 

Hebrew — 

Junior Class 

Advanced Class — \ 

Hebrew & Arabic / 
Divinity — 

Junior Class 

Senior Class 

Divinity and Church | 

History j 

BibHcal Criticism & 
Biblical Antiquities 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 



Days and Hours of 
Attendance. 



Nov. 7, 2 o'clock. 
Nov. 7, 10 o'clock. 

Nov. 7, 10 o'clock. 
Nov. 7, 11 o'clock. 

Nov. 7, 12 o'clock. 
Nov. 7, 1 o'clock. 



Professors. 



Rev. D. Liston. 



Rev. T. J. Craw 

ford, D.D. 
Rev. .J. Robertson, 

D.D. 
Rev. Robt. Lee, 

D.D. 



Class 
Fee. 



£ s. d. 
2 2 

2 2 



2 2 
2 2 

Free. 



FACULTY OF LAW. 



Medical Jurispru- ~| 
dence (for Students 1- 
of Law) J 

Civil Law 

Law of Scotland 

Conveyancing 



Dec. 3, 2 o'clock. 

Nov. 5, 3 o'clock. 
Nov. 6, 3 o'clock. 
Nov. 5, 4 o'clock. 



Dr. Traill. 

Prof. Swinton. 
Prof. More. 
Prof. M. Bell. 



4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 



)ietetics. Materia Me- ) 
dica, & Pharmacy / 

Chemistry 

Surgery , 

Institutes of Medicine 

Midwifery and Dis- ^ 
eases of Women and j- 
Children J 

Clinical Surgery — ) 
{Mon, and Thurs. ) 

CHnical Medicine — ") 
( Tues. and Frid.) ) 

Anatomy 

Practical Anatomy, ... 

Natural Hi story 

Practice of Physic 

General Pathology 

Anatomical Demon- ") 
strations J 



Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 
Nov. 



5, 9 o'clock. 

5, 10 o'clock. 

5, 10 o'clock. 

5, 11 o'clock. 



Nov. 5, 11 o'clock. 

Nov. 5, 12 o'clock. 
Nov. 6, 12to2o'ck. 



Nov. 
Nov. 

Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



2 o'clock. 

2 o'clock. 
1 o'clock. 

3 o'clock. 

4 o'clock. 



Nov. 5, 4 o'clock. 



Dr. Christison. 

Dr. Lyon Playfair. 
Prof. Miller. 
Dr. Bennett. 

Dr. Simpson. 



Prof. Syme. 

Drs. Bennett and 

Laycock, 
Prof. Good sir. 
Prof. Goodsir. 
Prof. Allman. 
Dr. Laycock. 
Dr. Henderson. 

Prof Goodsir. 



4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


3 3 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


2 2 



26 MATRICULATION FEES, ETC. 

Practical Chemistry, under tlie supenntendence of Dr. Lyon Playfair. 
Analytical Chemistry, under the superintendence of Dr. Lyon Playfair. 
The Chemical Laboratory will be opened on 1st November for Pupils who 
desire to practise Analytical Chemistry, or to practise Chemical investi- 
gations, under the immediate superintendence of Dr. Lyon Playfair, C.B., 
aided by Dr. Guthrie and Dr. Wauklin. 

SUMMER SESSION. Class Fees. Small Fees. 

Botany, Professor Balfour. May 1, 1861. 8 a.m., . . £4 4 5s. (Garden) 
[Second Course, £.3, 3s. Third Course, free. Perpetual 
Ticket. £6, 6s.] 
Practical Chemistry and Pharmacy, Professor Playfair. May 1., 

Natural History, Professor Allman. May 1. 1 p.m., . . 4 4 

Medical Jurisprudence, Professor Traill. May 1. 11a.m., . 4 4 

Clinical Lectures on Medicine. May 1. 12 a.m , . . . 3 3 

Clinical Lectures on Surgery, Professor Syme. May 2. 12 a.m., 3 3 

Practical Anatomy, Professor Goodsir. May 1, . . . 2 2 

Medical Psychology, Professor Laycock. May 6, . . . 2 2 

Medical Psychology, with Practical Instruction in Mental Diseases, 3 3 

Histology, Professor Bennett. May 1 3 3 

Comparative Anatomy, Professor Goodsir, .... 

MATRICULATION FEES. 

For the Academical Year, .... 

For the Summer Session only, .... 
For the Theological Faculty only. 

Students are required to matnculate, at the Secretary's Office in the Univer- 
sity, before entering any of the Classes. 

KOYAL INFIRMARY. 

Royal Infirmary at Noon, Dally. — Perpetual Ticket, £10; Animal 
Ticket, £5, 5s. ; Half- Yearly Ticket, £3, 3s. Separate payments of 2^ 
years entitle the Student to a Perpetual Ticket. A Half- Yearly Ticket 
can be procured only by Students who have previously had an Annual 
Ticket. 

MUSEUMS. 

The charge for admission to the Museum of Natural History is Is. 
Students are admitted without anj"^ payment, on the first Monday of each 
montli, on production of their Matriculation Tickets. 

The fee for admission to the Anatomical Museum is 7s. for the Season, 
and £1, Is. for tlic Course of Medical Study. 



£1 





10 





10 






COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 27 

SYNOPSES OF THE COURSES IN THE DIEFEEENT CLASSES 
OF THE UNIVERSITY, DURING SESSION 1860-61. 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 

Dean : 

ALEXANDER C. ERASER., M.A., 
Peofessor of Logic axd Metaphysics. 

1. Humanity. 

PROFESSOR PILLANS. 
In both Classes a Trial Exercise will be written in the Class- 
room on the first Saturday of the Session.* 

Junior Class. 

The Order of the day, from November till Christmas. — First 
Principles of Latin Grammar prelected and examined upon for 
some time ; to be continued, where necessary, by the Class- 
Assistant, with Mair's Introduction as Text-book ; Readings in 
Curtius, and in the Fasti and Tristia of Ovid. 

After Christinas. — Curtius, Ovid, Odes of Horace, and a portion 
of Livy, Book vi. 

Throughout the Session, a weekly written Exercise. On the 
Wednesdays, at 12 o'clock, lessons and demonstrations in Ancient 
Geography, — Text-hooh, " First Steps in Physical and Classical 
Geography" (A. and C. Black). On the Fridays, at 2 p.m., 
Lectures on the MSS. of the Classics, their form, material, and 
history. 

Books required for Junior Class. — 1. Curtius, Leipsic Edition, with Preface and 
Notes, by Professor Pillans (M'Lachlan and Co.) 2. Selections from the Fasti and 
Tristia of Ovid. 3. Horace. 4. Livy (lib. 6), Leipsic Edition, -with Preface and 
Notes, by Profes.^or Pillans (Williams and Norgate). 5. Mair's Introduction. C. First 
Steps, &c. Recommended. — Adam's Grammar and Antiquities. 

Senior Class. 
Throughout the Session, Specimens of the writings of Cicero, 
Oratorical and Ethical : — of Horace, Odes, Satires, and Epistles ; 
of Livy, Book ix., and of Tacitus, Annals. 



* This exercise is to test the proficiency of the Students at the time of entering the 
Classes, that it may be compared with a similar one to be done in March 1861. 



28 COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 

On the Wednesdays, at 9 a.m., before Christmas, Geographical 
Demonstrations, with illustrative passages from Lucan, Statins, 
Silius Italicus, Claudian, &c., appended to the text-book, viz., 
"Elements of Physical and Classical Geography" (Blackwoods). 

After Christmas. — On the Wednesday, at 9 a.m., a course of 
Lectures on General Grammar, and on alternate Fridays, Exami- 
nations, conducted chiefly in Latin, on Adam's Roman Antiquities. 

Written Exercises in Prose and Verse throughout the Session. 

^,.*■^^ The Lectures may be attended by Amateur Students, on a separate Ticket. 



2. Greek. 

PROFESSOR BLACKIE. 

Junior Class. 



Cebetis Tabula ; Homer's Iliad ; Clyde's Syntax ; Daily 
Exercises in Greek Composition and Conversation. 

Middle Class. 

Plutarch's Life of Cimon ; Lucian ; Euripides, or Sophocles ; 
Weekly Expositions of Greek Archseology from Pausanias. 

Advanced Class. 

Plato's Republic, last three Books. Exercises in Greek Com- 
position. Commentary on Homer, Critical and Archaeological, 
twice a week, beginning with Hiad, Book iii. 



3. Mathematics. 

PROFESSOR KELLAND. 

First Class. 



Theory of Arithmetic ; Six Books of Euclid and part of the 
Eleventh Book ; Plane Trigonometry, with its Applications ; Men- 
suration ; the Elements of Perspective ; and Geometrical Conic 
Sections. 

Jcxt-hoiiks. — Playfair's Geometry and Trigonometry indispensable. Elliott's Mensu- 
ration and Wallace's Conic Sections are recommended and largely drawn on. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 29 

Second Class. 
Introductory Lectures. Algebra, with its Applications to Analy- 
tical Trigonometry, Analytical Conic Sections, and Solid Geometry. 

Text-books. — Kelland's Elements of Algebra, indispensable. Colenso's Examples, 
Wrigley's Examples, or Bland's Equations, referred to and recommended. Snowball's 
Trigonometry. 

Third Class. — Nine to Ten, three days a vjeeJc. 
The Differential Calculus with its Branches and Applications. 

Text-books. — Hall's Differential Calculus. As the aim is, as completely as possible to 
read through the book, no other works are recommended. 

For the advanced Students, Lectures are given on the higher 
portions of Definite Integrals, and on Finite Differences. 

Examinations, viva voce, are carried on daily in all the Classes. Written Examina- 
tions take place on alternate Saturdays. Exercises for solution at home are given out 
on Fridays. The Prize List is made out from a summation of the whole work. Extra 
Prizes are adjudged by competitions on Arithmetic, Equations, Trigonometry, kc, against 
time. Extra Prizes are also awarded for original Solutions of Problems, Essays, &c. 



4. Logic and Metaphysics. 

PROFESSOR FRASER. 

The following is a Programme of the ordinary Course of 
Lectures : — 

Introduction. — Province and Divisions of Logic — the Science 
of Human Science. Its Philosophical relations to the other 
Sciences. Aims and Methods of Logical Study. Axioms and 
Postulates of Logic. 

Part I. — Pure or Formal Logic. 

Analysis of Science in relation to Pure Thought and its Neces- 
sary Laws, including the Formal theory of Deduction. Verbal 
Logic. — Thought or Understanding compared with Perception 
and Imagination, Intuitive and Symbolical Knowledge. Re- 
lations of Thought and Language. Notions or Concepts. Propo- 
sitions and Syllogisms. Aristotle and Hamilton. Deduction of 
possible forms of Proposition and Syllogism from the principle 
of the Concept. Division, Definition, and Demonstration. In- 
formal Thought and Verbal Fallacy. Imperfection and Ambiguity 
of Language. Exercises in Immediate and Mediate Deference, 
and in Verbal Fallacies. 



30 COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 

Part II. — Mixed Logic — Physical and Ontological. 

Analysis of Science in its relations to Nature and Natural Law, 
as comprehensible by Finite intelligence, and including the theory 
of Physical Induction. — Provisional Classification of the Sciences 
in relation to their objects. Bacon and Comte. The Order of 
Nature. Prevision of Phenomena. Conditions of the formation of 
Science according to the Laws of Nature. Theory and Art of 
Physical Discovery. Experimental Methods of Bacon and Mr. 
Mill. Use and Abuse of Hypothesis ^and of Deduction. Final 
Causes and Physical Discovery. Metaphysical limits of Physical 
Discovery. Metaphysical Theory of Matter. Berkeley, Reid, and 
Hamilton. Metaphysical Theory of Physical Causation. Hume 
and Kant. Science and the Infinite. Philosophical lessons of this 
Part of Logic. 

Part III. — Mixed Logic— Psychological and Historical. 

Analysis of Science in its relations to the Constitution of Man, 
in its catholic integrity, as revealed in Consciousness and History, 
including the theory of the Occasions of Error and the First Prin- 
ciples of Truth. — Human Consciousness in general, in its relation 
to Science. Personality, Volition, and Free Causation, Science 
and the Consciousness of Man in its Physiological relations. 
Science and the Laws of Mental Association. Theory of JNIemory 
and Imagination. Science and the Passions. Science and the 
Social Sympathies of Man. Science and Authority. Human 
Testimony, oral and written. Science and the History of Man. 
History of Philosophical Systems. Dogmatism and Scepticism. 

The Lectures and Course of Study for Session 1860-61 belong 
to Parts I. and II. 

The Class meets daily at one o'clock, on five days in each week. The hours are devoted 
partly to the Lectures of the Professor, and partly to Oral and Written Examinations, 
Exercises and Essays, meant to tniin the members to logical habits andu reflective life. 
Prizes are adjudged both to Senior and Junior Studtnte. 



5. Moral Philosophy. 

PROFESSOR MACDOUGALL. 

The course of Lectures comprehends mainly the following sub- 
jects : — 

Introductory. — The aims, province, and methods of Ethical 
study. The relations of Ethics or Moral Philosophy to Psychology. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 31 

DiYisiox I.— General view of the mental constitution, or powers 
to be regulated by the sense of Duty. Particular examination of 
the powers usually denominated Active,— including detailed con- 
sideration of the Emotions, Desires, and Affections ; with discus- 
sion of the more important philosophical questions relating to 
them. 

Division IL— Ethics, more properly, and strictly so called ; or 
the system of ethical truth, and the philosophy of that system ; 
including (1.) Exposition of Duties, with their grounds ; and (2.) 
Inquiry into the nature and faculty of Moral Approbation, or the 
Theory of JMoral Perception and Moral Sentiments. Review of 
leading Ethical Theories. Examination, in particular, of the views 
of Bishop Butler on both the preceding Divisions. 

Division III. — Inferential, and consummative ; as to the exis- 
tence, moral government, and character of Deity ; the immortality 
of the soul ; and future retribution. Duties thence arising, and 
reflex influence on Morality generally. Comparison of N^atural 
and Christian Ethics. 

The Class meets from twelve to one o'clock each day, for five 
days of the week. The time is devoted in part to the Lectures 
and in part to examinations, written and oral, on these and on 
prescribed portions of Ethical authors. Subjects are also prescribed 
for elaborate Essays, as well as for briefer occasional exercises ; 
and prizes are awarded at the close of the Session for general in- 
dustry, proficiency, and ability. 



6. Natural Philosophy. 

PROFESSOR TAIT. 

The subjects embraced in the Course of Natural Philosophy are 
the following : — 

Properties of Bodies, Mechanics (including Statics and Dyna- 
mics, and their application to Civil Engineering), Hydrostatics, 
Hydrodynamics (including Pneumatics and Acoustics), Heat (in- 
cluding the Steam-Engine), Light (Common and Physical Optics), 
Plane and Physical Astronomy, Electricity and Magnetism (includ- 
ing Terrestrial Magnetism). All these subjects are not, however, 
gone over in a single Session ; but while the Mechanics of Solid 
a.nd Fluid Bodies forms an invariable part of the Course, the other 



32 COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 

subjects are altered more or less from year to year. It is intended 
that, in the Session 1860-61, the Properties of Bodies, Light, Elec- 
tricity, INIagnetism, and Electro-dynamics (or portions of those 
subjects) shall be included in the Course. 

The works on which the two principal written Examinations will 
be held are for this Session — 

Third or Junior Division. 

In January — Potter's Mechanics — the Statical part (except 
Chapters iv. and ix.), and ih.e first and third Chapters of Dynamics. 
In March — Herschers Astronomy in Lardner's Cyclopaedia. 

For the Second or Middle Division. 

In January — Potter's Mechanics generally, hi March — Pot- 
ter's Elementary Optics. 

For the First or Highest Division. 

In January — Tait and Steele's Dynamics of a Particle, omitting 

Chapters vi., viii., xr, and xii. March — Airy's Tract on the 

Undulatory Theory, first part. 

At the close of each Examination, the names of the whole of the regular Students who 
have entered the Examination will be suspended in the Class in the order of merit, de- 
termined by a system of marks. Prizes will be awarded by combining the results of 
these Examinations with others to be afterwards aimounced. 



7. Rhetoric and Belles-Lettres. 

{English Language and Literature.) 
PROFESSOR AYTOUN. 

The Students are taught and exercised, (1.) In the Principles 
of Vernacular Composition, a considerable portion of the lectures 
relating to the examination of style, as exhibited by eminent 
English authors. The history, formation, and development of the 
language are likewise comprehended in this branch. (2.) The 
leading rules for the framing and arrangement of spoken discourses 
are explained and illustrated. (3.) A critical review of British 
Literature, from the Anglo-Saxon period downwards, in its con- 
nexion with external history and social development. (4.) Occa- 
sional Lectures tending to illustrate remarkable epochs in Ancient 
and Mediasval Literature will be delivered in the course of the 
Session. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 33 

Written exercises are prescribed, from time to time, with a view 
to the improvement of the Students in English Composition. 
These are returned to the Students after being revised and cor- 
rected by the Professor. 

Prizes are awarded for composition in prose and verse, and for 
accomplishment in elocution. 



8. Practical Astronomy, 

PROFESSOR S5IYTH. 

These lectures are confined strictly to the subject of Practical 
Astronomy, and are intended to illustrate the best methods of ap- 
plying instrumental measurement to celestial phenomena, for the 
purpose of deducing their nature, and ascertaining their bearing 
on astronomical theory. 

They commence with the simplest estimations of angle and 
distance reqiiired in first approximations ; and then show how 
rapidly as well as securely, the true arrangement of the universe 
may be arrived at by any one who, observing independently for 
himself the successive phenomena presented by the skies, is able, 
as he proceeds, to strengthen his means of observation and refine 
his methods of computation, up to the limits which the present 
advanced condition of Optics, Mechanics, and Mathematics place 
within his reach. 



9. Agriculture. 

PROFESSOR WILSON. 

The Lectures extend over two Sessions ; the first course treat- 
ing of the Principles, and the second of the Practice of Agricul- 
ture. 

First Course. — History of Agriculture. General purposes of 
Agriculture ; conditions affecting it ; and principles on which it 
is based. The Chemistry of Agriculture. The Geology of Agri- 
culture. The Botany of Agriculture. The Physics of Agriculture. 

Second Course. — The Mechanics of Agriculture and their appli- 
cation. Sequence of Agricultural operations. Economical Division 
of Labour. Rotations of various districts discussed and explained. 
Improvement of the Soil by Draining, Manuring, &c. Live stock. 
The Economics of Agriculture. Farm Engineering and Construc- 
tion. Agricultural Policy. General Management and Improve- 
ment of Landed Property. 

C 



34 COURSES IN FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 

10. TJniversal History. 

PROFESSOR INNES. 



11. Theory of Music. 

PROFESSOR DONALDSON. 

In accordance with, the Deed of Foundation* the Lectures 
embrace the following subjects : — 

The phenomena and philosophy of sound ; the nature and pro- 
duction of musical sounds, accordant and discordant. 

The Theory of Music. 

General rules for the composition of Music, including methodical 
composition in the different counterpoints, with a critical analysis 
of the works of the great masters. 

The laws of harmonics, with an exposition of how far the theory 
of Music, as taught by the best theorists, is deducible from, and in 
accordance with, these laws. 

Occasional Lectures are given on the Structure, Compass, and Properties of Musical 
Instruments, as shown by Weber, Chladni, Savart, AVheatstone, and others, having for 
their object to discover the true principles on which musical instruments ought to be 
constructed, and which may lead, and have led. to the invention of new ones. 

All the topics included in these branches are illustrated with diagrams, musicalinstru- 
inents, and philosophical apparatus. 

Lectures are delivered occasionally on the history of the science. 
Three courses of Lectures are given during the Session ; tvjo for 
gentlemen, and one exclusively for ladies. 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 

Dean : 

JAMES KOBEETSON, D.U., Professor of Divinity and of 

Ecclesiastical History. 

1. Divinity. 

PROFESSOR CRAWFORD. 

The Law of the Church of Scotland requires that every Theo- 
logical Student be enrolled by the Professor of Divinity at least 
four Sessions, three of which must be Sessions of regular or con- 
stant attendance. If a Student attend only two full Sessions, his 

* This Chair was founded by General Jolin Keid, for the teaching of Music as a Scien- 
tific Art, on a wide and comi)rehensive scale ; or, to use the Testator's own words, so to 
teach it as to give " stability, respectability, and consequence to the establishment." 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 35 

course must extend to five Sessions. In every case six Discourses 
must be delivered with, approbation before the Professor can be 
entitled to give such a certificate as shall warrant a Presbytery to 
take the Student on trial for license. Every Student, iu the last 
Session of his course, is expected to have all the requisite Dis- 
courses delivered before the end of December, it being desirable 
that, soon after that period, every document necessary for entitling 
Presbyteries to take on trials the candidates for license should be 
forthcoming. 

Students in their first year of regular attendance are expected 
to attend the Junior Class, and the others the Senior Class. The 
course of study in the two Classes is as follows : — 

Junior Class. 
Lectures are delivered on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 
on the Evidences of Revealed Religion. On Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days the Students are examined on the subjects of the Lectures, 
and on Paley's Evidences of Christianity. 

Senior Class. 
The course of study in this Class extends over three Sessions. 
The subjects of the Lectures during Session 1860-1 will be, — the 
Inspiration of Scripture, the Divinity and Incarnation of Christ, 
the Personality and Divinity of the Holy Spirit, the Trinity, 
Original Sin, and the Atonement. Lectures on these subjects will 
be delivered on Mondays and Wednesdays, and occasionally on 
Fridays. On Tuesdays and Thursdays the Students will be ex- 
amined on the subjects of the Lectures, and also on Hill's Lectures 
in Divinity, Books III., IV., and V. The Fridays v/ill be usually 
devoted to the hearing of Discourses. 



2. Divinity and Church History. 

PROFESSOR ROBERTSON. 

Course during Session 1860-61. — History of the Christian Reli- 
gion and Church from the accession of Gregory tit., to the Religious 
Peace of Augsburg, a.d. 1073-1555. 

First Period. — To the removal of the Papal Residence to Avignon, 

A.D. 1305. 

1. General Eeviev^- of the History of the Papacy. 

2. Do. do. of the Hierarchy in the National Churches. 



36 COURSES IN FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 

3. General Review of the History of Monachisrn. 

4. History of the Theological Sciences. 

5. Do. of Rites and Ceremonies, and Discipline. 

6. Do. of Heresies. 

7. Do. of Diffusion of Christianity. 

8. Do. of the Greek and other Oriental Churches. 

Second Period. — To the Reformation, a.d. 1517. 

1. History of the Papacy, Papal Schism, and General Councils. 

2. Do. of the Hierarchy in the National Churches. 
.S. Do. of Monachisrn. 

4. Internal History of the Church. 

.'). History of the Sects opposed to the Church of Rome. 

6. Do. of Diffusion of Christianity. 

7. Do. of the Greek and other Oriental Churches. 

Third Period. — To the Religious Peace of Augsburg, a.d. 1555. 

1 . History of the Reformation to the Presentation of the Augsburg Con- 

fession, A.D. 1530. 

2. History of the Reformation to the commencement of the War of 

Smalcald a.d. 1.546. 

3. History of the Reformation to the Religious Peace of Augsburg, 

A.D. 1555. 

Lectures. — Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays. Examination — Fridays. 
Essays on subjects prescribed in connexion with the Course, four of which are required 
from- each Student during the Session, — to be read to the Professor in private. 



3. Biblical Criticism and Biblical Antiquities. 

PROFESSOR LEE. 

This class is now included in the curriculum required by the 
Church of Scotland of Students in Divinity, 

The Lectures are comprehended in two Courses, which are 
delivered during alternate Sessions. One of these Courses relates 
to the Ciiticism of the Old Testament ; the other to that of the New. 

Subjects of First Course. — 1. Canon of Old Testament; Con- 
dition and History of Hebrew Text ; Account of principal Versions, 
particularly Septuagint, Vulgate, and Targums ; Modern efforts 
to improve Hebrew Text ; Account of printed Editions, &c. 
2. Hermeneutics, or Principles of Interpretation, as applicable 
to Sacred Scriptures. 

Subjects of Second Course. — Manuscripts of New Testament ; 
different systems of classification ; accounts of particular MSS. ; 
disputed passages ; quotations in New Testament, &.c. &c. ; mo- 
dern editions of New Testament — their characteristics and merits. 



COUESES IN FACULTY OF LAW. 37 

On these subjects Lectures are delivered on Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days ; Monday's Lectures are devoted to Biblical Antiquities ; on 
Wednesday the Professor prelects on some portion of the Greek 
New Testament, and on Fridays he hears exercises by the Students. 

The Course of Lectures on the New Testament Criticism falls to 
be delivered Session 1860-61. 



4. Hebrew. 

professor liston. 

Junior Class. 
Grammar (Tregelles' Heads of Hebrew Grammar) ; first twenty 
chapters of Genesis, and eight or ten Psalms. 

Senior Class. 
Grammar. The Psalms and a Historical Book on alternate weeks. 
Arabic will form extra study. (Elements of Grammar, and 
Selections.) 



FACULTY OF LAW. 

Dean: 

ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL SWIXTON, LL.D., Peofe.ssor of 

Civil Law. 

1. Medical Jurisprudence. 

PROFESSOR TRAILL. 

Part I. — Forensic Medicine. 

Section 1. Qpestioxs affecxisg the Civil or Social Rights op Individuals. — 
Duration of Human Life. Personal identity. ^Marriage. Divorce. Pregnancy. Par- 
turition. Impotence. Paternity and affiliation. Survivorship. Mental alienation. 
Rights of Deaf and Dumb. Exemption from public duties. Simulated diseases. 

Section 2. Injuries to Propertt. — Nuisances. Arson. Forgery. Coining. 

Section 3. Personal Injuries. — Defloration. Rape. Mutilation. Infanticide. Ho- 
micide. Starvation. Death from extremes of temperature. Wounds. Toxicology, or 
poisoning by inorganic, vegetable, and animal substances. Imaginary and pretended 
poisonings. 

Part II. — Medical Police. 

Section 1. Health op Individuals as affected by Cleanliness and Ventilation. 
Aliment. Exercise. Celibacy. Marriage. Lactation. Professions and trades. 

Section 2. Health of Communitiks as affected bv Climate. Sites of towns and 
habitations. Drainage and sewerage. Paving and care of public roads. Cemeteries. 
Construc:ion of hospitals, schools, and prisons. Lazarettos. Punishments. 

Two Courses are annually given ; one adapted for Students of 

Law during the Winter, and another for Medical Students during 

the Summer. 



38 COURSES IX FACULTY OF LAW. 

2. Civil Law. 

PROFESSOR CAMPBELL SWIXTON. 

General principles of Roman Law treated very much in the 
order of Justinian's Institutes, with references to the Laws of 
Modern Nations. 

The Students are examined on the contents of the Lectures, 
and the Institutes of Justinian ; and subjects are prescribed for 
four or five Essays in the course of the Session. Cumin's 
Manual of Civil Law, and Sandars' Institutes of Justinian, are 
recommended. Students intended for the Scotch Bar must make 
themselves acquainted with either Warnkoenig's Institiitiones 
Juris Romani Pricati, or Mackeldey's Systema Juris Romani 
hodie usitati. 

A Prize often guineas is awarded for an Essay written during 
the Summer recess. 



3. Law of Scotland. 

PROFESSOR MORE. 

1. Introductory. 2. Social or Domestic Relations. 3, Contracts 
or Obligations. 4. Quasi or implied Contracts. 5. Obligations 
arising from Delinquency or Quasi Delinquency. 6. Assignation 
of Personal Claims. 7. Discharge or Extinction of Obligations, 
including Prescription. 8. Distinction between Heritable and 
Moveable Rights. 9. Heritable or Real Rights. 10. Deeds of 
Transmission, particularly Entails. 11. Burdens upon Real Pro- 
perty, including Heritable Debts and Leases, Teinds, and Parochial 
Burdens. 12. Succession, Heritable and Moveable, Testate and 
Intestate. 13. Election Law. 14. Actions and Diligence, in- 
cluding Defences against Actions. 15. Bankruptcy and Insol- 
vency. 16. Criminal Law. 

A full printed Syllabus of the Course is delivered to every Stu- 
dent, of which the above is a mere abstract. 



4. Conveyancing. 

PROFESSOR MONTGOMERIE BELL. 

The Lectures are intended to assist Students of Law in the pre- 
paration of Deeds and Instruments, and in judging of their legal 
efficacy, and adaptation to the objects of the parties. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF LAW. 39 

The Course is divided into three branches ; the Jirst, relating to 
the particulars applicable to all or most deeds ; the secooid and 
third, to those peculiar to personal or moveable, and to heritable 
or real rights, respectively. 

Under Branch First are explained — (1.) The solemnities of 
authentication of deeds. (2.) The necessity of delivery and 
acceptance. (3.) That the parties must be competent, and the 
subject-matter lawful. (4.) There must be deliberate consent ; 
under which head are noticed shortly the general rules applicable 
to essential error, fraud, and force and fear, as grounds of reducing, 
and to homologation, and ret interventus^ as grounds of supporting 
deeds. (5.) The Stamp Laws in their relation to Conveyancing. 
(6.) The parts or clauses common to all or most deeds, being the 
narrative or introductory ; the warrandice, registration, and testing 
clauses. (7.) The general rules as to the effect of blanks in deeds. 

Branch Second. — (1.) The personal bond, and other personal 
obligations, transmissions thereof inter vivos, and discharges. 
Personal contracts, and deeds relating to corporeal moveables, 
including maritime writs. (2.) Bills and promissory-notes, their 
authentication, structure, transmission, and extinction. (3.) 
Writs of personal diligence. 

Branch Third. — (1.) The writs constituting a feudal estate, and 
the rights of the Superior and Vassal. (2.) The writs of trans- 
mission, voluntary or judicial, of such estate, and of burgage lands. 
(3.) The marriage- contract, bond of provision, and relative writs, 
as affecting either personal or real estate, or both. (4.) Testa- 
mentary deeds, applicable to either or both classes of estate. (5.) 
The entail and disentail, and relative deeds. (6.) The completion 
of titles, by executors or next of kin, or heirs, of persons deceased, 
to personal or real estate. (7.) Heritable securities ; their con- 
stitution, transmission, and extinction. (8.) Writs of real dili- 
gence ; and lastly. Leases. 

Class hour 4 to 5 o'clock every lawful day, except Saturday. 



40 COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

Dean : 
JOHN HUTTON BALFOUR, M.A., M.D., Professor op Botaky. 

1. Materia Medica. 

PROFESSOR CHRISTISON. 

Introductory. — Materia Medica comprises the subjects of 
General Therapeutics, Special Therapeutics, and Pharmacy ; and 
Diet and Regimen equally with Remedies ordinarily so called. 
Arrangement of the Course under that view of its objects. 

General Topics. — On Pharmacopoeias. On General Thera- 
peutics, or the Actions of Remedies. 1. Physiological, or Actions 
on the Healthy Body, viz., their kinds of action, their modes of 
action, and the circumstances which modify their actions. 2. 
Therapeutic, or Actions on Disease ; their several kinds of action 
on disease. 

Special Topics. — I. The Natural History, Pharmacy, Thera- 
peutic actions, Uses, and mode of administering Remedies, ordi- 
narily so called. 1. i\Iineral Substances, arranged according to 
their chemical constitution, viz., Non-metallic oxidable elements ; 
acids ; ordinary metals and their compounds ; alkalis and earths, 
and their compounds ; compound inflammables ; mineral waters. 
2. Vegetable substances, arranged according to the natural fami- 
lies of plants, as this arrangement also classifies them in some 
measure according to their actions on the body. 3, Animal sub- 
stances. 4. Imponderables, or Qualities of matter, viz.. Heat, cold, 
electricity, galvanism, magnetism ; appendix on acupuncture, 5. 
Blood-letting, general and local. 

II. On Diet and Regimen. — 1. Food, viz., its relative diges- 
tibility and uutritiveness ; the eifects of improper food on man ; 
the proper food for man in various circumstances of life ; such as 
for maintaining the athletic constitution ; for persons under ordi- 
nary vigorous exercise ; for those in confinement ; for children ; 
for hospitals. Dietetic treatment of diseases in detail, according 
to their nosological arrangement.— ^2. Drink; its kinds ; its effects, 
when erroneous ; proper drink for health ; regulation of drink in 
the treatment of diseases. 3. Condiment; its kinds : their actions 
in health, and their applications to the treatment of diseases. 4. 
Exercise. 5. Climate. 6. Clothing. 7. Cleanliness. 8. Moral 
discipline. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 41 

2. Chemistry. 

PROFESSOR PLAYFAIR. 

The Course of instruction consists — 

1. Of Lectures. — In the Course of Lectures the general sub- 
jects of Theoretical Chemistry, including a detailed description of 
Elementary Bodies and their Compounds, are considered with 
especial reference to their useful applications to Medicine and 
the Industrial Arts. The subjects of Chemical Physics are also 
fully discussed in their bearing on the general laws which govern 
the union of the different bodies. Examinations of the Students, 
both oral and written, are frequently held. The Chief and Second 
Assistant conduct Tutorial Classes in connexion with the Lectures, 
in order to discipline the Student on the subjects -treated of. 

2. Laboratory.— The Laboratory is open for the reception of 
Pupils who desire to study Analytical Chemistry, or to undertake 
Chemical Investigations. The Hope Prize, of the annual value of 
£50, is awarded to the author or authors of the best Investiga- 
tions, if approved by the Senate. The fee for the Laboratory is 
ten guineas for six months, or six guineas for three months. It 
is open during all the Winter Session, and for three months in the 
Summer Session. The Professor is aided in the Laboratory by 
Dr. Guthrie as Chief Assistant. 

3. Practical Classes. — The instruction in these is chiefly de- 
voted to practice in Qualitative Analysis, with the view of 
enabling the Student to test unknown substances, poisons, urine, 
&c. They are taught by the Demonstrator, Dr. Wauklyn, under 
the superintendence of the Professor. The fee is three guineas. 

Text-looTcs. — Any of the following, viz. : — Fowne's Manual of 
Chemistry : Churchill, London. Gregory's Hand-Book of Chemis- 
try : Taylor & Walton, London. Miller's Elements of Chemistry. 
3 vols. : Parker & Sons, London. 



3, Surgery. 

PROFESSOR MILLER. 

I. — The Principles of Surgery. 
1. Elementary Diseases, including especially — 

The inflammatory process ; congestion ; the healing process ; suppuration ; ulcers ; 
mortification ; hypertrophy, atrophy, and absorption ; tumours ; hemorrhage. 



42 COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

2. Diseases in certain tissues, — 

In the integument; serous and mucous membranes; peristeum and bone : joints; 
arteries; veins; lymphatics; nerves. 

3. Injuries, — 

Wounds; effects of heat ; effects of cold ; fracture; dislocation; sprain, and rupture of 
muscle and tendon; bruise; suspended animation. 

II. — The Practice of Surgery. 
1. The subject of operations in general. 

2 Injuries and diseases of the head ; 3. affections of the orbit and its contents ; 4. 
affections of the nose ; 5. affections of the upper jaw ; 6. affections of the face ; 7. affec- 
tions of the lips; 8. of the palate; 9. of the teeth ; 10. of the lower jaw; 11. of the 
tongue; 12. of the uvula and tonsils; 13. of the pharynx; 11. of the oesophagus; 15. 
of the ear; 16. of the neck; 17. of the arm, forearm, wrist, and hand ; IS. injuries of 
the upper extremity ; 19. affections of the spine; 20. affections of the chest ; 2i. of the 
mamma; 22. of the abdomen; 23. hernia; 24. affections of the rectum; 25. stone; 
26. affections of the bladder and prostate; 27. the venereal disease ; 2S. affections of the 
urethra; 29. of the testicle; 30. of the scrotum and penis; 31. of the female genital 
organs; 32. diseases and injuries of the lower extremity ; 33. amputation. 

The Professor uses his own work on the Princii^les and Prac- 
tice of Surgery as the text-book. 



4. Institutes of Medicine. 

PROFESSOR BENNETT. 



This Course of Lectures is divided into three parts. I. His- 
tology, or a Systematic Account of the Doctrine of the Tissues. 
II. Physiology, or a Systematic View of the Functions of the 
Animal Body, arranged in three groups. 1. Function of Nutri- 
tion ; 2. Function of Innervation ; and 3. Function of Reproduc- 
tion. Ill, Pathological Physiology, in relation to the three 
groups of functions referred to ; but more especially the general 
doctrines of congestion, fever, inflammation, tubercle, cancer, 
morbid growths, and degenerations of texture, parasitic growths, &c. 

These Lectures are illustrated hy diagrams, preparations, and occasional experiments. 
Every Saturday a demonstration is given from 11 to 12, a..m., under a series of micro- 
scopes, illustrative of the properties, mode of development, and functions of the various 
tissues and organs of the animal body. Examinations of the Class will also be held at 
stated periods. 

Ti'xt-hook. — Outlines of Physiology. By John Hughes Bennett, M.D., &c. Small Svo, 
woodcuts. Edinburgh. 

Summer Course. 
Practical Histology, and the use of the Ificrosco^je. 
This Course is divided into, — 1, Lectures on the construction of 
Microscopes, as instruments of Physiological and Pathological re- 
search, and as a means of diagnosis at the bedside. 2. The mode 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 43 

of employing the various parts of the apparatus, 3. The prac- 
tical demonstration, examination, and description, by each Student, 
of all the textures and fluids of the animal body, in health and 
disease ; examination of an extensive histological collection of 
objects, and experimental investigation into the phenomena of 
contractility, ciliary action, inflammation, &c. 

This Course is an Appendix to that of the Institutes, and an introduction to the 
higher kinds of Clinical Study. 

Text-book. — A.n Introduction to Clinical Medicine, &c.. Lectures iv. and v By John 
Hughes Bennett, M.D., &c. Third Edition. Edinburgh, 1857. 



5. Midwifery and Diseases of Women and Children. 

PROFESSOR SIMPSON. 

The Course of Instruction comprises, — 

I. 1st, The anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive 
organs, and their products ; 2d, Natural and morbid parturition ; 
3c?, The pathology of the puerperal state ; 4th, The physiology and 
pathology of pregnancy ; 5th, The special pathology of the female 
sexual organs ; and 6th, The hygiene and diseases of infancy and 
childhood. 

II. Clinical Lectures are given once a week during the Session, 
on Diseases of Women, in connexion with No, 12 Ward, Royal 
Infirmary, which the Managers of that Institution have placed at 
Dr. Simpson's disposal for this purpose, 

III. Weekly Examinations and Demonstrations in Obstetric 
Operations will be conducted on Saturdays in the Class-room, at 
the usual Lecture hour, by the Class Tutor, under the superintend- 
ence of the Professor. 



6. Clinical Medicine. 

PROFESSORS BENNETT AND LATCOCK. 

This Course, as directed by Dr, Bennett, is composed of two 
parts, — 1. Lectures on Tuesdays and Fridays, in which the Stu- 
dent's attention is first directed to the methods of examining the 
patients by interrogation, observation of symptoms, percussion, 
auscultation, the use of the microscope, and of chemical tests ; 
subsequently to the history and treatment of cases in the wards. 
2. Visits on the other four days of the week to the Clinical Wards 



44 COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

of the Infirmary, at which the Student is taught to examine for 
himself the condition of the patient, form a diagnosis, and suggest 
a treatment. 

Text-books. — Introduction to Clinical Medicine, third edition, 
12mo, numerous woodcuts, Edinburgh ; or Clinical Lectures on 
the Principles and Practice of Medicine. By John Hughes 
Bennett, M.D., &c. Third edition, 8vo, 500 woodcuts. Edinburgh. 

This Course, as conducted by Professor Laycock, comprises : — 
1. Bedside instruction in physical, physiognomical, and diathetic 
diagnosis. 2. The examination and treatment of cases by the 
student under the guidance of the Professor. 3. Small evening 
classes for the special training of the students in the use of the 
Stethoscope, and other means of Clinical research. 

Text-hook. — Dr. Laycock's Principles and Methods of Medical 
Observation and Research. 



7. Clinical Surgery. 

PROFESSOR SYME. 



The objects of this Course are to teach the discrimination of 
Surgical diseases, by pointing out their distinctive characters in 
the living body ; and to impress the principles of treatment, by 
showing their application in practice. With these views, all the 
patients whose cases come under consideration are placed before 
the Students in the theatre of the hospital, when, with due regard 
to their feelings, the opinions entertained as to the seat and nature 
of the malady are freely expressed, and the means of remedy 
deemed requisite are administered, either at the same time, or 
upon some other more convenient occasion. The Lectures are de- 
livered at 12 o'clock on Mondays and Thursdays, and the hospital 
is visited daily. 

The Text-Book is the Professor's " Principles of Surgery." 



8. Anatomy. 

PROFESSOR GOODSIR. 

Winter Courses. 
I. Lectures on Anatomy, at 2 p.m. — The objects of this Course 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 45 

are the Demonstration and Description of the Structure of the 
Human Body, from the physiological point of view ; the parts 
being displayed and explained with reference to their actions 
and functions. 

The members of the Junior Division of the Class meet in sec- 
tions under the Demonstrators for the study of Microscopic 
Structure, and of parts which cannot be distinctly seen in the 
Theatre during lecture. 

Specimens of Elementary Anatomy are arranged for private 
study in an apartment provided for this purpose, and open from 
9 A.M. to 4 P.M. 

Microscopic Structure is examined and demonstrated in a spe- 
cial class-room, provided with simple and compound microscopes. 

One Gold and two Silver Medals are awarded to First Year 
Students for written answers to a series of questions proposed in 
the Theatre. The first competition takes place at the end of 
November, the three following at the end of each succeeding 
month, the final one at the end of the Winter Session. 

The following work may be consulted in connexion with the 
Lectures : — Quain's Elements of Anatomy, edited by Dr. Sharpey 
and Mr. Ellis. 

Fee, £4 4 

Second Course, . . . . . . 3 3 

Third Course, ...... Free. 

Perpetual Ticket, . . . . . . 6 6 

II. Anatomical Demonstrations, by Mr. Turner, at 4 p.m. — 
In this Course, which is conducted in the Theatre, the Structure 
of the Human Body is displayed and demonstrated topographically, 
from the surface inwards, and with reference, more particularly, to 
the relative position of parts. Mr. Turner gives Demonstrations 
of the minute Anatomy of the Viscera to the Senior Division of 
this Class, in the class-room for Microscopic Anatomy, instead 
of the Demonstrations in the Theatre, every Friday after the 
Christmas recess. 

Fee, . . . , . . .£220 

When taken along with Practical Anatomy, . . 1 1 Qi 

Third Course, ..... Free. 



46 COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

III. Practical Axatomy, under the superintendence of the 
Professor, assisted by the Demonstrators, AVilliam Turner, M.B., 
London ; John Cleland, M.D., Edinburgh ; and Henry S. Wilson, 
M.D., Edinburgh. 

The Dissecting-rooms are open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and on 
Saturdays from 9 to 12 noon. 

The Manuals enaployed are Demonstrations of Anatomy by Professor Ellis, and 
Holden's Manual of the Dissection of the Human Body. 

Fee. . . . . . . .£330 

No Perpetual Ticket for this Course. 

Summer Courses. 

I. Lectures on Comparative Anatomy, by Mr. Goodsir. — The 
Course is open to those engaged in Practical Anatomy during the 
Summer. 

II. Practical Anatomy, as in Winter. 

Fee, £2 2 

III. Anatomical Demonstrations in the Theatre and Class- 
room for Microscopic Anatomy, by Mr. Turner, as in Winter. 

This Course is open to those engaged in Practical Anatomy 
durini; the Summer. 



9. General Patholog-y. 

PROFESSOR IIENDERSOX. 



In these Lectures the Causes, Processes, and Phenomena of 
Diseases are treated of as separate and distinct subjects of study, 
with the view of exhibiting the general facts or laws proper to 
each of these departments of Pathology. Accordingly, the Course 
is divided into three Sections, as follows : — 

1. Etiology, or the Causes of Disease, e.g., the operation of cold 
and heat ; nature, &c., of morbid poisons. 

2. General ])athology of the functions morbidly affected, in 
Pathological Physiology, as of digestion, respiration, &c., &c., or 
disease. 

3. General Pathology of the Symptoms and Signs of Disease, 
each considered by itself, e.g., pain, haemorrhages, convulsions, 
&c. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 47 

10. Natural History. 

PEOFESSOR ALLMAN. 

I. The Zoological Lectures embrace a general view of the 
Animal Kingdom, an exposition of the principles which should 
guide us in its study, and of the laws of a philosophical classifi- 
cation. They are occupied with the demonstration of the five 
great plans recognisable among animals, namely, Vertebrata, 
Annulosa, Mollusca, Radiata, and Protozoa ; the subordinate 
groups into which each of these admits of being divided are de- 
fined and illustrated, and the laws of their Distribution in Time 
and space examined. 

II. The Geological Lectures are occupied with an examination 
of the physical forces which have brought about the present con- 
dition of the earth's crust, considered under two distinct aspects : 
1. Its mode of formation ; 2. The successive periods of time which 
have elapsed during its formation. Under this second head the 
earth's crust is considered more particularly with reference to the 
remains of organized beings which are entombed in it, and the 
students' attention is specially directed to the value of zoological 
laws in the interpretation of geological phenomena. 

III. The Mineralogical Lectures embrace the general principles 
of Crystallography. The six great systems of Crystals are ex- 
plained, and their laws demonstrated. The various physical pro- 
perties of minerals, and the value of these properties in the diagnosis 
of species are considered. The more important mineral species are 
described. 



11. Practice of Medicine. 

PROFESSOR LAYCOCK. 

The entire Course extends over two Winter Sessions. 

1. Introductory. At the commencement of each Session the 
attention of the Class is carefully directed to the nature, diagnosis, 
and management of constitutional diseases, and to the influence of 
diathetic states on local affections. 

2. Special diseases are then discussed as they affect the blood, 
the nervous system, and groups of organs. 

The subjects of the Course for the ensuing Session will be dis- 
eases of the skin and of the thoracic and abdominal viscera. 

Examinations for a Prize and Certificates of Honour are held at 
the close of the Session. 



48 COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

12. Medical Jurisprudence. 

PROFESSOR TRAILL. 
[See Faculty of Law, p. 37.] 



13. Medical Psychology: 

With Practical Instruction in Mental Diseases. 
PROFESSOR LAYCOCK. 

This Course is divided into two distinct parts — systematic 
and practical. 

I. Medical Psychology. — A systematic Course, open to gentle- 
men of all professions. In this Course, — 1. So much of Psychology 
and of the Laws of Life will be considered as may be necessary to 
set forth the Principles of a science of Mental Physiology, based 
on the Anatomy and Physiology of the Nervous System. The 
doctrines of this division will be introductory to the succeeding 
practical divisions of the course. 2. Mental Pathology. 3. 
Mental Therapeiitics, or the principles of the Medicinal and Moral 
Treatment of Insanity, and of analogous affections of the feelings 
and judgment. 4. Mental Hygiene, or the Prevention of Insanity 
and of nervous affections in general. This division will include 
an examination of the means suitable for maintaining a sound 
mind in a sound body. 

Gentlemen, not medical, who may propose to attend the Course, 
are recommended to acquire a general knowledge of the Anatomy 
and Physiology of the nervous system in man and animals, and of 
the instincts of animals and vegetables, if not already acquainted 
therewith. 

Text-books. — Dr. Laycock's Mind and Brain, or the Correlations of Consciousness 
and Organization ; Sir H. Holland's chapters on Mental Physiology. 

II. Practical Instruction. — This practical division of the 
Course can only be attended by Members of the Systematic Class. 
The Students of this division are instructed in a course of twelve 
lectures at an asylum in the diagnosis and treatment of mental 
diseases, and in the general management of Hospitals for the 
Insane. 

III. Written and clerical Examinations of the Class are held at 
the conclusion of the Course, and Certificates of Uonour are pub- 
licly awarded. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 49 

A Prize, value three guineas, is offered by Dr. W. A. F. Browne, 
one of Her Majesty's Commissioners in Lunacy, for the best Essay, 
by a member of the Class, On the Psijcholorpj of Diseases generally. 

Dr. Gilchrist also offers a Prize, value £2, to the holder of the 
First Certificate of Honour. 



14. Botany. 

PROFESSOR BALFOUR. 

The Course of Botany is a general one, open to all Students. 
It consists of — 

1. Vegetable Organography, or an Account of the Tissues and Organs 
of Plants, illustrated by Specimens, Drawings, and Microscopical Dissec- 
tions. 

2. Vegetable Physiology, or an Account of the Functions of Plants, 
illustrated by the Microscope and Experiments on Living; Plants. 

3. Classification of Plants, or an Account of the different IModes of Ar- 
rangement, with illustration of the Classes and Orders of the Vegetable 
Kingdom by means of Living Specimens and of Plants from the University 
Herbarium. 

4. Geographical Botany, or an Account of the Distribution of Plants 
over the Globe. 

5. Palteontological Botany, or a description of Fossil Plants, of their re- 
lation to each other and to the present Flora, illustrated by Specimens 
from the Museum. 

The work used as a text-book is Professor Balfour's Class-Book 
of Botany. 

1. Lectures are given at the Royal Botanic Garden every Mon- 
day, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, at 8 a.m., from 
the beginning of May till the end of July. 

2. Examinations in the Mathematical Class-room at the College, 
every Wednesday, at 3 p.m. Pupils who Avish to be examined, 
and especially those who wish Certificates for examination, must 
give in their names. 

3. Besides the Lectures, Demonstrations are given on the Natural 
Orders in the open ground of the Garden, on the Preparations 
in the Museum of Economic Botany, and on the Plants in the Hot- 
houses. In visiting the latter. Pupils are taken in parties of about 
a dozen at a time. The Demonstrations are given on Mondays, 
Wednesdays, and Fridays, from 9 to 10 a.m. 

4. Histological Class for instruction as to the use of the 

D 



50 COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

Microscope in examining Vegetable Structure, meets on Tuesdays 
and Thursdays at 9 a.ji. The Class is conducted by the Professor 
and his Assistant. 

5. Saturdays occupied with Excursions and Demonstrations in 
the fields. 

6. Rooms at the Garden open to pupils for the consultation of 
Books of Plates, Periodicals, and other Botanical Works ; as well 
as for the examination of recent and dried Specimens of Plants, 
and for the use of the Microscope. 

7. Prizes for Herbaria, Essays, Microscopical Preparations, and 
Cumpetitive Examinations. 

8. Excursion for Eight or Ten Days at the beginning of 
August. 

Prizes offered in the Botanical Class for Summer Session 1861. 

1. Gold Medal for the best and approved Herbarium of Phanerogam- 
ous Plants and Ferns collected within twenty miles of Edinburgh. 

2. A Prize of Two Guineas is offered by Dr. W. A. F. Browne for the 
best and approved Essay on the Relations of Insects and Plants, il- 
lustrated by the connexion of the Lepidoptera with species of Salix, Popu- 
lus, Alnus, Corylns, and Urtica, in the district round Edinburgh. The 
Essay to be accompanied by Specimens. (See Die Oflanyen uud Raupen 
Deutschland. Von O. Wilde. Berlin, 18fi0.) 

3. A Prize will be given for the best aud approved Experimental 
Essay on the effects of Li>:ht and Darkness on the Opening and Closing 
of Leaves aud Flowers. (For Reference, see Class-13ook of Botany, p. 
500 and pp. 530537.) 

4. A I'rize will be given for the best and approved Experimental 
Essay on the Functions of the Liticiferous Vessels. (For References, 
see Class-Book of Botany, pp. 30 and 425.) 

Facilities will be given for making Observations and Experiments 

at the Botanic Garden. 
All these Essays to be sent to the Botanic Garden on or before 

1st July 1861, and to be accompanied with mottoes and sealed 

notes as usual. 

5. A Prize is offered by Dr. Gilchrist, Dumfries, for the best and ap- 
proved Collection of F(.ssil Plants from Midlothian. (To be given in 
on or before 1st July 18G1.) 

G. A Prize will be given for the best and approved Series of Speci- 
mens and Di.ssections illustrating the Organography of the British 
Genera of Rosacese. (To be given in on or before 1st July IfJGl.) 

7, A Book or Hooks of the value of Three Guineas will be given by 
Messrs. P. Lawson and Son for the best and approved Series of Speci- 
mens and Dissections illu.strating the Form and Structure of the follow- 
ing Grasses : — Agrostis alba, Avena pubescens, Brachypodium sylvati- 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 51 

sum, Bromus asper, Catabrosa aquatica, Festuca ovina or any of its 
varieties, Hox'deura murinum, Pliaiaris aruudinacea, Poa trivialis, and 
Piiragmites communis. 

Complete Specimens of the Grasses, with the root, stem, leaves, 
and flowers, to be dried and fastened on paper, as well as 
Dissections of the flowers. The paper to be similar to that 
shown at the Botanic Garden. The names of the species with 
the authorities to be given, and the specimens to be collected, 
as far as possible, in native localities. 

8. A similar Prize will be given by Messrs. P. Lawson and Son for 
the best and approved Series of Specimens and Dissections of twelve 
varieties of Cultivated Wheat. 

Complete Specimens to be dried and fastened on paper, as in 
No. 7, with Dissections of the flower and fruit. The name of 
the variety to be given with the authority, and the source 
whence it was obtained. 

Tiiese two sets of Dissections to be given in on or before 1 5th 
June 1861. It is understood that the successful Collections 
shall be placed at the disposal of Messrs. Lawson. 

Students competing for these Prizes should make the Collection 
and Dissections in Autumn, when the Grasses and Cei'eal 
Grains are in good condition. 

9. A Prize will be given to the Pupil in the Senior Division of the 
Class who shall acquit himself best at the Monthly Competitive Exami- 
nations, which are to be conducted in the Class-room by means of written 
questions and answers, without any aid from books or notes. 

10. A similar Prize will be given in the Junior Division of the Class. 

11. A Prize will be given in the Junior Division of the Class for Dis- 
sections executed during the Course. The nature of the Dissections to 
be intimated in May or June 1861. 

12. A Prize will be given in the Histological Class for a Series of 
Microscopical Preparations executed during the Summer Session of 
1861. 

For particulars in regard to all these Prizes, see Notice at the 
Botanic Garden. 

N.B. — Tt is understood that the successful Essays, Models, Prepara- 
tions, and Dissections (unless otherwise specified) shall be added to the 
Public Collection at the Botanic Garden. 

Statistics of the Botanical Class for 1860. 

Number of Pupils, 247 : of these 207 were medical, and 40 general student?. Num- 
ber of Lectures, 64 ; Practical and Histological Demonstration!!, 00 ; Monthly Competi- 
tive Examinations, 3 ; Weekly Examinations, 11 ; Weekly Excursions, 11. 

The following were the Excursions : — 1. Penicuik, Auchendinny, and Roslin. 2. 
Gorebridge and Arniston. 3. Queensferry and St. David's. 4. Midcalder, Dalmahoy, 



r)2 CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 

and Currie. 5. Galashiels, Abbotsford, and Melrose. 6. Bridge-of-Eain, Moncreiff Hill, 
Kinfauns, and Kinnoull Hill, Perth. 7. Drem, Gullane, and Longniddry. 8. Kincar- 
dine and Charleston. 9. Kinross, Lochleren, Benarty, Lochgelly. 10. Slatefcrd, Colin- 
ton, Pentland Hills, Halbie's Howe. 11. Callander and Ben Ledi. 

Number of Species collected during the Excursions: — Phanerogamous Plants, 6-30; 
Ferns and their allies, 40; other Cryptogamous Plants, 130. Total, 800. IS' umber of 
miles travelled by railway, steamboats, and walking, about 640 ; the largest number 
at an Excursion (Bridge-of-Earn and Perth), 160; the smallest (Habbie's Howe), 25. 
The greatest distance travelled in one day's excursion (Callander and Ben Ledi), 120 
miles. The longest walk in a day (Habbie's Howe), 25 miles. Total expenses of trips, 
■23s. lOd. 



CLASS PEIZE LISTS.— 1860. 
FACULTY OF ARTS. 

I.— HUMANITY CLASSES. 
Soiior Class. 
The Straton Gold Medat. (value £1(0. after a comparative trial of fifteen Candidates, 
was awarded to George Grim, Aberdeen Granjinar School, and Junior Humanitv 
Class. 

A Broxze Medal to Stodart Macdonald, Durham Usliam School, and Junior Humanity 
Class. 

Book Prizes were also awarded in the following order : — 

1. Latin Hkxameters,— Subject— //a^/«, — Henry Cowan, Ayr Academy, and Junior 
Humanity Cla.^s. 

t;. Translation of Liv3-. Lib. vi. caiis. 15 to 2(1 inclu.sive, with English Introduction, 
— Prize divided between David L. Adams, Blairgowrie Parish School, and William 
T. Henderson, Kirkcaldy Burgh School. Tlie following were deemed worthy of 
Honourable Mention,— David Hunter, Kelso (Grammar School ; William M. Mil- 
roy, Edinburgh Academy; James Simpson, Edinburgh High School, and Junior 
Humanity Class. 

3. Conversion of the Direct Form of Speech, in Liv. vi. 15, into the Indirect or Re- 

ported form, and the Keported into the Direct, with an English Translation,— 
William M. Milroy. iit sujira. Honourable Mention, — David 1-. Adams, nt supra ,■ 
"\Villiam T. Henderson, ut supra. 

4. English Fs«ay on the Points of Bescmblance and DiflTerence between the Comilia 

Cfiituria'a of the Romans and tlie British House of Commons, and between the 
Roman Senate and the British House of Peers.— John Campbell, Auchterarder 
Parish School, and Junior Humanity Class. Honourable Mention, — Thomas J. 
Wilson, Edinburgh High School. 
.*). A Summary of the Course of Lectures cm General Grammar delivered during the 
Session,— ]. James Hay Scott, Edinburgh Institution. 2. Peter Cattanach, Edin- 
burnh High School. Honourable Mention,— Daniel M'Kerchar, Breadalbane 
Academy. 

6. Private Studies durint; the Session in Curtius,— William T. Henderson, ut supra. 

In Livy, — Ehenezer Barton. 

7. For Proficiency in Ancient Geography,— Stodart Macdonald, w/ *M;ira. Honourable 

Mention, William T. Lumsden, Edinburgh High School; and Duncan Stewart, 
Perth Academy. 

8. Recitation,- Alexander D. M. Black, Musselburgh High School, and Junior Hu- 

manity Class. 
!). Kxtra ortlhioii Prize to John Campbell, ul supi-a, for a selection of Notes, critical 
and illustrative, and of jiaralUI jiassages, to the portions ot Horace read during 
tlie Session. 
1(1. Prizes were also assigned before the Christmas Recess, for work done during the 
Summer half-year of l(j5y, to Ehenezer Barton and William A. C. Macfarlane. 



CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 53 

Junior Class. 
Prizks were awarded for — 

1. Translation of a portion of Q. Curtius,— to Mnir T. S. Darling, Kelso Grammar 

School, and John Fairley, Culross Kndowed School — Equal. Honourable Mention, 
— Joliu Pitt, Dollar Academy, and Thomas S. Mitchell, Edinburgh Southern Aca- 
demy. 

2. Conversion of a Direct Speech in Curtius to the Indirect or Reported Form, — 

Daniel L. Ferguson, Stirling High School, and John Cameron, Aberdeen Grammar 
School — Equal. Honourable Mention. — George Hill Di'k, Edinburgh Normal 
School, and James Nicoll, Laurencekirk Free Church School. 

3. Spicilegii'.m,— 1. George H. Dick, nt snj ra. 2. Henry Henderson, Perth Academy. 

Honourable Mention,— John E, Tinsley, Edinburgh Normal School, and John K. 
Wardrop, Heriot's Hospital. 
■i. Private Studies in Curtius,— G. H. Dick, itf, supra. 

5. For Proficiency in Ancient Geography, the following six were equally distinguished 

viz., Moir T. S Darling, Robert Donald, George H. Dick, Daniel L. Ferguson, 
Henry Henderson, Thomas S. Mitchell. 

6. Extra ordinem Prizes for General Excellence during the Session were awarded to 

Robert Primrose Douglas, Dryfesdale Parish School, and John Pitt, Dollar Aca- 
demy. 

Prizes will be awarded for Studies prosecuted during the Summer Vacation : — 

1. For Readings in Quintus Curtius, beginning at the Sixth Book. Accurate prepara- 

tion of a limited amount — nut less than two books <'»//*•(' -will far outweigh any pro- 
fessed quantity. A Journal to be kept from month to month, and given in to the 
Professor the first week of November. A Trial Examination will take place on 
the Second :f;iturday of November laGil. 

2. A. Public Prize will be awarded to the Student who shall eive in the greatest 

number of well-selected passages in the yEneid of Virgil, which shall appear to 
have been borrowed from, or suggested by parallel passages in, the Hiad of Homer. 
The corresponding passages, in both Poets, to be quoted at length, referred^to, 
and translated into English. 
The above notices apply to all intending members of the Senior Humanity Class during 
Session 1860-(il, without exception. 

JAMES PILLANS, Professor. 

II.-GREEK CLASSES. 
Advanced Class. 

I. Straton Prize (£10), for Greek Composition,— Alexander Wallace Milroy, Edin- 

burgh. 

II. Prizks for General Excellence, — 1. Alex. Wallace Milroy, Edinburgh. 2. Ken- 
neth Moodv Stuart, Edinburgh. 3. Allan Cadell, Edinburgh. 4. George Elder, 
Guthrie. 5. Francis H. Muir, Edinburizh. Subsequent Order of Merit,— 1. Gil- 
bert Lawrie, Caithness. 2. William Affleck, Edinburgh. 

III. Special Prize for Philology given by John Muir, Esq., 16 Regent Terrace, Ken- 
neth :M. Stuart, Edinburgh. 

IV. Private Rkadixgs, — !. Summer Series— The Plays of Sophocles,— A. W. Mil- 
roy, Edinburgh. '1. Winter Series— Plato's Phaedrus, A. W. Milroy, Edinburgh. 

Second Class. 

I. Prizes for General Excellence,—!. (Rankin's Prize, £.j) James Kennedy, Benares. 

2. William Cowan, Blairgowrie. 3. Stodart Macdonald, Edinburgh. 4. Wm. M. 
Milroy, Edinburgh. 5. William A. C. iM'Farlane, Edinburgh, (j. James Blyth. 
Montrose. 7. Charles Moinet, Edinburgh. 8 R. \V. Cochran Patrick, Ayrshire. 
9. A. Moody Stuart, Edinburgh. KJ. William Iverach, Kirkwall. Subsequent 
Order of Merit,— 1. Francis Mudie, Dundee. 2. George Ross, Fordoun. 

II. Special Prize for Philology given by John Muir, Esq., 16 Royal Terrace,— James 
Stott, Edinburgh ; W. A. C. M'Farlane— Equal. 

III. Special Prize for Historical Study of the Peloponnesian War,— Thos. Finlayson, 
Edinbuigh. 

IV. Special Prize for Poetical Translation, — Wm. Cowan, Blairgowrie. 

V. Private Readings— First Series— Thucydide=, vi. l-HO.-James Kennedy, Ben 
ares Second Series— Euripides Hippolytus,— James Kennedy, Benares. 



o4 CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 

Junior Class. 

I. Trizes for General Excellence,— I. Robert P. Douglas, Lockerbv. 2. Archibald 

Sutherland, Caithness. 3. David Garment, Comrie. 4. James Nicoll, Lauretice- 
kirk. J. Jas. Milne, Cauvin's Hospital, fi. John Pitt, Dollar Academy. T.Henry 
Henderson, Kinclaven. 8. Henry Cowan, Ayr. 9. James Glass, Dollar. 10. 
David M. Connor, Airdrie. Subsequent Order of Merit, — 1. Daniel Ferj^uson, 
Bridge ot Allan. 2. John Fairley, Culross. 3. John Cameron, Alortlach 4. 
John Burt, Kirkcaldy. 5. John M'Ewan, Kirkcudbright. 6. John J. Irvine, 
Edinburgh. 

II. Priv.ate READrxGS,— First Series— Xenophnn's Memorabilia, Book I.,— R. P. 
Douglas, Lockerbv. Second t^eries— Homer's Odyssey, XII.,— R. P. Douglas, 
Lockerby; W. Johnston, Lochniaben — Equal. 



X.B.—BvMMER RKAnrNGS prescribed to those entering the Seco.vd Ci-a83, Session 
1860-61,— Homer's Odyssey, Books 1-12 ; for those entering the Adva.nced Class, 
Session 186(»-61,— Ho.mer's Iliad, Book 12. 

The Entrance Exaiminatiox for those entering the JrxiOR Class, next November, 
will be, as usual, on the Greek Grammar and the first fifteen chapters of the 
Gospel of Luke. 

JOHN S. BLACKIE, Professor. 

IIL-MATHEMATICS. 
First Class. 

PhizES,— 1 David Laird Adams, Perthshire— Medal. 2 and 3. Francis W. R. Cowley, 
Red River Settlement, Charles Russell, Edinburgh — tliese are all very ncarlv equal. 
4. Andrew Moody Stuart, Edinburgh. 5. James Veitch, Edinburgh (i. William 
Iverach, Orkney. 7. James Robertson Buntine, Ayrshire. 8. Patrick G. Craigie, 
Perthshire. 9 and in. Donald JIacRae, liiverness-«hire; David Pringle, Berwick- 
shiie— Equal. 11. John Laurie, Selkirkshire. 12. John S. Gutlirie, Ayrshire. 13. 
Charles E. Paterson, Edinburgh. 14. W. Hamilton Dunlop, Ayrsliire. l.i. and 
I'J. Alexander Milne Dalryrajde, Edinburgh. William Steel. East Lothian— Equal. 
17- Andrew J. Young, Perthsh.ire. 18. AVilliam M'Donald, Ross shire. 19. and 
iO. David JL Connor, Lanarkshire, Charles Jerdan, Dalkeith— Equal. 21. and 22. 
John A- Hope, Lanarkshire, Jonathan ?iliddleton — Equal. 

Prize for the best Essay — Thomas R. S. Nivison, Dumfriesshire. 

Certificates of Merit,— \. avd 2. James R. Caird, James Cameron— Equal. 3. Charles 

"M.Cook. 4. William M. Bell. .'i. H. F. Grant, fi. George Keith. 7. Alexander 

Scott. 8. P. :Mactarlaiie. P. and H'. George Marjoribanks, Adam B. Thom — 

Equal. II. Davidson Hunter. 12. John Henderson. l;3. David Hamilton. 14. 

Thomas W. M'Dowall. 15. \V. M. Alilroy. 

Seco7ul Class. 
Prizes, — 1. Georce Ross, Kincardineshire— Medal. 2 Alexander Anderson, Aberdeen- 
shire. 3. John F. Halket, Perthshire. 4. John Simpson, Kinross shire. T). James 
Dewar, Perthshire. *'<. and 7. Donald M'Martin, Perthshire. Robert Smith, Ayr- 
shire—Equal. 8. Ebenezer J. Barton, Dumfriesshire. !). and 10. James Blyth. 
Kincardineshire, Colin H. M'Lachlan, Buteshire— Equal. 11. Alexander Robert- 
son, Edinburgh. 12. Kobert RanUine, Clackmannanshire. 13. A.F.Hutchison, 
Fifeshire. 14. William Alexander, Berwickshire. 

Cerlificales of Merit,— \ Samuel M. Brodie. 2. Arthur R. "\V. Rainey. 3. and 4. 
Donald M'Phail. Joseph T. Sinton— I'.qual. ,5. Christoidier -M. Davidson, fi. 
Thomas Scott. 7. James Hope. 8. Kenneth Moody Stuart. 

Third Class. 
Prizes, — !. John M'Beath, Perthshire— Strato.n Medal 2. John Ross, Caithness. 
3. W. A. P. Johnman, Edinburgh. 

Certificates of Merit,— I. Francis Barclay. 2. George Romanes. T. Cedric Vaughan. 



The subjects for Fssay for the next Session are :— First CLASS,~On the Theory of 
Parallels. Seco.vd Class,— On Induction. Third Class,— On the Summation 

"* ''*^"''''*' PHILIP KELLAND, Professor. 



CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 55 

IV. -LOGIC AND METAPHYSICS. 

I. Business of the Sessiox. 

Honours awarded by the Votes of the Class for Eminence in the Ordinary Business of 
the Session. 

Senior Dif)si07i. 
1. (Medal), Gilbert Laurie, Caithness. 2. Robert Finlayson, Laurencekirk 3. Goorpe 
W. Thomson, Perth. 4. Peter MacFarlane, Balfroii. 5. David K. Miller, Pertn- 
shire. 6. D. Douglas Bannerman, Ormiston. 7. Janaes Ross, Elgin. 8. James F. 
Thomson, Perth. 
The following Gentlemen obtained Honourable Mention :— John Calderwood, Edin- 
burgh ; William R. Campbell, Ayr ; Thomas P. Henderson, Berwickshire ; James 
Renton, Eyemouth ; George MacDonald, Halkirk. 

Junior Division. 
1. (Medal), John Ross, Wick. 2. Ebenezer Barton, Middleby 3. R. W. Cochran 
Patrick, Ayrshire. 4. John D. Harper, Leith. 5. AVilliam'B Darling, Dunferm- 
line. 6. Hugli Elder, Dunfermline. 7- Thomas Neave, Dundee. 8. AlexanderM. 
Dalrymple, Leith. 9. George Ross, Fordoun. 10. James Masson, Kintore. 11. 
Dan. Wallace, Paisley. 12. Arcliibald Jolly, Bowden. 13. Francis Mudie, 
Dundee. 14. Alexander H. Japp, Alontrose. 15. Alan Cadell, Edinburgh. 
The followingGentlemen obtained Honourable Mention :— Joseph T. Sinton, Eyemouth ; 
Thomas Finlayscni, Greenock ; Andrew W. Milro)-, Crailing ; William Alexan- 
der, Greenlaw ; Hugh Gordon, Sutherlandshire ; James Cameron, Alyth ; Samuel 
Cha])man, Sheffield; Charles Jerdan, Dalkeith; William Iverach, Kirkwall; 
John S. Guthrie, Ayrshire : John Thomson, Liverpool ; Roderick MacDonaid, 
Lewis; William MacDonald, Urray ; David Johnston, Glasgow; David Don, 
Brechin. 



II. BuSrNESS DURING THE VACATION, 1859. 

I. For Essay on the " Nature and Philosophical Remedies of Error," — D. Douglas 

Bannerman, Ormiston. 

II. For Examination. — 1. James Hope, Edinburgh; 2. James Ross, Elgin. 



Honours proposed for the ensi/ixg Vacation, 1860. 
.) The Nature and Methods of Induction. 
Essays,^ [b.) An Exposition and Criticism of Berkeley's Metaphysical Theory of 

Matter. 
Examination.— The " De Augmentis Scientiarum" of Bacon. 



vs, j [b.) 



Essays to be given in before 1st December next, dislinguislied bp a Blotto, and ivith the 
Aulfwr's name in a sealed note attached. Professions with a view to examination 
to be intimated at the same date. 

ALEXANDER C. F BASER, Proyi'ssw. 

v.— RHETORIC AND BELLES LETTRES. 

I. Prose CoMPOSTTrov. — 1. (Straton Prize) William Coldstream, Edinburgh. 

William Kennedy, Forfarshire— Equal. 2. John W. Foyer, Edinburgh. 3. Wil- 
liam ilackintosh, Inverness-shire. 4. John R. M'Laren, Edinbnrf;h. 5. Francis 
Deas, Edinburgh, (i. Charles Henderson, Fifeshire. 7 David Ross, Perthshire. 
8. Thomas M. ^lure, Avrshire. 9. William C. M'Donald, Edinburgh. 10. Henry 
G. C. Smith, Edinburgh. H. James Robertson, Quebec. 12. William F. Hunter, 
Argyleshire. 13. John Lidgate, Edinburgh. 14. James Smith, Nairnshire. 15. 
Robert Allan, Edinburgh. 

Speciax. Prize for Improvement during the Session.— Peter Barr, Lanarkshire. 

Worthy OF Honourable Mention. — Andrew Mackay, Forfarshire; Walter Graham, 
Ross-shire ; Samuel Barclay, Linlithgowshire ; John D. Bruce, Edinburgh. 
Robert Wright, Dumfriesshire; Matthew Kinnaird, Edinburgh; David Shaw. 
Forfarshire; William Smith, East Lothian ; John Smart, Edinburgh; James 
Glasgow, Lanarkshire; John Robertson, Forfarshire. 

II. Poetical Composition (Subject, Ulysses and the Sirens).— James Robertson, 
Quebec; James Burness, Forfarshire. 



56 



CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 



III. — Elocution. — (Decided by tlie votes of the Class) — 1. John Forrest, South Caro- 
lina. 2. David N. Coulson, Aberdeenshire. 

W. EDMONDSTOUNE AYTOUN, Professor. 

VI.-MORAL PHILOSOPHY CLASS. 

HoNOtiRs awarded for general eminence and ability in the ordinarr business of the 
Class. 
1. (Straton Prize) John M. Robertson. Brouahty Ferry. 9. Robert Finlavson, 
Laurencekirk. .3 Thomas Dunloj), Kilmarnock. 4. Alexander Hay Jaj)]), Mon- 
trose. ."). John M'Beath, Blair-Atbol. 6. (jili)ert Laurie, Caithness. 7- George 
W. Thomson. Perth. 8. D. Douglas Bannernian, East Lothian. 9. James Kil- 
eour, Edinburiih. JO Alexander Ewins;, Northumberland. 11. John Morgan, 
Kinross-shire, li'. William Affleck, Edinburah. IH. James Hope, Roxburgh- 
shire. 14. Andrew Smith, Shetland. l.o. David K. Miller, Perthshire. 16. 
Donald Cameron, Inverness-shire. Not Classifikd.— George D. Low (cegrotat), 
Dundee. 

Worthy of Hoxoitrakle JIention. — John Creighton, Dumfriesshire; William A. P. 
Johnman. Perthshire; Alexander O. Johnston, Fit'eshire; AV. K. ilacAdam, 
Liverpool; D. Rogers, Edinburgh ; Robert Rankin, Clackmannanshire ; Kenneth 
M. Stuart, Edinburgh. 

For English Verses. — Snhjecf, "Freedom."— I. Thomas Dunlop, Kilmarnock. 2. 
Alexander Ewing, Northumberland. 

For Work done during Summer Vacation, 18J9. 
Kssap, — Vacan t . 
Kjcamination, — On Selected Philosopliical Readings. — James Simpson, Linlithgow. 

Prizes proposed Fon ensuinc; Vacation, ISt'o. 
Essaps. — Any of the following SuVjjects :— 1. Kant's Ethical Theory. 2. Analogical 
Evidence, and the mode of its emi)loyment by Bishop Butler. 3. Dogmatism and 
Scepticism, their analogy and contrast— particularly in relation to Moral Truth. 
Studies. — Either (1.) Cicero's treatise " De Finibus," Books iir., iv.. v. ; or(f?.) Wheweil's 
" Elements of Morality, including Politv," Books i., in., iv., first ten chapters 
of: (The Author's vii-ws arc farther explained and defended in his " Lectures on 
Systematic Morality.") To which add Wardlaw's "Cliristian Ethics." 
The Competition to be open to Students of tlie Class for the past or the ensuing Session. 
Essays to be given in by 1st December ISfJo. liistinguished by a motto, and to have the 
author's name in a sealed note attached. Professions of Study to be intimated at 
the same date 

P. C. MACDOUGALL, Professor. 

VII. -NATURAL PHILOSOPHY CLASS. 
First Diris-ion. 
First Straton Prize and Medal. — I. William Eadie, Perthshire. 2. Andrew Mac- 
kay, Forfarshire. 

Secoml Division. 

Second Strato.v Prize and Medal.- 1. William Logan, Berwickshire. 2. James 
Halket, Perthshire. 3. John Matheson, Ross-.shire. 4. John .Munro, Caithness- 
shire. ;"). Donald MacMartin, Perthshire, ti. and /. George Romanes, Berwick- 
shire; James Thomson, Midlothian,— Equal. 

Third Dirision. 

1. Alister J. M'Tavish, Inverness-shire. 2. Robert Smith, Ayrshire. 3. James Dewar, 

Perihsliiie. 4. William L. Ker, Peeblesshire. r> <>. and 7- James Burness, 

Forfarshire; James Gordon, Perthshire; John Affleck Hope, Lanarkshire, — 

Equal. H. Charles Fraser. Alidlothian. 

The following Gentlemen also distinguished themselves in the Competitions:— S('CO«rt 

/>//•«/(';(,— Alexander Kydd; Robert .Munro.- 77//rd Z>«i-i.s/ow,— George Brown ; 

Francis Braidwood; .lohn G. Dalgieish ; William Fraser; Archibald N. -Mackray- 

The greatest number of correct written answers to questions on the Lectures was given 

by Andrew Mackav. 

JAMES D. FORBES, Professor. 

ALEXANDER C. ERASER, Dean of the Faculty of Arh 



{ 



CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 57 

FACULTY OF DIVINITY. 

VIII.— HEBREW CLASS. 

Junior Classes. 
Proftciency,— George P. Hunter, B.A., Kirkcudbrightshire. Essay,— William Smith, 
B.A., Haddingtonshire. 

Senior Clnrscs. 
Proficfency.- 1. James Johnston, M.A., Kirkcudbrightshire. 2. Robert William 
Walker, M.A , Haddiii,y;tonshire. Essay.— 1. Ar. Bryson, Lanarkshire. 2. 
A. O. Huod, Angus. 3. William Porteous, St. John's, New Brunswick. 

DAVID LISTON, Professor. 

IX —DIVINITY CLASS. 
Subjects of Prize Essays to be written during the vacation, and given in on or before 15th 
November : — 
For Students of the First Year:— 1. The Necessity of Divine Revelation. 2. The 

JVIythic Theory of Strauss. 
For Students of the SecoTid Year : — 1. Adaptation cf Christianity to the condition of 
Man. 2. Corifirmation of the Truth of Christianity derivable from the Character 
and Conduct of Judas Iscariot. 
For Students of the Third and Fourth Years :—l. The Origin of Sacrifices. 2. The 
connexion aiid relative importance of the External and Internal Evidences of 
Christianity. 

THOS. J. CRWNVORX), Professor. 

JAMES ROBERTSON, Deaii of the Faculty of Divinity . 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

X.-PRACTICE OF MEDICINE CLASS. 

First Class.— Thomas S. Gray. Second Class.— Wm. Ward Ledham ; John O'Neil; 
George Granville Bantock, John D. Niven, Equal. 

T. LAYCOCK, Professor. 

XL— MIDWIFERY CLASS. 

Gold Medal,— 1. Wm. Ward Leadam, London. Silver Medals,— 2. Wm. Car- 
michael M'Intosh, St. Andrews. 3. Alex. Ballantyne, Dalkeith. 4. Pierce 
Adolphus Simpson, B.A. Cantab. 5. Robert Selby, Portobello. 

Certificates of Merit were awarded to Andrew R. Cameron, Aberdeenshire. John 
Roberts, Caernarvon. Colville Brown, Northumberland. David Lyell, Newburgh. 
* . George Monteath, Dumfries-shire. John Brown, 

Perthshire. Gideon Rutherford, Sutherlandshire. John Ross, Edinburgh. 

J. Y. SIMPSON, P/-o^ewor. 

XIL-SURGERY CLASS. 

1. Thomas S. Grav, Perthshire. 2. Peter M. Dens, Yorkshire. 3. Arthur Reid, 
Morayshire. 4". Andrew Bonthron, Fife. 5. David Ross, Skye. 

J AS. MILLER, Professor. 

XIIL-ANATOMY CLASS. 
SeniorDivision. 
For the best Dissection, or series of Dissections, of the Ganglia and Nerves in the Mam- 
malian Heart; accompanied by a Description of the Nervous Arrangement 
displayed. No Competitor. 

Junior Division. 
For Written Exercises,— 1. William Wi.'-hart, M.A. King's College, Aberdeen. 2. John 
Wallace, M.A. King's College, Aberdeen. 3. James Grierson, Dumfries. 

JOHN GOODSIR, Professor. 
* Name not known. 



58 



CLASS PRIZE LISTS, 
XIV.-CHEMISTKY CLASS. 



Gold Medal,— John Smith. 

Bronze Medals,— S. Dana Hayes. R. B Finlay. William .TcfiFrey. John Roberts. 

James Grierson. J. C. Goodiiie. James Anderson, J. M. Girdwood, Thomas 

Walker — Equal. James Carmichael, T. L. Harrison — Kqual. A. S. Coubrough. 
CERTiprcATKs IF HoNoiiR,— David James; J. M'Conchie: W. Logan: B. Anningson, 

J. Berrvman-Equal. L. Greg; G. Campbell, J. Rhiiid, J. Hiddell-Foual. J. 

Baker Brown, H. Wilkinson — Equal. Dyce Duckworth, R. L. Dymock, J. R. 

Lloyd, R. Roiaertson- Equal. R. Alexander, Cedric Vaughan— Equal. C. A. 

Rose, H. G. \Villianison~ Equal. W. M. Banks, James Procter — lujual. A. F. 

Carrington ; M. C. Douglas: .lohn Robertson ; William Rae, Alexander Grant — 

Egual. P. M. Braidwodd, Edmund Lovett, R. M. Pollok— Equal. K. Tliorburn, 

W. C. Twynham, J. Wilson, Joseph Wood— Equal. 

LYON PLAYFAIR, Pro/essm: 

J. H. BALFOUR, Dran of the Faculty of Medicine. 



FACULTY OF LAW. 

XV.-LAW OF SCOTLAND. 

Stratox Prize for the best Essay,— John Shiress Will, Brechin. 

Prize for the best written Answers to Questions, — Walter \V'ilIiamson, Barrhead. 

'ihe following Students were also greatly distinguished : — Francis Deas, Edinburgh; 
David Crichton, Cumnock; William Tliomson, Stonehaven; Robert M. Gloag, 
Eldinburgh ; Alexander Dewar, Dull, Perthshire; William Dingwall Fordyce, 
Aberdeenshire; Neil MacdonaldCamiibell, Dundee; William Rintou!, Perthshire; 
James Falconer, Ediniiuigh; Donald Eraser, Inverness; David Milne, Parkside, 
Dundee; William Stuart Fraser, Edinburgh; James Aitken, Edinburgh; Henry 
Gordon, Perth ; Alexander Robertson, Blairgowrie ; Adam Mackenzie, Tannadice, 
Forfarshire: William Smith, Dundee; Robert Hamilton, E;dinbur<»h ; James 
Brunton, Edinburgh; W. K. AL-icdonald, Edinburgh ; Alexander Murray, Banlf; 
Charles Halford, Jliddlesex ; L. A. Inkson, Inverness; James Web^-tcr, F'ortar ; 
James Webster, Kirriemuir; Robert Russell Simpson, Bathgate ; James Elder, 
Haddinaton; R. Lindsav Oliphant, Edinburch ; James Knox, Airdrie: Thomas 
Smith Mitchell, Cupar-Fife; James Milne, Forfar; T. J. Orphoot, Edinl:)urgh ; 
John B. Gilruth, Blairgowrie ; James Young Guthrie, Edinburgh : Joseph Wilson, 
Dunse ; Malcolm Sinclair Irvine, Eklinburgh ; Lewis Grant, Elgin. 

J. S. .MORE, Professor. 
XVL -CIVIL LAAV CLASS. 

I. ExAiMiNATioNs. — 1. Colin Mackenzie, F'dinburgh (Straton Prize). 2. Robert 

Strachan, Eldinbnrgh. t^. George L. Gal))raith, Australia. 4. William Inglis, 
Fifeshire. 5. Robert Beatson, ildinburgh. 

II. p;ssAv.s.— I. Robert Strachan (Si'KcrAL Prize). 2. Robert Beatson. 3. Colin 
Mackenzie. 4. John W'ishart, Fifeshire 5. George L. Galbraitli. G. James 
Gibson Stark, Edinburgh. 7. John William Gordon, Edinburgh. 8. William 
Inglis. 

III. Vacation Essay prescribed to last year's Students.— Thomas White, Leven, 
Fifeshire (Forensic Prize). 

[The Forensic Prize, open for Competition among the Students of Session 1859-(i(l, will 
be given for the l)est Essay " On Ihe Irares afthe lioiiian Lair in the Coiinuon Lair 
and the Old Slatute Law of Seolliind." The F'ssays must be given in to the Lib- 
rarian, at the College Library, on or before the Jst of November.] 

A. CAMPBELL SWINTON, Professor. 

XVII.-CONVEYANCING CLASS. 

1. First or Straton Prize to Students of the first year,— Thomas White, Leven, 

Fifeshire. 

2. Do. to Students of the second year,— James Keir, Morayshire. 

3. Second I'rize to Students of the tirst year, -James S. Farmer, Fifeshire. 

4. Do. to Students of the second year,— W'illiam Brown, Ediiiburgli. 

The following other Gentlemen eminently distinguished themselves in the Examina- 



CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 59 

tions -.—Thomas Grier, Hamilton; William Eintoul, Perthsliirc ; Willinm C. 
Murray, Cupar-Fife; Walter Williamson, Renfrewshire; Robert T. jM-hean. 
Glasgow; James Campbell Smith, Greenock; James SpaklinR, Forfarsliiic ; 
Georse Hart, Paisley ; John Thomas Simson, Aberdeenshire; James Moir, Blair- 
gowrie : John Cowan, junior, Edinburgh; John M'Farlane, Dundee; Alexander 
Archibald, Edinburgh; John Scott. Blairgowrie; James F. Edwards, Fnrtar; 
William Humphrey, Aberdeen; Alexander Blair, Edinburgh: John Neilson, 
Renfrewshire; John Turnbull, Glasgow; and David Hail. Kincardineshire. 

ALEXANDER M. BELL, Professcrr. 

A. CAMPBELL SWINTON, Bean of the Faculty of Lav.\ 



List of Honours av/arded for Summer Session 1860. 
BOTANICAL CLASS. 

1. — Prize for an Essay on the Spontaneous Movements tcJiich take place 

in Plants. 

1, Stephen James Meintjes, junior, Cape of Good Hope. 

2. Robert Bannatyne Finlay, Edinburgh. 

II. — Prize given hy Messrs. P. L.^wson & Son /or Dissections often namal 
■carieties of Cultivated Barley. 

1. Francis Metcalfe Duncan, Edinburgh. 
Additional Prize given hy Professor Balfour. 

2. William Ramsay M'Nab, Edinburgh. 

Certificates of Merit. 

3. Peter M. Braidwood, India. 

4. John Morehead M' Parian, Stirlingshire. 

III. — Prize given by Messrs. P. Lawson & So:< for Specimens and Dissec- 
tions illustrating the Structure of ten named Species of Grasses. 
William Ramsay M'Nab, Edinburgh, 

IV. — Prize given hy Dr. John M'Nab, Bunessan, near Oban, for a Col- 
lection of British Marine Algce, xdih Essay on their ProjJerties. 
Robert Brown, Caithness (Silver Medal), 

V. — For Monthly Competitive Examinations, conducted hy Written 
Exercises in the Class-room, without the aid of Books or Notes. 

Senior Division. 

(Number of Competitors, 13 ; Total Value of Answers, 261.) 

1. William Carmichael M'Intosli, St. Andrews (value 202). 

2. Charles Millingen, Constantinople (194). 

Certificates of Merit. 

3. Robert Bannatyne Finlay, Edinburgh (173). 

4. James Rhind, Cheshire (161). 

5. Motto No. 122 (138). 



60 CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 

Junior Division. 

(Number of Competitors, 63 ; Total Value of Answers, 233.) 

1. Peter ^laury Deas, Yorkshire (rahie 213). 

2. John Roberts, Castell (159). 

3. James C. Grierson, Zetland (158). 

4. John Watson Wemyss, St Andrews (147). 

5. Angus Macdonald, Aberdeen (131). 

Certificates of Mi rlt. 

6. John Craw, junior, Jedburi^h (123). 

7. Kenneth Moody Stuart, Edinburgh (120). 

8. C. Mellis Douglas, Canada (116). 

9. George Campbell, Perthshire (UI5^, 

10. William iMitehell Banks, Edinbur-h (QQ). 

11. William Walford, Worcestershire (96). 

12. James Heron, Aberdeenshire (94). 

VI. — For a Series of Dried Specimens illustrating the Inflorescence 

of P hints. 

1. Hubert Henry Wilkinson, Rotherhara, Yorkshire. 

2. David Wright, Ayr. 

Certificates of Merit. 

3. Daniel Anderson. Fife. 

4. John Watson Wemyss, St. Andrews. 

5. William Laidlaw Purves, Edinburgh. 

VII. — For a Series of Tweuty-four 3Iicroscopical Preparations illnstratintj 
the Minute Structure of carious parts of Plants, prepared by Pupils 
of the Histoloyical Class. 

1. P. K. Vartan, Constantinople. 

2. James Wilson, Edinburgh. 

3. James Bi'inis, Caithness-shire. 

4. James Rhind, Cheshire. 

Certifcates of Merit . 

5. Thomas Walker. New Brunswick. 

6. John Fortune IMackinlay, Edinburgh. 

7. James Ste\vart Sadler, Perthshire, 
n. James Watson, Edinburgh. 

9. Robert Bannatyne Finlay, Edinburgh. 

VIII. — For Assistance in condncJhaj the Duties of the Class, more especially 
in the Ilistoluifical part of the Course, and in 3Iuseum icork. 

1. James Gerhard Reid, Cape of Good Hope. 

2. Percy Boulton, Yorkshire. 

3. Valentine O'Connor Conyngham, Monte Video. 

4. William Ramsay M'Nab, Edinburgh. 

J. H BALFOUR, Professor, 
and Dean o/Ihe Faculti/ of medicine. 



J 



61 



PART IV. 

GRADUATION IN AETS, MEDICINE, LAW, AND THEOLOGY. 

I.-D EGREES IN ARTS. 

Candidates for the Degree of Master of Arts must have com- 
pleted four years of Academical Study, and attended the following 
Classes, viz., Latin, Greek, Mathematics, Logic and Metaphysics, 
Moral Philosophy, Natural Philosophy, and Rhetoric ; of which 
Greek, Logic and Metaphysics, Moral Philosophy, and Natural 
Philosophy, must have been attended during separate Sessions. 

Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts must have com- 
pleted three years of Academical Study, and attended the follow- 
ing Classes : — Latin, Greek, Mathematics, Logic and Metaphysics, 
and Moral Philosophy ; of which Greek, Logic and Metaphysics, 
and Moral Philosophy, must have bean attended during separate 
Sessions, 

It is recommended that Students, at the close of the second or 
third year of the regular Curriculum in Arts, should offer them- 
selves for that part of the Examination which relates to Classical 
proficiency. 

The Books and Subjects upon which Candidates are to be exa- 
mined are specified from year to year. 

The Examinations take place on certain days in April, pre- 
viously announced by advertisement. They are conducted in 
writing, and also, at the option of the Examiners, orally. The 
Names of Candidates must be announced to the Dean of the 
Faculty of Arts in March. 

Successful Candidates are classified in the order of their profi- 
ciency ; and the List of Graduates afiaxed to the College Gates, 
and announced in the Newspapers. 

Degrees in Arts are publicly conferred by the Chancellor (or 
Vice' Chancellor) and the Senatus Academicus, on a day in April, 
previously announced by advertisement. 

The Fee for the Degree of M.A. is i'3, 3s. ; for the Degree of 
B.A., £l, lis. 6d. ; for the Classical Examination, 10s. Payments 
previously made by Candidates at the Classical Examination, or 



62 



GRADUATES IN ARTS, 1860. 



for the Degree of B.A., are deducted from the Fee for the Degree 
of M.A. 

GRADUATES IN ARTS IN 1860. 

On the 25th April, the Senatus Academicus conferred the Degree of 
M.A. on— 

John A. Banks. 

David Black. 

James Burness. 

John C. Deans. 15 

.5 William Dickson. 

R. W. Ferrier. 

Daniel Forbes. 

John W. Foyer. 

John M. Hamilton, B.A. 20 

10 John U. Hillhouse, B.A. 

George P. Hunter, B.A. 

And the Degree of Bachelor of Arts on 

William Affleck. 

D. Doue^las Bannerman. 

Daniel Cameron. 

John Crawford. 15 

5 James Deans. 

John W. Gibson. 

James Glasgow. 

George Grim. 

Cumberland Hill. 20 

10 James Hope. 

William F". Hunter. 

Kenneth Moody 



Matthew Kinnaird. 
John Macrae. 
Arch. Neilson Mackray. 
John Matheson. 
Robert ^Mathewson, B.A. 
Robert Mitchell, B.A. 
Robert Munro. 
Alexander Neilson, B.A. 
W. C. Shearer, B.A. 
John G. Smieton. 
WiUiam Smith, B.A. 

James Jsffrey. 
WilHam A. P. Johnman. 
David K. Miller. 
Thomas M. Mure. 
Adam Macintyre. 
William Macintosh 
William C. Macdonald. 
William Nicolson. 
Robert Rankin. 
John Rutherford. 
John Russell. 
Stuart. 



The Examination in Classics, preparatory to a Degree, was passed by 
the following Gentlemen : — 



James Blyth. 
William Eadie. 
(ieorge Elder, 
.lames Gibson. 
Alex. 0. .Johnston. 
Tiiomas F. Johnstone. 
William R. Ker. 



William Millar Nicolson. 
.Tames ( )liver. 
10 John Baton. 

R. W. Cochran Patrick. 
James Patterson. 
John Pringle. 
John Steel. 



The naraea of the Graduates, as given above, are placed iu 
alphabetical order. In the subjoined Lists, the names are arranged 
in the Order of Merit in the several departments, as ascertained 
by the Seven Days' Examination in April. In some Departments, 



GRADUATES IN ARTS — ORDER OF MERIT. 



63 



in which the names of several Gentlemen do not appear, those 
Gentlemen have passed the Examinations at the end of a previous 
Session. 



First Day. — Latin. 



^Y. Millar Xicolson. 
liutlierford. 
Pringle, ^ 

Baunerman, >-Equal. 
Grim, } 

Dickson; 



i Equal. 



John C. Deans, 
Moody Stuart, 
Alex. 0. Johnstone 

James Deans. 
Matheson, lT?^„ni 

John W. Gibson, l^^^'^''^- 
Patterson, > -p, i 

James Gibson, / ^ 
Elder. 



Thos. F. Johnstone, ^ 



Jeflfrej', 

Cochran Patrick, 

Steele, 

Forbes, ") 

Smieton, > Equal. 

Blyth, J 

Johnraan, \ 

Oliver, f 

J. Paton, f 

Eussell, ) 

Affleck. 

Miller. 

W. Nicolson 

Macrae. 

Mure. 

Rankin. 

Munro. 



3 



• Equal. 



Equal. 



Second Day. — Greek. 



W. Millar Nicolson. 
Moody Stuart. 
Bannerraan. 



Affleck. 

K' [ '=^-'- 

A.^O. Johnston, | £,„»,. 

Cochran Patrick, ^ 
Elder, I 

Jeffi-ey, [-Equal. 

Rankin, | 

Rutherford, i 

J. ^\ . Gibson, > -p ■, 
Patterson, j ^ ' ' 



Matheson, ) -p , 
Miller, ;|Equal. 

James Gibson, "\ 
T. F. Johnstone, ! 
Pringle, r 

W. Nicolson, ) 



Equal. 



Dickson, "i 

), [-Equal. 



^ Equal. 



Munro, 

Steel, 3 

James Deans, 

Russell, 

Ker, 

Macrae, 

Smieton, 

Johnman 

J. C. Deans, ^Equal 

Eadie, 

John Paton 



Equal. 



64 



GRADUATES IN ARTS — ORDER OF MERIT. 



Matheson. 

Hill, 1 T. 1 

Jolinman, ) ^ 



Third Bay. — Mathematics. 



Munro, 

Glasgow, ) ,. 1 

Miller, ■ 1^^"^^^- 

Eaukine. 

Gibson. 

Moody Stuart. 

Black, l^^^'^^- 

Rutberford. 

Macintjre, 

Hunter, 

Hojie. 

Macrae, ) t^ , 

Burness, j ^ 



Equal. 



I Equal. 



Mure, 

Mackray, 

Jeffrey. 

Russell. 

Mackintosb. 

Cameron. 

Foyer. 

Kinnaird. 

Affleck. 

Kicolson. 

Crawford, ) -r. ■, 

Banks, l^^"''^^- 

James Deans, \ 

Jobn C. Deans, >Equal. 

Grim, ) 

Macdonald. 

Smieton. 

Forbes. 

Dickson. 



Fourth Day. — Logic and Metaphysics. 



Macintosh. 

Cameron. 
Bannerman. 



Black, ■) 

Mackray, / 
Miller. 
Kicolson. 
Moody Stuar 
Smieton. 
Hope. 
Dickson. 



Mackintosb. 
Cameron. 



Equal. 



Affleck. 

Jeffrey. 

Riitbortbrd 

Kinnaird. 

Banks. 

Russell. 

Jobn man. 

Hunter. 

Macintyre. 

Glasgow. 

Matlieson. 

Macrae. 



(- Equal. 



J 



Burness, "] 

Forbes, | 

Gibson, 

Hill, 

Slunro, 

Rankin 

Crawford, 

Foyer, 

Grim, 

Macdonald, ) 

Mure. 

Jobn C. Deans. 

James Deans. 



> Equal 



Bannerman, 

Macki-ay, 

Miller. 

Nicolson. 

Kinnaird. 

Smieton. 

l]bick. 

Macrae. 

Affleck. 

Dickson. 



I Equal 



Fifth Bay. 

I Moody Stuart 
I Matbeson. 
I Russell. 

(irim. 

(ilasgow. 

Foyer. 

Banks. 

IMunro. 

]\racint3'rc. 

Rutberibrd. 

Ciibson. 

Jobnman. 



Moral PniLosornY. 
Hill. 



^(acdonald. 

Forbes. 

Crawford. 

Burness. 

Hope. 

Rankin. 

Jeftiey. 

Himter. 

dobn C. Deans. 

Mure. 

James Deans. 



ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1860. 



65 



Sixth Day. — Natural Philosophy. 



Hillliouse. 

Munro. 

Matheson. 

Macrae. 

Burness. 

Hunter. 

Mitchell. 



Matliewson. 

Ferrier. 

Smith. 

IMackray. 

Forbes. 

Hamilton. 

Black. 

Shearer. 



Neilson. 

John C. Deans. 

Smieton. 

Banks. 

Foyer. 

Kinnaird. 

Dickson. 



Shearer. 

Mackray. 

Forbes. 

Foyer. 

Burness. 

Macrae. 

Black. 



Seventh Day. — Rhetoric and Belles Lettres. 



Hunter. 

Hamilton. 

Banks. 

Hillhouse. 

Kinnaird. 

Matheson. 

Dickson. 

Mathewson. 



Smith. 

Ferrier. 

Mitchell. 

Neilson. 

John C. Deans. 

Munro. 

Smieton. 



EXAiMIMTIOX PAPERS FOR DEGREES IX ARTS. 

GRTEN IN APEIL I860. 



I. LATIN.— Foe the Minimum. 



The following narrative to be translated into Latin Prose : — 
T. Q. Flaminius, the son of that Flaminius who perished at Lake 
Thrasimenus, was sent, being Consul, against Philippus, king of the 
Macedonians, who had assisted Hannibal with money and forces, and had 
provoked to arms the Athenians, then allies of the Roman people. Now 
the Athenians had engaged in war with Philippus upon grounds by no 
means sufficient. Two Acarnanian youths entered the temple of Ceres, 
not being initiated, with the rest of the crowd. Their speech easily be- 
trayed them. Being conducted to the priests of the tenjple, although it 
was manifest that they had entered through a mistake, they were put to 
death as if for an unutterable crime. The Acarnanians, much moved by 
the violent death of their countrymen, in order to avenge them, sought 
assistance from Philippus, w^ho laid waste the territory of Attica with fire 
and sword, took several cities, and laid siege to Athens itself. 

IL 

Translate into English the following passages : — 

Consulum designatorum alter, Flaminius, cui eae legiones quae Placen- 
tiae hibernabant sorte evenerant, edictum et literas ad consulem misit, ut 

E 



66 ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1860. 

is exercitus Iclibus Martiis Ariraini adesset in castris, Huic in provincia 
consulatum inire consilium erat, memori veterum certaminum cum Patri- 
bus, quae tribunus plebis et quae postea consul, prius de consulatu qui 
abrogabatur, dein de triumplio liabuerat : invisus etiam Patribus ob 
novam legem, quam Q. Claudius tribunus plebis adversus senatum, uno 
Patrum adjuvante C. Flaminio, tulerat ; ne quis senator, cuive senatorius 
pater fuisset, maritimara navem quae plus quam trecentarum ampborarum 
asset, baberet. Id satis babitum ad fructus ex agris vectandos : quaestus 
omnis Patribus indecorus visus. Res, per summam contentionem acta, 
invidiam apud nobilitatera suasori legis Flaminio, favorem apud plebem 
alterumque inde consulatum, peperit. Ob baec ratus auspiciis emen- 
tiendis, Latinarumque feriarum mora, et consularibus aliis impedimeutis 
retenturos se in urbe, simulato itinere privatus clam in provinciam abiit. 
— LivY, xxi. 63. 

III. 

nata mecum consnle Manlio, 
Seu tu querelas, sive geris jocos. 
Sen rixam, et insanos amores, 
Seu facilem, pia Testa, somnum, 
Quocnmque lectum nomine Massieum 
Servas, moveri digna bono die, 
Descende, Corvino jubente, 
Promere languidiora vina. 
Non ille, quanquam Socraticis madet 
Sermonibus, te negliget borridus. 
Narratur et prisci Catonis 
Saepe mero caluisse virtus. 
Tu lene tormentum ingeuio admoves 
Plerumque duro. Tu sapientium 
Curas, et arcanum jocoso 
Consilium retegis Lyaeo. 
Tu spem reducis mentibus anxiis 
Viresque, et addis cornua pau2)eri. 
Post te neque iratos trementi 

Regum apices, neque militum arma. 
Te, Liber, et si laeta aderit Venus, 
Scgnesque nodum solvere Gratiae, 
Vivaeque produccnt lucernae, 
Dura rediens fugat astra Phoebus. 

HoR. Carm. in. 21. 

Nos numcrus sumus, et fruges consumere nati, 
Sponisi Penelopae, nebulones, Alcinoique 
In cute curanda plus aequo operata juventus : 
Cui pulcrum fuit in medios dormire dies, et 
Ad strepitum citliarae cessatum ducere curam. 

Utjugulcnt homines, surgunt de nocte latrones 
Ut teipsum serves, non cxpergisceris ? atqui 
Si noles sanus, curres bydropicus : et ni 



ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 18G0. 67 



Posces ante diem libnim cum kimine, si non 
Intendes animura stiidiis, et rebus honestis, 
Invidia vel amove vigil torquebere. Nam cur 
Quae laedunt oculos, festinas deraere ; si quid 
Est animum, differs curandi tempus in annum ? 
Dimidium facti qui coepit habet. Sapere aude : 
Incipe. Vivendi recte qui prorogat horam, 
Kusticus expectat dum defluat aninis : at ille 
Labitur et labetur in orane volubilis aevum. 

HoR. Epist. I. 2. 27. 

IT. 

Quos ait Caecilius, comicos stultos senes, bos significat credulos, obli- 
viosos, dissolutos : quae vitia sunt non senectutis, sed inertis, ignavae, 
somniculosae senectutis. Ut petulantia, ut libido magis est adolescen- 
tium quam senum — nee tamen omnium adolescentium — sed non proborum : 
sic ista senilis stultitia (quae deliratio appellari solet) senum levium est, 
non omnium. Quatuor robustos filios, quinque filias, tantum domum, 
tantas clientelas Appius regabat, et senex et caecus. Intentum enim 
animum, tanquam arcum, babebat, nee languescens succumbebat senec- 
tuti. Tenebat non modo auctoritatem, sed etiam impevium in suos : 
metnebant servi, verebantur liberi, carum omnes babebant : vigebat in 
ilia dome patrius mos et disciplina. Ita enim senectus bonesta est, si se 
ipsa defendit, si jus suum retinet, si nemini emancipata est, si usque 
ad extremum spiritum dominatur in suos. Ut enim adolescentem, in quo 
senile aliquid ; sic senem, in quo est adolescentis aliquid, probo : quod 
qui sequitur, corpore senex esse poterit, animo nimquam erit. Septimus 
milii Originum liber est in manibus : omnia antiquitatis monumenta 
colligo : causarum illustrium, quascunque defendi, nunc quum maxime 
conficio orationes : jus augurium, pontificium, civile tracto : multum etiam 
Graecis Uteris utor : Pytbagoreorumque more exercendae memoriae gratia, 
quid quoque die dixerim, audierim, egerim, commemoro vesperi. Hae 
sunt exercitationes ingenii, baec curricula mentis : in bis desudans atque 
elaborans, corporis vires non magnopere desidero. — Cic. de Senec. xi. 

I. LATIX. — For the Maximum. 

Translate into Englisli tbe following passages : — 

I. 

Videmusne, apud quos eorum ludorum qui gymnici nominantur magnus 
bonos sit, nullum ab iis, qui in id certamen descendant, devitari dolorem? 
apud quos autem venandi et equitandi laus viget ; qui bunc petessunt 
nullum fugiunt dolorem. Quid de nostris ambitionibus, quid de cuplditate 
honorum loquar ? quae flamma est, per quam non cucurrerint ii, qui baec 
ollm punctis singulis colligebant ? itaque semper Africanus Socratlcum 
Xenopbontem in manibus babebat ; cujus in primis laudabat illud, quod 
diceret eosdem labores non esse aeque graves imperatori et militi, quod ipse 
honos laborem leviorem faceret imperatorum. Irfed tamen boc evenit, ut in 
vulgus inslpientium opinio valeat bonestatis, cum ipsam videre non possint. 



68 ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1860. 

Itaque famaet multitudinis judicio moventur, ut id honestiiin putent quod 
a plevisque laudetur ; te autem, si in ocidis sis multitudinis, tamen ejus 
judicio stare nolini, nee, quod ilia piitet, idem te putare pulcherrimum ; 
tuo tibi judicio est utendum : tibi si recta probanti placebis, turn non 
modo tu te viceris, quod pauUo ante piaecipiebam, sed omnes, et omnia. 
— Cic. Tusc. Quaest. ii. 25. 

11. 

" Quotiens causas belli et necessitatem nostram intueor, magnus mihi 
animus est, liodiernum diem, consensumque vestrura, initium libertatis 
totius Britanniae fore. Nam et universi servitutis expertes, et nullae 
ultra terrae, ac ne mare quidem securum, imminente nobis classe Komana : 
ita proelium atque arma, quae fortibiis honesta, eadem etiam ignavis 
tutissima sunt. Priores pugnae, quibus adversiis Eoraaiios varia Ibrtuna 
certatum est, spem ac subsidium in nostris manibus habebant : quia 
nobilissimi totius Britanniae, eoque in ipsis penctralibus siti, nee sen'ien- 
tium litora aspicientes, oculos quoque a contactu domiiiationis inviolatos 
liabebamus. Nos, terrarum ac libertatis extremos, recessus ipse ac sinus 
famae in liunc diem defendit : nunc terminus Biitanniae patet : atque 
omne ignotum pro magnifico est. Sed nulla jam ultra gens, nibil nisi 
fluctus et saxa, et infestiores Eomani : quorum superbiam frustra per 
obsequium et modestiam effugeris : raptores orbis, postqnam cuncta 
vastantibus defuere terrae, jam et mare scrutantur : si locuples hostis est, 
avari : si pauper, ambitiosi : quos non Oriens, non Occidens, satiaverit : 
soli omnium, opes atque inopiam pari affectu concupiscunt : auferre, 
trucidare, rapere falsis nominibus, imperium ; atque ubi solitudinem 
faciunt, pacem appellant." — Tac Agric. 30. 

"NAHio delivered the speech of whicli the above is an extract ? and to 
whom is it addressed ? 

111. 

Frigida sufficient velantes iiiguina panni, 
Exiguusque cibus, mersa rate naufragus assem 
Dum rogat, et picta se tempestate tuetur. 
Tantis parta malis, cura majorc metuque 
Servantur : misera est magiii rnstodia census. 
Dispositis praedives liamis vigilare cohortcm 
Servorum iioctu Liciiuis jubet, attoiiitus pro 
Electro, signisque suis, Phrygiaqiie columna, 
Atque chore, et lata testudine : dolia nudi 
Non ardent Cynici ; si fregeris, altera fiet 
Cras domus : aiit eadem pi umbo commissa manehit. 
Sensit Alexander, testa cum vidit in ilia 
Magnum habitatorem, quaiito lelicior hie qui 
Nil cuperet, qnam qui totum sibi posccret orbem, 
Passurus gestis aequanda pericula rebus. 
Nullum nnmen habes, .si sit prudcntia; sod te 
Nos facimus, Fortuna, Deam. Mensura tamen quae 
Sufficiat census, si quis mc consulat, edam, 



ARTS EXAMINATION PArERS, 18G0. 69 



In quantum sitis atque fames et fii^i^ora poscunt : 
Quantum, Epicure, tibi parvis suffecit in hortis 
Quantum Socratici ceperunt ante Penates. 
Nunquara aliud natura, aliud sapientia (licit. 
Acribus exemplis videor te claudere : misce 
Ergo aliquid nostris de moribus : effice summam, 
Bis septem orJinibus quani lex dignatur Othonis. 
Haec quoque si rugam traliit extenditque labellura 
Sume duos equitcs, fac tertia quadringenta. 
Si nondum in)plevi gremium, si panditur ultra : 
Nee Croesi fortuua imquam, nee Persica regna 
Sufficient animo, nee divitiae Narcissi. 

Juv. Sat. XIV. 300. 

II. GEEEK.— For the Minimum. 

1. Translate the following passage : — 

Hjtifis 5' apKovvTWS Tcepi rwv KeXrcjv eip-rjKores, fiera^i^aao^i.ev ttjv icrTopiav 
eiTL Tovs Tr\7](Tiox^povs TOVTQLs KeXri/3?7pas. Ovtol yap to waXaiou irepi 
TYjS %w/3as aWifKoLS htairoXep.rjaavTe's, ol re l^rjpes fcat ol KeXrot, Kat pLera 
ravra diaXv'^euTes, Kac rrju ■)(^Lopav Kotur] KaTOiKrjaavres, ctl 5' eTrLyap-ias 
TTpos a\\T]\ovs (jvv'^efjievoi, ota ttjv €7rLp.L^i.ap XeyovraL ravrrjs tux^lv tt^s 
Trpos7]yopLas. Auot^ S' e'iivwv a\KLp.wv p.t.x'^evTwv, Kac xwpas viroK€ip.cvr)S 
aya'S)7]s, avi'€(3i] tovs KeXri^-rjpas eiri ttoXv ttj So'^t] irpoeX'^eii', Kai 'PojfxaLOLS 
ToXXoi/s xpoj/ous avTiTa^afj-euovs, p-oXis KaTaTroXep,T]'^r]i'aL. 

2. What was the prominent character of Greek literature when trans- 
ferred from Athens to Alexandria, uuder the Ptolemies ? and mention some 
of its most notable writers. 

3. If 3'ou were writing an account of the doctrines of Socrates, wliat 
ancient authorities would jou consult, and in case of contrary evidence, 
to what authority would you assign the preference ? 

4. Compare and contrast the ancient Greek and the modern English 
drama. 

5. What date does Herodotus give to Homer and Hesiod? 

6. "What opinion does Herodotus express with regard to the historical 
origin of Greek mythology, and how far do you think his views correct? 

7. When did Psammetichas flourish, and for w^hat was his reign re- 
markable ? 

8. In what respects did the Egyptian method of noting time differ from 
that used among the Greeks ? 

9. Describe the situation of the Pyramids according to their geographi- 
cal groups. 

10. What account does Herodotus give of the Egyptian alphabet ; and 
how do the modern discoveries of Champollion bear upon this statement ? 

11. Give a philological analysis of the following words: — 

(1.) avddrip.a. (2.) rep^epos. (3.) eados. (4.) iraTeop.ai. (o.) 6(7aop.ai. 
(6.) ^vu). (7.) evTVTras. (8.) epirv^w. (9.) (TO^L^op.aL. 

12. Turn the following transposed line into Iambic trimeter : — 

ris 0.V (piKoi rois tQu avdpii'irwv KaKcarovs ; 



70 ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1860. 

II. GREEK.— For the Maximum. 

I. Turn into Greek : — 

I am sorry to see you exhibiting so much of the spirit of doubt anrl 
denial, so characteristic of the present age, abounding as it does in all 
sorts of negative criticism. 

On one point I certainly agree with you, that Herodotus tells many 
stories more entertaining than true. At the same time, you are mani- 
festly wrong in holding him clicap as. a historical authority. Setting his 
stories aside, which a man of sense can easily separate, you will find his 
facts confirmed in the most important points by a whole host of modern 
travellers, geographers, and scholars. 

II. Give a philological analysis of the following words : — 

(1.) irvKa^w. (2.) (XKacpis. (3.) eTriKapaios. (4.) e'djKw. (5.) TavrfKeyfis. 
(6.) avapaios. (7.) 'y^avKQnrLS. (8.) eTroiri^o/xat. (9.) Xicraos. 

III. AVhat is the argument of the last Book of the Iliad ? how is it 
connected with the general argument of the Poem ? and could it be dis- 
pensed with, without injury to the poetical unity of the work ? 



III. MATHEMATICS.— For the Minimum. 

1. The straight lines which join the extremities of equal and parallel 
straight lines towards the same parts, are themselves equal and parallel. 

2. Parallelograms upon the same base and between the same parallels 
are equal. 

3. To divide a given straight Hue into two parts, so that the rectangle 
contained by the whole and one of the parts may be equal to the square 
of the other part. 

4. If a point be taken either within or without a circle, and straight 
lines be drawn from it to the circumference, the greatest and least are 
those which pass through the centre, and of all others that which is nearer 
to the greatest, is always greater than one more remote. 

5. The opposite angles of any quadrilateral figure described in a circle, 
are together equal to two right angles. 

6. To describe a circle in a given square. 

7. Define proportionals, and prove that if four magnitudes be propor- 
tionals, they are proportionals when taken alternately. 

8. The sides about the equal angles of C([uiangular triangles are pro- 
portionals. 

'.). Equiangular parallelograms have to one another the ratio which is 
compounded of the ratios of their sides. 

10. The straight lines drawn from the angles of a triangle to the points 
of bisection of the opposite sides meet all in one point, which is the point 
of trisection of each of them. 

11. a. Divide a:* — 2x '^if -f lO.r//^ — 15^* by .r- — 2x^ -f- oy^. 
h. Find the cube of a — b -\- c. 



ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1860. 71 

12. a. Extract tlie square root of 

4a2_ 12a V & + 9& + 12 _ 18^+ -r, 

Cv CI 

b. And tlie cube root of x^ + jf + Bxy {x-\- y). 

13. a. Prove the rule for multiplication of fractions. 

b. Eeduce — ' "^ + — ~ — + — '^— to its simplest form. 
^2 — y2 X 4- y y — X 

14. Solve the following equations : — 

X— 2 X — 1 7 

a. 1- =- 

2^36 

b. ^/x + l = V(ic — 3)-f 2. 

15. Solve : — 

zu xz yz 

^ =1, — ^=2,— ,— = 3. 



x-^ y 'x + z 'y + 

16. Prove the exponential theorem. 

17. Sum the following series to 20 tenus : — 
-a. 1 + 5 + 9 + &C. 

b. l + i+ i, + &c. 

c. 1 — 2 + 4— &c. 

18. Prove the relations between sine, cosine, tangent, and radius : also 
given tan. A = f find sin. A and cos. A. 

19. The sides of a triangle are to one another as the sines of the angles 
opposite them. 

Express the cosine of the angle of a triangle in terms of the sides. 

20. In all the conic sections the tangent bisects the angle between two 
directing lines. 



III. MATHEMATICS.— For Honours. 

1. Prove that a continued fraction is the best possible approximation 
to a given fraction. 

2. Solve, by Cardan's method, the equation : — 

a^ — Aaf -{- ox — 2 = 0. 

3. A garrison contains 100 men and five ofiScers. The patrol consists 
of 12 men and 2 officers. How often per annum should the same man 
serve with the same officer ? 

4. Expand cos. ^a in terras of cosines of multiples of a. 

5. Prove that sm.a = afl — (ij \ fl— fe)') &c. 

6. Explain fully the theory of maxima and minima. 

7. Find the evolute of the cvcloid. 



72 ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 18G0. 



8. Integrate :— 
dx 



h. 



a; V 1 + 3; 
dx 



.t2 V 1 + a;2 
(/a; 



9. Solve the equation ,f — 3 — + 2 v 
aa;2^ dx 



IV. LOGIC AND METAPHYSICS.— For the Minimum. 

1. Describe, according to the Lectures, the respective provinces and 
mutual relations of Psychology, Logic, Metaphysics. 

2. Explain the meaning of the following words : — 

Perception — Attention — Imagination — Abstraction — Conception 
— Thought — Eeasoning — Reason. 

3. What is meant by a Notion, and what by its extension and compre- 
hension ? Arrange the following terms in the order of their extension, 
and also in the order of their comprehension : — 

Man — Biped — European — Animal — Socrates — White Man — 
Being — Native of Greece. 

4. Wliat is meant by the Quantity and what by the Quality of a Pro- 
position ? Give the Logical Symbols wdiich express the Quantity and 
Quality of the following Propositions : — 

Caesar is a tyrant. 

To study Logic is useful. 

No passionate man is judicious. 

Whatever is agreeable to right reason ought to be followed. 

Many men are rash. 

Not many men are Philosophers. 

Convert the preceding Propositions according to the proper rules. 

5. Ofwdiat parts does a logical definition consist? What classes of 
words are logically undcfinable ? Define logically the following terms : — 

Proposition — Syllogism — Logic — Science. 

6. Which of the following are valid Syllogisms ? Which are not, and 
why ? 

* All— EEE— ETO— EAO— lEO— 100. 

7. Construct a Syllogism in Camestres, and reduce it. 

8. Give examples of the Hypothetical and Disjunctive Syllogism — the 
Dilemma — and the Sorites. 

9. Reduce the subjoined reasonings to the form of a Categorical Syllo- 
gism. Test the logical validity of each. Specify the rules which are 



ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1860. 73 

violated where the reasoning is fallacious, and mention the class to which 
the fallacy belongs. 

That which is endowed with reason, is better than that which is not ; 
there is nothing better than the w^orld : therefore the world is en- 
dowed with reason. 

No man can possess power to perform impossibilities ; a miracle is an 
impossibility : therefore no man can possess powder to perform a 
miracle. 

Italy is distressed : therefore it is misgoverned, 

Livy describes prodigies in his histoi-y : therefore he is never to be 
believed. 

We know^ that God exists because the Bible tells us so ; and we know 
that whatever the Bible aflSrms must be true because it is of Divine 
origin. 

Five is one number ; three and two are one number : therefore three 
and two are five. 

10. Give the syllogistic formula for Induction according to Aristotle, 
Whately, and Hamilton. 

11. Explain the general nature of Error, and give the consequent 
arrangement in the Lectures of the occasions of Error. 

12. What is meant by Eeal or Philosophical Induction ? On what 
Faith does such Induction rest ? What are any of the obstacles to the 
development of that Faith into Science, and any of the means by which 
they may be overcome ? Show the nature and weakness of Jnductio jjer 
enumerationem simplicem. Contrast it with the more rigorous inductive 
methods. 

IV. LOGIC AND METAPHYSICS.— For Honours. 

1. Mention any subsequent modifications or developments of the analysis 
of Syllogistic Forms as g-iven by Aristotle. Give an account, in particu- 
lar, of the manner in which Hamilton proposes to simplify the doctrine of 
Mood and Figure. 

2. Give the date of Bacon's birth and death. Enumerate his philoso- 
phical works. Give a short account of each. Explain their respective 
relations to Bacon's Philosophical Scheme as a whole. 

3. What is Bacon's first aphorism in the Novum Organum ? "N^Hiat 
is there meant by "natura?" Distinguish "natura naturata," from 
" natura naturans." Where and how is the latter phrase used by Bacon ? 
What do you understand by "re vel mente observaverit " in the first 
aphorism ? Give various interpretations. 

4. State and criticise Bacon's objections to the Logic current in his 
day. 

5. State fully the examples of "Idola specus" given by Bacon. 



74 ARTS EXAMINATION PAPEES, 1860. 

6. Translate and comment on the following passage : — 

Nos vero non Acatalepsiam sed Eucatalepsiam meditamur et proponi- 
mus : sensui enim non derogamus, sed ministranms ; et intellectum non 
contemnimus, sed regimns. Atque melius est scire quantum opus sit, et 
tamen nos non penitus scire putare, quam penitus scire nos putare, et 
tamen nil eorum quae opus est scire. 

7. Explain and illustrate the " latens processus" and " latens schema- 
tismus." Is the distinction well founded? What does Bacon mean by 
" vindemiatio prima," and what other terms does he apply to it? What 
does he mean by Instantiae Praerogativae ? Mention and illustrate any 
of the classes of such instances. 

8. State, according to Hamilton, the hypothesis of unconscious mental 
agency. AVliat phenomena has it been employed to account for ? Present 
fully and criticise the evidence that has been offered in verification of the 
hypothesis. 

9. Compare and criticise the doctrines of Berkeley and Hamilton with 
regard to exttn-nal perception and the nature of Matter. 

10. Enunciate and criticise Hamilton's hypothesis in explanation of 
our causal judgment. 

V. MORAL PHILOSOPHY.— For the Minimum. 

1. What are the three classes into which the mental phenomena are 
generally divided by philosophers on the continent ? 

2. What would be the place of the Desires and Affections, of Eeid and 
Stewart, under that scheme. 

3. What also, that of the Emotions, of Dr. Thomas Brown ? 

4. Of what special class of our Desires is Avarice an example? And 
how are they generated ? 

5. What peculiarity of mental regard is distinctive of Avarice, as com- 
pared with an ordinary value for money ; and how is the peculiarity to be 
accounted for ? 

6. State Bishop Butler's doctrine of Resentment ; and how far it in- 
volves a moral element. 

7. Does crime extinguish the moral claims of the criminal ? — if not, on 
what ground is capital punishment justifiable? 

8. is P^thics an Art or a Science? and in what respects? 

9. What is Ethology ; and what is its relation to Psychology ? 

10. Distinguish between an inquiry into the nature of Virtue, into the 
principle of Moral Approbation, and into the Criterion of right, respec- 
tively ; and state any relations between them. 

11. Enumerate the chief elements implied in, or immediately accom- 
panying the act of Moral Perception ; and state which of them, if any, 
you regard as distinctively fundamental, — with your reasons. 

12. Give proofs of the natural authority and supremacy of the Moral 
Faculty. 

13. In what sense is morality or moral obligation founded on the will 
of God? Explain fully. 



ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1860. 75 

14. Wherein did virtue consist according to Plato, to Aristotle, and to 
Zeno respectively ? 

15. State the doctrine of Final Causes, the grounds on which it has 
been opposed, and your opinion of these. 

16. On what great doctrine does the scheme of Philosophical Necessity 
mainly rest for its support ; and how is that consideration met by the 
advocates of Liberty ? 

17. What have been held to be the equal and insuperable difficulties 
attaching to the two counter schemes, in virtue of their fundamental 
hypotheses ? ^Vhy, nevertheless, has either been held to be credible ? 
And why one of them to be the preferable and the true ? 

18. State at large your own opinions — with their grounds — on any of 
the points comprised in the preceding question. 



V. MORAL PHILOSOPHY.— For Honours. 

1. What is the general scope and aim of the Philebus of Plato? 

2. What are the rival claims to the designation oi good, with which the 
Dialogue opens ? 

3. How is it shown that the absolute good can be assigned exclusively 
to neither ? 

4. In what, then, is it indicated with probability to consist ? 

5. How is it proposed to judge of the relative pretensions of the two 
claimants ? 

6. What are specified as the constituent elements of all things natural? 

7. Which of them is the Good declared most closely to resemble? And 
which, Pleasure ? 

Translate : — 

20. Ov yap irov hoKovfxev ye, S) Updorapxe, ra rerrapa cKeiva, iripas 
/cat direipov Kai kolvov kol to ttjs airias yeuos, ev aTracn reraprov evov, 
TovTO ev jxev rots Trap' r]/J.2p tpvxw '^^ irapix^v kuI aoo/J.acrKLav e/nTroLovv Kai 
TraiaaPTOS au/xaros larpLKTjv /cat eu ctAAots aXAa (TVPTL^ev Kai aKovfievov 
iraaav Kai iravroiav ao(piav iiTLKaXeXa^ai, twv 5' avrQv tovtojv ovtwv ev 
6\y re ovpaviS Kai Kara /leydXa p.epr}, Kai Trpoaeri KaXQu Kai e'CKiKpivQiv, ev 
TovTOLS 5' ovK apa f.Lep.rjxavTJa'^aL ttjv tQv KaWlarc^v Kai Ti/mcoTdTCjv cpvaiv. 
nPii. 'AW ovbajxws tovto y' dv \6yov e'xot* 2fi. Ovkovv el jult] tovto, 
fJLer^ eKeivov rod Xoyov av eiro/xevoi jSeXriOv Xeyoijiiev, ws 'eartv, a iroXXaKis 
elpriKa/xev, direipov re ev t(2 iravrl iroXv, Kai Trepas bcavov, koI tis e7r' aiiTois 
alrla ov (pavXr), Koap.ovad re /cat awTdrTovcra iviavrovs re Kai (bpas Kai 
fJLTJvas, crocpia Kai vovs Xeyoixevrj OLKaiOTar dv. IlPfi. AiKaioTara dip-a. 
20. 'Zotpia fXT]v Kai vois dvev ^vxv^ ovk dv irore yevoi^rdrjv. IlPfl. Ov 
yap ovv. 20. Ovkovv ev puev rrj tov Alos epe?s (pvcreL ^acrcXiKTjv [j-hv 
i^^XV^) jSaaiXiKov 5e vovv eyyiyveadai 5ta ti)v rrjs alrias bvvajXLv, ev 8e 
dXXoLs dXXa KaXd, Kad' o (piXov eKdarois Xeyeadai. 

8. Explain as distinctly and fully as you can the meaning and use of 
TO direipov in the philosophy of Plato. 



76 ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1860. 

9. Is it hinted in tlie close of the preceding passage, that the soul, even 
of the supreme Deity, is originated and derived ; or what is meant ? 

10. What is the general theory of pleasure and paii^ enounced in this 
dialogue ; and how far does it agree with or differ from the Eleatic, and 
the Aristotelic respectively ? 

11. Does Plato appear to have admitted any pleasures purely mental 
and intellectual? if so, specify. 

12. On what principle does his distribution of the pleasures, into the 
pure and not-pure, proceed ? Give pi'ominent examples of the foi-mer 
class. 

13. How are the different sciences and occupations of intelligence 
arranged by him, in respect of relative rank ; and upon what principle? 

14. From what combination of the sciences and pleasures, which is most 
suitable to man's condition, are any of the latter peremptorily excluded? 
if so, which, and why? Aiid why none of the former? 

15. "What are determined to be the indispensable conditions of a per- 
fectly successful combination ? 

16. What results from the whole discussion, as the true scale of things 
good; and what is the place of pleasure therein? 

Translate : — 

'I/cai'cDs ovu 'ix°P-^'^ tovto, otc iravra euro? ytyveraL, i^ evavTLWV to. 
ivavTia Trpdyfj-aTa ; TLdvv ye. Tt 5' ad ; ^ari tl Kai roiovbe ev avTO?s, glov 
/xera^v d,u<poTepwi' irdvTWP tGjv iuavrlap Svolv ovtolv 5uo yev^aeis, dirb /nev 
Tov irepou iiri to erepov, diro S' ad rod erepov irdXcp iiri to eTepof fxei^ovos 
fxep irpdyp-aTOs Kal iXuTTOPOS Kal iXdrTOPOs fieTa^v av^rjaLS Kai (p'^iais, Kal 
Ka\ov/j.ep oiJTU} to /xep av^dpea'^ac, to de (p'^ipetp ; Xai, ^<py]. Ovkovp Kal 
diaKptpea'^aL Kai (TvyKpipea^aL, Kal ^vx^cr'^ai Kal '^ep/naiuea'^ai, Kai irdpTa 
ovTUJ, KCLP el f-LT] XP^I^^'^'^ "^^Is 6p6/J.a(Tip iptaxov, dX\' epyui yovp irai'Taxov 
ovTOJS ^xeii* dpayKalop, yiypea^ai re avTo. e^ dWriXiop yhealp re etvai e^ 
eKaTepcjv els dXXrjXa ; Ildi'u p-eu ovv, rj 5' 6s. Tt ovv ; ^0^, tSj ^rjv ^(Tti tl 
ivaPTiOP, wairep t(S eyprjyopepai to Ka^€v5eip ; Hdpu [xep ovp, ^(prj. Tt ; To 
Te'^pduai, i(pr]. 

17. Enumerate briefly the several distinct lines of argument advanced 
in the Pha^do for a future life. 

18. How is the objection met, that mind may be but a result or a func- 
tion of the material organism ? 

19. Did Plato hold the priority of Mind to matter in point of dignity 
alone, or in point of time also ? 

20. Did he countenance the doctrine of the ultimate absorption of souls 
into the Divine essence ; or what did he believe to be their destined con- 
dition? 

(1.) What docs Cousin mean by the word ahsoliite throughout his Lec- 
tures ? 

(2.) Give examples of his absolute ideas, and specify their characteris- 
tics. 

fS.) What is his proposed reduction of the Kantian Categories ? 



ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 18G0. 77 

(4.) To what does he refer truth, beauty, and goodness, as modes of 
manifestation ? How are these modes related, yet distinguished ? 

(5 ) Is our cognizance of Absohite Being, according to him, direct and 
immediate; or of what sort, and through what means attained? 

(6.) How does he profess, in reaching that knowledge, to stand clear of 
the laws of the subjective ? 

(7.) What are his two great divisions of the Beautiful ? his several 
orders of Beauty ? and his several faculties, together constitutive of 
Taste ? 

(8.) What is meant in his philosophy by the Ideal of beauty? Has it 
an objective and real existence ? How is the knowledge of it attained ? 

(9.) Into what elements does he analyse our moral judgments or per- 
ceptions ? 

(10.) Criticise Cousin's doctrine of the True, Beautiful, and Good, and 
compare it with Plato's on the same subject. 

VI. NATURAL PHILOSOPHY.— Mechanics. 

1. Prove the proposition called the Triangle of Forces, and give in- 
stances of problems to which it may be usefully applied. 

2. When two equal parallel and opposite forces act on a mathematical 
lever, but not at the same point, what is the case called ? Give an ex- 
ample of such a case occurring in practice, show how equilibrium may be 
produced, and, if in more ways than one, specify the conditions. 

3. Define the Centre of Gravity. Explain Stable, Unstable, and In- 
different or neutral Equilibrium. 

4. Find the ratio of the power to the weight in the single moveable 
pulley, (1.) with the strings parallel ; (2.) with the strings inclined at a 
given angle. 

5. Apply the principle of Vertual Velocities in the two cases of the pre- 
ceding question. 

6. Write a short Essay on Friction. 

7. Eniimerate the three laws of Motion. Describe Atwood's Machine, 
and explain its use in illustrating these laws. 

8. Find the velocity of a stone falling freely after 5 seconds ; and suppos- 
ing it to recoil vertically with | of that velocity, how high will it ascend 
afterwards ? 

Astronomy, Oi'tics, Hydeostatics. 

1. Describe and figure the construction of the Astronomical Telescope, 
and of Newton's Eefiectiug Telescope. 

2. Explain the cause of Twilight, of the Seasons, of the variation of 
climate from the Equator to the Poles, and of the Equation of Time. 

3. Explain the causes of Solar and Lunar Eclipses ; of their compara- 
tive rarity ; and detail any phenomena peculiar to each. 

4. Give an account of the circumstances which gave rise to the dis- 
covery of the planet Neptune. 

5. Trace the course of a ray of light through a Prism, and explain total 
Pieflection. 



78 ARTS EXAMINATION PAPEES, 1860. 

6. A solid body weighs 750 grains in air, 600 in wator, and 540 in another 
fluid ; required the specific gravity of the solid ; and also of the fluid, that 
of water being unity. 

7. Enumerate the chief circumstances which modify the flow of water 
from a long or from a short pipe. 

. VI. NATURAL PHILOSOPHY.— For Honours. 

Mechanics. 

1. Prove Guldinus's properties relative to the Centre of Gravity. Apply 
them to the following question, — Given the surface of a Sphere equal to 
the area of 4 great Circles, to find the position of the Centre of Gravity of 
a semicircular line. 

2. Investigate the Equation to the Catenary and its leading Mechanical 
Properties. 

3. State the Theories successively held with reference to the strength 
of Beams and of Tubes. Illustrate the application of these to problems 
of modern engineering, such as Girder Bridges and Tubular Bridges. 

4. Investigate the Theory of the Compound Pendulum, of the Ballistic 
Pendulum, and of the Torison Balance as given by Jackson. 

Astro no:my- AND Optics. 

1. Give a short history of tlie Lunar Theory. Specify the perturbations 
which were satisfactorily accounted for by Newton, and those which were 
not so accounted for ? Which of the latter have been since explained, 
and by whom ? 

2. Distinguish Secular and Periodic Inequalities ? To Avhich class 
does the long inequality of Jupiter and Saturn depend ? Give a history 
of the problem, and state the mathematical peculiarity which renders its 
magnitude of importance. State another example in the solar system of 
a like perturbation. 

3. Give a short account of the best methods for determining the Earth's 
figure, attraction, and density. 

4. Give Newton's Theory of the Rainbow, and state what additions 
have been made to it. 

5. Give a short account of the Newtonian and the I^ndulator}' Theories 
of Light. Describe a simple experiment of Interference ; and calculate 
in the case you may select the breadth of the interference bands. 

6. Give some tests of Polarized Light, and enumerate several different 
modes of polarizing light. Explain generally the cause of the form of a 
cross and rings in an uniaxal crystal. 

VIL EHETORIC AND BELLES LETTRES. 

1. Define Allegory ; and state what are the disadvantages of an allego- 
rical style. 

2. How is Ilannony in a sentence produced ? Give a specimen (of 
your own cotnposition) of u ihytbmical prose sentence. 



•ARTS EXAMINATION FOR 1861. 79 

3. What is Energy in style, and how is it produced ? 

4. At what time, and in what manner, was the English language 
fixed? 

5. Explain the shades of diflference in the following synonymous 
terms : — 

(1.) Self-conceit, pride, vanity, arrogance, haughtiness. 
(2.) Strong, powerful, vigorous, forcible, potent. ' 
(3.) Error, mistake, blunder. 
(4.) Abdicate, resign, relinquish. 

6. What are the characteristics of the poetry (not dramatic) of the age 
of Queen Elizabeth ? 

7. "What is the strict rhetorical distinction between conviction and per- 
suasion ? 

8. What are the proper divisions of a discourse ? 

9. When did Daniel Defoe live ; and what were the peculiarities of his 
style ? 

10. What were the principles of Pope's method of versification ? 

11. Enumerate the leading English poets in chronological order. 

12. What is the distinction between the rhetorical terms " principium" 
and " insinuatio "? 



BACHELOR AND MASTER OF ARTS EXAMINATION. 
Intimation? foe 1861. 

The Faculty of Arts give notice, that the following 
are the Regulations to be observed by Candidates for the 
Degrees of Bachelor and Master of Arts : — 

1. It is required that Candidates for the Degree of jMaster of 
Arts shall have completed four years of Academical Study, and 
attended the following Classes : — Latin, Greek, Mathematics, 
Logic and Metaphysics, Moral Philosophy, Natural Philosophy, 
and Rhetoric ; of which Greek, Logic and Metaphysics, Moral 
Philosophy, and Natural Philosophy, must have been attended 
during separate Sessions. 

2, It is required that Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of 
Arts shall have completed three years of Academical Study, and 
attended the following Classes: — Latin, Greek, Mathematics, Logic 
and Metaphysics, and Moral Philosophy ; of which Greek, Logic 



so ARTS EXAMINATION FOR 18GI. 

and Metaphysics, and Moral Philosophy, must have been attended 
during separate Sessions. 

3. The Books and Subjects upon which the Candidates are to 
be examined are specified below. 

4. The names of intending Candidates for the year 1861 must 
be announced to the Dean of the Faculty before the 18th of March 
1861, and the Tickets and Certificates of the requisite Classes, to- 
gether with ]\Iatriculation Tickets, must be lodged with him 
before the 12th of x\pril. 

5. The Examinations for the year 1861 will take place on the 
seven following days : — ]\[onday the 8th of April, Tuesday the 
9th, Wednesday the 10th, Friday the 12th, Saturday the 13th, 
jMonday the 15th, and Tuesday the 16th. 

6. The Examinations will be conducted by requiring from the 
Candidates icritten answers to questions and translations, and, at 
the option of the Examiners, vicCt voce answers to questions arising 
out of the books or subjects prescribed. The written answers and 
translations are to be given in to the respective Professors at the 
close of each Examination. 

7. For the Degree of M.A., the days of Examination are fixed 
as follows : — 

First Day, Monday, April 8. — Latin : for the minimum, from 
10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

Second Day, Tuesday, April 9. — Greek : for the minimum, 
from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

Third. Day, Wednesday, April 10. — Mathematics : for the 
minimum, from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

Fourth Day, Friday, April 1 2. — Logic and Metaphysics : for 
the minimum, from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

Fifth Day, Saturday, April 13. — Moral Philosophy: for the 
minimum, from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

Sixth Day, Monday, April 15. — Natural Philosophy ; for the 
minimum, from 10 to 1 ; for honours, from 2 to 4. 

Seventh Day, Tuesday, April 16. — Rhetoric : from 10 to 1. 

8. For the Degree of B.A., the Examinations will take place at 
the hours above announced, on the First, Second, Third, Fourth, 
and Fifth Days. 

9. Those Candidates who may be found entitled to the Degrees 
of B.A. and M.A. will be classified according to the results of 



ARTS EXAMINATION FOR 18C1. 81 

the Examinations : and the List of Graduates affixed to the Col- 
lege Gates, suspended in the Library, and advertised in the News- 
papers. 

10. The following are the subjects of Examination in the dif- 
ferent departments for 1861 : — 

Latin. — For the minimum : Translation of English Narrative 
into Latin Prose ; Livy, Books xxiii. and xxiv. ; Cicero's Tusculan 
Disputations, Books i. and ii. ; Horace, Odes, Book iii., with the 
principal metres ; Epistles, the last Eight of Book i. For honours, 
in addition to the above, the Oration Pro Milone ; the Eighth 
Satire of Juvenal ; and the Annals of Tacitus, Book i. 

Greek. — For the minimum : Plutarch's Life of Cimon; Lucian's 
Icaro Menippus ; Hesiod's Theogony; History of Greek Literature 
(Brown, Miiller, Mure, or Dr. Smith's Dictionary) ; Laws of 
Hexameter and Iambic Verse. For honours : The Plays of Sopho- 
cles ; principal Tragic metres ; Greek Composition. 

iV.^.— Besides the above, the Candidates for both Grades will 
be required to translate some passage of an easy prose author 
which they have not seen before, ad a'perturam. 

Mathematics. — The First Six Books of Euclid, Elementary 
Algebra, and the Rudiments of Trigonometry and Conic Sections, 
for the minimum. Higher Algebra, Plane Trigonometry, Conic 
Sections, Analytical Geometry, and the Differential Calculus, for 
honours. 

Logic and Metaphysics. — For the minimum : The Professor's 
Lectures, with Whately's Logic. For honours, in addition, the 
Theaetetus of Plato (Greek) ; Bacon's De Augmentis, Books iii., 
iv., v., vi. ; and the History of Psychology in the 17th century. 

Rhetoric and Belles Lettres {English Language and Literature). 
— The Professor's Lectures, with Spalding's History of English 
Literature. 

Moral Philosophy . — For the minimum : The Professor's Lec- 
tures, with Sir James Mackintosh's " Dissertation on the Progress 
of Ethical Philosophy." For honours, add Books v., vi., viii., ix.. 
and X. of Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics" (Greek). 

Natural Philosophy . — For the minimum : Potter's Mechanics ; 
and Questions on at least two of the following subjects : — Ele- 
ments of Astronomy, Heat, and Electricity, as given in the Lec- 
tures, or in such elementary works as those of Herschel and 

F 



82 STATUTES RELATIVE TO DEGREE OF M.D. 

Lardner. For honours, Jackson's Mechanics ; Grant's History of 
Astronomy ; and the Theory of Optics, 

It is recommended that Students, at the close of the Second or 
Third Year of the regular Curriculum in Arts, should offer them- 
selves for that part of the Examination which relates to Classical 
proficiency. Those who avail themselves of this recommendation, 
will undergo the Examination in Mathematics and Philosophy at 
the close of the Fourth Year of their Studies, as usual. 

Students, therefore, for whom the Session 1860-61 is the Second 
or Third of the Curriculum, will be entitled to join the Classical 
Examination in April 1861. 

ALEXANDER C. FRASER, 

Prof, of Logic and Sletaphjsics, and 
Dean of the Faculty of Arts. 



1 l.-D EGREES IN MEDICINE. 

STATUTES of the University of Edinburgh, relative 
to the Degree of M.D., sanctioDed on 27th October 
1846. 

Sect. T. No one shall be admitted to the examinations for the 
Degree of Doctor of jMedicine who has not been engaged in medical 
study for four years, during at least six months of each, in the 
University of Edinburgh, or in some other University where the 
Degree of M.D. is given ; unless, in addition to three Medical 
Sessions so constituted, he has attended, during at least six winter 
months, the Medical or Surgical Practice of a General Hospital, 
which accommodates at least eighty patients, and during the 
same period a course of Practical Anatomy. 

Sect. II. No one shall be admitted to the Examinations for the 
Degree of Doctor who has not given sufficient evidence — 

1. That he has studied, once at least, each of the following de- 
partments of Medical Science, under Professors of Medicine, in 
this or in some other University, as already defined, viz. : — 



STATUTES RELATIVE TO DEGREE OF M.D. 



83 



ANATOMV, 

CHEMISTRY, • . . 

MATERIA MRDICA and PHARMACY 

INSTITUTES of MEDICINE or PHYSIOLOGY. 

PRACTICE of MEDICINE, 

SURGERY, ..••... . . 

iMIDWIFERY and the DISEASES peculiar to WOMEN 
and CHILDREN, 

GENERAL PATHOLOGY, or in Schools where there is no 
such Course, a Three Months' Course of Lectures on Mor- 
bid Anatomy, together with a sup7)lemental Course of 
Practice of Medicine, or Clinical Medicine, 

PRACTICAL ANATOMY (unless it has been attended in / 
the year of extra-aca'demical Study allowed by Skct. I.), 

CLINICAL MEDICINE, that is, the Treatment of Patients 
in aPublic Hospital, under a Profess 
whom Lectures on the Cases are given 

CLINICAL SURGERY, 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE, . 
BOTANY, ... .... 

NATURAL HISTORY, including ZOOLOGY, 



' Durirg CoiiT«c of 
Six Aionths. 



"4 DuringCoursesolSix 
in aPublic Hospital, under a Professor of Medicine, by >Montlis, or 2 Courses 

) of Three Months. 



During Courses of 

at least Three 

Months. 



2. That, in each year of his Academical Studies in Medicine, he 
has attended at least two Six Months' Courses of Lectures, or one 
of these and two Three Months' Courses. 

3. That, besides the Course of Clinical Medicine already pre- 
scribed, he has attended, for at least six months of another year, 
the Medical or Surgical practice of a General Hospital, either at 
Edinburgh or elsewhere, which accommodates not fewer than 
eighty patients. 

4. That he has been engaged, for at least six months, by Ap- 
prenticeship or otherwise, in Compounding and Dispensing Drugs 
at the Laboratory of an Hospital, Dispensaiy, Member of a Surgical 
College or Faculty, Licentiate of the London or Dublin Society of 
Apothecaries, or a professional Chemist or Druggist. 

5. That he has attended, for at least six months, by Apprentice- 
ship or otherwise, the Out-practice of an Hospital, or the Practice 
of a Dispensary, Physician, Surgeon, or Member of the London or 
Dublin Society of Apothecaries. 

Sect. III. Attendance on the Lectures of Teachers of Medicine 
in the Hospital Schools of London, or School of the College of 
Surgeons in Dublin, or of Teachers of Medicine in Edinburgh, re- 
cognised as such by the Royal Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Edinburgh (in accordance with regulations to be adopted by 



84 STATUTES RELATIVE TO DEGREE OF M.D. 

these Colleges jointly, and approved of by the Patrons of the 
University), shall to the extent of one- third of the whole depart- 
ments required by Section II., Clause 1, to be studied by Candidates, 
be held equivalent to attendance under Professors in this or in 
some other University, as already defined. And such attendance 
shall be available to Candidates to the extent of one of the four 
years of study required by Section I., provided it has embraced, in 
one year, at least two Six Months' Courses of Lectures, or one of 
these and two Three IMonths' Courses. 

Sect. IV. No one shall obtain the Degree of Doctor who has 
not studied, in the manner already prescribed, for at least one year 
previous to his Graduation, in the University of Edinburgh. 

Sect. V. Every Candidate must deliver, before the 31st of 
IMarch of the year in which he proposes to Graduate, to the Dean 
of the Faculty of INIedicine — 

1. A Declaration, in his own handwriting, that he is twenty- 
one years of age, or will be so before the day of Graduation ; and 
that he will not be then under articles of apprenticeship to any 
Surgeon or other master. 

2. A statement of his Studies, as well in Literature and Philo- 
sophy as in Medicine, accompanied with proper Certificates. 

3. A Medical Dissertation composed by himself, in Latin or 
English ; to be perused by a Professor, and subject to his ap- 
proval. 

Sect. VI. Before a Candidate be examined in Medicine, the 
I\Iedical Faculty shall ascertain, by examination, that he possesses i 
a competent knowledge of the Latin language. ^' 

Sect. VII. If the Faculty be satisfied on this point, they shall 
proceed to examine him, either viva voce or in writing, — -first, on 
Anatomy, Chemistry, Botany, Institutes of Medicine, and Natural 
History, bearing chiefly on Zoology ; and, secondly/, on Materia 
Medica, Pathology, Practice of Medicine, Surgery, Midwifery, and 
Medical Jurisprudence. 

Sect. VIII. Students who profess themselves ready to submit 
to an examination- on the first division of these subjects, at the end 
of the third year of their studies, shall be admitted to it at that 
time. 

Sect. IX. If any one, at these private examinations, be found 
unqualified for the Degree, he must study during another year two 



STATUTES EELATTVE TO DEGREE OF M.D. 85 

of the subjects prescribed in Section II. Clause 1, in this or in some 
other University, as above defined, before he can be admitted to 
another examination. 

Sect. X. Should he be approved of, he will be allowed, but not 
required, to print his Thesis ; and, if printed, forty copies of it 
must be delivered before the 25th day of July to the Dean of the 
Medical Faculty. 

Sect. XI. If the Candidate have satisfied the Medical Faculty, 
the Dean shall lay the proceedings before the Senatus Academicus, 
by whose authority the Candidate shall be summoned, on the 31st 
of July, to defend his Thesis ; and, finally, if the Senate think fit, 
he shall be admitted, on the first lawful day of August, to the 
Degree of Doctor. 

Sect. XIL The Senatus Academicus, on the day here appointed, 
shall assemble at Ten o'clock a.m., for the purpose of conferring the 
Degree ; and no Candidate, unless a sufiScient reason be assigned, 
shall absent himself, on pain of being refused his Degree for that 
year. 

Sect. XIIT. Candidates for Graduation shall be required to pro- 
duce evidence of their having conformed to those Eegulations 
which were in force at the time they commenced their Medical 
Studies in a University. 

J. H. Balfour, A.M., M.D., 

Prof, of Botany, Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. 



*%* Caudidates who commenced their studies before 1825, will be 
exempted from the fourth year of attendance (Sect. I.), from the additional 
Hospital attendance (Sect. II., Art. 3), from the necessity of a year's study 
in Edinburgh (Sect. III.), and from attendance on 

Clinical, Surgery. Practical Anatomy. 

Medical Jurisprudence. Pathology, and 

Natural History. Surgery distinct from Anatomy. 
Military Surgery. 

Those who commenced between 1825 and 1831 will be exempted from 
attendance on General Pathology, and also on Surgery distinct from 
Anatomy. 

Those who commenced between 1825 and 1833, will be required to 
attend cnly two of the following Classes, viz. : — 



8G REGULATIONS — GRADUATION IN MEDICINE. 

Clixical Surgery. Military Surgery. 

Medical Jurisprudence. Practical Anatomy. 

Natural History. 
And those who commenced before 1833 will be exempted from the 
attendance specified in Sect. II., Arts. 4 and 5. 

Regulations as to Lecturers whose Courses of Lectures are to 
quaZify for the Degree of M.D. in the University of Edinhv/rgh. 
Approved of on 26fh January 1847. 

1. That no Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, or of the 
Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, i>hall be recognised by 
the College to which he belongs, as a Public Lecturer or Teacher 
of any of the Medical Sciences, until his qualifications shall have 
been tried in the particular branch which he professes, by exami- 
nation before a Board appointed by the Royal College of which he 
is a member. 

2. That in the case of Lecturers on Chemistry, and on Natural 
History, who, according to the practice of this School of i\redicine, 
do not require to be Fellows of the Colleges, or to possess a medi- 
cal status, the examination, with a view to recognition, shall be 
conducted by a joint board, consisting of an equal number of per- 
sons appointed by each of the two Colleges. 

3. That the Lecturers who have delivered Courses of Lectures in 
Edinburgh, which Lectures have constituted a part of the course 
of study required for the Surgical qualifications conferred in this 
City, shall be exempted from the necessity of c[ualifying in the 
manner above described, in regard to future Courses on the same 
subjects. But this regulation shall not be applicable to Lecturers 
on departments which may in future be added to the course of 
study for the degree of M.D. 

4. That no Lecturer shall be recognised, who, at the same time, 
teaches more than one of the prescribed subjects of study, except- 
ing in those cases where Professors in the University are at liberty 
to teach two branches. 

•5. That for every Ticket of a Lecturer, recognised in terms of 
these regulations, to be ultimately presented as evidence of at- 
tendance with a view to Graduation, there shall be paid a fee of 
the same amount with that exigible by the Medical Professors in 
the University. 



NEW REGULATIONS — GRADUATION IN MEDICINE, 87 

The Latin Examination on Wednesday, the Zlst of October I860, 
which is o])€n to all Students of Medicine who have com7nenced their 
Medical Studies before the 15th of October 1860, will he confined to 
the following works : — 

1. Life of Ageicola, by Tacitus. 

2. First and Second Books of Cicero de Officiis. 

3. Horace's Ars Poetica. 

Students must give iti their Names and Schedules of 'preliminary 
education to the Secretary, at least a fortnight before the days fixed 
for Examination, Each Candidate must inscribe his Name and 
Address, and the number of his Matriculation Ticket in a hook kejpt 
for the jnirpose at the Secretary's Office. 

The Fee for the Degree of M.D. is £25. This includes £10 for stamp-duty. 



NEW REGULATIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH 

WITH REFERENCE TO GRADUATION IN MEDICINE. 

[Ordinance of Commissioner sJ] 

I. The preliminary branches of extra-professional education shall 
be English, Latin, Arithmetic, the Elements of Mathematics, and 
the Elements of Mechanics ; and it is highly desirable that pro- 
ficiency in these branches should be ascertained by Examination 
prior to the commencement of Medical Study. 

II. No Candidate shall be admitted to a Professional Examina- 
tion who has not passed a satisfactory Examination on at least 
two of the following subjects (in addition to the subjects men- 
tioned above) :~ Greek, French, German, Higher Mathematics, 
Natural Philosophy, Logic, Moral Philosophy. It is desirable that 
the Examination on these latter subjects also should be undergone 
before the Candidate has entered on his Medical Curriculum. The 
Examinations to be conducted by Examiners in Arts, together with 
some of the Medical Examiners. 

III. A Degree in Arts, acquired by Examinations from any one 
of the Universities in the United Kingdom, mentioned in section 
4 of " The Medical Act," shall exempt from all preliminary Exa- 
mination, and it is strongly recommended that intending Graduates 
in Medicine should become Graduates in Arts. 

* These Regulations are based on the Ordinance of 6th August 1859 — not yet passed 
into Law. 



88 NEW REGULATIONS — GRADUATION IN MEDICINE. 

IV. No one shall ]>e admitted to a Degree who has not been 
engaged in Medical and Surgical Study for four years — the Medical 
Session of each year, or Annus Medicus, being constituted by at 
least two courses of not less than one hundred Lectures each, or 
by one such course, and two courses of not less than fifty Lectures 
each ; with the exception of the Clinical Courses, in which Lec- 
tures are to be given at least twice a week during the prescribed 
periods. 



V. No one shall be admitted to the examination for a degree who 
has not given sufficient evidence by certificates — 

1. That he has studied each of the following departments of 
Medical Science, viz. : — 



ANATOMY, 

CHEMISTRY, . 

MATERIA MEDICA and PHARMACY, .... 

INSTITUTES of MEDICINE or PHYSIOLOGY, 

PRACTICE of MEDICINE, 

SURGERY 

MIDWIFERY, and the DISEASES peculiar to WOMEN and 
CHILDREN ; two Courses of Midwifery, of Three Months 
each, being reckoned equivalent to a Six Months' Course, 
provided different departments of Obstetric Medicine be 
taught in each of the Courses, 

GENERAL PATHOLOGY, or, in Schools where there is no 
such Course, a Three Months' Course of Lectures on 
Morbid Anatomy, together with a Supplemental Course 
of Practice of Medicine, or Clinical Medicine, 

PRACTICAL ANATOMY 

PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY, 



PRACTICAL MIDWIFERY. 



CLINICAL MEDICINE, 
CLINICAL SURGERY, 



MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE, . 

BOTANY, 

NATURAL HISTORY, including ZOOLOGY, 



During Courses 

including nut less 

than One Hundred 

Lectures. 



Six Months. 
Three Mouths. 

Three Months at a 
Midwifery Hospi- 
tal, or a Certificate 
of Attendance on 
six Cases from a 
Registered Medi- 
cal Practitioner. 

During Courses of 
Six Mouths, or two 
Courses of Three 
Months : Lectures 
being given at least 
twice a week. 

During Courses in- 
cluding not les.s 
than Fifty Lec- 
tures. 



NEW EEGULATIONS GRADUATION IN MEDICINE. 89 

2. That he has attended, for at least two years, the Medical 
and Surgical Practice of a General Hospital, either at Edinburgh 
or elsewhere, which accommodates not fewer than eighty Patients, 
and possesses a distinct staff of Physicians and Surgeons. 

3. That he has been engaged, for at least three months, by Ap- 
prenticeship or otherwise, in compounding and dispensing drugs 
at the Laboratory of an Hospital, Dispensary, Member of a Surgical 
College or Faculty, Licentiate of the London or Dublin Society of 
Apothecaries, or a member of the Pharmaceutical Society of Great 
Britain. 

4. That he has attended, for at least six months, by Apprentice- 
ship or otherwise, the out-practice of an Hospital, or the practice 
of a Dispensary, Physician, Surgeon, or Member of the London or 
Dublin Society of Apothecaries. 

VL No one shall obtain a Degree who has not studied, in the 
manner already prescribed, for at least one year in the University 
of Edinburgh, 

VII. Every Candidate must deliver, before the 31st of March of 
the year in which he proposes to graduate, to the Dean of the 
Faculty of Medicine — 

1. A Declaration, in his own handwriting, that he has completed 
his twenty-first year, and that he will not be, on the day of gra- 
duation, under articles of Apprenticeship to any Surgeon or other 
master. 

2. A Statement of his Studies, as well in Literature and Philo- 
sophy as in Medicine, accompanied with proper certificates. 

3. A Thesis composed by himself, to be approved by the Medical 
Faculty. 

VIII. Each Candidate shall be examined both in writirig and 
viva voce, — First, on Chemistry, Botany, and Natural History ; 
Secondly, on Anatomy, Institutes of Medicine, and Surgery ; and, 
Thirdly, on Materia Medica, Pathology, Practice of Medicine, 
Clinical Medicine, Clinical Surgery, Midwifery, and Medical Juris- 
prudence. The Examinations on Anatomy, Chemistry, Institutes 
3f Medicine, Botany, and Natural History shall be conducted, as 
Far as possible, by demonstrations of objects placed before the 



9( ) NEW REGULATIONS — GRADUATION IN MEDICINE. 

Candidates ; and those on Medicine and Surgery, in part by 
Clinical demonstrations in the Hospital. 

IX. Students who profess themselves ready to submit to an 
Examination, on the first division of these subjects, at the end of 
their second year, may be admitted to it at that time. 

X. Students who have passed their Examination on the first 
division of these subjects, may appear for their Examination in 
the second division at the end of their third year. 

XI. The Examination of the third division shall not take place 
until the Candidate has completed his fourth Annus Medicus. 

XII. Candidates may be allowed, if they choose, to appear for 
their Examination on the first two of these divisions at the end of 
their third year, or to appear for the three Examinations at the 
end of their fourth year. 

XIII. If any one, at these Examinations, be found unqualified 
for the Degree, he must study, during another year, two of the 
subjects prescribed, in the University, or in some other School of 
Medicine, before he can l)e admitted to another Examination. 

XIV. If the Candidate has satisfied the Medical Examiners, the 
Dean shall lay the proceedings before the Senatus Academicus, by 
whose authority the Candidate shall be summoned, on the 31st of. 
July, or, if such day shall be Sunday, on the preceding day, to 
defend his Thesis ; and, finally, if the Senate think fit, he shall be 
admitted, on the first day of August, or, if such day shall be 
Sunday, on the following day, to his Degree. 

XV. The Senatus Academicus, on the day here appointed, shall 
assemble at ten o'clock, a.m., for the purpose of conferring Degrees; 
and no Candidate, unless a suflicient reason be assigned, shall 
absent himself, on pain of being refused his Degree for that year. 

XVI. Candidates for Graduation shall be required to produce 
evidence of their having conformed to the Regulations which were 
in force at the time they commenced their Medical Studies. 



GRADUATES IN MEDICINEj I860. 91 

NOMINA EOEUM QUI GRADUM MEDICIN.E DOCTOEIS IN 
ACADEMIA JACOBI SEXTI EEGIS, QU^ EDINBURGI 
EST, ANNO ]\roCCCLX ADEPTI SUNT. 

§ Those who have obtained Prizes for their Dissertations, t Those deemed worthy 
of competing for the Dissertation Prizes. * Those commended for their Dissertations. 

* Abercrombie, Alexander, a Promontorio Bons6 Spei. On Tu- 

bercular Leprosy. 

* Allan, Christophorus Jacobus, Anglus. On Diet. 

Allan, Jacobus, Orcadensis. On the Functions of the Ca- 
pillai'ies. 
"^ Anderson, Gulielmus, Scotus. On Typhus and Typhoid 

Fevers. 
§o xlnnandale, Thomas, Anglus. On Injuries of the Hip Joint. 
Ballantyne, Alexander, Scotus. On Traumatic Tetanus. 
Beaugeard, Horatius Lazare, ab Insula Mauritii (Port Louis). 

On Tabes Mesenterica. 
Bell, Gulielmus Riddall, Hiberuus. On the Mutual Rela- 
tions of the Circulatory and Respiratory Functions in 
Health and Disease. 
t Bonthron, Andreas, Scotus. On Inflammation ; the Relation 
of its Primary Stages to Carbonic Acid. 
10 Branch. Gulielmus Joannes, Barbadensis. On Religious In- 
sanity. 
Broster, Joannes, Anglus. On Amputation. 
Brown, Colville, Scotus. On Syphilis. 

* Cowie, Georgius, Scotus. On Infanticide. 

Cusworth, Gulielmus Wilson, Anglus. On Diabetes Mellitus. 
§ 15 Dickson, Alexander, Scotus. On the Development of the 

Flower, and especially the Pistil, in the Caryophyllaceae. 
Erskine. Robertus, Scotus. On the Entozoa. 
Fairbairn, Gulielmus Joannes, Scotus. On the Detection of 

Infanticide. 
Hood, Georgius, Scotus. On Acute Rheumatism. 
Inglis, Robertus, Scotus. On the Physiology and Pathology 

of Religious Epidemics. 
20 Jones, Joannes Curtis, Americanus. On the Nature and 

Treatment of Epilepsy. 



92 GRADUATES IN MEDICINE, 1860. 

King, Joannes Henricus Carolus Erridge, Anglus. On Dis- 
eases of Articular Cartilage. 

Landsberg, Joannes Philippus de, a Promontorio Bonae Spei. 
On Hysteria. 

Langford, Henricus Eduardus, Anglus. On Ergot of Rye. 

Leadam Gulielmus Ward, Anglus. On the Circulation. 
25 Le De'aut, Joannes Etienne Arthurus, ab Insula Mauritii 
(Port Louis). On the Blood, with Pathological Con- 
siderations, 
t Little, Robertus, Scotus. On the Climate and Prevailing 
Diseases of Singapore. 

Low, Gulielmus Cook, Anglus. On the Detection of Infan- 
ticide. 

* Lyell, David, Scotus. Some Observations on the Blood and 

Animal Heat. 
M'Dougall, Jacobus Nairn, Scotus. On Retention of Urine. 
§ 30 M'Intosh, Gulielmus Carmichael, Scotus. Observations and 
Experiments on the Carcinus Moenas. 
t Maclagan, Robertus Craig, Scotus. On Hyoscyamus niger. 
Maclagan, Thomas Joannes, Scotus. On Oxaluria. 
M'Master, Valentinus Munbee, V.C, ab India Orientali. On 
Uiinary Calculi. 

* Middleton, Jacobus, Scotus. On the Medical Jurisprudence 

of Muriatic Acid. 
*35 Monteath, Georgius, Scotus. On the Pathological Relations 
between the Heart and the Brain. 
Moren, Arthurus, a Nova Scotia. On the Causes and Patho- 
logy of Epidemic Cholera. 

* Murray, Gustavus Carolus Philippus, ab Insula Trinidad. 

On Morbid Conditions which may be mistaken for Preg- 
nancy. 

Nicoll, Joannes Black, Scotus. On the Pathology and Treat- 
ment of Tic Doloureux. 
*■ O'Neill, Joannes, Scotus. On Cannabis Indica. 
* 40 Piggott, Gulielmus Cummins, Barbadensis, On Elephantiasis. 

Racey, Joannes, Canadensis. On Certain Deposits of Pig- 
ment, their Causes, Sources, and Chemical Characters. 

Robertson, Gulielmus Borwick, Orcadensis. On Tabes Me- 
senterica. 



EXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGREE. 93 

Ross, Joannes, Scotus. On the Influence of Mind on Dis- 
ease. 
Rutherford, Gideon, Scotus. On the Mechanism of Natural 

Labour. 
* 45 Saidler, Jacobus, Scotus. On Mercury, a Chologogue, Antisy- 

philitic, and Antiphlogistic, 
t Scott, Henricus, Anglus. On the History, Botanical and 

Topographical Sources of Sarsaparilla. 
Scott, Gualterus, Scotus. On some of the Diseases of the 

Pharynx and (Esophagus, 
Scott, Gulielmus, Anglus. On Pelvic Cellulitis. 
Sheriff, Gulielmus, Anglus. On the Preventive Measures 

to be employed against Epidemics. 
*50 Shore, Offley Bohun, Anglus. On Erectile Tumors and their 

Treatment. 

* Sloan, Robertus Stirling, Scotus. On Puerperal Fever. 
Spence, Robertus, Scotus. On Natural Labour. 

Thom, Joannes Jacobus, Scotus. On Medical Diagnosis. 
Thomson, Ebenezer, Scotus. On Diphtheria. 
55 Warden, Thomas, Scotus. On Infanticide. 

* White, Samuel Gamble, Hibernus. On Variola. 

! 57 Whitefield, Petrus Plenderleith, A.M. Edin., Scotus. On the 
Homology of iMatter and Spirit. 



EXAMINATION PAPERS FOR MEDICAL DEGREE. 

LATIl^.— Wednesday, 26th October 1859. 

C. CoRXELH Taciti Agricola, xHv. 

Xatus erat Agricola, Caio Cfesare tertium consule, Idibus Juniis : ex- 
cessit sexto et quinquagesimo anno, decimo Calendas Septembres, Col- 
lega Priscoque consulibus. Quod si habitum quoque ejus posteri noscere 
velint, decentior quam sublimior fuit : nihil metus in vultu : gratia oris 
supererat : bonum virum facile crederes, magnum libenter. Et ipse 
quidem, quamquam medio in spatio integrfe fetatis ereptus, quantum ad 
gloriam, longissimum revum peregit. Quippe et vera bona, quae in vir- 
tutibus sita sunt, impleverat ; et consularibus ac triumpbalibus ornamentis 
praedito, quid aliud adstruere fortuna poterat ? Opibus nimiis non gaude- 
bat ; speciosse contigerant ; filia atque uxore superstitibus, potest videri 
etiam beatus, incolumi dignitate, florente fama, salvis adfinitatibus et 
amicitiis, futura effugisse. 



94 EXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGREE. 



Cicero de Officiis. Lib- i., xxvii. 

Sequltiir, ut de una reliqua parte honestatis tlicendum sit ; in qua 
verecundia, et quasi quidam ornatus vitfe, temperantia et modestia, 
omnisque sedatio pei'turbationuni animi et rei'um modiis cernitur. Hoc 
loco continetur id, quod dici Latine decorum potest : Grasce enini irpeirov 
dicitur. Hujus vis ea est, ut ab lionesto non queat separari. Nam et 
quod decet, honestuni est ; et quod bonestum est, decet. Qualis autem 
differentia sit honesti et decoii, facilius intelligi, quam explanari potest. 
Quidquid est enim, quod deceat, id turn apparet, cum antegressa est 
bonestas Itaque non solum in bac parte bonestatis, de qua boc loco 
disserendum est, sed etiam ia tribus superioribus, quid deceat, apparet. 
Nam et ratione uti, atque oratione prudenter : et agere quod agas con- 
siderate ; omnique in re quid sit veri, videre, et tueri, decet : contraque 
falli, errare, labi, decipi, tarn dedecet, quam delirare, et mente esse cap- 
turn. Et justa omnia decora sunt ; injusta contra, ut turpia, sic inde- 
cora. 

Q. HoRATius Flaccus. De Arte Poetica, 99-113 

Xon satis est pulcbra esse poemata ; dulcia sunto 
Et quocunque volent, animum auditoris agunto. 
Ut ridentibus arrident, ita flentibus adstmt 
Humani vultus : si vis me Here, dolendum est 
Primum ipsi tibi ; tunc tua me infortunia ladent. 
Telepbe, vel Peleu, male si mandata loqueris, 
Aut dormitabo, aut ridebo. Tristia mcestum 
Vultum verba decent ; iratum, plena minarum ; 
Ludentem, lasciva; severum, seria dictu. 
Format eiiim natura prius nos intus ad omnem 
Fortunarum babitum ; juvat, aut impellit ad iram, 
Aut ad bumuni nicerore gravi deducit, et angit ; 
Post effort animi motus interprete lingua. 
Si dicentis erunt I'ortunis absona dicta, 
Romani tollent equites peditesque cacbinnum. 



LATl'Hi.— mdnesday, 28th March 1860. 

Cicero de Xatura Deorum. Lib. ii., cap. 49. 

Legi etiam scriptum, esse avem quandam, qua3 Platulea nominaretur : 
earn sibi cibum qua}rere advolantem ad eas aves, qure se in mari merger- 
ent : quae cum eniersissent, piscemque cepissent, usque eo premere earum 
capita mordicus, dum illa^ captum amitterent ; id qoud ipsa invaderet. 
Eademque luec avis scribitur concbis se solere complcre, casque, cum 
stomacbi calore concoxerit, evomere, atque ita eligere ex iis, quae sunt 
i!sculenta. Ranrc autem marinai dicuntur obruere sose arena solere, et 
Hioveri propc aquam : ad quas, quasi ad escam, pisces cum acccsserint. 



EXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGREE. 95 

confici a ranis atque consumi. Milvo est quoddam bellum quasi naturale 
cum corvo ; ergo alter alterius, ubicumque nactus est, ova frangit. 

Celsus. Medicine, Lib. viii., cap. 1. 

In manu vero prima palmae j)ars ex multis minutisque ossibus constat, 
quorum numerus incertus est. Sed oblonga omnia, et triangula, strnctura 
quadam inter se connectuntur, cum invicem superior alterius angulus, 
alterius planities sit : eoque fit ex bis unius ossis paulum in interiora con- 
cavi species. Verum ex manu duo exigui processus in sinum radii conjici- 
untur. Turn ex altera parte recta quinque ossa, ad digitos tendentia, pal- 
mam explent. A quibus ipsi digiti oriuntur ; qui ex ossibus ternis constant : 
omniumque eadem ratio est. Interius os in vertice sinuatur, recipitque 
exterioris exiguum tuberculum ; nervique ea continent. A quibus orti : un- 
gues indurescunt: ideoque non ossi, sed cami magis radicibus suis inbarent. 

ViRGiLius. ^NEiDOS, Lib. V., 424-436- 

Turn satus Ancbisa caestus pater extulit eequos, 
Et paribus palmas amborum innexuit armis. 
Constitit in digitos extemplo arrectus uterque, 
Bracbiaque ad superas interritus extulit auras. 
Abduxere retro longe capita ardua ab ictu : 
Inmiscentque manus manibus, pugnamque lacessunt. 
Ille pedum melior motu, fretusque juventa : 
Hie membris et mole valens ; sed tarda trementi 
Genua labant : vastos quatit ^ger anbelitus artus. 
Malta viri nequidquam inter se vulnera jactant, 
Multa cavo lateri ingeminant, et pectore vastos 
Dant sonitus, erratque aures et terapora circum 
Crebra manus : duro crepitant sub vidnere malse. 



FIEST EXAMINATION.— /'/•/(/ay, ^Qth Ilarch 1860. 

Anatomy. — 1. Describe tlie parts as tbey come into view in tbe dis- 
section of tbe Digastric space of tbe Neck, including tbe space between 
tbe ascending ramus of tbe Lower Jaw and tbe Mastoid process. 

2. Describe the structure of a Lobule of tbe Liver, including its ar- 
rangements for secretion. Give also tbe relations of tbe lobule to the 
interlobular parts. 

3. Describe tbe Lacunae and Canaliculi of Bone, with their contents 
and their relations to the Haversian Canals. Give also the contents of 
the latter. 

Chemistry. — 1. What is tbe formula of Urea, and what relation does 
it bear to tbe nitrogenous constituents of the body ? Under what circum- 
stances is Uric Acid substituted for Urea in Urine? 

2. What are the chemical relations in composition betweeu Starch, 
Dextrin, and Grape Sugar ? How can Starch be converted into the two 
latter? 



9G EXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGREE. 

3. Give tlie Names and Equivalents of the three following bodies : — 
PbO, C^HgO, 
M£jO, SO3+7 HO 
CuO, NO5 
(Pb=103 . Mg=12 . Cu=32 C=6 S=16). 

FIEST EXAMINATION.— /SafwrcZa?/, March 31, 1860. 

Institutes of ITedicine. — 1. ^NHiat are the properties and uses of the 
various kinds of Fibrous Tissue in the animal body ? 

2. State, seriatim, the functions of the different branches of the Vagus 
nerve. 

3. To what cause do you attribute tbe stoppage of the circulation in 
an inflamed part, and wdiy are all mechanical explanations of this phe- 
nomenon inadmissible ? 

Botany — 1. Contrast in a tabular form the characters of Solanaceje, 
Boraginaceae, Scrophulariaceae, and Labiatae. 
V 2. Describe the Embryogenic Process in Lycopodiaceae. 

3. Contrast in a tabular form the characters of the fniit of the Straw- 
berry, Raspberry, and Mulberry. 

Natural History. — 1. Eefer to its sub-kingdom the class Ce])halopoda. 

2. Divide the Cephalopodo into orders, and state the essential charac- 
ters of each order. 

3. "What is the typical condition of the nervous system in the sub-king 
dom Annulosa? 

SECOND EXAMINATION.— r/a/rst^ay, May 31, LSOo. 

Materia Medica. — 1. The actions of Belladonna as a poison and as a 
medicine, — the principal applications of it in practice, — and the forms for 
using it, and its active principle- 

2. The treatment, medicinal and dietetic, of Uric Acid Gravel. 

3. The distinctive characters and tests for the principal adulteratioius 
of Iodide of Potassium, and of Iodine. 

Surgery — 1. State the circumstances which contra-indicate operation 
in the case of malignant disease. 

2. The symptoms, nature, and treatment of Pyaemia. 

Clinical Surgery. — 1. Describe the different sorts of Ulcers to whicli 
the legs are liable, together with their respective treatment. 

2. Describe the dift'crent injuries to wliich the bones composing the 
elbow-joint are liable, together with their resi)ective treatment. 

Midwifery — 1. State the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of Prolap- 
sus of the Umbilical Cord during Labour. 

2. Describe the peculiarities in the management of a Labour with 
Twins. 

3. The pathological nature, the anatmnical sites, and tlie treatment of 
Fibroid Tumours of the Uterus. 



KXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGUEF. 97 

SECOND EXAMmATlO^.— Friday, June 1, 18i30 

Practice of Phj/sic. — 1. The diag-nosis and management of the pretu- 
bercular stage of Puhnonary Phthisis. 

2. The varieties of Gastric Ulcer ; the diagnosis of each ; and Iho 
dietetic and medicinal treatment. 

3. Mention the principal forms of Delirium, and state the treatment of 
each form. 

General Pathology. — 1. "What are the consequences of defibrination of 
the blood, and how are they to be explained ? 

2. Mention the reasons which are given for the stagnation of blood in 
the capillaries of an inflamed part. 

3. ^\Tiat are the morbid effects on the secretions that may be produced 
through the nervous system, and how may they be explained? 

Legal Medicine — 1. Medico-legal examination of a body found sus- 
pended by the Neck ; how to distinguish if this caused his death ; whether 
he was murdered, or committed Suicide. 

2. Symptoms of poisoning by Strychnia, or plants containing it ; Treat- 
ment, Tests, and their appHcation. 

3. Most usual adulterations of Milk in large towns ; and how detected. 

I'KESCRIPTIONS. 

[The names, quantities, and directions, to he loritten in Latin words, 
without contractions.) 

1. Prescribe Iron and a Bitter Tonic for the treatment of Dyspepsia. 

2. Prescribe an aperient for habitual Constipation, accompauijd with 
Haemorrhoids. 

3. Prescribe for a case of Gastric Ulcer. 

4. Prescribe for Lead Colic. 



LATIN EXAMINATION.— Wednesda'.j, June 27, 1860. 

CiCEEO. De Natura Deorum, Lib. ii. cap. vii. 

Ulud autem, quod vincit hsec omnia, rationem dico, et, si placet, pluri- 
bus verbis, mentem, consilium, cogitationem, prudentiam, ubi invenimus ? 
Unde sustulimus ? An caetera mundus habebit omnia, hoc unum, quod 
plurimi est, non habebit ? Atqui certe nihil omnium rerum melius est 
mundo, nihil praestabilius, nihil pulchrius : nee solum nihil est, sed ne 
cogitari, quidem quidquam melius potest. Et, si ratione et sapientia 
nihil est melius, necesse est hsec inesse in eo, quod optimum esse con- 
cedimus. Quid vero? Tanta rerum consentiens, conspirans, conti- 
nuata cognatio, quem non coget ea, quae dicuntur a me, comprobare ? 
Possetne uno tempore florere, deinde vicissim horrere terra ? aut, tot 
rebus ipsis se immutantibus, solis accessus discessusque solstitiis 
brumisque cognosci ? aut eestus maritimi, fretorumque angustiae, ortu aut 
obitu lunse commoveri? aut una totius cceli conversione cursus astrorum 

G 



98 EXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGREE. 

dispares conservari? Hxc ita fieri omnibus inter se concinentibns 
mundi partibus profecto non possent, nisi ea nno divino et continnato 
spiritu continerentur. 

Celsus. Medicix.t:, Lib. viii. cap xxi. Genu Li(,xatw. 

Genu vero et in exteriorem, et in interiorem, et in posteriorem partem 
excidere, notissimum est. In priorom non prolabi, plerique scripserunt : 
potesque id veto proximura esse ; cum inde opposita patella, ipsa quoque 
caput tibiae contineat. Meges tamen eum, cui in priorem partem exci- 
disset, a se curatum esse, memorise prodidit. In his casibus intendi nervi 
rationibus iisdem, quas ni femora retnli, possunt. Et id quidem, quod in 
posteriorem partem excidit, eodeni modo rotundo aliquo super poplitem 
imposito, adductoque eo crnre, reconditur. Cetera vero manibus siraul, 
dum ossa in diversas partes compelluntur. 

YinoiLius. iExEiDos, Lib. v. 225-238. 

Solus jamque ipso snperest in fine Cloantbus : 
Quern petit, et sninmis adnixus viribus urget. 
Tum vero ingeminat clamor, cunctique sequentem 
Instigant studiis ; resonat clamoribus aether. 
Hi proprium decus, et partiim indignantur honorem, 
Ni teneant ; A'itaraque A'olunt pro laude pacisci : 
Hos successus alit : possunt, quia posse videntur. 
Et fors aequatis cepissent pitnemia rostris ; 
Ni, palmas ponto tendens utrasque, Cloanthus 
Fudissetque prcces, divosque in vota vocasset : 
Di, quibus imperium est pelagi, quorum asquora curro. 
Yobis, Ifetus ego hoc candentem in littore taurum 
Constituam ante aras voti reus, extraque salsos 
Porriciam in fluctus, et vira liquentia fundam. 



FIRST EXAmXATION— TAwrsf/a?/, June 28, 1880. 

Anatomy. — 1. Enumerate tb.e muscles supplied by the Median, Ulnar, 
and i\Iusculo-spiral Xerves respectively ; giving the muscles in their order 
of supply from above downwards. 

2. Describe the Inguinal Canal ; and state the composition of the 
Spermatic Cord in tlie course of the canal. 

3. Describe the Microscopic structure of a portion of connective texture 
free from f;U, e.g., taken from beneath a serous or mucous membrane ; 
and state the cliange which occurs, and the structures which come more 
distinctly into view, on the addition of Acetic Acid. 

CJienustri/. — 1. Give in symbols and equivalents the Oxides of Car- 
bon, and state a few of their chief properties. 

2. What is the chemical nature of fats in general? Illustrate the 
answer by giving the proximate constituents of any one solid fat in the 
human body. 



EXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGREE. 99 

3. In the foimulaB 

C, H3 0, C, H, O3 
C4 Hg 0, C^ H3 CI 

FIRST EXAMINATION.— i^nVZa?/, June 29, 1860. 

Institutes of Medicine. — 1. What are the physical and vital properties 
possessed by Blood-Tessels, and where are these respectively best ex- 
hibited ? 

2. In what way does the function of Respiration influence the Blood 
and the Atmospheric Air, and conduce to the production of animal heat? 

3. How are Pus Cells developed, and what are the circumstances that 
fovour and diminish their power of growth ? 

Botany. — 1. Describe four modes of Antherine Dehiscence, and give 
an example of each. 

2. Describe fom* modes of Capsular Dehiscence, and give an example 
of each. 

3. Contrast in a tabular form the characters of Eanunculaceae, CistaccJe, 
and Hypericaccce ; giving only the essential distinguishing characters. 

Natural History. — 1. Enumerate the primary sections into which the 
Mollusca have been divided in accordance with the development of their 
nervous and circulatory systems. Give an example of each section. 

2. Distinguish from one another the Respiratory Organs in the follow- 
ing animals : — 

Whelk (Buccinum iivdatum), 
Snail (Helix aspersa), 
Bee (Ajns mellifica). 

3. Give an example of each of the classes of Vertebrata, and point out 
the leading differences between them. 

SECOND EXAMINATION.— T/mrsJa//, Jidy 12, 1860. 

Materia Medica. — 1. State the Actions, poisonous and medicinal, of the 
Preparations of Lead ; the doses of the Acetate, and the principal dis- 
eases in which it is used. 

2, The distinctive characters of Sulphureous Thermal Spi'ings, the prin- 
cipal ones in Europe, and the diseases for which they are used. 

3. The general external characters for distinguishing — 1. Digitalis 
purpurea ; Aconitum Napellus ; 3. Hyoscyamus niger. 

Surgery. — 1. State the. signs, and indicate the treatment of Iritis. 
2. State the diagnosis between Scrotal Hernia and Cirsocele. 

Clinical Surcjery. — 1. The situation, symptoms, and treatment of 
Cancer of the Rectum. 

2. The Muscles, Bloodvessels, and Nerves divided in amputation at 
the Shoulder-Joint. 

Midioifery. — 1. Describe the principal practical points which require 
to be attended to in the management of the second stage of Labour. 



100 EXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGREE. 

2. Under what circumstances is Craniotomy required, and wliat are the 
different stejis of the operation ? 

3. State the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of Prolapsus of the Uterus. 

SECOND EXAMINATION.— /ViVZa?/, July 13, 1860. 

Practice, of Physic. — 1. The characteristic symptoms, mental and 
motor, as manifested in the successive stages of General Paralysis of the 
Insane. 

2. State whtit visceral diseases are characterized hy Acute or Chronic 
Anasarca, and add the appropriate treatment of each. 

3. The physical signs and general symptoms of insufficiency of the Mitral 
Valve. 

4. The diagnosis and treatment of the Endemic or Summer Cholera of 
this country. 

General PatJwlogy. — 1. Under what circumstances have notahle quan- 
tities of fatty matter been discharged from the Bowels, and what are the 
probable sources of them ? 

2. Mention the different kinds of Stearosis of the Kidneys, and how 
each is produced. 

3. What are the consequences of the Bile being prevented from gaining 
access to the Intestinal Canal ? 

Legal Medicine. — 1. Arson or Fire-raising. How to distinguish Crimi- 
nal Arson from that arising from friction and percussion ; from fermenta- 
tion ; and from chemical action. 

2. Poisoning by Lead. How most usually introduced into the system. 
Symptoms, treatment, and detection. 

Pkescriptions. 

{The names, quantities, and directions, to he written in Latin words, 
tvithout contractions.) 

1. A Chalybeate in the form of pill as a Tonic. 

2. An Emetic for Narcotic Poisoning. 

3. An Astringent and Sedative for Chronic Diarrhoea. 



101 



lll.-DEGREES IN LAW, 1860. 

On 16tli April, tlie Senatus Academicus conferred the Honorary Degree 
fLL.D. on— 



James David Forbes, Principal of 
the United Coll., St. Andrews. 

Edward Francis Maitland, Esq., 
Solicitor-General. 



The Eight Hon. W. E. Gladstone, 

Chancellor of the Exchequer. 
The Very Eev. Dean Eanisay. 
The Hon. Lord Neaves. 

The Eev. Henry Longueville Mansel, 
Professor of Moral and Metaphysical Philosophy, Oxford. 

On the 25th April, the Senatus Academicus conferred the Honorary 
)egree of LL.D. on — 

Archibald Campbell Swinton, Esq., Professor of Civil Law in the 
University. 

On the 18th May, the Senatus Academicus conferred the Honorary 
)egree of LL.D. on — 

The Eight Hon. Duncan M'Neill, Lord President of the Court of 

Session. 
William Stokes, M.D.,'Eegius Professor of Physic in the University 

of Dublin. 
•John Forster, Esq., London. 
William Sharpey, M.D., Prof, of Anatomy, University College, 

London. 
Eev. William Eeeves, D.D., University of Dublin. 
William Allen Miller, M.D., Professor of Chemistry, King's College, 

London. 
William Fairbairn, Esq., F.E.S., Manchester. 

On the 27th July, the Senatus Academicus conferred the Honorary 
degree of LL.D. on — 

Charles F. Shand, Esq., Chief-Justice of the Mauritius. 



*^* The gentlemen whose names are above the line, in the Lists 
n the several Departments of the Seven Days' Examination for 
Degrees in Arts, on pp. 63-65, have passed with Honours. 



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BURSARIES AND SCHOLARSHIPS. 





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under such dee<l of trust as Is usual in such cases;" 
then to notify to the clergy aiul kirk-sessions of the 
above parishes ttiat it is open to the youths within 
the above specification. The foundation contem- 
plates competitive examination of candidates by a 
Committee of Professors. 

The M'Diarmid Bursary, is n memorial of the 
late John M'Diarmiii, Ksq., Kditor of the i)um/?'(es 
and Galloway Courier. The presentee is to bel 
elected from anions the students of limited means,' 
born in the county of Dumfries or stevvartry of 
Kirkeudbripht. The election is to be made after 
such intimation in the loial newspapers of Dumfries, | 
and "competition and examination on the part ofallj 
qualitled candidates," as the Sinatus may prescribe.l 
The presentee is to hold for three years after his elec- 
tion, if he continues to attend the University for that 
period, but If he sliall become inattentive to his studies' 
or otherwise undeserving of the Bursary, or if the] 
Senatus be otherwise dissatislied with bis conduct, 
till y are entitled summarily to deprive him, and to 
eonl'er the Bursary upon another. 







Senatus Academicus. 


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ALPHABETICAL LIST OF MEMBERS 



GENERAL COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY. 



Absolon, G. W., M.D., 2, King Street, Pertb. 

Adair, Hugh, Teacher, Donaldson's Hospital, Edinburgh. 

Adam, Alex. Forsyth, AV.S., 19, Claremont Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Adam, .James, Advocate, 49, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Adam, William Roddam, M.A., 14, Dundas Street, Edinburgh. 

Adamson, Eev. John, Xewton Manse, Dalkeith. 

Agnew, Rev. David C. A., Wigtown. 

Ainslie, Eev. John, D.D., St. Andrews. 

Aird, Eev. Hugh, Neilston Manse, Glasgow. 
10 Aitken, John, M.D., Perth. 

Aitken, Patrick P., Writer, 20, Eefonn Street, Dundee. 

Aitken, Eev. Wm. Wilson, Carlops, Penicuick. 

Aldridge, John H., M.D., Southampton. 

Alexander, Eev. William L., D.D., 17, Brown Square, Edinburgh. 

Allan, C. J., M.D., Wooler, Northumberland. , 

AUman, Professor, 21, Manor Place, Edinburgh. 

Anderson, Eev. Alexander, Manse Falstoue, by Hexham. 

Anderson, Eev. Alexander, Markinch. 

Anderson, Andrew, M.D., 40, Minto Street, Newington. 
20 Anderson, David, of St. Germains, Advocate, Prestcyapans. 

Andei'son, D. S., 247, Canongate, Edinburgh. 

Anderson, Eev. George, 4.32, Parliamentary Eoad, Glasgow. 

Anderson, Henry Scott, M.D., Selkirk. 

Anderson, James, M.A., 13, Pitt Street, Edinburgh. 

Anderson, James, M.D., Stanley. 

Anderson, John, W.S., 50, Castle Street, Edinburgh. 

Anderson, Eev. John Arch., Collessie, Ladybank. 

Anderson, Eev. John, M.A., Dalkeith. 

Anderson, Letham, Clerk, 62, Cumberland Street, Edinburgh. 
30 Anderson, E. S., W.S., 4, Atholl Place, Edinburgh. 

Anderson, Thomas, Advocate, Fairlie House, Kilmarnock. 
Anderson, Thomas, M.D., 11, Park Circus, Glasgow. 
Anderson, Thomas, M.D., Bengal Army. 
Anderson, Eev. Thos. S., Crailing, Eoxburghshire. 
Anderson, Eev. Wm., Walls and Flota Longhope, Orkney. 



110 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

Andrew, James, M.D., 15, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Angus, Rev. Joseph, ]\I.A., D.D., Regent's Park, London. 

Anstrutlier, James, W.S., 42, Moray Place, Edinburgh, 

Arbuckle, Robert H., 69, King Street, Kilmarnock. 
40 Armstrong, Rev. Matthew, Manse of Skirling, Biggar. 

Armstrong, Robert, Madras College, St. Andrews. 

Arnott, C-ieorge Arnott Walker, M.A., LL.D., Professor, University. 
Glasgow. 

Arnott, James Moncrieff, M.D.. New Burlington Street, London, S. 

Arrott, James, M.D., 19 King Street, Dundee. 

Arthur, Rev. Alexander, 135, Renfrew Street, Glasgow. 

Arthur, Richard, advocate, 40, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Auld, John, W.S., 10, Duke Street, Edinburgh. 

Austin, Rev. John M., Clerkhill House, Dumfries. 

Aytoun Robert, W.S , 3, Fettes Row, Edinburgh. 
50 Aytoun, Professor, 16, Great Stuart Street, Edinburgh. 

Baillie, Rev. Andrew, 23, West Lauriston Place, Edinburgh. 

Baillie, James Wra., W.S., 14, Walker Street, Edinburgh. 

Baillie, John, Student of Divinity, 23, Lauriston Place, Edinburgh, 

Baird, George Dallas, Surgeon, Linlithgow. 

Baird, Rev. John, Manse of Yetholm. Kelso. 

Balfour, Rev. Alex., Forden. Banffshire. 

Balfour, David, of Balfour, W.S., Balfour Castle, Kirkwall. 

Balfour, James, W.S., 58, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

Balfour, James B., M.D., 37, Albany Street, Edinburgh. _ 
60 Balfour, John Blair, Student of Law, 10, Hart Street, Edinburgh. 

Balfour, .John M., W.S., Pilrig House, Edinburgh. 

Balfour, Rev. Peter, Manse of Clackmannan, Alloa. 

Balfour, Professor, 27, Inverleith Row, Edinburgh. 

Balfour, Thomas A. G., M.D., 5, George Square, Edinburgh. 

Balfour, Rev. William, 3, St. John's Hill, Edinburgh. 

Ballantyne, Rev. William, Langliolna. 

Bannerman, Rev. James, D.D., Professor, Free Church College, 
7, Clarendon Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Barclay, James, Writer, Forfar. 

Barclay, John, Duncan Place, Leith. 
70 Barclay, Rev. John, Bargrennan !^Lanse, Newton-Stewart. 

Barclay, Thomas, Sheriff-Clerk of Fife, Cupar, Fife. 

Barlas, Rev. George, Millhill, ^Musselburgh. 

Barr, Thomas, Aberdour, Fife. 

Bartholomew, Robert, M.D., Inverkeithing. 

Barton, .Tames, Writer, 7, York Place, Edinburgh. 

Barton, Rev. Angus, D.D., Castleton Manse. Canonbie. 

Barty, Rev. James S., D.D., B(!ndochy Manse, Cupar-Angus. 

Baxter, Edmund, W.S., 9, Rutland Square, Edinburgh. 

Bayley, George, W.S., 13, Regent Terrace, Edinburgh. 
80 Beath, Andrew, Surgeon, Craigs House, Stirling. 

Beattie, Rev. Irving, Wigtown, Galloway. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. Ill 

Beattie, Eev. AVilh'am, M.A., Alexandria, Dnnibartonsliire. 

Begbie, James, M.D., 14, Charlotte Street, Edinbnrgli. 

Begbie, J. Warburton, M.D., 21, Alva Street, Edinburgh. 

Begbie, AVm. Macrae, 6, N. E. Circus Place, Edinburgh. 

Beith, Donald, Writer, 50, Castle Street, Edinburgh. 

Belford, Colin G., Writer, 5, Dundas Street, Edinburgh. 

Bell, A. Beatson, Advocate, 20, Great King Street, Ediuburgh. 

Bell, Professor Montgomerie, 11, Eoyal Circus, Edinburgh. 
90 Bell, Benjamin, Surgeon, 8, Shandwick Place, Edinburgh. 

Bell, Rev. David, Manse of Kennoway, Fifeshire. 

Bell, George AVilliam, M.D., 16, Alva Street, Edinburgh. 

Bell, G. W., of East Fortune, KildufF House, Haddingtonshire. 

Bell, James, English Master, 8, Kew Terrace, Glasgow. 

Bell, Eev. James, The Manse, Haddington. 

Bell, Rev. B. J., Gartsherrie, Coatbridge. 

Bell, John, M.D., Jedburgh. 

Bell, John Montgomerie, jun., W.S., 11, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

Bell, Eev. John, Cumledge, Dunse. 
100 Bell, Joseph, M.D., Eoyal infirmary, Edinburgh. 

Bell, Eobert, 3, Airlie Place, Dundee. 

Bell, Eobert, 4, Heriot Eow, Edinburgh. 

Bell, Eev. Stephen, Eyemouth, Ayton. 

Bell, Eev. Thomas B., Kirkland Cottage, Leswalt, Stranraer. 

Bell, Thos. v., M.D., 17, William St., Lowndes Sq., London, S.W. 

Bell, Thomas, Schoolmaster, Tongland, Kirkcudbright. 

Bell, William, M.D., Bi^aehead, Canonbie. 

Bennet, Eev. William, Moflfat, Dumfriesshire. 

Bennett, Professor, 1, Glenfinlas Street, Edinburgh. 
110 Berry, John, of Tayfield, Advocate, Newport, Fife. 

Bickerton, George, Teacher, 28, Torphichen Street, Edinburgh- 

Binny, Graham, W.S., 9, Hart, Street, Edinburgh. 

Binuy, John, Student of Law, 9, Hart Street, Edinburgh. 

Birrell, David, Manufecturer, Dunfermline. 

Black, David, 39, Dublin Street, Edinburgh. 

Black, Henry, Solicitor, 21, St. Andrew Square, Edinburgh. 

Black, John, M.A., Advocate, 37, Northumberland Street, Edinr. 

Black, P. C, Kirkcaldy, Fife. 

Black, Eoger, Writer, Kirkcaldy. 
120 Black, Wm. MacMillan, 23, Dublin Street, Edinburgh. 

Blackie, Professor, 24, Hill Street, Edinburgh. 

Blackstock, Eev. Eobert, Manse of Ladhope, Galashiels. 

Blackwell, Eobert, AVharton House, Edinburgh. 

Blackwood, Jas., W.S., 19, St. Andrew Square, Edinburgh. 

Blackwood, Eev. W. S., Portobello. 

Blain, Eobert, Teacher, 9, Brighton Street, Edinburgh. 

Blair, Henry E., M.D., Maybole, Ayrshire. 

Blair, Hugh, W.S., 15, Eandolph Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Blair, John, 1, Lord Eussell Place, Edinburgh. 
130 Blair, Patrick, Advocate, 2, Nelson Street, Edinburgh. 



112 MEMBERS OF COU>'CIL. 

Blair, Patrick, 15, Eandolph Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Blair, William, Marionville, Mercliiston. 

Blair, "Wm., Advocate, of Avontoun, Linlithgow. 

Blyth, John B., M.D., Professor, Quegu's College, Cork. 

Blyth, Eev. Pt. B., M.A., 9, Bruntsfield Place, Edinburgh. 

Boag, Rev. "William G., Uphall Manse, Winchburgh. 

Bogie, Agnew Black, M.D., Annan, Dumfriesshire. 

Bogie, George, Writer, Kinross. 

Bogle, Andrew, W.S., 21, St. Andrew Square, Edinburgh. 
140 Bonar, Rev. Andrew R., 3, St. John's Street, Edinburgh. 

Bonar, Rev. A. Alex., 65, St. Vincent Crescent, Glasgow. 

Bonar, James, W.S., 15, York Place, Edinburgh. 

Bonar, Rev. Horatius, D.D., Kelso. 

Bonar, Rev. John J., Greenock. 

Bonar, Rev. John, D.D., 17, York Place, Edinburgh. 

Boog, Charles S., M.A., 21, Virginia Street, Glasgow. 

Borrowman, Rev. Patrick, Glencairn, Moniaive. 

Borwick, Rev. James, Rathillet, Cupar-Fife. 

Bower, John, M.D., Montreal Cottage, Perth. 
150 Boyd, John, M.D., Slamannan. 

Boyd, John B., younger, of Cherrytrees, Roxburghshire. 

Boyes, Chas. Robert, M.D., 23, Stafford Street, Edinburgh. 

Boyle, Archibald T., Advocate, 124, George Street, Edinburgh. 

Bramwell, James P., M.D., Barossa Place, Perth. 

Brand, William, W.S., 5, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Brash, John, Teacher, Drumeldrie, Largo. 

Bremner, Hugh, W.S., 26, Greenhill Gardens, Edinburgh. 

Brewster, Principal Sir David, Vice-Chan, of the University, College. 

Brewster, Rev. Henry, Farnell, near Brechin. 
160 Bridges, James, W.S., Belfield House, Musselburgh. 

Brodie, J. C, W.S., 26, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

Brodie, .Tames, junior, Dunkeld. 

Brodie, Thomas, W.S., 26, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

Brougham, Right Honourable Lord, Chancellor of the University, 
Brougham Hall, Penrith, Westmoreland. 

Broun, Archibald, Advocate, 15, India Street, Edinburgh. 

Brown, Alexander Crura, M.A., Arthur Lodge, Newington. 

Brown, Rev. Alexander W., Dean Bank Lodge, Edinburgh. 

Brown, Rev. Andrew, The Manse, Alva. 

Brown, Rev. Archibald, Legerwood, Earlston. 
170 Brown, Andrew, M.D., 18, Royal Terrace, Weymouth. 

Brown, Rev. Geo., Castle-Douglas. 

Brown, H. H., of Newhall, Advocate, Penicuick. 

Brown, James, Accountant, 4, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 

Brown, James Adam, C.A., 4, Charlotte Square. 

Brown, Rev. James, Gathcrick, Northumberland. 

Brown, Rev. James, M.A., Creetown, Galloway. 

Brown, John, M.D., Assessor in University Court, 23, Rutland 
Street, Edinburgh. 



MEMBEES OF COUNCIL. 113 

Brown, Jolin, W.S., 2, Gayfield Place, Edinburgh. 

Brown, Rev. Robert Lundin, Largo, Fife. 
180 Brown, Rev. Thomas, 8, Comely Bank, Edinburgh. 

Brown, William, Surgeon,^ 25, Dublin Street, Edinburgh. 

Brown, AVilliam iS'., M.D., St. John's, Melrose. 

Brown, "William Thomson, Rector, Grammar School, Dunfermline. 

Brown, William, M.D., Duddingstone. 

Browne, John, Parochial Schoolmaster, Kinglassie, Kirkcaldy. 

Brownlee, R. D., Student of Divinity, Ivybank, Midcalder. 

Bruce, Rev. Alex. B., Cardross, by Dumbarton. 

Bruce, George, 2, Glenfinlas Street, Edinburgh. 

Bruce, Hugh, Advocate, 10, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 
190 Bruce, James, Jun., 14, Hart Street, Edinburgh. 

Bruce, John, W.S., 38, Frederick Street, Edinburgh. 

Bruce, Robert, M.D., 27, Yotk Place, Edinburgh." 

Brunton, Rev. Alexander, Oban. 

Brunton, James, 40, George Square, Edinburgh. 
• Bryce, William, M.D., Dalkeith. 

Bryden, Rev. Mark J., The Manse, Kirkcaldy. 

Bryden, James, M.D., Hawick. 

Bvydie, Rev. Andrew, B.A., Dunfermline. 

Buchanan, James, Willowbank, Murrayfield, Edinburgh. 
200 Buchanan, Rev. R., Manse, Elie. 

Buist, Andrew, M.D., Infirmary, Perth. 

Burn, George, M.D., Latheron, Caithness. 

Burn, George, 51, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

Burn, Henry John, W.S., Cuttlehill, Pifeshire. 

Burn, James, W.S., 51, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

Burn, Robert, W.S., 5, Mansfield Place, Edinburgh. 

Burness, James, S.S.C., 11, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 

Burness, James, M.A., 11, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 

Burness, William, W.S., 11, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 
210 Burnet, John, Advocate, 37, Northumberland Street. 

Burnet, Rev. J. S., Lockerby. 

Burnet, Rev. Joseph, Carluke. 

Burnet, Rev. Wm., The Manse, Halfmorton, Canonbie. 

Burnett, Geoi'ge, Brisbane Villa, Grove Street, Edinburgh. 

Burns, Rev. George, D.D., Corstorphine. 

Burns, Edward, 13, Bank Street, Edinburgh. 

Burns, Rev Jas. C, Kirkliston. 

Burns, James, Teacher, 306, Bath Crescent, Glasgow. 

Burns, Rev. James D., M.A., Hampstead, London. 
220 Burns, James Orr, of Seaforth Cottage, Edinburgh. 

Burr, David M., 33, Renfield Street, Glasgow. 

Burr, P. L., 14, Heriot Place, Edinburgh. 

Burt, Rev. Alex., Manse of Arngask, Kinross. 

Burt, Benjamin, United Service Club, Edinburgh. 

Burt, John G. M., M.D., 88, George Street, Edinburgh. 

Butchart, George, M.D., Almond Bank, Perth. 

H 



114 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

Cadell, AVilliam, Lieutenant in H.M. Madras Army. 

Cadell, John, Advocate, 20, Picardy Place, Edinburgh. 

Cahill, D. F. S., M.D., Berwick-on-Tweed. 
230 Caird, Alex. M'Xeel, Procurator-Fiscal, Stranraer. 

Cairns, Rev. David, Stitchel, Kelso. 

Cairns, Henry, W.S., 15, Greenhill Gardens, Edinburgh. 

Cairns, Rev. John, D.D., Berwick-on-Tweed. 

Cairns, W. H., M.A., Eector of Academy, Dumfries. 

Calderwood, Eev. Henry, 1, Mansfield Place, Glasgow. 

Callender, Henry, 8, St. Vincent Street, Edinburgh. 

Cameron, Angus, M.D., Keighley, Yorkshire. 

Campbell, Arthur, junior, W.S., 12, India Street, Edinburgh. 

Campbell, Eev. Duncan, Manse, Luss. 
2-40 Campbell, Duncan, M.D., 108, Bay Street, Toronto, Canada "West. 

Campbell, Eev. George, Manse, Eastwood, Glasgow. 

Campbell, Eev. J. E., Ardoch Manse, Braco. 

Campbell, Very Eev. Peter, D.D., Principal, University, Aberdeen. 

Campbell, "WilUam, ofDunmore, Argyleshire. 

CandUsh, James S., M.A., 52, Melville Street, Edinburgh. 

Cannan, David, Surgeon, 14, Ure Place, Glasgow. 

Cappie, James, M.D., 18, Frederick Street, Edinburgh. 

Carfrae, G. M., M.D., North Berwick. 

Carlyle, Eev. Gavin, M.A., 318, Bath Street, Glasgow. 
250 Carmichael, A. W., 44, South Bridge, Edinburgh. 

Carmichael, James, 33, East Claremont Street, Edinburgh. 

Carmichael, John, M.A., 16, Loudon Street, Edinburgh. 

Carmichael, Walter Scott, M.D., 3, Annandale Street, Edinburgh. 

Carruthers, J. B., M.D., Cramond. 

Cassels, Alexander, W.S., 8, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Cattanach, Peter Lorimer, Edinburgh. 

Cay, John, F.E.S.E., Advocate, 5, South-East Circus PL, Edinburgh. 

Cay, John, junior, W.S., 3, Darnaway Street, Edinburgh. 

Cay, Robert Dundas, "W.S., 19, Greenhill Gardens, Edinburgh. 
260 Chalmers, Andrew C, M.D., Thornhill, Dumfriesshire. 

Chalmers, D. P., 47, Lauriston Place, Edinburirh. 

Chalmers, David, M.D., 47, Lauriston Place, Edinburgh. 

Chalmers, John, Castlebank, Merchiston. 

Chancellor, Edward, W.S., Chalmers Street, Edinburgh. 

Chancellor, George, "W.S., 1, Chalmers Street, Edinburgh. 

Chancellor, J. G., of ShielJhill, Advocate, Symington, Biggar. 

Chapman, Edward, M.D., Hawkfield House, Leith. 

Charteris, Eev. A. H., M.A., New Abbey Manse, by Dumfries. 

Charters, W.S., M.D., The Grove, Trinity. 
270 Cheyne, Henry, W.S., 6, Eoyal Terrace, Edinburgh. 

Chiene, George Todd, C.A., 27, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Chishi>lni-Batten, Edmund, M.A., Barrister-at-Law, 9, Old Square, 
Lincoln's Inn, London. 

Chisholm, John, M.D., Buccleuch Street, Dumfries. 

Christie, Eev. John, Arbirlot Manse, Arbroath. 



Christ 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 115 



John C, W.S., 4, Duncan Street, Newington. 



'I 



Christie, E. L. B. Stark, 13, Castle Street, Edinburgh. } 

Christison, Kev. Alexander, Foulden, Berwick-on-Tweed. • 

Christison, David, M.D., 40, Moray Place, Edinburgh. • 

Christison, John, W.S., 40, Moray Place, Edinburgh. '; 

280 Christison, John, Advocate, 3, Great Stuart Street, Edinburgh. \ 

Christison, Rev. John, M.A., The Manse, Biggar. ' 

Christison, Professor, Assessor in University Court, 40, Moray Place, I 

Edinburgh. 

Clark, Andrew R., Advocate, 17, Great Stuart Street, Edinburgh. ' 

Clark, Thomas, M.D., Whitburn, Edinburgh. ' 

Clark, William B., advocate, Marhill, Alloa. ; 

Clark, William, W.S., 3, Marhill, Alloa. 

Clark, Rev. John, Abernethy. 

Clark, Rev. John, D.D., Dunoon. 

Clarke, Rev. Donald rJobert, Aberfeldy. 
290 Clarkson, Eben., M.D., Selkirk. 

Clarkson, Ebenezer, M.D., 20, Broughton Place, Edinburgh. 

Cleghorn, Rev. Alex., Leuchars, Fife. 

Cleghorn, Thomas, advocate, 26, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Cleland, John, M.D., 5, Pitt Street, Edinburgh. 

Clerk, Right Hon. Sir Geo., of Penicuick, Bart., Penicuick. 

Clingan, Rev. J. M., M.A., Moffat, Dumfriesshire. 

Cochrane, Rev. James, M.A., The Manse, Cupar-Fife. 

Cockburn, John, 5, Doune Terrace, Edinburgh. . * i 

Coke, William, M.D., West Linton, Penicuick. 
300 Coldstream, John, M.D., 51, York Place, Edinburgh. 

Colvin, Rev. John Kirkmabreck, Creetown. 

Colvio, Rev. Walter L., D.D., The Manse, Cramond. 

Combe, Matthew, M.D., R.A., Woolwich. 

Comrie, Rev. Alexander, M.A., Carnoustie. 

Cook, John, W.S., 32, Abercromby Place, Edinburgh. 

Copland, James, M.A., 5, Picardy Place, Edinburgh. 

Core, Thomas Hamilton, M.A., Wiston, by Biggar. 

Core, Wm. Granville, AViston, by Biggar. 

Cormack, John Rose, M.D., 5, Bedford Square, London, W.C. 
310 Cornfoot, James, M.D., Leven, Fifeshire. 

Corson, Rev. William, The Manse, Girvan. 

Cosens, Rev. Alex. Thomson, Manse of Broughton, Brichan Mill. 

Cossar, Thomas, M.D., Darlington. 

Cotton, George, S.S.C., 51, Castle Street, Edinburgh. 

Cousin, Rev. William, Melrose. 

Coventry, Henry John, 33, Melville Street, Edinburgh. 

Coventry, Rev. Geo., M.A., 33, Melville Street, Edinburgh. 

Cowan, Rev. Andrew H., Troon, Ayrshire. 

Cowan, David, Writer, 17, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 
320 Cowan, Hugh, Advocate, 4, Ainslie Place, Edinburgh. 

Cowan, Rev. Samuel, Manse of Kelton, Castle-Douglas. 

Cowan, James Moffat, M.D , Northern Club, George St., Edinburgh. 



116 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

Cowan, James, Moffat, Dumfriessliire. 

Cowan, John, junior, W.S., 4, Ainslie Place, Edinburgh. ' 

Cowan, Robert, W.8., 9, Carlton Terrace, Erlinbursch. 

Cowan, Eev. Robert, St. Leonard's Free Church, Perth. 

Cowe, Eev. Robert, M.A., 36, Lansdowne Crescent, Glasgow. 

Cowper, James A., M.D., 86, Nethergate, Dundee. 

Cowper, Rev. WilUam, 6, Union Street, Edinburgh. 
330 Cox, Robert, W.S., 25, Rutland Street, Edinburgh. 

Crabb, Alexander, 6, West Preston Street, Edinburgh. 

Craig, Rev. Archibald, M.A., Bedrule Manse, Jedburgh. 

Craig, James, 7, Brown Street, Edinburgh. 

Craigie, David, M.D.. 28, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Crawford, James, junior, W.S., 12, Duke Street, Edinburgh. 

Crawford, Rev. James, Crossbill Manse, Maybole. 

Crawford, Professor, 13, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

Crawfurd, Rev. A. M., EuUarton, Irvine. 

Crichton, Rev. David, Inverbrothock, Arbroath. 
340 Crichton, Hew H., W.S., 13, Nelson Street, Edinburgh. 

Crichton, Robert Orr, M.D., Dairy, Ayrshire. 

Crichton, James A., Advocate, 13, Nelson Street, Edinburgh. 

Crowe, Robert Burns, Teacher, 5, Lothian Road, Edinburgh. 

Cullen, Rev. James, M.A., Links, Kirkcaldy. 

Cumming, "WiUiam, M.D., 18, Ainslie Place, Edinburgh. 

Cumming, "\Vm. EuUarton, M.D., 9, Atholl Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Cumming, James, LL.D., 20, Pilrig Street, Edinburgh. 

Cunningham, Rev. Adam, Crailing, Kelso. 

Cunningham, Rev. Andrew, Eccles, Birgham, Berwick. 
350 Cunningham, George, Middlefield, Dunse, Berwickshire. 

Cunningham, James, 50, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Cunningham, Rev. J. G., M A., NorthAVest Castle, Stranraer. 

Cunningham, Rev. R, M.A., North-West Castle, Stranraer. 

Cunningham, Rev. "William Bruce, Prestonpans. 

Cunningham, Rev. William, D.D., Principal, Free Church Collegi 
17, Salisbury Road, Edinburgh. 

Currie, Alexander, Advocate, 43, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 

Currie, Rev. Robert, Torrybnrn, Dunfermline. 

Currie, James Allan, M.A., M.D., H.M. Bengal Medical Service. 

Currie, Rev. James, M.A., Normal School, Edinburgh. 
360 Currie, Rev. J. R. Hntton, Lockerby. 

Cusin, Alexander, M.A., 56, India Street, Edinburgh. 

Cuthbcrtson, William, W.S., 66, Northumberland Street, Edinliurgli 

< 'uthill, James, M.D., Denny. 

Dalgleish, Walter Scott, M.A., Grange House, Edinburgh. 
Dahnahoy, i'atrick, W.S., 69, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 
Dalrymple, William, W.S., 2, St. Andrew Square, Edinburgh. 
Dalziel, George, W.S. 10, Regent Terrace, Edinburgh. 
Dalziel, George Ilolni, of Drumlanrig, IViipnnt, Thornhill. 
Dalziel, John, 10, Regent Terrace, Edinburgh. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 117 

370 Dalziel, Johu, M.D., Penpont, by Thornliill, Dumfries. 

Darling, J. S., jim., W.S, 64, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. .;' 

Darling, J. S., W.S , Kelso. 

Darling, Rev. E. S., Kelso. 

Davidson, Alexander, M.A., 11, Dean Street, Edinburgh. 

Davidson, Rev. A., M.A., 19, Salisbury Street, Edinburgh. 

Davidson, F. Y., 31, Warriston Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Davidson, Rev. G. S., Kiuf\iuns, Perth. 

Davidson, J. R., M.A., 32, Rutland Square, Edinburgh. 

Davidson, James, M.A., Edinburgh. 
380 Davidson, Rev. Thomas, Abbey St. Bathans, Dunse. 

Deas, Hon. Lord, M.A., 3, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

Demaus, Robert, M.A., 19, Ferryhill Place, Aberdeen. 

Deuchar, John, Morningside House, Edinburgh. 

Dewar, Duncan, Kenmore, Perthshire. 

Dewar, James, M.D., Kirkcaldy, Fife. 

Dick, Abercrombie R., Advocate, 1, Albyn Place, Edinbu"gb. 

Dick, John, M.D., Broombank, Midcalder. 

Dick, John, Notary-Public, Craighouse, Lothian Burn, Edinburgh. 

Dick, Thomas Gunn, 25, West Nicolson Street, Edinburgh. 
390 Dickson, David Scott, W.S., 3, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

Dickson, George, Advocate, 3, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

Dickson, H. G., Junior, W.S., 27, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 

Dickson, John, W.S., Perth. 

Dickson, J. R., M.D., 37, Buccleuch Street, Glasgow. 

Dickson, Rev. Thomas, 17, St. Patrick's Square, Edinburgh; ' 

Dickson, Thomas M., M.A. of Clare College, Cambridge. 

Dickson, AVilliam, Jun., M.A., Hamilton. 

Dill, Rev. WilHam, The Manse, Colmonel, Ayrshire. 

Dingwall, Arthur, Advocate, 8, Great Stuart Street, Edinburgh. 
400 Dobbie, Rev. David, Makerstoun, Kelso. 

Dobie, Rev. Hugh, Kirkmichael, Dumfiies. 

Dodds, Rev. James, Dunbar. 

DoJs, Rev. Marcus, M.A., 11, Castle Street, Edinburgh. 

Dods, Rev. Thomas, 16, Buccleuch Street, Edinburgh. ^ 

Don, Rev. John A., Hillside, Lasswade. '; 

Donaldson, Rev. John, M.A., Kirkconnel Manse, Sanquhar. 

Donaldson, Rev. John, Ceres, Cupar, Fife. 

Donaldson, Professor, Marchfield. 

Dougall, Rev. James, Stoneykirk, Stranraer. 
410 Douglas, Rev. Adam Black, Manse of Carnock, Dunfermline. 

Douglas, A. Halliday, M.D., 62, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Douglas, Charles, M.D., Kelso. I 

Douglas, Christopher, W.S.. 17, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. | 

Douglas, D., W.S., 21, Castle Street, Edinburgh. ' | 

Douglas, Rev. Daniel, Kennoway, Markinch. f 

Douglas, Francis Brown, Assessor in University Court, 21, Moray | 

Place, Edinburgh. | 

Douglas, Rev. Henry M., Kirkaldy. ..i 



118 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

Douglas, James, 9, Great King Street, Edinburgh . 

Douglas, Eev. John, Alexandria, Glasgow. 
420 Douglas, John Brown, W.S., 6, Fettes Row, Edinburgh. 

Douglas, John D. W. 

Douglas, Eev. Peter, 48, West Richmond Street, Edinburgh. 

Downes, John, M.A., 20, Grove Street, Edinburgh. 

Drummond, Eev. David, Grant's House. 

Drysdale, Alexander H., M.A., Bridge of Allan, Stirlingshire. 

Dudgeon, Robert Ellis, M.D., 82, Gloucester Place, Portman Square, 
London 

Dudgeon, John, W.S., Spylaw, Kelso. 

Dumbreck, William, M.L)., 48, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

Dunbar, Henry, M D., 47, Apsley Place, Glasgow. 
430 Dunbar, Sir William, Bart., 47, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 

Duncan, Alexander, M.D., 128, Nethergate, Dundee. 

Duncan, Rev. A. Bethune, Manse of Culross, Kincardine. 

Duncan, Rev. David, How2;ate, Penicuick. 

Duncan, Rev. H.. Ettrick, Selkirk. 

Duncan, James, M.D., 12, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 

Duncan, James, M.D., 12, Henderson Row, Edinburgh. 

Duncan, James, W.S., 46, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Duncan, Rev. Joseph Rogers, Manse of Torthorwald, Dumfries. 

Duncan, Rev. Robert Tulford, Roslin. 
440 Duncan, Rev. R. Dick, 8, Bruntsfield Place, Edinburgh. 

Duncan. Rev. William, Millhill, Musselburgh. 

Duncan, Rev. William Wallace, M.A., Peebles. 

Dundas, Sir David, of Beechwood, Bart. Dunira, Crieff. 

Dundas, William Pitt, Advocate, 16, Inverleith Place, Edinburgh. 

Dunlop, Andrew Vans, M.D., 18, Rutland Square, Edinburgh. 

Dunlop, John, Lochside Cottage, Duddingston. 

Dunlop, John, M.D., 6. South Charlotte Street, Edinburgh. 

Duns, Rev. John, Torphichen, Bathgate. 

Dunsmure, James, M.D., 53, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 
150 Dycer, Charles, M.D., 42, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

Dykes, Rev. James 0., M.A., East Kilbride. 

Dymock, Archibald, M.D., Louth, Lincolnshire. 

Dymock, Robert L., 19, George Square, Edinburgh. 

Eadie, Wm., M.D., 25, Newton Street, Glasgow 
Eadie, Wm Teacher, 38, Earl Grey Street, Edinburgh. 
Easton, William J., "Writer, 81, St. George Place, Glasgow. 
Eaton, James, M.D., 8, Alva Street, Edinburgh. 
Edgar, Rev. J. Pitt, Berwick-on-Tweed. 
Edmonston, Rev. John, Ashkirk, Hawick. 
460 Edwards, James, M.D., Cnllen House, Banffsliire. 

Edwards, Robert, 13, Pentonville Road, Lslington, London, N. 
Eisdale, David A., M.A., 6, St. Patrick Street, Edinburgh. 
Elder, James, W.S., 5, Thistle Street, Edinburgh. 
Elder, John, W.S., 3, South- West Circus Place, Edinburgh. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 119 

Elliot, Adam, M.D., Goldielands, by Hawick. 
Elliot, Ninian, 10, St. Andrew Square, Edinburgh. 
Elliot, Wm. S., W.S., 32, Regent Terrace, Edinburgh. 
Ellis, William, 4, Royal Terrace, Edinburgh. 
Ellison, James, M.D., "Wick. 
470 Esdaile, Rev. David, Roscobie Manse, Forfarshire. 
Espie, George, 12, Antigua Street, Edinburgh. 

Fairbairn, Rev. James, Newhaven. 

Fairbaim, Rev. J., Greenlaw, Dunse. 

Fairbairn, Peter, M.D., 53, George Square, Edinburgh. 

Fergus, Rev. John, Bower, by Wick. 

Ferguson, Alexander, M.A., Teacher, Dryfesdale, Lockerby. 

Ferguson, Charles, 56, High Street, Edinburgh. 

Ferguson, George, LL.D., Professor, Aberdeen. 

Ferguson, John, W.S., 1, Regent Terrace, Edinburgh. 
480 Ferguson, Rev. R., M.A., 19, Lauriston Street, Edinburgh. 

Ferguson, Robert, Teacher, 59, Lauriston Place, Edinburgh. 

Ferguson, William, W.S., 1, Dundas Street, Edinburgh. 

Fergusson, James, M.D., Aberdeen. 

Fergusson, Rev. John, Manse of Edgerston, Jedburgh. 

Fergusson, Rev. John Symington, Kilmarnock. 

Fergusson, Rev. Thomas, Closeburn, Dumfries. 

Ferrie, John Dickson, Solicitor, Constitution Street, Leith. 

Finlay, Charles Patrick, W.S., 17, Northumberland Street, Edinr. 

Finlay, G. L , 17, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 
490 Fisher, Alexander, Galashiels. 

Fleming, Alexander, W.S., 20, Lynedoch Place, Edinburgh. 

Fleming, Andrew, M.D., Seagrove, Leith. 

Fleming, Rev. J. D., Inverkeithing. 

Foggo, Rev. D. L., Abercrombie Manse, St. Andrews. 

Forbes, James D., LL.D., Pi-incipal, United College, St. Andrews. 

Fordyce, James Dingwall, M.A., Brucklay Castle, Aberdeenshire. 

Fordyce, Wm. Dingwall, M.A., 13, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

Formau, James, Advocate, 6, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. | 

Forman, John, 8, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. > 

500 Forman, John N., W.S., 8, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. J 

Foiman, Robert, 8, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 

Forrest, Sir John, Bart, of Comiston, 14, Hope Street, Edinburgh. 

Forrest, John, 41, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

Forrester, Rev. Alex. M'Caul, Manse of West Linton, Penicuick. f 

Forrester, John, W.S., 8, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. j. 

Forrester, William Alexander, of Barns, Manor, Peebles. i 

Forster, Rev. William, Bowden, Cheshire. l 

Forsyth, Henry, W.S., Forfar. t: 

Fortune, John, M.D., Driffield, Yorkshire. ? 

510 Fotheringhame, Wm. Henry, Sheriff-Clerk of Orkney, Kirkwall. \ 

Foulis, Robert, M.D.. 9, Alva Street, Edinburgh. I' 

Frame, Lockhart Ross, M.D., Ossett, near Wakefield. i' 

France, George, Inverness. 5 



120 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

Fraser, Rev. Henry Erskine, M.A., Shawhinds, Glasgow. 
Fraser, James, M.D., 14, Clarence Street, Edinburgh. 
Fraser, Rev. John Gordon, Kelso. 
Fraser, John, M.D., Kilsyth. 
Fraser, Professor, 12, Rutland Street, Edinbnrsch. 
Fraser, Rev. Robert George, 6, Hope Park, Edinburgh. 
520 Fraser, W. S., 42, Melville Street, Edinburgh. 

Fraser, AVilliam, Junior, W.S., 42, Melville Street, Edinburgh. 

Fraser, Rev, AVilliam, M.A., Manse, Blairgowrie. 

Fraser, William, W.S., 54, Castle Street, Edinburgh. 

Freer, Rev. James, Tulliallan, Kincardine-on-Forth. 

French, James, M.D., United Service Club, Edinburgh. 

French, Rev. James, Dunfermline. 

French, John, W.S., 6, Graham Street, Edinburgh. 

Fullarton, James, B.A., 7, South-West Circus Place, Edinburgh. 

Fyfe, George, Academy, Jedburgh. 

530 Gairdner, John, M.D., 45, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Gairdner, Matthew B., M.D., Crielf. 

Gairdner, W. T,, ]\I.D., 45, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Galletly, Wm., 11, Nicolson Square, Edinburgh. 

Gallie, Alexander, 72, Buccleuch Street, Edinburgh. 

Gardiner, James, Grange House, Trinity. 

Gardiner, Rev. Thomas, (34, Frederick Street, Edinburgb. 

Gardner, Rev. James, M.A., M.D., Colinton. 

Gardner, Rev. John, Livingston Manse, Midcalder. 

George, Alex., Mercantile Clerk, 28, London Street, Edinburgh. 
540 Gentle, James, W.S,, 36, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Gibson-Craig, J. T., W.S.. 24, York Place, Edinburgh. 

Gibson, George, Alma Villa. 

Gibson, Henry G., W.S., 38, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

Gibson, Rev. James Y., 12, Windsor Street, Edinburgh. 

Gibson, James, George Watson's Hospital, Edinburgh. 

Gibson, John, W.S.,"38, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

Gibson, John, W.S., 53, Liverleith Row, Edinburgh. 

Gibson, William, Gorebridge. 

Gibson, William L., M.D , Dundee. 
550 Gibson, William, M.D., Campbeltown, Argyleshire. 

Gilchrist, Rev. John, Dunbog, Newburgh. 

Gilchrist, William, M.D., 23, George Square, Edinburgh. 

Gillespie, Rev. George, Manse of Cimimertrees, Annan. 

Gillespie, J. D., M.I)., 45, Castle Street, Edinburc^h. 

Gillespie, James Ewer, Manse of Cummertrocs, Annan. 

Gillespie, Rev. Richard A., Parish of Cross-]\Iichael. 

Gilmour, Alexander, 8, ^lary Place, Edinburgh. 

Girdwood, William, 31, Nicolson Street, Edinburgh. 

Gladstone, Right Hon. William Ewart,j\LP., Rector of the University, 
Carlton Terrace, London, W. 
560 Glen, John, M.A , M.D., Dnndee Royal Infirmary. 

Glen, Robert, Riddoch, Writer, Linlithgow. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 121 

Gloag, Eev. Paton James, Dunning, PertlisLire. 

Glover, James G., M.D , South Shields. 

Glover, Rev. William, M.A., D.D., 8, Forth Street, EJinburgh. 

Glover, John, S.S.C, 31, India Street, Edinburgh. 

Goldie, Archibald Watson, W.S., 8, York Place, Edinburgh. 

Goldie, William, W.S., 2, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Goldie, Rev. William, Crawfordjohn, Abington. 

Goodall, James Leslie, Markinch. 
570 Goodsir, Professor, College 

Goold, Rev. W. H., D.D., Grove Place, Edinburgh. 

Gordon, Eev. Charles, 18, Brunswick Street, Edinburgh. 

Gordon, David, M.D., 32, Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh. 

Gordon, Edward S., Advocate, 2, Randolph Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Gordon, Rev. George, LL.D., Manse of Birnie, Elgin. 

Gordon, James, 10, Windmill Street, Edinburgh. 

Gordon, James, Lyndoch Cottage. 

Gordon, John, M.A., 21, East Claremont Street, Edinburgh. 

Gordon, Rev. Robert, 14, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 
580 Gordon, Rev. Thomas, Newbattle, Dalkeith. 

Gordon, Rev. William, Rathwell, Annan. 

Gordon, William, M.D., Bridge of Allan. 

Gorrie, John, Advocate, 25, London Street, Edinburgh. 

Gourlay, Rev. Adam, Manse, Lilliesleaf, Selkirk. 

Gourlie, Neil M'Vicar, 113, Princes Street, Edinburgh. 

Gourlie, Rev. J. H., Manse of Brydekirk. 

Govan, George, M.D., Pilmuir Cottage, St. Andrews. 

Govan, John, W.S., 13, Walker Street, Edinburgh. 

Gowan, William, 8, Albert Road, Regent's Park, London. 
590 Gowanlock, J. T., 8, Chapel Street, Edinburgh. 

Graham, Rev. Alex., Morham Manse, Haddington. 

Graham, Andrew, M.D., U. S. Club, 14, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Graham, C. W. M. S., M.D., Dalkeith. 

Graham, John, M.D., Brampton, Cumberland. 

Graham, John Murray, IM.A., 5, Walker Street, Edinburgh. 

Graham, Richard, 14, Roxburgh Street, Eilinburgh. 

Graham, Vilant, Student of Divinity, Loretto House, Musselburgh. 

Graham, William, Teacher, West Princes Street Gardens, Edinr. 

Grahame, Alex., 30, Great George Streer, Westminster. 
600 Grahame, John, Advocate, Whitecross, Dunblane. 

Grant, Colin C, 18, Great King Street, Edinbui'gh. 

Grant, James G., M.D., 58, Hanover Street, Edinburgh. 

Grant, Andrew, Merchant, Bombay. 

Grant, David, 26, Hamilton Place, Edinburgh. 

Grant, Rev. John Davidson, Calderwater Head, Shotts, Lanarkshire. 

Grant, Joseph, W.S., 30, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 

Grant, Rev. Peter, Dundee. 

Grant, Rev. Ludovick Wm., M.A., Banflfshire. 

Grant, Rev. William, Ayr. 
610 Grant, Rev. James, D.D., D.C.L., 18, Great King Street, Edini-. 

Gray, Rev. Archibald, 18, Fettes Row, Edinburgh. 



122 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

Gray, William, Accountant, 58, Frederick Street, Edinburgh, 
Greig, David, M.D., Dundee. 

Greig, J. B., W.S., 18, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London. 
Greig, Eev. Benjamin F., Kinfauns, Perth. 
Greig, George, W.S., 9, Abercromby Place, Edinburgh. 
Greig, Soramerville, 10, Inverleith Place, Edinburgh. 
Grierson, Andrew, W.S., 15, St. Andrew Square, Edinburgh. 
Grierson, Eev. James, D.D., Errol. 
620 Grieve, Eev. John, Mertoun, St. Boswell's. 

Grieve, Eobert S., Assessor in University Court, Blacket Place, 

Edinburgh. 
Grosart. Eev. A. B., Kinross. 
Guland,' William, M.D., Falkland. 
Gulland, William, W.S., 16, Nelson Street, Edinburgh. 
Guthrie, Eev. David Kellie, Liberton, Edinburgh. 
Guthrie, James, M.D., Newburgh, Fife. 
Guthrie, Eev. John, M.A., Greenock. 
Guthrie, Eev. Thomas, D.D., 1, Salisbury Eoad, Edinburgh. 

Haig, Wm. James, M.D., Dollarfield, by Stirling. 
630 Haldan, Bernard, Surgeon, 36, Church Street, Preston, Lancashirp. 

Haldane, Daniel Eutherford, M.D., 5, Shandwick Place, Edinburgh. 

Haldane, James, Accountant, 34, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 

Haldane, Eev. James Tatlock, 13, High Street, Leith. 

Haldane, Eobert, W.S., 17, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 

Halkett, Eev. Andrew, Manse of Brechin. 

Hall, David, 25, India Street, Edinburgh. 

Hall, George, Eector of the Academy, Fortrose. 

Hallard, Frederick, Advocate, 29, Scotland Street, Edinburgh. 

Halliday, John, Parochial Schoolmaster, Salton, Tranent. 
640 Halley, Eev. Thomas, 6, Henderson Eow, Edinburgh. 

Hamilton, George, M.D., Falkirk. 

Hamilton, Eev. Hugh M'Curdy, Temple Patrick, County Antrim. 

Hamilton, Eev. James, M.A., Cockpcn, Lasswade. 

Hamilton, John, W.S., 7, Great Stuart Street, Edinburgh. 

Hamilton, Eev. John, Eenton, Dumbarton. 

Hamilton, John M'Curdy, M.A., Bally money, County Antrim. 

Hamilton, Eobert, M.D., Sciennes House, Edinburgh. 

Hamilton, Eobert, W.S., Kamesbank, Eothesay. 

Hamilton, Thomas, M.D., Kelso. 
650 Hamilton, Eev. W. M. S., Abernethy, Perth. 

Hamilton, William, Tranent. 

Hamilton, Eev. Zachary IM'Aulav, Bressay, Lerwick, Shetland. 

Handyside, P. D., M.D., 11, Hope Street, Edinburgh. 

Hannay, David, Newton-Stewart. 

Hardic, Thomas, M.D., Eoyal Infirmary, Edinburgh. 

Hardyman, John Hay, H. M. Gen. Eegister House, Edinburgh. 

ILarper, Ebenezcr Erskine, Leith Blount. 

Harper, James Peddie, M.D., 21, Trinity Place, Windsor. 

Hart, Francis, 66, Gilmore Place, Edinburgh. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 123 

660 Haxton, Rev. J. B., Sinclairtown Bank, Pathhead. 

Hay, Charles, 10, Fettes Row, Edinburgh. 

Hay, Rev. David, 39, Home Street, Edinburgh. 

Hector, David, Advocate, Edinburgh. 

Heddle, Matthew F., M.D., 6, Playfair Terrace, St. Andrews. 

Henderson, Adam Young, Academy, Coldstream. 

Henderson, Andrew, 4, Hill Square, Edinburgh. 

Henderson, Rev. David, 1, Bruntsfield Place, Edinburgh. 

Henderson, Rev. David, Strathmiglo, Fifeshire. 

Henderson, F. C, M.D., U. S. Club, 14, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 
670 Henderson, Rev. James, D.D., Glasgow. 

Henderson, John, M.D., 26, Charlotte Street, Leith. 

Henderson, John, M.A., Meadowbank, Mousewald, Dumfries. 

Henderson, Professor, 19, Ainslie Place, Edinburgh. 

Henderson, Richard, Teacher, Academy, Coldstream. 

Henderson, Robert, M.A., 16, Hart Street, Edinburgh. 

Henderson, Thomas, W S., 8, Brunton Place, Edinburgh. 

Henderson, AVilliam, M.D., 49, Schoolhill, Aberdeen. 

Hepburn, John S., W.S., Colquhalzie, Auchterarder. 

Hepburn, Sir Thomas B., Bart., Smeaton, Haddingtonshire. 
680 Heriot, F. L. M., Advocate, 18, Rutland Street, Edinburgh. 

Heron, William, 13, Gardner's Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Hetherington, Rev. W. M., M.A., D.D., Professor, Free Church Col- 
lege, Glasgow. 

Hill, Crawfurd, Advocate, 2, Picardy Place, Edinburgh. 

Hill, Cumberland, 20, Meadow Place, Edinburgh. 

Hillhouse, James, East Linton, Prestonkirk. 

Hillhouse, John Underwood, Prestonkirk.' 

Hislop, John C, M.D., East Linton. 

Hislop, Rev. Stephen, 68, Gilmore Place, Edinburgh. 

Hodgson, Wm. Ballantyne, LL.D., Jordan Bank, Edinburgh. 
690 Hog, Thomas Alex., of Newliston, Kirkliston. 

Hogue, D. W., M.D., 65, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Hoile, David Ogilvy, M.D., Castle, Stirling. 

Holdom, Rev. W., Grangemouth, Stirling. 

Home, Alexander G., M.D., Portobello. 

Home, David Milne, M.A., Advocate, Milnegraden, Coldstream. 

Home, Robert, Manse of Polwarth, Dunse. v 

Home, Rev. Walter, Manse of Polwarth, Dunse. V 

Home, William, M.D. 

Hood, John, Karnes, Coldstream. 
700 Hope, George Carfrae, M.D. 

Hope, Hugh, Parliamentary Sohcitor, Princes Street, Westminster. 

Hope, James, Junior, W.S., 81, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

Hope, James D. K. S., Bordeaux Cottage, Liberton. 

Hope, John, W.S., 31, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

Hope, Rev. Peter, M.A., Wamphray, Dumfriesshire. 

Horniblow, Richard Edmund Brain, M.D., Leamington. 

Home, David, Manse, Corstorphine. 



124 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

Home, Eobert Dick, 30, Abercromby Place, Edinburgh. 
710 Home, Tboraas E. 0., W.S., 10, AtboU Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Howat, Eev. Hu^b T., Brougbtv Ferry. 

Howden, J. C, M.D., Asylum, Montrose. 

Howden, James, Accountant, 20, Manor Place, Edinburgh. 

Howe, Alex., Yv^.S., Edinburgh. 

Hughes, George, W.S., 10, Rutland Street, Edinburgh. 

Huie, Richard, M.D., 8, George Square, Edinburgh. 

Hume, Rev. Edward, Manse of Pitsligo, Aberdeenshire. 

Hunter, Adam, M.D., 18, Abercromby Place, Edinburgh. 

Hunter, Evan Allan, W.S., 7, York Place, Edinburgh. 
720 Hunter, Rev. G., Kirkton, Hawick. 

Hunter, James Adam, M.l)., 18, Abercromby Place, Edinburgh. 

Hunter, Rev. John, Belford, Northumberland. 

Hunter, Rev. John, D.D., 3, Regent Terrace, Edinburgh. 

Hunter, John, Advocate, 24, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Hunter, John M., 25, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

Hunter, J. D., M.I)., Middle'field House, Portobello. 

Hunter, Robert, 1, George Place, Leith Walk. 

Hunter, Robert, Advocate, 67, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Hunter, Thomas G., M.D., care of G. Dalziel, W.S., 5, Thistle'St. 
730 Husband, William, M.D., 28, Clarence Street, Edinburgh. 

Hutchison, Andrew A., Advocate, 18, London Street, Edinburgh. 

Hutchison, William, M.l)., The Hermitage, Troon. 

Hutton, Rev. G. C, Mount Pleasant, Paisley. 

Hutton, James, Teacher, 1, Nicolson Square, Edinburgh. 

Hutton, Rev. R. S., M.A., Cambusnethan Manse, Wishaw. 

IngHs, Andrew, M.D., 33, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 
Inglis, Archibald, M.D., 33, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 
Inglis, H. Maxwell, P.C.S., 4, Coates Crescent, Edinburgh. 
Inglis, John, M.D., 10, Walker Street, Edinburgh. 
740 Inglis, Walter, 1, Hill Square, Edinburgh. 

Innes, A. T., M.A., 2, DrummoTid Place, Edinburgh. 
Innes, J. B., W.S., 37, Ileriot Row, Edinburgh. 
Innes, Professor, 15, Inverleith Row, Edinburgh. 
Ireland, Walter Foggo, P>anker, St. Andrews. 
Irvine, Rev. Walter F,, j\I.A., Arbroath Manse. 
Irving, Andrew, Plea Cairn, Dulton, Dumfriesshire. 
Irving, Rev. L. H., Arnothill, Falkirk. 
Ivory, William, Advocate, 12, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

Jack, George, Teacher, 28, Cotton Street, Dundee. 
750 Jackson, Andrew, 37, Howe Street, Edinburgh. 
Jackson, John, 23, Dundas Street, Edinburgh. 
Jackson, Rev. John C, Colinsburgh, Fife. 
James, James, M.D., Samieston, Jedburgh. 
Jameson, David, Ml)., 4, Ib-ighton Place, Portobello. 
Jauiieson, Rev. Robert, D.D., Minister of St. Paul's, Ghisgow. 



MEMBEES OF COUNCIL. 125 

Jarvie, Eev. A. M., Woodhead Street, Dunfermline. 

Jarvie, Eev. John Milne, 85, Regent Street, Greenock. 

Jeffrey, J. T., M.D., 17 Clarence Street, Edinburgh. 

Jeffrey, Eev. George, Whitevale, Glasgow. 

Jeffrey, Eev. John, 9 Catherine Terrace, Gateshead-on-Tyne. 
760 Jefft-ey, Eev. William, Manse of Eiccarton, Kilmarnock. 

Jordan, David, Dalkeith. 

Johnston, Eev. A., The Manse, Muirkirk, Douglas. 

Johnston, Eev. David, 236, Duke Street, Glasgow. 

Johnston, George, M.D., Fincraigs, by Newport, Fife. 

Johnston, Eev. George, D.D., 6, Minto Street, Edinburgh. 

Johnston, Henry, H.E.I.C.S., 32, Heriot Eow, Edinburgh. 

Johnston, James, 4, Eankeillor Street, Edinburgh. 

Johnston, James, M.D., 34, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Johnston, Eev. John, Kirkmichael, Dumfries. 
770 Johnston, Eev. J. B , 12, Ure Place, Glasgow. 

Johnston, Eev. Eobert, B.A., Arbroath. 

Johnston, Eobert, "W.S., 8, Broughton Place, Edinburgh. 

Johnston, Eobert Bruce, 8, Broughton Place, Edinburgh. 

Johnston, Eev. Michael S., Manse of Monigaff, Newton-Stewart. 

Johnston, Eev. William, 4, Gilmore Place, Edinburgh. 

.Johnston, Thomas Peter, 9, Crichton Street, Edinburgh. 

Johnston, William, M.D., 28, Pitt Street, Edinburgh. 

Johnston, William, Free Abbey School, Dunfermline. 

Johnston, William, M.D., Pitt Terrace, Stirling. 
780 Johnston, William, Teacher, Castle-Douglas. 

Johnstone, George, Publisher, Murray Place, Stirling. 

Johnstone, Eev. John, New York, U.S. 

Johnstone, Eev. Thomas, Anworth, Gatehouse. 

Johnstone, W. Smeliie, M.D., Islay. 

Kay, Eev. Thomas, Missionary, Taaphill, Bennington. 

Keith, George Skene, M.D., 57, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Kelland, Professor, 20, Clarendon Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Kelly, Eev. William, Applegarth Manse, Luckerby. 

Kemp, Wm. Strathenry, B.A., Classical Master, Greenock Academy. 
790 Kennedy, Alexander, W.S., 4, St. Patrick Square, Edinburgh. 

Kennedy, John, W.S., 71, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

Kerraack, W. E., W.S., 22, York Place, Edinburgh. 

Ker, Eev. John, Polmont. 

Kerr, Charles James, Accountant, 33, Dublin Street, Edinburgh. 

Kerr, James, M.A., Gifford Bank, Haddington. 

Kerr, Eev. James, Broughty- Ferry. 

Kerr, Kenneth, Eigg, Arisaig. 

Kerr, Eev. Samuel, The Manse, Yester, Haddington. 

Kilgour, James, Teacher of Languages, 8, Downie Place, Edinburgh. 
800 Kinghorn, John, Student of Lincoln's Inn, Dunse. 

Kinloch, A. J , M.D., Park House, Deeside, Aberdeenshire. 

Kinneai, G. T.. W.S., 28, Eoyal Circus, Edinburgh. 



126 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

Kinnear, Eev. Robert, Mofifat. 

Kippen, Eev. James, ^I.A., Eaasay, Inverness-shire. 

Kirk, James Balfour, M.D., Bathgate. 
^' Kirk, James, High Street, Alloa. 

Kirk, John, W.S., 12, Claremont Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Kirkwood, Alexander, M.D., Eavensdown, Berwick-on-Tweed. 

Kirkwood, George, Dairy mple Loan, Musselburgh. 
810 Kirkwood, Eev. Thomas D., Bridge of Earn. 

Knight, Eev. George F,, M.A., East Werayss, Fife. 

Knox, WilHam, M.D., 11, Hart Street, Edinburgh. 

Laidlaw, Eev. John, M.A., Bannockburn. 

Laing, Eev. John, 26, Pitt Street, Edinburgh. 

Laird, Eev. Alex. 0., Dundee. 

Laird, Eev. John, Cupar-Fife. 

L'Amy, John Eamsay, Netherbyres, Berwickshire. 

Lamb, Eev. Wm., Manse of Ednam, Kelso. 

Landale, James, M.D., 92d Highlanders. 
820 Landale, Eobert, S.S.C, 18, Forth Street, Edinburgh. 

Landale, Eev. David, Auchtergaven Manse, Perth. 

Latta, Eobert, of Blandfield, 6, Nelson Street, Edinburgh. 

Laughton, Eev. William, Greenock. 

Laurie, Eev. John Wallace, Kilmarnock. 

Laurie, Eobert, Howgate, Penicuick. 

Laurie, Simon S., M.A., 22, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Law, James, W.S., 32, Saxe-Coburg Place, Edinburgh. 

Lawrence, George, M.D., Market Street, Crail. 

Lawson, H. G., M.A. Oxon., 35, George Square, Edinburgh 
830 Lawson, Eev. John, Selkirk. | 

Lawson, William, 14, George Street, Edinburgh. 

Laycock, Professor, 4, Eutland Street, Edinburgh. 

Leckie, Thomas, M.D., Belmont, Torquay. 

Lee, Eobert, Advocate, 40, Castle Street, Edinburgh. 

Lee, Professor, 24, George Square, Edinburgh. 

Lee, Eev. William, Manse, Eoxburgh. 

Lees, William, M.A., 15, Dublin Street, Edinburgh. 

Legat, Andrew, M.D., South Shields. 

Legat, Eobert, W.S., Eskpark, Musselburgh. 
840 Leishmai), Eev. Matthew, D.D., Govan Manse, Glasgow. 

Leishman, Eev. WilHam, 1, Claremont Place, Edinburgh. 

Leitch, Eev. Alex., Wigton, Cumberland. 

Levach, John Grant, 2, Salisbury Square, Edinburgh. 

Limont, Rev. AVilliam, Alnwick. 

Lindesay, James, W.S., 22, Ecgent Terrace, Edinburgh. 

Lindsay, .lames, W.S., 10, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Lindsay, Robert C, Clark Street Terrace, Kihnarnock. 

Lindsay, W. Lauder, M.D., Pitcullen House, Perth. 

Lister, John, Advocate, Kilmux, AVindygatcs, Fife. 
850 Liston, Professor, Ehu Cottage, Wbitehouse Loan. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 12' 

Listen, Rev. "William A., Manse of Redgonon, Perthshire. 

Little, James, M.D., Infirmary, Dumfries. 

Little, Eev. George, Kirkintilloch. 

Little, Piev. John, Manor Manse, Peebles. 

Little, Kev. Walter, Manse of Orwell, Kinross-shire. 

Littlejohn, H. D., M.D., 40, York Place, Edinburgh. 

Livingstone, John S., 9, Montague Street, Edinburgh. 

Lockhart, Allan E., of Cleghorn, M.P., Borthwick Brae, Hawick. 

Logan, Charles Bowman, W.S., 29, India Street, Edinburgh. 
860 Logan, Edmond, W.S., 141, George Street, Edinburgh. 

Logan, George, W.S., Register House, Edinburgh. 

Logan, Hart, Advocate, Castle Malgewyn, Llechryd, Carmarthen. 

Logan, Rev. James, Swinton Manse, Coldstream. 

Logan, Rev. Robert, 29, India Street, Edinburgh. 

Logie, Rev. Wm., Manse of Firth, Orkney. 

Longmore, J. A., W.S., 56, Melville Street, Edinburgh. 

Lorimer, Rev. Archibald, Cockenzie. 

Lorimer, Rev. John Gordon, D.D., 6, Woodside Place, Glasgow. 

Lorimer, James, Advocate, 32, Hill Street, Edinburgh. 
870 Lorimer, John, Advocate, 19, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

Lorimer, John, M.D., MuiTay's Asylum, Perth. 

Lorimer, Robert, M.D., Tynepark, Haddington. 

Lorimer, "William, M.D., Haddington. 

Lorn, John, M.D., Dunbar. 

Louden, J. S., 44, Howe Street, Edinburgh. 

Louttit, James, M.D., Gorebridge. 

Lowe, David, 3, Montague Street, Edinburgh. 

Lowe, James, Rector of Royal Grammar School, Dunkeld. 

Lo'UTie, Thompson, M.D., 46, Minto Street, Edinburgh. 
880 Lucas, John, M.D., Dalkeith. 

Lundie, R. H., M.A., Birkenhead. 

Lyell, John G., M.D., South Bell Street, St. Andrews. 

Macalester, James, of Chapeltown, Stewarton, Kilmarnock. ! 
MacAllan, Allan B., W.S., 26, Rutland Square, Edinburgh. 
Mac Allan, James, W.S., 26 Rutland Square, Edinburgh. 
Macallan, J. H., 3 Scotland Street, Edinburgh. 
Macara, Laurence M., W.S., 58, Northumberland Street, Edinr. 
MacArthur, Rev. John, North Bute, Rothesay. 
Macartney, John Park, M.D., 42, Ann Street, Edinburgh. 
890 Macaulay, Rev. George, Inverteil, Kirkcaldy. 

Macaulay, James, M.D., M.A., 23, Pelham Street, London. 
Macaiilay, R. AV., M.D., 16 Castle Street, Edinburgh. 
Macbean, ^neas, W.S., Darnaway Street, Edinburgh. 
MacBeth, Rev. Laurence, 22, Hans Place, London. 
MacCulloch, Rev. Colin, The Manse, Montrose. 
Macdonald, Alexander, 24, Middle Arthur Place, Edinburgh. 
Macdonald, J. H. A., Advocate, 15 Aberci'omby Place, Edinburgh. 
Macdonald, F. R., M.D, Inveraray. 



128 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

Macdonakl, Colonel William, of Powderhall, Edinlnirgli. 
900 Macdonald, William, M.D., Professor, United College, St. Andrews 

Macdonakl, Wm. K., AVindmill House, Arbroath. 

MacDouall, Charles, LL.D., Professor, Queen's College, Belfast. 

MacDougall, Eev. James Ewen, Ladyloan, Arbroath. 

MacDougall, Professor, G, Clarendon Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Macduff, Alexander, of Bonhard, Perth. 

Macduff, Rev. R. C. H., Manse of Falkland. 

MacFarlane, David, M.I)., Drvmen, by Glasgow. 

Macfarlan, A. J , 4, Park Place, Edinburgh. 

Macfarlane, Rev. Duncan, ^lanse of Rannoch, Pitlochrv. 
910 Macfarlane, Rev. John, D.D., Eskbank, Dalkeith. 

Macfarlane, William, M.D., 21, St. Bernard's Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Macfoi'lane, Rev. AValter, Traquair Manse, Dumfries, 

MacGibbon, David, 89, George Street, Edinburgh. 

MacGregor, Alexander, M.A., Rector of Stranraer Academy. 

Macgregor, Rev. Duncan, IM.A., 11, West Princes Street, Glasgow. 

MacGregor, Rev. James, Barry, Carnoustie. 

MacGregor, John, M.A., 75, Broughton Street, Edinburgh. 

Mackav, James, M.D., 11, Drummond Street, Edinburgh. 

Mackay, J. W., Nonis, M.D., Elgin. 
920 Mackay, J. A., of Blackcastle, 26, George Square. 

Mackelvle, Rev. William, D.D., Balgedie, Kinross. 

Mackenzie, Donald, Advocate, M.D., 12, Great Stuart Street, Edinr. 

Mackenzie, Geo., W.S., 9, Hill Street, Edinburgh. 

Mackenzie, John, W.S., 16, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

Mackenzie, John W., W.S., 16, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

Mackenzie, Rev. John, Oxford Terrace, Edinburgh. 

Mackenzie, J. 0., W.S., 7, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

Mackenzie, Rev. Mungo Campbell, Lasswade. 

Mackenzie, AVilliam Forbes, Portmore, Peeblesshire. 
930 Mackenzie, William M'Lean, M.D., Kelso. 

Mackenzie, Kenneth C. A., 29, Northumberland Street, Ediii. 

Mackersy, Lindsay, 24, London Street, Edinburgh. 

Mackersy, Robert W., 24, London Street, Edinburgh. 

Mackie, Rev. A. W., Caddon Foot, Galashiels. 

Mackinnon, Kenneth, M.D., Broadford, Skye. 

Mackintosh, Andrew, Advocate, 31, Northumberland Street, Edini-. 

MacKnight, .James, W.S., 12, London Street, Edinburgh. 

Maclacblan, George, W.S., 21, X^uke Street, Edinburgh. 

Maclagan, D. P., M.D. 
940 Maclagan, David, M.D., 129, George Street, Edinburgh. 

Maclagan, Douglas, M.D , 28, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 

Maclaren, James, Hamilton Place Academy, Edinburgh. 

Maclaren, James D., M.D., 6, Newton Street, Glasgow. 

Maclaren, John, 10, Hamilton Place, Edinburgh. 

Maclaren, 1'. H., M.D., Royal Intirniary, Edinburgh. 

MacLaren, Rev. P., Newark, Port-Glasgow. 

MacLaurin, John, Sheriff-Sub. of Argylcshirc, Inveraray. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 129 

Maclean, John, 21, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

Macleay, Kenneth, Major, of Keiss, 19, Charles Street, St. James', 
London. 
950 Maclellan, Eev. Alexander, Manse of Kirkholm, Wigtown. 

MacLeod, Eev. Neil, M.A., Newport, Fife. 

Macleod, John M., of St. Kilda, Stanhope Street, Hyde Park Gar- 
den, London. 

MacMichael, Eev. N., Craignish, Lochgilphead. 

MacMillan, .John, M.A., Teacher, Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh. 

Macnaughton, Eev. James, Manse of Lores, Inverness. 

MacNee, Eev. Daniel, Eankeillor Street, Edinburgh. 

Macneil, Hector A., W.S., 8, Maitland Street, Edinburgh. 

Maconochie, E. B., W.S., 14, Great Stuart Street, Edinburgh. 

Macphail, Eev. James C., Aberdeen. 
960 Macpherson, Eev. Dougal, Dunkeld. 

Macpherson, Eev. John, Lairg. 

Macpherson, ^neas, Kingussie. 

Macqueen, John F., Barr.-at-Law, Lincoln's Inn, London. 

Macqueen, J. M., S.S.C., Marionville, Merchiston Park. 

Macready, Eev. A., St. Leonard's, Lanark. 

Macredie, P. B. Mure, Perceton House, Irvine. 

Macritchie, Thomas E., W.S., 4, Gayfield Square, Edinburgh. 

M'Alpine, William, Tabernacle Close, Dalkeith. 

M'Bride, Eev. Daniel, The Manse, Little Dunkeld. 
970 M'Callum, George K., of Braco, Braco Castle, Perthshire. 

M'Candlish, John M., W.S., 18, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

M'Carter, Eev. John, 6, Scotland Street, Edinburgh. 

M'Clymont, Eev. James, Denholm, Hawick. 

M'Cowan, Francis Da Cruz, M.D,, 25, Elder Street, Edinburgh. 

M'Crie, Charles G., 13, Pilrig Street, Edinburgh. 

M'Culloch, James Miller, 125, George Street, Edinburgh. 

M'Culloch, Eev. James J., 1, Buccleuch Street, Edinburgh. 

M'Culloch, Eichard, 6, Hanover Street, Edinburgh. 

M'Diarmid, W. E., Editor, " Dumfries Courier." 
980 M'Dougall, Eev. Daniel, Bucklyvie, Stirling. 

MacCalman, Eev. Donald, Manse, Ardchattan, Bunaw. 

M'Coll, Eev. Donald, Manse, Glenorchy, Argyllshire. 

M'Donald, Eev. James, Bankfoot, Perth. 

M'Dougall, Eev. J. P., 9 South-East Circus Place, Edinburgh. 

M'Dougall, P., Yr. ofGallanach, W.S., 4 Great King Street'^ Edinr. 

M'Ewen, James, W.S., 9 Union Street, Edinburgh. 

M'Farlan, Eev. Wm. L., Tongland Manse, Kirkcudbright. 

M'Farlan, J. M., Muiravonside Manse, Linlithgow. 

M'Farlane, Eev. Andrew, D.D-, Greenock. 
990 M'Farlane, James, W.S., 9, Atholl Place, Edinburgh. 

M'Farlane, Eev. John, Hamilton. 

M'Farlane, Eev. John, Greenock. 

M'Farlane, Eev. John, LLD., Park Grove, Glasgow. 

M'Gregor, Eev. Andrew, 108, George Street, Edinburgh. 

I 



130 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

M'Gree^or, Rev. Malcolm, 5, North Junction Street, Leith. 

M'Guffie, George, Liberton. 

M'Intyre, Rev. Malcolm Monikie, by Carnoustie. 

M'Kie, Thomas, 4, Albyn Place, Edinburgh. 

M'Kinell, John, Teacher, Old Cumnock, Avrshire. 
1000 M'Knight, John S., M.A., Kenyon Terrace", Birkenhead. 

M'Lachlan, John, Teacher, 21, Gardner's Crescent, Edinburgh. 

M'Lagan, James M'G., M.D. 

M'Lagan, Peter, Junior, Pumpherstone, Midcalder. 

M'Lagan, Philip W., M.D. 

M'Laren, Eev. Alexander Leslie, Markinch. 

M'Laren, Eev. Daniel, 9, Young Street, Edinburgh. 

M'Laren, Eev. Duncan, Dunning, Bridge of Earn. 

M'Laren, John, Advocate, Edinburgh. 

M'Laren, Rev. John, Larbert, Falkirk. 
1010 M'Lauchlan, Rev. Simon F., Cawdor, Nairn. 

M'Lauchlan, Thomas, 14, Scotland Street, Edinburgh. 

M'Lean, Rev. William, Ashkirk, Hawick. 

M'Lean, Charles, 21, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

M'Lelland, Sylvester Mackie, 2 Barony Place, Edinburgh. 

M'Master, James, Teacher, Woodside, Penpont. 

M'Millan, Rev. Dugald, M.A., 50, Brunswick Street, Edinburgh. 

M'Millan, Rev. John, Kirkcudbright. 

M'Moran, Robert, 15, Drummond Street, Edinburgh. 

M'Xab, John, M.D., Bunessan, by Oban. 
1020 M'Xeill, Archibald, 73, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

M'Murtrie, Rev. John, M.A., Manse of Mains, Dundee. 

M'Neill. Sir John, M.D., G.C.B., Granton House. 

M'Phail, Rev. Arch. C. Portland Park, Hamilton. 

Macquarrie, Rev. Neil John, Cariuish, North Uist. 

M'Queen, Richard R., 25, Barony Street, Edinburgh. 

M'Tavish, Rev. Alexander, Inverchaolain, Greenock. 

M'Vean, Rev. C. A., Manse, Kilninver, Oban. 

M'Walt, Rev. J., M.A., Saltoun. 

M'Watt, John P., Solicitor, Dunse. 
1030 M'Watt. Robert C, M.D., Dunse. 

Main, William, M.D., Bonnyrig, Lasswade. 

Mair, William L., Advocate, 41, York Place, Edinburgh. 

Maitland, Edward Francis, LL.D., Assessor iu University Court, 
3, Ainslie Place, Edinburgh. 

Maitland, G. R., W.S., 54, Melville Street, Edinburgh. 

Maitland, John, Accountant, 9, Walker Street, Edinburgh. 

Maitland, Kenmure, Sheriff-Clerk, 4, Hailes Street, Edinburgh. 
_ Maitland, Kev. .James, D.D., Manse of Kells, New Galloway. 

Makellar, Rev. William, Ascog, Rothesay. 

Malcolm, Robert B., M.D., 12(3, George Street, Edinburgh. 
1040 Manson, James, Southwood, Crieff. 

Mansr."^ Eev. Thomas, Perth 

Marjoribanks, Rev. T., Stenton Manse, Prestonkirk. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 131 

Marr, Kev. J. L., Douglas, Lauarkshire. 

Marshall, Jolm, Advocate, 11, Wemj'ss Place, Edinburgh. 

Marshall, John, Jan., Writer, Sandyford Place, Glasgow. 

Marshall, William J., M.D., 66, Regent Street, Greenock. 

Martin, Benjamin, M.A., 1, Clerk Street, Edinburgh. 

Martin, John, W.S., 32, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

Martin, Mungo J., M.D., 16, Melville Street, Edinburgh. 
1050 Martine, Wiliiam, M.D., Haddington. 

Mason, William, S.S.C., 6, Frederick Street, Edinburgh. 

Masson, William, 16, Keir Street, Edinburgh. 

Matheson, Adam Scott, 44, Cumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Mathieson, John A., Merchant, 25, Sardinia Terrace, Glasgow. 

Mathewson, E., M.A., Madras College, St. Andrews. 

Maxwell, Kev. Alexander, Ceres, Cupar-Fife. 

Meikle, Rev. Gilbert, Inverary. 

Meiklejohn, John, M.D., M.A. 

Meiklejohn, John William Sinclair, M.D., H.M.S. Royal Albert. 
1060 Mellis, Rev. David B., Tealing, Dundee. 

Melville, Andrew, 3, North Charlotte Street, Edinburgh. 

Melville, J. M., of Hanley, W.S., Corstorphine. 

Menteath, Alex. S., M.A. 

Menzies, John, 31, Windsor Street, Edinburgh. 

Menzies, Rev. Robert, Manse of Hoddam, Ecclefechan. 

Menzies, Rev. W., D.D., Keir Manse, Thornhill. 

Menzies, William, 10, Windsor Street, Edinburgh. 

Menzies, Wilham John, W.S., 10, Hill Street, Edinburgh. 

Menzies, James, M.D., Bellfield, near Abington. 
1070 Mercer, Robert, W.S., Ramsay Lodge, Portobello. 

Messer, John Cockburn, M.D., Maitland Street, Edinburgh. 

Middleton, James, 5, Broughton Place, Edinburgh. 

Middleton, John, M.D., 4, St. John Street, Edinburgh. 

Middleton, William, Rector, Grammar School, Falkirk. 

Mill, Ebenezer, S.S.C, 12, Atholl Place, Edinburgh. 

Millar, James Lawson, Waulkmill, by Dunfermline. 

Millar, John, Advocate, 10, Abercromby Place, Edinburgh. 

T.'i'.lar, Rev. John, Largoward, St. Andrews. 

Miller, James, George Watson's Hospital, Edinburgh. 
1080 Miller, James William, M.D., 30, Tay Street, Dundee. 

Miller, John, M.D., 28, Stafford Street, Edinburgh. 

Miller, Rev. John K., 21, Charles Street, Edinburgh. 

Miller, Rev. J. S., Thurso. 

Miller, Professor, 29, Chai'lotte Square, Edinburgh. 

Miller, Andrew, M.D., Scarborough, Yorkshire. 

Miller, Thomas, of Balliliesk, Pilmuir, Largs. 

Miller, Pet^r, Writer, Linlithgow. 

Milne, John, M.A., 1, Forres Street, Edinburgh, 

Milne, Nicol, Advocate, Faldonside, Melrose. 
1090 Milroy, Rev. Andrew, London Street, Edinburgh. 

Milroy, David, M.D., 26, London Street, Edinburgh. 



132 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

Milroy, Rev. James, M.A., Dreghom, Ayrshire. 

Milroy, Rev. John, Ballantrae, Girvan. 

Mitchell, Alexander, W.S., 9, London Street, Edinburgh. 

Mitchell, G. A., Edinburgh. 

Mitchell, Rev. Graham, LL.D., The Manse, Whitburn. 

Mitchell, Peter, Cockpen, Lasswade. 

Mitchell, Robert, 26, Waterloo Place, Edinburgh. 

Mitchell, Robert A., M.A., 1, St. Stephen Street, Edinburgh. 
1100 Mitchell, William James, Throwburn, Carnwath. 

Moffat, Robert, M.D., Polmont. 

Moffat, William, M.A., Teacher, High School, Edinburgh. 

Moffatt, Andrew, 49, Ivirk^ate, Leith. 

Moir, John I. A., M.D., 52, Castle Street, Edinburgh. 

Moir, Robert, M.D., Musselburgh. 

Moncreiff, Rev. Sir Henry Wellwood, Bart, 43, St. Cuthbert Street, 
Edinburgh. 

Moncreiff, William, 10, Rutland Street, Edinburgh. 

Moncrieff, Alexander, AV.S., Perth. 

]\roncrieff, David, Scott, 17, Duke Street, Edinburgh. 
1110 Moncrieff; R. S., Advocate, Dalkeith. 

Monilaws, Rev. George H. B., The Manse, Peebles. 

Monilaws, Rev. James John, Manse of Middleby, Ecclefechan. 

Monro, Rev. John Gardenstown, Banff. 

Monteith, Alex. E., Sheriff of Fife, Inverleith House, Edinburgh. 

Montgomery, William, W.S., Atholl Ciescent, Edinburgh. 

Moodie, A. L., Surgeon, Stirling. 

More, Professor, 19, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

More, George, W.S., 5, Fettes Row, Edinburgh. 

Morison, Alexander Kelly, S.S.C., 14, Pitt Street, Edinburgh. 
1120 Morison, Roderick, Manse of Kintail, Rosshire. 

Morrieson, R., late H.E.I.C., G, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 

Morris, Rev. T. M., Ipswich, Suffolk. 

Morrison, Ebenezer, Writer, Baker Street, Stirling. 

Morrison, Rev. John, Elie, Fife. 

Morton, Charles, W.S., Ramsay Lodge, Edinburgh. 

Mowbray, J. T., W.S., 15, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

Moxey, G. T., M.D., Lauder Road, Grange. 

Muir, Alexander, Teacher, Lowheazes, Hexham. 

Muir, Rev. R. H., Dalmeny Manse, South Qiieensferrv. 
1130 Muir, Rev. John S., Cockpen. 

Muir, John L., Merchant, 22, Broughall Street, London, E.C. 

Muirhead, Claud, junior, 7, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 

Muirhead, James, Advocate, Gl, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Muirhead, Rev. Patrick T., Kippen, Stirling. 

Munro, Alexander, M.D., 14, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Munro, Archibald, M.A., Middleby Street, Edinburgh. 

Munro, David, Teacher, Totteridge Park, Herts. 

Munro, Seymour H., M.D., Kilsyth. 

Munro, Thomas Munro, M.D., Benrig. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 133 

1140 Murdoch, Archibald Burn, Oxford Terrace, Edinburgh. 

Murdoch, Eev. A. H. Bui-n, B.A., Gartincaber, Stiriing. 

Murdoch, James M'G. B., Downing College, Cambridge. 

Murdoch, John Burn, junior, Advocate, Manor Place, Edinburgh. 

Murdoch, William Burn, M.D., 5, Melville Street, Edinburgh. 

Mure, Andrew, M.A., Advocate, 35, Dublin Street, Edinburgh. 

Murphy, Thomas A., North Chapel Street, Dunfermline. 

Murray, A. E., Advocate, 36, Ann Street, Edinburgh. 

Murray, Andrew, of Conland, 1, Scotland Street, Edinburgh. 

Murray, Anthony, of CreifF, W.S., 15, Ainslie Place, Edinburgh. 
1 150 Murray, Rev. A. J., Manse, Eddleston. 

Murray, George, Wimbledon Common, London. 

Murray, G., of Troquhain, Balmaclellan, New Galloway. 

Murray, George J., W.S., 7, Melville Street, Edinburgh. 

Murray, Rev. Matthev?-, St. George's Road, Glasgow. 

Murray, James Charles, W.S., Strathearn Road, Whitehouse Gar- 
dens, Edinburgh. 

Murray, Rev. John, Moonzie, Cupar-Fife. 

Murray, Rev. John, Newburgh. 

Murray, Rev. John, Morton Manse, Thornhill. 

Murray, John, Writer, 50, Castle Street, Edinburgh. 
1160 Murray, John, W.S., Wooplaw, by Galashiels. 

Murray, Rev. J., Chapleton, Hamilton. 

Murray, J. R., M.D., Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh. 

Murray, Patrick, M.D., 22, Buccleuch Street, Dumfries. 

Murray, Thomas, LL.D., 13, Dean Terrace, Edinburgh. 

Murray, T. G., W.S., 4, Glenfinlas Street, Edinburgh. 

MuiTay, Rev. William, Manse, Melrose. 

Murray, W. H., of Geanies, Advocate, Tain. 

Murray, John, Kersknowe House, Kelso, 

Murray, Rev. John G., Auchencairn, Castle-Douglas. 
1170 Murray, Wm. D., Shawlands, Pollockshaws, near Glasgow. 

Muschet, John S., M.D., Birkhill, Stirling. 

Myrtle, Andrew Scott, M.D., Falkirk. 

Myrtle, J. Y., M.D., 24, Rutland Street, Edinburgh. 

Nairne, James, W^.S., 8, Henderson Row, Edinburgh. 
Napier, Alexander J., W.S., 23, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 
Napier, George, Advocate, Coates Hall, Edinburgh. 
Napier, Mark, Advocate, 6, Ainslie Place, Edinburgh. 
Nasmyth, Robert, Surgeon, 5, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 
Neaves, The Honourable Lord, 7, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 
1180 Neilson, John, 8, Gayfield Square, Edinburgh. 
Nelson, Rev. John, Greenock. 

Newbigging, Patrick S. K., M.D., 29, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 
Newton, James, W.S., 33, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 
Newton, R. P., of Drumcross, Kerse, Falkirk. 
Nichol, Rev. R. B., Galashiels. 
Nicolson, Alexander, M.A., Advocate, 16, Forth Street, Edin. 



134 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

Nicholson, Eev. Maxwell, 3, Eegent Terrace, Edinburfi^Ii. 
Nicolson, James Badenoch, Advocate, 31, Albany Street, Edin- 
burgh. 
Ni'colson, Eev. William, Amble, Nortburaberland. 
1190 Nisbet, Eev. Eobert, D.D., 19, Lynedoch Place, Edinburgh. 
Niven, Alexander J., C. A., 33, Scotland Street, Edinburgh. 
Niven, James, Teacher, 31, Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh. 
Niven, John, M.D., 10, Lauriston Place, Edinburgh. 
Niven, Eev. T. B. W., Cranston, Ford. 
Nixon, John, Union Place, Montrose. 
Noakes, Benjamin, M.D., Hinckley, Leicestershire. 
Noble, Eev. A., M.A., Loudoun, by Kilmarnock. 
Noble, Eev. James, 7, Scotland Street, Edinburgh. 

Ogilvie, G. E., M.A., Advocate, Bankhead, Forfjir. 
1200 Ogilvie, E. G-., AV.S., 14, Cumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Ogilvie, AVilliam, of Cliesters, Jedburgh. 

Ogilvy, John, Tnchewan, Forfixr. 

Oliphant, Thomas, 33, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 

Oliver, Eev. Alexander, B.A., Galashiels. 

Oliver, James, Writer, Hawick. 

Omond, Eev. J. E., Monzie, Crieff. 

Omond, Eobert, M.D., 43, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 

Orphoot, Peter, M.D., 113, George Street, Edinburgh 

Orphoot, Thomas H., 113, George Street, Edinburgh. 
1210 Orr, Eobert, Advocate, 15, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

Orr, Eobert Scott, M.D., 0, Albany Phice, Glasgow. 

Oswald, Eev. John, Dorrator House, Falkirk. 

Pagan, J. M., M.D., 8, Melville Street, Edinburgh. 

Pagan, John M'M., M.I)., Professor, Glasgow University. 

Palmer, Eobert, Teacher, Parish Schoolhouse, Currie. 

Panton, Eev. George A., 242, St. Vincent Street, Glasgow. 

Park, J. Hall, ^LD., Broughty-Ferry. 

Parker, W. A., Advocate, 81, Princes Street, Edinburgh. 

Parker, Eev. John, Smyrna Manse, Sunderland. 
1220 Paterson, Alexander, M.D., Bridge of Allan. 

Paterson, Geo., of Castle Huntly, 3, Coates Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Paterson, James, Barr.-at-Law, M.A., 2, Church Yard Court, Temple, 
London. 

Paterson, jNIaurice, B.A., Blair Lodge Academy, Polmont. 

Paterson, Eev. J. C., 56, Cecil Street, Manchester. 

Pater-son, Eev. Nathaniel, D.D., 19, Lansdowne Crescent, Glasgow. 

Paterson, Eobert, :\LD., 32, Charlotte Street, Leith. 

Paterson, Eobert Paterson, 39, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

Paterson, E. P., Teacher, Duddingstone. 

Paterson, Thomas, NV.S., 4, India Street, Edinburgh. 
1230 Paton, George, iMiddleficld, I^eith Walk, Edinburgh. 

Paton, Eev. John, Ancrum, Jedburgh. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 135 

Paton, Eev. Kobert, D.D., 6, Newton Place, Glasgow. 

Paton, Robert, W.S., Selkirk. 

Patterson, Jobn, Fogo, Diinse. 

Pattison, G. H., Advocate, 18, Duke Street, Edinburgb, 

Pattison, John, W.S., Broughton Place, Edinburgh. 

Pattison, Thomas Hill, M.D., 39, London Street, Edinburgh. 

Patton, George, Advocate, 30, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 

Paul, iley. John, D.D., 33, George Square, Edinburgh. 
1240 Paul, Rev. William, M.A., Whitekirk, Prestonkirk. 

Pearson, Andrew A., W.S. 

Pearson. David Alex., North Cliff, North Queensferry. 

Peat, George, Writer, Dunse. 

Peddie, Alexander, M.D., 15, Rutland Street, Edinburgh. 

Peddie, Alexander, W.S., 36, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

Peddie, D. S., C.A., 1, George Street, Edinburgh. 

Peddie, James, W.S., 36, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

Peddie, James, Junior, C.E., 36, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

Peddie, J. D., Architect, 21, Claremont Crescent, Edinburgh. 
1250 Peddie, Rev. William, D.D., 57, George Square, Edinburgh, 

Peebles, Rev. And., Colliston, Arbroath. 

Peterkin, Alexander, 46, Cumberland Street, Edinburgh. * 

Philipps, John, W.S., St. Colme House, Aberdeen. 

Phin, Rev. K. M., Manse, Galashiels. 

Pillans, Professor, 43, Inverleitli Row, Edinburgh. 

Pirie, George C, M.D., Dundee. 

Pirie, John, M.D., 3, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

Pirrett, Rev. David, Windsor Terrace, Glasgow. 

Pitman, Frederick, W.S., 50, Castle Street, Edinburgh. 
1260 Playfair, Professor, 14, Abercromby Place, Edinburgh. 

Pollexfen, James R., W.S.,. 6, India Street, Edinburgh. 

Porteous, William, 16, Broughton Place, Edinburgh. 

Pow, Andrew, M.D., Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh. 

Pridie, Robert, M.D., 10, Roxburgh Street, Edinburgh. 

Pringle, William, Dick Place, Grange, Edinburgh. 

Pringle, Robert, W.S., Young Street, Edinburgh. 

Pur\^es, Rev. Jobn, Jedburgh. 

Pyper, Hamilton, Advocate, 15, Royal Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Ramage, Alex., Teacher, 18 Rankeillor Street, Edinburgh. 
1270 Ramage, C. T., LL.D., M.A., Wallace Hall, Dumfriesshire. 
Ramsay, Rev. John, M.A., Gladsmuir, by Tranent. 
Ramsay, Rev. Richard, Perth. 
Rankin, Patrick, M.D., Willow Bank, Airdrie. 
Ranken, Thos., S.S.C, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 
Rankine, Rev. John, Manse of Sorn, Mauchline. 
Rattray, Rev. Alexander, M.A., Camlachie Church, Glasgow. 
Redpath, Rev. Robert, M.A., 12, College Place, Camden Town. 
Reid, Alexander, M.A., LL.D., 19, York Place, Edinburgh. 
Raid, James R., 17, York Place, Edinburgh. 



13G MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

1280 Eeid, Eev. David, Ballinglins:, Logierait, Dunkeld. 

Eeid, William, M.D., St. Andrews. 

Reid, "NVilliam, Jiin., 8, Hope Street, Edinburgh. 

Rennie, Rev. John, Church Street, Inverness. 

Rennie, Rev. James, Dalkeith. 

Rennison, Rev. A., M.A., Laigh Kirk Parish, Paisley. 

Renton, James, S.S.C, 25, Scotland Street, Edinburgh. 

Renton, James, M.D., Dalkeith. 

Renton, Rev. John, Auchtermuchtj, Fifeshire. 

Renton, Robert, M.D. 26, Howe Street, Edinburgh. 
1290 Renwick, John, B.A., 28, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 

Rettie, Middleton, Advocate, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

Rhenius, Rev. Josiah, M.A., Tongland, Kirkcudbright. 

Richardson, James, Advocate, 22, Claremont Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Richardson, John, Y/.S , 50, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Richardson, John, Solicitor, London. 

Richardson, Rev. Samuel, M.A., Penninghame, by Newton-Stewart. 

Riddell, Rev. John, Moffat. 

Riddel), Robert, Advocate, Letham Hoiise, Haddington. 

Ridpath, John, Teacher, M.A., 128, Causewayside, Edinburgh. 
1300 Ritchie, Rev. Adam, Inch, Fettercairn, Kincardineshire. 

Ritchie, A. Carnegy, Advocate, 10, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

Ritchie, Charles, 1, Haddington Place, Edinburgh. 

Ritchie, Rev. David, Tarbolton Manse, Kilmarnock. 

Ritchie, Rev. J. B., Aberdeen. 

Ritchie, James, 13, Danube Street, Edinburgh. 

Ritchie, Rev. John, Shottsburn, Holytoun. 

Ritchie, R. P , M.D., Bethnal House, Cambridge Heath, London. 

Ritchie, Rev. William, D.D., Longforgan Manse, Dundee. 

Robertson, Alexander, Advocate, 76, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 
1310 Robertson, Ale.K., M.A., 11, King's Place, Leith. 

Robertson, Rev. A. B., Coldinghame, Aytoun. 

Robertson, Rev. F. L., Bonhill Manse, Glasgow. 

Robertson, G. B., 28, Albany Street, I]dinburgh. 

Robertson, G. G., M.D., 50, Coney Street, York. 

Robertson, George, W.S., 17, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

Robertson, Rev. J. A., Whitsome Manse, Chirnside. 

Robertson, Rev. J. B., 7, Salisbury Street, Glasgow. 

Robertson, J. S., W.S., 11, Claremont Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Robertson, James, W.S., 11, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 
1320 Robertson, James, 37, Royal York Crescent, Clifton, Bristol. 

Robertson, Rev. John, M.A., Blairgowrie. 

Robertson, John, W.S., 69, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

Robertson, Rev, John, Whitsome Manse, Berwickshire. 

Robertson, R(!V. John, Saline, Dunfermline. 

Robertson, Professor, 25, Ainslie Place, Edinburgh. 

Robertson, Robert M., Surgeon, Greenlaw, Berwickshire. 

Robertson, Rev. Thomas, Dunipacc, Dennv. 

Robertson, Rev. AVilliam, 12, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 137 

Robertson, William, M.D., 28, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 
1830 Robson, Rev. George, Lauder. 

Roddick, Rev. George, The Manse, Aberdour. 

Roddick, Rev. James, Lybster, Golspie. 

Rodger, Rev. A., Tranent, Haddington. 

Rodger, Rev. Alexander, Coldstream. 

Rodger, Peter, Writer, Selkirk. 

Rogerson, John J., 14, Clerk Street, Edinburgh. 

Rollo, H. J., W.S., 16, Dundas Street, Edinburgh. 

Ronaldson, John, Banker, Somerset Cottage, Mary's Place, Edin. 

Rose, Jas., AV.S., Castle Street, Edinburgh. 
1 840 Rose, James, junior, Castle Street, Edinburgh. 

Rose, Rev. AV. C, Cargill, Perth. 

Ross, Andrew, M.D., Waterloo, Portsmouth. 

Ross, David, M.A., 5, Morrison Street, Edinburgh. 

Ross, Rev. Evan, Manse, Ardersier. 

Ross, George, Advocate, 7', Forres Street, Edinburgh. 

Ross, Hugh, W.S., Pitt Street, Edinburgh. 

Ross, James, Teacher, Albany Lane, Edinburgh. 

Ross, John Miller, 8, Lothian Street, Edinburgh. 

Ross, Rev. William, Kintore, Aberdeenshire. 
1850 Runciman, Rev. David, D.D., 18, Annfield Place, Glasgow. 

Russell, Francis, Advocate, 17, Randolph Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Russell, J. Rutherford, M.D., 8, Harley St., Cavendish Sq., London. 

Russell, James, M.A., M.D., 15, Lynedoch Place, Edinburgh. 

Russell, Rev. James, M.A., The Manse, Yarrow. 

Russell, Rev. William, M.A., 1, Claremont Place, Edinburgh. 

Rutherford, Frank, Writer, Galashiels. 

Rutherford, Rev. A. C, Buckhaven, Leven. 

Rutherford, Jas. Lauder, 10, Windmill Street, Edinburgh. 

Rutherford, R., W.S., 64, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 
1860 Rutherford, Rev. R., M.A., Mountain Cross, Noblehouse. 

Rutherfurd, Andrew, Advocate, 47, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

Rutherfurd, John, W.S., 14, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 

Rutherfurd, William 0., of Edgerston, Roxburghshire. 

Sandeman, Robert John, 5, London Street, Edinburgh. 
Sanders, W. R., M.D., 15, Duke Street, Edinburgh. 
Sandford, E.Douglas, Advocate, 16, Randolph Crescent, Edinburgh. 
Sandie, Rev. George, Gourock, Renfrewshire. 
Sandilands, Robert, 45, George Square, Edinburgh. 
Sang, Edward, Teacher of Mathematics, 2, George Street, Edin. 
1370 Sang, Geo., 61, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

Saunders, William, S.S.C., 51, Albany Street, Edinburgh. 
Scarth, Pillans, AV.S., 37, Bernard Street, Leith. 
Sclanders, Alexander, M.D., Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh. 
Scott, Andrew, M.A., Professor, University, Aberdeen 
Scott, Andrew, W.S., 13, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 
Scott, Andrew, junior, 13, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 



1 38 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

Scott, Arcliibald, Solicitor, 20, Walker Street, Edinburgh. 

Scott, C. R., 83, Canning Street, Liverpool. 

Scott, Francis W., 3, Gayfield Square, Edinburgh. 
1380 Scott, Rev. G., Dairsie Manse, Cupar-Fife. 

Scott, George, M.D., Moira House, Southampton, Hants. 

Scott, Eev. Hew, Anstrutlier- Wester. 

Scott, Rev. J., Dirleton. 

Scott, Rev. James G., 75, Broughton Street, Edinburgh. 

Scott, James R., M.D., Belford, near Kelso. 

Scott, John, W.S., 17, Duke Street, Edinburgh. 

Scott, .lohn, Academy, Tain. 

Scott, Robert, M.D.,'Leuchars, Fife. 

Scott, Rev. Robert Selkirk, M.A., Manchester. 
1390 Scott, Stephen, M.D., Ratho. 

Scott, Rev. Thomas, Stonehaven. 

Scott, Thomas, M.D.,46, Rankeillor Street, Edinburgh. 

Scott, Thomas M., of Wauchope, W.S., Hawick. 

Scott, Thos. R., M.D., IMusselburgh. 

Scott, Rev. Walter, Whittingham Manse, Prestonkirk. 

Scott, Rev. AVilliam, Laurel Bank, Partick, Glasgow. 

Scott, William, M.D., Dumfries. 

Scrymgeour, Rev. William, Linlithgow. 

Seller, William, M.D., 18, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 
1400 Seton, George, Advocate, St. Rennet's, Greenhill. 

Shand, Alexander Burns, Advocate, 57, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Shand, C. F., Advocate, 6, St. Colrae Street, Edinburgh. 

Shand, John, M.D., Oakley House, Kirkcudbright. 

Sharp, Rev. John, Aberdalgie Manse, Perth. 

Sharpe, Robert, M.D., Coleraine, Ireland. 

Sharpe, William, of Hoddam, Knockhill, Ecclefechan. 

Shaw, Rev. William, M.A., The Manse, Ayr. 

Shaw, Rev. Robert, D.D., Whitburn. 

Shearer, George, M.D., Royal rntirmary, Edinburgh. • 
1410 Shirreff, C. J., Advocate, 10, Hope Street, Edinburgh. 

Sibbald, John, M.D., Morningside. 

Sibbald, John R., M.D., F.R.C.S.E., 141, Princes Street, 
Edinburgh. 

Sidey, James A., M.D., 42, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Sime, David, 40, Blacket Place. Edinburgh. 

Sime, James, M.A., 40, Blacket Place, Edinburgh. 

Simpson, Rev. Alexander L., D.D., Kirknewton Manse. 

Simpson, Rev. A. L., 25, Howe Street, Edinburgh. 

Simpson, A. R., M.D., 52, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Simpson, Rev. David, Dundonidd. 
1420 Simpson, John C, 3, Duncan Street, Edinburgh. 

Simpson, Matthew, Teacher, 7G, Kirkgate, Leith. 

Simpson, Peter, Writer, 23, Gayfield Square, Edinburgh. 

Simpson, Professor, 52, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Simson, James, M.D., 3, GlenGnlas Street, Edinburgh. 



' 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 1 39 

Sinclair, Eev. Sutherland, Greenock. 

Sinclair, Eev. William, M.A., Kirkwall. 

Sinclair, AVilliam, 22, Giles' Street, Leith. 

Skelton, John, Advocate, 20, Alva Street, Edinburgh. 

Skinner, William, W.S., 41, iSorthumberlcjnd Street, Edinburgh. 
1403 Slater, Thomas, 5, Bloomfield Place, Glasgow. 

Sloan, John M., M.A., Coraraonside, Tarbolton, Ayrshire. 

Small, John, M.A., College. 

Smart, John, 11, Smith's Close, Leith. 

Smeaton, Eev. George, Professor, Free Church College, Edinburgh. 

Smieton, John G., Dundee. 

Smiles, William, M.D., 43, Bedford Square, London, W.C. 

Smith, Alexander, M.D., 41, Castle Street, Forfar. 

Smith, Eev. David, Biggar. 

Smith, David, W.S., Daddingstone Cottage, Portobello. 
1440 Smith, Eev. E., 2, Haddington Place, Edinburgh. 

Smith, Eev. H. W., Manse of Durisdeer, Thornhill. 

Smith, Henry G. C, Teacher, 19, St. Patrick Square, Edinburgh. 

Smith, James S., 3, Hewat Place, Edinburgh. 

Smith, John, M.D., Callander, Perthshire. 

Smith, John, M.D., 12, Dundas Street, Edinburgh. 

Smith, Eev. John, Manse of Ecclesmachan, Linlithgow. 

Smith, Eev. John, Manse of Aberlady, Drem. 

Smith, Eev. John, D D., Glasgow. 

Smith, John, M.D., 20, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 
1450 Smith, John A., M.D., 7, W^est Maitland Street, Edinburgh. 

Smith, Eev. Joseph S., Dunbar. 

Smith, Eev, Eobert, D.D., Old Machar, Aberdeen. 

Smith, Eev. Thomas, M.A., 4, Kerr Street, Edinburgh. 

Smith, Eev. Thos., Manse of Ewes, Hawick. 

Smith, W. F. M., Lieutenant, E.A., Eandolph CliflT, Edinburgh. 

Smith, William, M.A., 1, Clerk Street, Edinburgh. 

Smith, Eev. William, Abbey Mount, Edinburgh. 

Smith, William, 17, Scotland Street, Edinburgh. 

Smith, Eev. W. G., Fintray Manse, Glasgow. 
1460 Smollett, A., of Bonhill, Cameron House, Dumbartonshire. 

Smyth, Professor, 1, Hillside Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Somerville, Eev. A., D.D., 32, Ann Street, Edinburgh, 

Somerville, Eev. Alex. N., 328, Eenfrew Street, Glasgow. 

Somerville, D. H., M.D., Ayton, Berwickshire. 

Somerville, David, M.A., 22, Pilrig Street, Edinburgh. 

Somerville, Eobert, M.D., Innerleithen. 

Somerville, Eev. Eobert, The Manse, St. Boswell's. 

Somerville, Samuel, M.D., 17, Hart Street, Edinburgh. 

Sommerville, Eev. G. E., Logic, Cupar-Fife. 
1470 Spark, Eev. William, Kirkwall. 

Spasshatt, S. P., M.D., 107. Douglas Street, Glasgow. 

Spence, Edward, Linlithgow. 

Spence, Eobert, M.D., Letham, by Cupar-Fife. 



140 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

Spence, Eev. S., Kilbirnie, Ayrsliire. 

Spence, Gilbert William, M.D., Greenfield Place, Lerwick. 

Spenser, Eev. Adam, Eiccarton, Ayrshire. 

Spiers, Eev. John, Kinglassie, Kirkcaldy. 

Spittai, Charles Gray, M.A., 3, Minto Street, Edinburgh. 

Spottisvroode, J., of Spottiswoode, Lauder. 
1480 Sprot, Thomas, W.S., 10, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 

Stark, .James, M.D., 21, Eutland Street, Edinburgh. 

Stark, Eev. John, Horndean, Berwick. 

Stai'k, John, M.D., Viewbank, Auchtermuchty. 

Starke, James, Advocate, 34, Heriot Eow, Edinburgh. 

Starke, J. G., M.A., 34, Heriot Eow. Edinburgh. 

Steel, George, Merchant, Hopetoun Place, Annan. 

Steele, Eev. John, Portmoak, Kinross. 

Steele, Peter, M.A., 33, Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh. 

Steele, William, 3, Eldon Place, Glasgow. 
1490 Stein, Andrew, W.S., 39, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Stephen, Eev. James Innes, Terregles, Dumfries. 

Stevenson, Alex., W.S., 9, Heriot Eow, Edinburgh. 

Stevenson, Alan, M.A., Morton Cottage, Portobello. 

Stevenson, Eev. C. F., Stobhill, Gorebridge, Edinbin-gh. 

Stevenson, Eob. J., 2, Meadow Place, Edinburgh. 

Stevenson, Eev. P. J., D.D., Cupar-Angus. 

Steuart, Eobert, of Carfin, 46, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

Steuart, Archibald, W.S., 6, Ann Street, Edinburgh. 

Steuart, Chas., W.S., 3, Albyn Place, Edinburgh. 
l.oOO Steuart, Chas., junior, W.S., 8, Doune Terrace, Edinburgli. 

Steuart, James, W.S., 8, Doune Terrace, Edinburgh. 

Stewart, Alexander Macdonell, 3, Windsor Street, Edinburgh. 

Stewart, Eev. A., Manse of Glasserton, Whithorn. 

Stewart, A. J., AV.S., 27, Pitt Street, Edinburgh. 

Stewart, Eev. C. C, Scone, by Perth. 

Stewart, G. E., M.D., Dundee. 

Stewart, Eev. H. A., Penicuik. 

Stewart, H. G., M.D., Dumfries. 

Stewart, James, junior, Accountant, 8, Doune TeiTace, Edinburgh. 
1.510 Stewart, Eev. John, iMoulin, Pitlochry. 

Stewart, John, 3, Warriston Place, Edinburgh. 

Stewart, John, M.D., 73, George Street, Edinburgh. 

Stewart, John, W.S., 4, North Charlotte Street, Edinburgh. 

Stewart, T. E., W.S., 8, Doune Terrace, Edinburgh. 

Stewart, Thomas G., M.D., 7, Frederick Street, Edinburgh. 

Stewart, Eev. AVilliam, Warkworth, Arlington. 

Stirling, James, of Holmchill, Dunblane. 

Stirling, Eev. Eobert, D.D., (ialston Manse, Whithorn. 

Stobbs, Eev. AVilliam, M.A., Gordon, by Kelso. 
1520 Stodart, G. T., W.S., 16, Abercromby Place, Edinburgh. 

Stodart, J. R., AV.S., 2, Drummond Place, Edinburgh. 

Stoddart, Thos. T., Advocate, Kelso. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 141 

Stormonth, James, 9, Eoxbnrgli Street, Edinburgh. ' 

Story, Rev. Robert H., 20, Picardy Place, Edinburgh. 

Stothert, Rev. James, Bruges, Belgium. 

Strauchon, Rev. W., M.A., 4, Hay Street, Edinburgh. 

Struthers, James, M.D., 22, Charlotte Street, Leith 

Slruthers, John, M.D., 3, Park Place, Edinburgh. 

Struthers, Rev. John, The Manse, Prestonpans. 
1530 Stuart, Charles, M.D., Hillside Cottage, Chirnside, Ayton. 

Stuart, Rev. John, 13, Forth Street, Edinburgh. 

Stuart, Joseph G., Merchant, 9, Picardy Place, Edinburgh. 

Stuart, Robert, Advocate and Barrister, Bloomfield Terrace, Harrow 
Road, London, 

Stuart, R. L., W.S., Dick Place, Grange, Edinburgh. 

Stuart, William, W.S., British Linen Bank, Peebles. 

Sturrock, David, M.D., 2, Park Place, Dundee. 

Sutherland, D. M'Gregor, Castletown, by Thurso. 

Swan, Wm., Professor, United College, St. Andrews. 

Swinton, Campbell, Professor, 7, Darnaway Street, Edinburgh. 
1540 Swinton, Rev. James, Portmoak, Kinross. 

Swinton, J. C, of Kimmergharae, Berwickshire. 

Swinton, J. R., 2, St. George's Road, London, 

Syme, David, S.-S., of Kinross-shire, Kinross. 

Syme, James G., 7, South Frederick Street, Edinburgh. 

Syme, Professor, 2, Rutland Street, Edinburgh. 

Symington, William, M.D., Penicuik. 

Tait, Professor, College. 

Tait, Rev. A, D., Kirkliston. 

Tait, Rev, James, Wellington Street, Kirkwall. 
1550 Tait, James C, W.S., 2, Park Place, Edinburgh. 

Tait, James, junior, W.S., 9, Queensferry Street, Edinburgh. 

Tait, John, Advocate, 2, Park Place, Edinburgh. 

Tait, Rev. J. H., Kirkliston. 

Tait, Rev. Walter, St. Madoes, Perth. 

Tait, Wm., Writer, 10, Mary Place, Edinburgh. 

Tait, William, of Prior Bank, 2, Walker Street, Edinburgh. 

Tawse, John, W.S., 11, Royal Terrace, Edinburgh. 

Tawse, J. W., W.S., 49, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

Taylor, Rev. James, D.D., Oakfield House, Hillhead, Glasgow. 
1560 Taylor, Robert H., M.D., 1, Percy Street, Liverpool. 

Taylor, John, M.A., Parliament Square, Edinburgh. 

Taylor, John, Teacher, 13, North-West Circus Place, Edinburgh. 

Taylor, M. W., M.D., Hutton Hall, Penrith. 

Taylor, William, Teacher, Mount Pleasant, Greenock. 

Taylor, William, W.S., 38, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 

Taylor, William, M.D., Cardiff, Glamorganshire. 

Tennent, Hugh L., S.S., Greenock. 

Tennent, Patrick, 9, Lynedoch Place, Edinburgh. ; 

Thain, Rev. Alexander, New Machar, Aberdeen. 



142 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

Thatcher, Lewis H., M.D., Picardv Place, Edinburgh. 

Thorn, John James, 29, Chirence Street, Edinburgh. 

Thomson, Andrew, "Wliitehill, Heiton, Kelso. 

Thomson, Andrew, M.D., 11, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Thomson, Rev. Adam, Hawick. 

Thomson, Eev. E. A., Findhorn Place, Grange, Edinburgh. 

Thomson, Alexander, M.D., 8, Teviot Row, Edinburgh. 

Thomson, Allen, M.D., Professor, University, Glasgow. 

Thomson, David P., M.D.> 11, Nelson Street, Liverpool. 
1580 Thomson, Eraser, M.D., 8, Athole Crescent, Perth. 

Thomson, George, of Burnhouse, Advocate, London. 

Thomson, G. S., M.D., Row, Helensburgh. 

Thomson, Rev. John, M.A., 13, Bonnington Place, Leith. 

Thomson, Rev. John, Prestonkirk. 

Thomson, Rev. John, Hawick. 

Thomson, Rev. Joseph, Ladykirk, Coldstream. 

Thomson, J. J. Johnston, Solicitor, Dumfries. 

Thomson, Rev. John W., Pitcairngreen, Perthshire. 

Thomson, L. R., M.D., Belmont, Dalkeith. 
1590 Thomson, IMurray, INI.D., 8, Meadow Place, Edinburgh. 

Thomson, Robert, M.A., 12, Union Street, Edinburgh. 

Thomson, Robert, 11, South St. James Street, Edinburgh. 

Thomson, Rev. E., Earlston, Melrose. 

Thomson, Rev. R. S.. M.A., Arbirlot. 

Thomson, Rev. R. "NV., The Manse, Ormiston, Tranent. 

Thomson, Thomas, M.D., Coltsgate Hill, Ripon, Yorkshire. 

Thorburn, Rev. David, .ALA., Leith. 

Thorburn, John, AVriter, 23, Castle Street, Dumfries. 

Tod, Henry, W.S., 39, York Place, Edinburgh. 
1600 Tod, Henry, junior, 39, York Place, Edinburgh. 

Tod, James, 55, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

Todd, Ge-^rge, C.A., 5, East Claremont Street, Edinburgh. 

Todd, Robert, M.D., Dysart. 

Torrence, Rev. Alexander, Manse of Glencross, Roslin. 

Traill, William, M.D., Maygate Street, Dunfennline. 

Traill, Professor, 29, Rutland Square, Edinburgh. 

Traquair, Ramsay H., Colinton. 

Traquair, William, W.S., 17, Young Street, Edinburgh. 

Trotter, J. J., St. Andrews. 
1010 Trotter, John P., Advocate, Dumfries. 

Trotter, Richard, of Mortonhall, Liberton. 

Turnbull, John, ^^^S., 49, George Square, Edinburgh. 

Turnbull, John, M.D., Dunbar. 

Turnbull, ]?ev. John, Eyemouth. 

Turnbull, :\r. J., J\LD., Coldstream. 

Turnbull, W. B., 19, North-AVest Circus Place, Edinburgh. 

Turner, Rev. A., Port of Alenteith, Stirling. 

Tytler, James, of Woodhouselee, W\S., Roslin. 

Tytler, James Stuart, W.S., 36, Melville Street, Edinburgh 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 143 

1620 Underwood, Rev. Thomas Kirkpatrick, Irongray, Dumfries. 
Urquhart, Adam, -Advocate, 5, St. Colme Street, Edinburgh. 

Vallange, William, M.D., Portobello. 

Veitch, James, of Eliock, Hamilton. 

Veitch, John, M.A., Professor, United College, St. Andrews. 

Veitch, Robert Annan, Merchant, 1, Hill Square, Edinburgh. 

Waddell, Rev. David, Manse, Stow. 

Waddell, William, W.S., 20, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

Walker, Arthur A., M.D., 23, Nelson Street, Edinburgh. 

Walker, David T., Whitekirk, Prestonkirk. 
1630 Walker, G. A., M.D., Dollar, Stirhngshire. 

Walker, Rev. James, Carnwath, Lanarkshire. 

Walker, James, Manse of Greenlaw, Dunse. 

Walker, James, of Dairy, Advocate, 10, Albyn Place, Edinburgh. 

Walker, John, W.S., 20, Rutland Street, Edinburgh. 

Walker, Rev. John, Newton-Stewart. 

Walker, Rev. Norman M. L., Dysart. 

Walker, Robert W., M.A., 31, Stafford Street, Edinburgh. 

NValkinshaw, Rev. William, Lyne Manse, Peebles. 

Wallace, Alex., M.A., Royal Observatory, Edinburgh. 
1640 Wallace, Rev. Andrew, Cockburnspath. 

Wallace, Ebenezer, W.S., 13, London Street, Edinburgh. 

Wallace, Rev. John, 1, Archibald Place, Edinburgh. 

Wallace, Wm. M.D., 7, Church Lane, Morningside. 

Waterston, Rev. R., B.A., Forfar. 

Watkins, James Hutton, Writer, 77, W. Nile Street, Glasgow. 

Watkins, John W., M.D., Newton, near Warrington. 

Watson, Alexander, Teacher, 10, Catherine Street, Edinburgh. 

Watson, Rev. Charles, D.D., M.A., 10, Charlotte Sq., Edinburgh, 

Watson, Rev. Charles, B.A., Langholm. 
1650 Watson, Rev. George, Sprouston, Kelso. 

Watson, Rev. Jas. R., Manse, Eccles, Coldstream. 

Watson, Patrick H., M.D., 10, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 

Watson, Rev. Hiram, Ratho. 

Watson, Rev. R. B., 30, Royal Terrace, Edinburgh. 

Watson, AYalter, Surgeon, Midcalder. 

Watson, WiUiam, M.D., LesHe. 

Watt, John, of Meathie, St. Andrews. 

Watt, Rev. John, 46, South Clerk Street, Edinburgh. 

Webster, Alexander, M.D., Dundee. 
1660 Webster, Alex. Binny, M.D., 13, Warriston Crescent, Edinburgh. 

Webster, George, Advocate, 56, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh. 

Wedderburn, George, W.S., 18, India Street, Edinli -gh. 

Wedderburn, William, Keith House, Blackshiells. 

Wedderspoon, David, M.A., Solicitor, Perth. 

Weir, Rev. George, Humbie, Blackshiels. 

Weir, Thomas Graham, M.D., 25, Heriot Row, Edinburgh. 



144 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 



Weir, T. D., Boghead, Bathgate. 

Weir, Rev. Walter, Longtbrmacus, Dunse. 
■ Welsh, Rev. William, Broughton, Rachan Mill. 
Ib70 ^Vells James, M.A., 2l, Salisbury Street, Edinburgh. 

Whigham, David, W.S., Langlands Place, Dumfries. 

VVhigham James Judge of County Courts, 6, Gloucester Crescent 
31., Hyde Park, London. 

mite, Adam, Advocate, 4, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 

\Wiite, Rev. Adam, M.A., Harray, Orkney. 

wi^-*^' J'^"™=^s, Felton, West Linton, Peeblesshire. 

\V hite ^\ilham Alexander, M.D., 5, Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh. 

V\ hitelaw, Rev. John M., Athelstaneford, Drem 

Whitfield, William, JVLA., Biggar. 

Whitson, Rev. John, London Road, Carlisle. 
1680 Whitson, Patrick R., 11, Duncan St., Drummond PL, Edinburgh. 

\V luttet, George, Whitehouse, Cramond. 

Whyte, William J., of Towiebesr, M.D., Banff. 

Wickham, Joseph, M.D., Penrith, Cumberland. 

Uight, Rev. Henry, 24, Walker Street, Edinburgh. 

VVilkinson, John, M.D., Tranent. 

Williamson, Rev. Alexander, Manse, Innerleithen. 

\\ ilhamson, Rev. David, South Queensferry. 
Williamson, Geo., M.D., Morningside, Edinburgh. 

N\ illiamson, James, M.D., Burntisland. 
1690 Williamson, Thomas, M.D., 40, Quality Street, Leith. 

VVi lamson, AV^illiam, M.D., Union Street, Aberdeen. 

VViUnis, John, Teacher, Peebles. 
Willins, Rev. Angus, Dunse. 
Wilson, Rev. Andrew, Abbey Manse, Paisley. 
Wilson, Andrew, Everton Terrace, Liverpool. 
Wilson, A.M., S.S.C, 41, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 
Wilson, Charles, M.D., 43, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 
Wilson, Charles M'Dowell, 43, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 
.^A^ ,S'^°"' ^^^'^'•' ^^•^•' 12. Dean Terrace, Edinburgh.' 
1700 Wilson, George, M.A., West Hurlet, Glasgow. 

Wilson, George, M.D., Alnwick, Northuml^erland. 
Wil.son, Rev. G., Glenluce. 

Wilson, Henry S., M.D., Windmill Street, Edinburgh. 
Wilson, James, M.D., Ravensdown, Berwick-on-Tweed. 
Wilson, James, W.S., 21, Maitland Street, Edinburgh. 
Wilson, Rev. James, Leven. 
Wilson, Rev. Jas., Manse of Edrom, Ayton. 
Wilson, Rev. Jas. H., M.A., Fountainbridge Manse, Edinburgh. 
Wilson, Professor, College. 
1710 Wilson, J. Dove, Advocate, 43, Moray Place, Edinburgh. 

Wilson, J. Pettigrew, Advocate, 20, Abercromby Place, Edinburgh. 

W 1 son, Patrick, M.A., 2, Arniston Place, Edinburgh. 

Wilson, Rev. Robert, Tynron, Thornhill. 

Wilson, William, 34, Great King Street, Edinburgh. 



MEMBERS OF CODNCIL. 145 

Wilson, Rev. William, York Lane, Edinburgh. 

Wilson, Rev. William, Union Terrace, Dundee. 

Wilson, AVilliam, W.S., 16, St. Andrew Square, Edinburgh. 

Wood, Alexander, M.D., Assessor in University Court, 10, St. 
Colme Street, Edinburi^h. 

Wood, Andrew, M.D., F.R.C.S E., 9, Darnaway Street, Edinburgh. 
1720 Wood, John George, W.S., 27, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh. 

Wood, James, Academy, Melrose. 

Wood, Jas., M.D., 19, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

Wood, Rev. John, Broughty-Ferry. 

Wood, Rev. Walter, Elie, Fife. 

Wood, William, C.A., 2, Oxford Terrace, Edinburgh. 

Wood, William, M.D., Lomond House, Trinity. 

Wormald, Joseph D., Writer, 17, Scotland Street, Edinburgh. 

Wotherspoou, C. G., 18, Great Stuart Street, Edinburgh. 

Wright, Alfred, M.D., Malta House, Edinburgh. 
1730 Wright, Rev. George, Manse of Kingsbarns, St. Andrews, 

Wright, Rev. John, Alloa. 

Wright, John, W.S., 28, Forth Street, Edinburgh. 

Wright, Rev. Robert, 23, Downie Place, Edinburgh. 

Wright, Thomas, M.D., 1, Duncan Street, Edinburgh. 

Wright, Rev. Thomas, Swinton, Coldstream. 

Wyld, Robert S., Queensferry. 

Yellowlees, David, M.D., Royal Edinburgh Asylum. 

Young, Rev. Alex., Westerkirk Manse, Langholm. 

Young, Andrew, Teacher, 22, Elm Row, Edinburgh. 
1740 Young, Archibald, Advocate, 22, Royal Circus. 

Young, Rev, David, Chatton, Belford. 

Young, James, M.D., 36, North Castle Street, Edinburgh. 

Young, Rev. Jas., 4, Newington Terrace, Edinburgh. 

Young, John, M.D., Morningside. 

Young, Rev. John, LL.D., 28, Thornhill Crescent, London. 

Young, John William, 22, Royal Circus, Edinburgh. 

Young, Peter, M.D., 1, Dean Terrace, Edinburgh. 

Young, Rev. Robert, Teviothead Manse, Hawick. 

Young, Robert, M.D., Chapelhall, Airdrie. 
1750 Young, William L,, Solicitor, Auchterarder. 

Yule, John, W.S., Broughton Hall, Edinburgh. 

Ziegler, William, M.D., 47, George Square, Edinburgh. 



K 



APPENDIX. 



APPENDIX. 



A, 

REGULATIONS APPLICABLE TO STUDENTS OF LAW 
AND THEOLOGY. 

Law, — The Scotch Bar. 
The Regulations having reference to admission to the Scotch 
Bar may be obtained from the Librarian, Advocates' Library, 
Edinburgh. So far as the University is concerned, it is important 
only to state that the necessary Classes are, Civil Law, Scots 
Law, Conveyancing, and Medical Jurisprudence. Candidates 
for admission to the Bar who are not Graduates in Arts, must 
undergo a preliminary examination in Latin, Greek (or French 
and German), Logic or Mathematics, and Metaphysics, conducted 
by examiners appointed by the Faculty of Advocates. 

Law. — Writers to the Signet. 

Students intending to become Writers to the Signet must attend 
two full Winter Sessions at the University — the Humanity Class 
being attended during one of these. 

Further information regarding the Course of Study and the 
Examinations may be obtained from John Plamilton, Esq., W.S., 
Signet Office, Register House, or 7, Great Stuart Street, Edin- 
burgh. 



Theological Students. 

The following are the Regulations of the principal religious 
Communions regarding the University Course to be followed by 
their Students : — 

1. Church of Scotland. — Students must "produce Certificates 
of having attended all the Classes required of such as apply for 



150 APPENDIX. 

the Degree of Master of Arts, viz., Greek, Latin, Logic, Mathema- 
tics, Moral Philosophy, and Natural Philosophy, in such order that 
after Greek and Latin being attended during the first Session, the 
Classes of Logic, Moral, and Natural Philosophy, must have been 
attended separately during three successive seasons, and that Ma- 
thematics shall have been studied in a University, at least during 
one Session, before entering the Class of Natural Philosophy. 

" The course of attendance at the Divinity Hall shall be 
completed in four Sessions, provided that the Student's attend- 
ance during three of these Sessions shall have been regular ; but 
Students giving only two Sessions of regular attendance shall be 
required to give an additional attendance of three partial Sessions 
to complete their Course. All Students shall be required to give 
at least two Sessions of regular attendance ; and every Student 
must attend the Classes of Church History, Hebrew, and Biblical 
Criticism, during at least two of the Sessions which he claims to be 
considered as regular, if such classes shall exist in the University 
or Universities at which he has prosecuted his Theological Course. 
— Act of Assemhly, 1856. 

2. Free Church, — The Course in the Faculty of Arts is the 
same as in the case of the Church of Scotland. 

3. United Presbyterian Church. — " Students, before being 
admitted to the Theological Hall, must attend at least three Ses- 
sions at one of the National Universities, and their University 
Course must be duly certified to have included Latin, Greek, Logic, 
and Moral Philosophy, , . . Students who have not attended 
the Natural Philosophy Class of the University, before admission 
to the Hall, are required to do so immediately after the first Ses- 
sion, . . . It is strongly recommended to Students to attend 
such Classes as they may have access to, for the study of Geology, 
Chemistry, and other branches of Natural Science." — From Paper 
on Theological Education, issued hy Authority of the Synod. 

4. Reformei) Presbyterian Church. — " Every Student shall 
prosecute his studies at one of the National Universities during 
four complete Sessions at least ; and shall comprise in that cur- 
riculum the usual Literary and Philosophical branches, viz., Latin, 
Greek, Mathematics, Logic, Ethics, and Natural Philosophy, to 
which, before entering the Hall, a knowledge of Hebrew must be 
added. The Student is recommended to add to this Course of Study, 



APPENDIX. 151 

Natural History, Chemistry, Anatomy, and the German Language." 
— From Synopsis of St2idies, issued hy Authority of the Synod. 

5. Congregational Union op Scotland. — Students are required 
to go through the ordinary curriculum of four years in the Faculty 
of Arts. It is not necessary that this should be done before 
enterinor the Theological Hall. 



B. 

The following Ordinances, applicable to the University of 
Edinburgh, were issued by the Universities Com- 
missioners in 1860, and approved by Her Majesty in 
Council. 

At Edinburgh, the Twenty- Second day of June, Eighteen 
Hundred and Sixtg Years. 

Whereas, by an Act passed in the Twenty-first and Twenty-second 
Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty, Chapter Eighty-three, inti- 
tuled, ^ An Act to make Provision for the better Government and Dis- 
cipline of the Universities of Scotland, and im])roving and regulating the 
Course of Study therein ; and for the Union of the Two Universities and 
Colleges of Aherdetn^'' it is provided, that tha Commissioners of Her 
Majesty's Treasury shall be empowered to pay, out of such Moneys as 
may be provided by Parliament for the Purpose, such Su ns of Money 
as the Commissioners under the said Act shall recommend to be paid for, 
among other Purposes, that of providing retiring Allowances to aged 
and infirm Principals and Professors ; and whereas the said Act, by 
Section XII. 5, empowers the University Court of each University, upon 
sufficient Cause shown, and after due Investigaticn, to require a Prin- 
cipal or Professor to retire from his Office on a retiring Allowance, sub- 
ject to the Proviso, that no such Requisition shall have any Eff'ect until 
it has been approved by Her jMajesty in Council ; but the said Act does 
not provide in what Manner a Principal or Professor, disabled from the 
Performance of his Duties by Age or Infirmity, should make Application 
to be allowed to retire on a retiring Allowance ; and whereas it is expe- 
dient that Provision should be made as to the Mode of Procedure in such 
a Case, the Commissioners statute and ordain : — 

That any Principal or Professor desiring to retire from his Oifice on a 
retiring Allowance, on the Ground of ^ge or Infirmity, shall apply by 
Petition to the University Court, stating the Grounds on which his Ap- 
plication is rested, and if the University Court, after due Inquiry, shall be 
satisfied that the Petitioner is, by Reason of Age or Infirmity, perma- 
nently incapable to discharge the Duties of bis Office, they shall report 
the fame to Her Majesty in Council, together with a Statement of their 



152 APPEN^DIX. 

Opinion that the Petitioner ought to be permitted to retire ; and. in the 
Event of the Opinion of the University Court receiving the Approval of 
Her Majesty in Council, the Petitioner shall be entitled to retire from 
his Office, and to receive a retiring Allowance on the same Scale and 
Conditions as may for the Time be applicable to the Case of a Principal 
or Professor retiring under Section XII. 5 of the said Act. 

In Witness whereof, these Presents are sealed with the Seal of the 
Commission. 

\ 
John Inglis, Chairman. 



At Edinburgh, the Second Day of July, Eighteen Hundred 
and Sixty Years. 

Whereas, by an Act passed in the Twenty-first and Twenty-second 
Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty, Chapter Eighty-three, inti- 
tuled "An Act to make Provision for tlie better Government and Disci- 
pline of the Universities of ^'o^Za/JC?, and improving and regulating the 
Course of Study therein ; and for the Union of the Two Universities and 
CoWeges oi Aberdeen" the Commissioners imder the said Act are em- 
powered, subject to the Provisions of the Act, to regulate by Ordinance 
the Powers, Jurisdictions, and Privileges of Chancellors, Rectors, Asses- 
sors, Professors, and all other Members or Office- Bearers in the several 
Universities of Scotland, as also of the Senatus Academicus, the General 
Council, and the University Court, and their Meetings ; and, further, to 
make Regulations as to Time, Place, and Manner of presenting and 
electing all University Officers ; the Commissioners statute and ordain, 
with reference to each of the said Universities, as follows : — 

I. At the Meetings of the General Council, in the Absence of tlie 
Chancellor, Rector, and Principal, the Professor who has been longest in 
Office, as Professor in tlie University, of those present shall preside : 
Provided that in the University of St. Andreivs the Junior Principal, 
if present, shall, in the Absence of the Chancellor, Rector, and Senior 
Principal, preside in Preference to the Senior Professor; and in every 
Case the President of the Meeting shall have a deliberative and also a 
casting Vote. 

II. It sliall not be in the Power of the General Ci)uncil to adjourn its 
Meetings from either of the stated annual Days of Meeting to a future 
Day: but it shall be in the Power of any Meeting to suspend its Pro- 
ceedings from One Hour to a later Hour of the same Day. 

III. It sliall be in the Power of the General Council to appoint a Com- 
mittee or Committees at One Meeting to arrange or prepare Business 
for a future Meeting ; but it shall not be in the Power of the General 
Council to delegate any of its Functions to a Committee, or to act by 
means of a Committee. 



APPENDIX. 153 

IV. In the Absence of the Rector at a Meeting of the University 
Court of any University, the Member present, who is first mentioned in 
the Enumeration of its Members in the said Act, shall preside, with a 
deliberative Vote only : and in the Event of an Equality of Votes upon 
any Question at such Meeting, the Considei'ation of the Question before 
the University Court shall be adjourned to a Day, of which due Notice 
shall be given to the Rector ; and on that Day the Consideration of the 
Question so adjoui-ned shall be resumed, and, if the Rector does not then 
attend, the Member presiding at such subsequent Meeting shall have 
both a deliberative and a easting Vote on that Question. 

V. On the occurrence of a vacancy in the Office of Chancellor, the 
Election of his Successor shall take Place at the first ordinary Meeting 
of the General Council, which shall take Place after the Lapse of Two 
Months from the Occurrence of the Vacancy. 

VI. Whensoever the statutory Term of Office of the Assessor in the 
University Court for the General Council is to expire within Ten Days 
next after an ordinary half-yearly Meeting of the Genei-al Council, it 
shall be lawful for the General Council at the said half-yearly Meeting to 
proceed to the Election of an Assessor, who shall enter upon his Office 
at the Expiration of the said statutory Term of Office ; and, in the Event 
of a Vacancy occurring from any Cause at any other Period, the General 
Council shall proceed to the Election of an Assessor at the next ordinary 
half-yearly Meeting. 

VII. Provided always, that at any Meeting of the General Council, at 
which an Election of Chancellor or Assessor shall fall to take Place, the 
General Council shall proceed to such Election before entering on any 
other Business. 

VIII. The Appointment of every Assessor to the University Court 
shall be made in Writing, and the written Appointment shall be forth- 
with transmitted to the University Court ; and no Assessor shall be en- 
titled to act as a Member of the University Court, until his written 
Appointment shall have been so transmitted. 

IX. In the Election of Chancellor or of Assessor by the General 
Council, where more than One Person is nominated for the same Office, 
the President of the Meeting shall, by means of a Show of Hands, ascer- 
tain and declare which of the Persons nominated has a majority of Votes 
at the Meeting, and, if no Poll be demanded by the Proposer or Seconder 
of any Candidate, the President shall declare such Person to be duly 
elected ; but, in the Event of a Poll being demanded by the Proposer or 
Seconder of a Candidate, a Poll of all the Members of the General 
Council shall be taken in the Manner hereinafter pi'ovided, that is to 
say, the Registrar shall, on the next Day but One after the Day of 
Meeting, issue, through the Post, to each Member resident in the United 
Kingdom, to his Address as appearing in the Register, a voting Letter 
in the Form of Schedule (A.) hereunto annexed, with all the Blanks filled 
up, except the Name of the Person for whom the Member votes and the 
Signature of the Member ; and such Letter shall be accompanied by a 
Letter of Intimation from the Registrar in the Form of Schedule (B.) 
hereunto annexed, and each Member, upon Receipt of his voting Letter, if 



154 APPENDIX. 

he desires to vote in the Election, shall insei't the Name of the Candidate 
for whom he votes, and affix his Subscription, and return the voting 
Letter to the Registrar in such Time, that the Registrar shall receive the 
same within Twenty-one Days after the said Day of Meeting ; and on 
the Expiration of tlie said Twenty-one Days, the Registrar shall, in the 
presence of the Proposer or Seconder of each Candidate, or of some 
Person to be named by them for the Purpose, sum up the Votes so re- 
turned ; and the Candidate, for whom the largest Number of Votes shall 
be returned within the Time aforesaid, shall be declared to be duly 
elected as from the Day of Meeting, and an Intimation to that Effect, 
under the Hands of the President of the Meeting and the Registrar, shall 
be forthwith published in the Edinhurgh Gazette, and a Copy thereof 
fixed in some patent Place in the University ; and in Case of an Equal- 
ity of Votes for Two or more Persons, the President of the Meeting shall 
have a casting Vote : Provided always, that it shall be lawful for the 
Registrar to deliver his voting Paper, with the Blanks duly filled up as 
aforesaid, to any Member of the General Council personally, or to send 
it throuo-h the Post to any Member to a different Address from that ap- 
pearing in the Register, on an Application by such ^Member to that 
Effect being lodged with the Fiegisnar not later than the Day imme- 
diately following the Day of Meeting ; but the Registrar shall not in 
any Case deliver the voting Paper of any Member to another ^Member, 
or to any other person, but shall either send it through the Post, or de- 
liver it personally to each Member ; and no Vote shall be reckoned in 
the Election, which is not returned under the Signature of a Member to 
the Registrar in a voting Letter issued as aforesaid. 

In Witness whereof, these Presents are sealed with the Seal 
of the Commission. 

John Inglis, Chairman. I L.S. 



SCHEDULE (A.) 
UNIVERSITY of [Name of University.] 
VOTING LETTER. 

No. [Number of Member^ as in the Register]. 

I [Name of Member in full, with his D<signation and Residence, to be 
filled in by the lltgistrar], hereby record my Vote in favour of* 

for the Office of [Clian- 

cellar, or Assessor, as the case may be], 

t 

( Date) - 



• Ikre the Voter will fill in the Name of the Caudidate for whom he votes. 
t Signature of Voter. 



APPENDIX. 



155 



SCHEDULE (B.) 

UNIVERSITY of [Name of University]. 

Election to the Office of [Chancellor or Assessor', as the case may he'\. 



Persons Nominated. 


Proposed by 


Seconded by 


A.B. . 
CD. . 
E.F. . 


{Name of Proposer.) 
Do. 
Do. 


{Name of Seconder.') 
Do. 
Do. 



Sir, — I have to intimate, that the above-mentioned Persons have been 
nominated for the Office of [Chancellor or Assessor, as the case may be'], 
and I have to request that, if you desire to vote in the Election, you will 
insert in the. Blank of the accompanying voting Letter the Name of the 
Person for whom you vote, and after signing the Letter, will transmit it 
to me at the University, so as to reach me on or before [Day on or 
before which Votes must be returned.] — I am, etc., 



-Registrar. 



{Date). 



THE EDINBURGH 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 



1861-62. 



CORRECTED TO OCTOBER 15, 1861. 




AND SOLD BY 

EDMONSTON AND DOUGLAS, EDINBUEGH. 



i86i. 



CONTENTS. 



Calendar, 



PAGB 

4 



University Officers, 

Part I. — Constitution op the Unitersity of Edinburgh — 

Origin and Growth of the University, 



Offices of Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, Rector 

Professor, 
Senatus Academicus, . 
University Court, 
General Council, . 
Matriculated Students, 
Universities' Commissioners, 



Pri 



ncipal, and 



Part II — University Library, 
Library, 
Museums, 
Botanic Garden, . 



Museums, and Botanic Garden 



Part III. — Classes and Courses of Study — 

University Terras, ........ 

Programme of Classes and Class Fees for 1861-62, 
Matriculation Fees, &c., ....... 

Synopses of the Courses in the Classes of Arts, Theology, 

Law, and Medicine for 1861-62, . ■ . 
Class Prize Lists for 1861, 

Part IV. — Graduj\.tion in Arts, Medicine, Law, and THEOLoav- 

Regulations for the Degree in Arts, 
Graduates in Arts, 1861, 
Arts Examination Papers for 1861, 
Intimation for 1862 in Faculty of Arts, 

Regulations for Degrees in Medicine, 

Medical Graduates for 1861, 

Medical Examination Papers for 1861, 

Degrees in Law, 1861, 

Degrees in Theology, 1861, 

Bursaries and Scholarships, 

Pitt Scholarship — Ordinance of Universities' Commissioners, 



11 
16 

17 
18 
18 
18 



19 
21 
23 



24 
24 
26 

27 
50 



60 
67 
71 

85 

89 

98 

101 

108 

108 

110 

117 













1 


1861.— NOVEMBER, 30 Days. 


DECEMBER, 31 Days. ] 


1 


Fr 


Sun rises 7h. 22m. Sets 4h. 32ra. 


1 


S' 


Advent Sunday. 


2 


Sa 




2 


M 


Sun rL=es 8h. 23m. Sets 3h. 41m. 


3 


s 


[Address. 


3 


Tu 




4 


31 


■Winter Sesjion opens. — Principal's 


4 


W 




5 


Tu 


Clnsses in Arts, Law, and Medicine 


5 


Th 




6 


W 


Classes in Theology open. [open. 


6 


Fr 




7 


Th 




7 


Sa 




8 


Fr 




8 


s 




9 


Sa 




9 


M 




10 


s 




10 


Tu 




11 


M 


Martinmas Terra. 


11 


W 




12 


Tu 


Court of Session sits. 


12 


Th 




13 


W 




13 


Fr 




14 


Th 




14 


Sa 




15 


Fr 


Sun rises 7h. 52m. 


15 


s 


Sun rises 8h. 41m. 


16 


Sa 


Sun sets 4h. 2m. 


16 


M 


Sun sets 3h. 3Gm. 


17 


S 




17 


Tu 




18 


M 




18 


W 




19 


Tu 


prelim. Medical Examination ends. 


19 Th 




20 


W 




20!Fr 




21 


Th 




2i;sa 


Shortest Day. 


22 


Fr 




22 s 




23 


Sa 




23 


M 




24 


S 




24 


Tu 




25 


M 




2.5 W 


Christmas-day. 


26 


Tu 




26Th 




27 


W 




27iFr 




28 


Th 




28'sa 


Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 


29 


Fr 




2f»S 




30 


Sa 


Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 


30 'm 
31 Tu 




1862.— JANUARY, 31 Days. 


FEBRUARY, 28 Days. 


1 


W 


Bank Holiday.— Sun rises 8h. 47m. 


1 
ISa 


Sun ri.«es 8h. 11m. 


2 


Th 


Sun sets 3h. 48m. 


28 


Candlemas Term.— Sun sets 4h. 45m. 


3 


Fr 




3 


31 


Prelim, iledical Examination. 


4 


Sa 




4 


Tu 




5 


s 




5W 




6 


M 




6Th 




7 


Tu 




7Fr 




8 


W 




8 


Sa 




9 


Th 




9 


S 




lOiFr 




10 


M 


Queen married, 1840. 


11 Sa 




11 


Tu 




12 S 




12 


W 




13 M 




13 


Th 




14 Tu 




14 


Fr 




15 W 


Sun rises 8h, S3ra. 


15 


Ha 


Sun rises 7h. 42ra. 


lelTi) 


Sun Bets 4h. 10m. 


16 


S 


Sun sets 5h. 15m. 


17 Fr 




17 


M 




ISSa 




18 


Tu 




IDS 




19 


W 




20 iM 




20 


Th 




21 Tu 




21 


Fr 




22 \V 




22 


Sa 


Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 


23 


Th 




23 


S 




24 


Fr 




24 


M 


Holiday in Faculty of Arts. 


25 


Sa 


Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 


25 


Tu 




2fc 


s 




26 


|W 




27 


iM 


Holiday in Faculty of Arts. 


27 


|Th 




28 


Tu 




28 


Fr 




2£ 


W 










3C 


Th 










31 


Fr 











JULY, 31 Days. 


AUGUST. 31 Days. 


1 


Tu 


Sun rises 3h. 3 ."in. 


1 
ITr 


Jledical Degrees conferred. — Lammas 


2 


W 


Sun sets 8h. SSm. 


2Sa 


Sun rises 4h. 21m. [Day- 


3 


Th 




3|S 


Sun sets 8h. 15m. 


4 


Fr 




4iM 




5 


Sa 




5!Tu 




6 


S 




6 W 




T 


M 


First Examination for Degrees in 


7Th 




8 


Tu 


[Medicine. 


8Fr 




9 


W 




9Sa 




10 


Th 




Ms 




11 


Fr 




ii!m 




12 


Sa 




12Tu 




13 


S 


[Medicine. 


law 




14 


M 


Second Examination for Degrees in 


14 Th 




15 


Tu 


Sun rises 3h. 51m. 


loFr 


Sun rises 4h. 46m. 


16 


W 


Sun sets Sh. 45in. 


16lSa 


Sun sets 7h. 46m. 


17 


Th 




17 S 




18 


Fr 




IBM 




19 


Sa 


Court of Session rises. 


19 Tu 




20 


s 




20 W 




21 


M 




21 Th 




22 


Tu 




22 Fr 




23 


W 




23iSa 




24 


Th 




2415 




25 


Fr 


Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 


25iM 
26iTu 




26 


Sa 






27 


S 




27|W 




28 


M 




2S:Th 




29 


Tu 




29,Fr 




30 


W 


Summer Session ends, [of Senatns. 


30 Sa 




31 


Th 


Defence of Medical Theses. — Meeting 


31 S 




SEPTEMBER, 30 Days. 


OCTOBER, 31 Days. 


IM 


Sun rises 5h. 19m. 


i 

IW 


Sun rises 6h. 18m. 


2Tu 


Sun sets 7h. 4m. 


2 


Th 


Sun sets 5h. 46m. 


3W 




3 


Fr 




4 


Th 




4 


Sa 




5 


Fr 




5 


S 




6 


Sa 




6 


M 




r 


s 




7 


Tu 




8 


M 




8 


W 




9 


Tu 




9 


Th 




10 


W 




10 


Fr 




11 Th 




11 


Sa 




12 Fr 




12 


S 




13 Sa 




13 


M 




14 S 




14 


Tu 




15 M 


-un rises 5h 46m. 


15 


W 


Sunrises 6h. 47m. 


16 


Tu 


Sun sets 6h. 2Tm. 


16 


Th 


Sun sets 5h. 9m. 


17 


W 




17 


Fr 




18 


Th 




18 


Sa 




19 


Fr 




19 


s 




20 


Sa 




20 


M 




21 S 




21 


Tu 




22 M 


Day and Night equal. 


22 


W 


[Leith. 


23 


Tu 




23 


Th 


Sacramental Fast-day in Edinburgh and 


24 


W 




24 


Fr 




25 Th 




25 


Sa 




26 Fr 




26 


S 


Communion Sunday in Edinburch and 


27 Sa 




27 


M 


[Leith. 


28'S 




28 


Tu 




29 M 


Michaelnras Day. 


29 


W 




30 Tu 




.■30 


Th 


Prelim. Medical Examination. 


1 




1 


Fr 


General Council of the Univer. meets. 



mnxhtxBxi^ ©ffxms. 



ChanceUor. ^^^^^„,^,. 

TsTthk m.HT HON. LORD BROUGHAM ak. YAUX, D.C.L., LLD.,. . 1859 

Vice-chancellor. 
1859. SIR DAVID BREWSTER, Principal of the University, I860 

Rector. 

1859. THE RIGHT HON. WILLIAM EWART GLADSTONE, D.C.L., LL.D., 1859 

Principal. 

1582. SIR DAVID BREWSTER, K.H., D.C.L., LL.D., 1859 

University Court. 

The Rector, ex officio. 

The Principal, cx officio. „„^ 

ALEXANDER WooD, M.D., ABsessor, Elected by Chancellor, .... I860 

The Lord Provost OF Edinburgh, e^r o#ao. lo.q ' 

i « r T, iFVF Esa Assessor, Elected by Town-Council, . . 1859 

KS. GRIEVE, Esq, ^ ^g^g 

JohnBrown,M.D ._..^^..^.... DO. General Council, 1859 

E. F. Maitland, LL.D., Sol.-Gen.. Do. ^^^^ 

Professor Christison, Do. ao. oeucit , 

Professors. 

T^.>'r^ rhairs IncumbentB. Appointed. Patrons 

Institution. Chairs. T<,TnP^ Pillans MA . 1820 Lords of Session, Cura- 

1597 Humanity James PiUans, m.a. . . lo ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^ Advocates, 

Soc' of Writers to the 

IVOR Greek John «• ^lackie, M.A. 1852 Curators. [Signet. 

ml Satfematics " Philip Kelland, MA 1838 Cura ors. 

1708 Logic and Metaphysics . . Alex^C. Eraser, M.A., 1856 ^^^a tors. 

1708 Mornl Philosophy Pat. C^MacDougall •• 1852 Curator . 

1708 Natural Philosophy .... Peter G. Tait, M.A. . . I860 Curators. 
1762 Rhetoric & Belles Lettres W. E. Aytoun, D.C.L. 1845 Crown^ 

1719 Universal History Cosmo Innes 1846 Curators. 

1786 Practical Astronomy .... J^J-^ ^^^^'^ ; . ; ; ; fgfl SoXof Session, Cura- 
1790 Agriculture John VV ilson ^^^^^ ^ xJniYer. Court. 

1 ROQ Music John Donaldson 1845 University Court. 

IPo DiSty ■ •.•.;■.■.•.■.■..... . . T. J. Crawford, D.D. . . 1859 Curators. 

'''' ""ffistr.^^"''""^^^^^^^ ^''^ ''''^""• 

1846 Biblical Criticism and 

BibUcal Antiquities. . . . Robert Lee,D.D Ib4b ^.rown. 



8 UNIVERSITY OFFICERS. 

j^^^ ^j. F&OFESsons—coutimied. 

Institution Chairs. Incumbent. Appointed. Patrons. 

i^n? ? tr^'^T ^^^'^ ^*^*°'^' ^-^ 18i8 Curators. 

1.07 Public Law (,j.^^^^ 

1 ' 10 Cml Law Arch. C. Swinton, LL.D. 1842 Faculty of Advocates, 

1722 Law of Scotland '''°'^D?'^'"'''do 

1825 Conveyancing Alex. Montgomerie Bell 185G Curato^'rs, Dep.^Keeper 

and Society of Writers 

}yll ^^^^i'^^^^opiedicine .. John H. Bennett, M.D. 1848 Cur^tors^'^^*' 
1768 Dietetics, Materia Medica, 

1 on7 Ar^°,*^ rtiarrnacy Robert Christison, M.D. 1832 Curators. 

loU7 Medical Jurisprudence 

1 -1 -^ rT^ ^?^'"' ■ ■.• Ai ■••••• ; '^- ®'^^^''* 'T^-'^i"' M.D. 1832 Crown. 
1<13 Chemistry and Chemical 

i«Qi «^^''™^<^y ^- Playfair, C.B., Ph.D. 1858 Curators. 

iS- I't^'^P'-- y^:--. J^™es Miller 1842 Curators. 

168o Practice of Physic Thomas Laycock. M.D. 1855 Curators. 

170D Anatomy John Goodsir 1846 Curators. 

illl X, V ""^ Pathology Wm. Henderson, M.D. 1842 Curators. 

1806 Military Surgery Crown 

1726 Midwifery and Diseases of 

AVomen and Children . . J. Y. Simpson, M.D. . . 1S40 Curators. 

1741 Clinical Medicine ( J- H. Bennett, M.D.. . 1848 

ifi.o ni- ■ , c " " < ^^'^^- I^aycock, M.D., 1855 

T«ll Clinical Surgery James Syme 1833 Crown. 

1^7 S .''''^, ■^■■: ^°^° ^- Balfour, M.D. 1845 Curators. 

1(67 Natural History Geo. J. AUman, M.D. 1865 Crown. 

Secretary to the Senatus Acaderaicus. 
PfiOFESSOa Kelland. 



Dean of the Faculty of Divinity. 

Professor Leb. 

Dean of the Faculty of Law. 
Professor Campuell Swinton. 



• Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. 

Professor Balfour. 

Dean of the Faculty of Arts. 

Professor Feasee. 



Librarian. 

John Smail, M.A. 



Keeper of Museum of Natural History. 

Professoe Allman. 

Keeper of the Anatomical Museum. 
Professor Goodsir. 

Keeper of the Botanic Garden. 
Professor Balfour. 



Secretary and Registrar to University. 

Albxander Smith. 

Printer to the University. 

Tiio.MAS Constable. 

Janitor. 

James Cameron. 



Examiners of Parochial Schoolmasters. 
Professor Crawford. 
Propbssoe Lee. 
Professoe Stevenson. 



Professor Pillans. 
Professor Kklland. 
Professor Feasee. 



PART I. 

CONSTITUTION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBUEGH. 

Charter. — The University of Edinburgh was founded in 1582, 
by a Royal Charter, granted by James vi. It is accordingly 
called " Academia Jacobi Regis," " King James' College," and 
" King's College." The Charter contemplated a Uniyersity on 
a wide basis, with the conditions necessary for liberal study, 
and arrangements suited to the progressive state of science. 
" Nos enixe cupientes," are the terms which it employs, " ut in 
honorem Dei et commune bonum nostri regni, literatura indies 
augeatur, volumus et concedimus, quod licebit praefatis praeposito, 
consulibus et eorum successoribus, edificare et reparare sufficientes 
domos et loca, pro receptione, habitatione, et tractatione Profes- 
sorum, scholarum grammaticalium, humanitatis, et linguarum, 
philosophise, theologias, medicinse, et jurium, aut quarumcunque 
aliarum scientiarum liberalium," The Charter constituted the 
Lord Provost, Magistrates, and Town-Council of Edinburgh patrons 
and governors of the University. In 1621, an Act was passed 
by the Scottish Parliament, which ratified to the University of 
Edinburgh, in ample form, all the rights, immunities, and privileges 
enjoyed by other Universities in the kingdom. This ratification 
was renewed in the Treaty of Union between England and Scot- 
land, and in the Act of Security. 

University in 16th and 17th Century. — In the beginning of 
the 17th century, what is now called the Senatus Academicus con- 
tained a Principal and four Regents. The Principal was at first 
also the Professor of Theology. A separate Chair of Theology 
was founded in 1620. The Regents conducted the academical 
youth through the course of study in Philosophy necessary to 
a Degree in Arts. The Faculty of Arts, or Fundamental Faculty 
in the University, was in a measure organized early in the 17th 
century. Each Regent had charge of his Students from their en- 
rolment, in the first year of their attendance at College, to the end 
of their fourth session. It was his duty to teach them in succession 
the several branches of Philosophy, viz., Logic or Dialectic, Ethics, 
and Physics or Natural Philosophy, — with such kindred studies, 
literary and mathematical, as were most nearly connected with 
these fundamental parts of knowledge. It was also the duty 
of the Regents to instruct their respective classes in Greek during 
the course in Philosophy. The Chair of Humanity was founded 



10 PROGRESS OF THE UNIVERSITY FROM 1582 TO 1858. 

before the close of the 16th century, in consequence of the imperfect 
preparation of many students in Latin. The Chair of Mathematics 
was instituted in 1674. In 1642 and 1695 the Chairs of Hebrew 
and Church History were founded, and the Faculty of Theology 
was thus developed. The first Professor of Medicine was appointed 
in 1685 ; and the Chair of Botany was founded some years earlier. 

Graduation in 17th Century. — In the 17th century it was 
customary to print and publish the Philosophical Theses submitted 
to disputation on occasion of taking the Degree of Master of 
Arts. The leading doctrines in Logic, Metaphysics, Ethics, and 
Physics were discussed in the Theses. The examination for the 
Degree was rigorous, and was undergone by the students at large, 
who were graduated according to their proficiency, at the Public 
Ceremonial of Laureation. The ancient practice of taking Degrees 
in Arts gradually fell into disuse in the University of Edinburgh, 
soon after the close of the 17th century, and is only now beginning 
to revive. 

Parliamentary Commission in 1690. — After the Revolution of 
1688, the University of Edinburgh, along with the other Scottish 
Universities, was subjected to a Parliamentary Visitation. A Com- 
mission was issued in 1690, and the University was under the 
authority of the Commissioners until after the close of the century. 
Among other improvements, the Commission instituted a separate 
Chair for Greek, instead of intrusting the instructions in that 
language to the Regents in Philosophy, who had previously dis- 
persed the lessons over the successive years of the academical course. 
Accordingly, in 1708, as afterwards in the other Scottish Universi- 
ties, the present professorial arrangement in the Faculty of Arts 
was substituted for the previous system of Regent-tutors, in accom- 
modation to the growth of modern knowledge. With tliat year 
commenced the history, in their present distinctive form, of the 
three Chairs of Philosophy, viz.. Logic and Metaphysics, Moral 
Philosophy, and Natural Philosophy. 

Growth of Professoriate and Faculties. — After 1708 the 
professorial system was rapidly developed in the University ; the 
Faculties of Law and Medicine were organized, and Degrees were 
granted in both these Facilities. The Chair of Universal History was 
founded in 1719, and a separate Chair of Rhetoric was given to 
the Faculty of Arts in 1762. The Class of Natural History was 
founded in 1767. Professorships of Practical Astronomy and 



ACT OF PAKLIAMENT 1858. 11 

Agriculture were added in 1786 and 1790. In 1707 the foundation 
of the Faculty of Law was laid, by the institution of a Chair of 
Public Law, followed in a few years by Chairs of Civil and Scotch 
Law. In the Faculty of Medicine several new Chairs were founded 
in the course of the 18th century, long before the close of which 
the Medical School of Edinburgh was among the most renowned 
in Europe. In 1760 the Senatus Academicus contained eighteen 
Professors, besides the Principal. In the present century the 
Chair of Music has been founded in the Faculty of Arts ; Chairs 
of Clinical Surgery, Military Surgery, Medical Jurisprudence, 
Surgery, and General Pathology in the Faculty of Medicine ; the 
Chair of Conveyancing in the Faculty of Law ; and the Chair of 
Biblical Criticism in the Faculty of Theology. 

Univeksities Act and Commission of 1858. — From its founda- 
tion in 1582, until 1858, the University was governed by the Lord 
Provost, Magistrates, and Town- Council of Edinburgh. In 1858 an 
Act of Parliament was passed, by which the offices of Chancellor, 
Vice-Chancellor, and Rector were instituted, and by which the 
government of the University was withdrawn from the Town- 
Council, and placed in the Senatus Academicus and the University 
Court, in connexion with a General University Council. The patron- 
age of the Chairs in the gift of the Town-Council, was, by the same 
Act, transferred to seven Curators, — three nominated by the Uni- 
versity Court, and four by the Town-Council.* The University is 
placed under the regulation of a Parliamentary Commission until 
1863. 

CHANCELLOR. 

The Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh is elected by 
the General Council of the University. The office is held for life. 
The Chancellor is the official head of the University. Changes in 
its internal arrangements, proposed by the University Court, must 
receive his sanction. It is through him, or his deputy the Vice- 
Chancellor, that all Degrees are conferred. The Chancellor is 
President of the University Council. 

Chancellor in 1861. 
Henry, Lord Brougham and Yadx. 

* The Curators for the present year are as follows : — Right Hon. "W. E. Gladstone, M P., 
E. F. Maitland, Esq., Solicitor-General, and David Mure, Esq., M.P., nominated by the 
University Court ; Robert Johnstone, Esq., Andrew Fj-fe, Esq., David Peat, Esq., and 
John Mood, Esq., nominated by the Town-Council, 



12 



UNIVERSITY OFFICERS. 



VICE-CHANCELLOR. 

The Vice-Chancellor is nominated by the Chancellor. He may, 
in the absence of the Chancellor, discharge the duties of his Office 
in so far as regards conferring of Degrees. 

Vice-Chancellor in 1861. 
Sir David Breavster. 

RECTOR. 

The Rector is elected by a General Poll of the IMatriculated 
Students of the University. The Second Saturday after the com- 
mencement of the Winter Session is the day appointed for the 
election of the Rector. The term of office is three years. The 
last election was on November 12, 1859. The Rector is President 
of the University Court. 

Hector in 1861. 
Eia;ht. Hon. William Ewart Gladstone. 



PRINCIPAL. 

The Principal is appointed by the Curators, and holds the office 
for life. He is the resident Head of the College, and President of 
the Senatus Academicus. 

Principals since 1582. 

Gilbert Rule. 
William Carstairs. 
William Wish art. 
William Hamilton. 
James Smith. 

William Wisliart, secundus. 
John Gowdie. 
William Robertson. 
George Husband Baird. 
John Lee. 
1859. Sir David Brewster. 

PROFESSORS. 

The Chairs of the University are thirty-three in number. They 
are comprehended in four Faculties, viz. ; — 

I. Arts — the most ancient of the whole — contains, strictly 
speaking, only the chairs of Humanity (Latin), Greek, JMathematics, 



1585. 


Robert Rollock, First Begent. 


1690. 


1599. 


Henry Charteris. 


1703. 


1620. 


Patrick Sands. 


1716. 


1622. 


Robert Boyd. 


1730. 


1623. 


John Adamson. 


1732. 


1652. 


William Colvill. 


1736. 


1653. 


Robert Leighton. 


1754. 


1662. 


William Colvill. 


1762. 


1675. 


Andrew Cant. 


1793. 


1685. 


Alexander Monro. 


1840. 



PROFESSORS. 



13 



Logic and Metaphysics, Moral Philosophy, Natural Philosophy, 
and Ehetoric (English Literature). Attendance on those classes 
only is required for the Degree of Master of Arts. The Faculty 
of Arts also emhraces the Professorships of Universal History, 
Practical Astronomy, Agriculture, and Music. 

II. Theology, — which comprehends Systematic Divinity, Ec- 
clesiastical History, Biblical Criticism, and Hebrew. 

III. Law, — which comprehends Public Law, Civil or Roman 
Law, Law of Scotland, and Conveyancing, and with which Medical 
Jurisprudence is also connected. 

IV. jMedicine, — which comprehends Institutes of Medicine, 
Practice of Physic, Anatomy, Midwifery, Clinical Medicine, Materia 
Medica, Clinical Surgery, Military Surgery, Surgery, and General 
Pathology. The Chairs of Botany, Chemistry, and Natural His- 
tory also belong to this Faculty. 

CHKONOLOGICAL LISTS OF THE PROFESSOKS IN THE 
VARIOUS CHAIRS. 
FACULTY OF ARTS. 



Professors of Humanity since 1708. 

1708. Laurence Dundas, one of 
the Regents. 

1728. Adam Watt. 
1734. John Ker. 
1741. George Stuart. 
1775. John Hill. 

1806. Alexander Christison. 
1820. James Pillass. 

Professors of Greek since 1708. 
1708. William Scott, one of the 
Regents. 

1729. William Scott, Secundus. 

1730. Colin Drummond. 
1738. Robert Law. 
1741. Robert Hunter. 
1772. Andrew Dalzel. 
1805. George Dunbar. 
1852. John Stuart Blackie. 

Professors of Mathematics 
since 1674. 

1674. James Gregory. 

1675. John Young. 



1683. David Gregory. 

1692. James Gregory. 

1725. Colin M'Laurin. 

1747. Matthew Stewart. 

1775. Dugald Stewart. 

1785. Adam Ferguson. 

1785. John Playfair. 

1805. John Leslie. 

1819. William Wallace. 

1838. Philip Kellaxd. 

Professors of Logic and Meta- 

physics since 1708. 
1708. Colin Drummond, one of 

the Regents. 
1730. John Stevenson. 
1774. John Bruce. 
1785. James Finlayson. 
1808. David Ritchie. 
1836. Sir W^iUiam Hamilton. 
1856. Alexander C. Fraser. 

Professors of Moral Philosophy 
since 1708. 
1708. William Law, one of the 
Regents. 



14 



PROFESSORS. 



1729. William Scott. 

1734. John Pringle. 

1745. William Cleghorn. 

1754. James Balfour. 

1764. Adam Ferguson. 

1785. Dugald Stewart. 

1810. Thomas Brown. 

1820. John Wilson. 

1853. P. C. MacDougall. 
Professors of Natural Philosophy 
since 1708. 

1708. Robert Stewart, one of 
the Regents. 

1742. John Stewart. 

1759. Adam Ferguson. 

1764. James Russell. 

1774. John Robison. 

1805. John Playfair. 

1819. Sir John Leslie. 

1833. James David Forbes. 

1860. Peter Guthrie Tait. 
Professors of Rhetoric and Belles 
Lettres since 1762. 

1762. Hugh Blair. 

1784. William Greenfield. 

1801. Andrew Brown, 

1835. George Moir. 

1840. William Spalding. 

1845. W. E. Aytoun. 



Professors of Practical Astronomy 
since 1786. 
1786. Robert Blair. 
1834. Thomas Henderson. 
1846. Charles Piazzi Smyth. 

Professors of Agriculture 
since 1790. 
1 790. Andrew Coventry. 
1831. David Low. 
1855. John Wilson. 

Professors of Universal History 

since 1719. 
1719. Charles Mackie. 

1753. John Gordon. 

1754. William Wallace. 

1755. John Pringle. 
1780. Alex. Fraser Tytler. 
1801. William Fraser Tytler. 
1821. Sir William Hamilton. 
1837. George Skene. 

1842. James Frederick Ferrier. 
1846. Cosmo Ixxes. 

Professors of the Theory of Music 
since 1839. 
1839. John Thomson. 
1842. Sir Henry Rowley Bishop. 

1844. Henry Hugh Pearson. 

1845. John Donaldson. 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 



Professors of Hebrew since 1642. 

1642. Julius Conradus Otto. 

1656. Alexander Dickson. 

1679. Alexander Amedeus. 

1681. Alexander Douglas. 

] 692. Patrick Sinclair. 

1694. Alexander Rule. 

1702. John Goodall. 

1719. James Crawford. 

1732. William Dawson. 

1751. James Robertson. 

1792. George Husband Baird. 

1793. William INloodie. 

1812. Alexander Murray. 

1813. Alexander Brunton. 
1848. David ListoNo 



Professors of Divinity since 1620. 
1620. Andrew Ramsay. 
1627. Henry Charteris. 

1629. James Fairly. 

1630. John Sharpe. 

1648. Alexander Colvill. 

1 649. Samuel Rutherford. 
1650 David Dickson. 
1662. Patrick Scougall. 
1664. W^illiam Kcitli. 
1675. Laurence Charteris, 

1682. John Menzies. 

1683, John Strachan, 
1690, George Campbell. 
1701, George Meldrum, 
1709. William Hamilton. 



PROFESSORS. 



15 



1715. William Dunlop. 

1732. James Smith. 

1733. John Gowdie. 
17o-4. Robert Hamilton. 
1779. Andrew Hunter. 
1809. William Ritchie. 
1828. Thomas Chalmers. 
1844. John Lee. 

1859. Thomas J. Crawford. - 

Professors of Divinity and Church 
History since 1695. 
1702. John Gumming. 



1726. Matthew Crawford. 

1737. Patrick Gumming. 

1762. Robert Gumming. 

1788. Thomas Hardie. 

1799. Hugh Meiklejohn. 

1831. David Welsh. 

1844. James Robertson. 

1861. William Stetenson. 

Professor of Biblical Criticism < 
Biblical Antiquities since 1846. 
1847. Robert Lee. 



FACULTY OF LAW. 



Professors of Medical Jurispru- 
dence since 1807. 
1807. Andrew Duncan, >S'ecw??c?«s. 
1820. William Pulteney Alison. 
1822. Robert Christison. 
1832. Thomas Stewart Traill. 
Professors of Civil Law 
since 1710. 
1710. James Craig. 
1732. Thomas Dundas. 
1746. Kenneth M'Kenzie. 
1755. Robert Dick. 
1792. John Wilde. 
1800. Alexander Irving. 
1827. Douglas Cheape. 
1842. A. Campbell Swinton. 



Professors of the Laiu of Scotland 
since 1722. 



1722. 
1737. 
1765. 
1786. 
1822. 
1843. 
1861. 



Alexander Bayne, 
John Erskine. 
William Wallace. 
David Hume. 
George Joseph Bell. 
John Schank More. 



Professors of Conveyancing 

since 1825. 

1825. Macvey Napier. 

1847. Allan Menzies. 

1856. A. MoNTGOMERiE Bell. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 



Professors of Materia Medica 

since 1768. 
1768. Francis Home. 
1786. Daniel Rutherford. 
1798. James Home. 
1821. Andrew Duncan, 5ecMwdfi«. 
1832, Robert Christisox, 

Professors of Chemistry 
since 1713. 
1713, James Crawford. 
1726. Andrew Plummer. 
1755, William Cullen, 
1766. Joseph Black. 



1795. Thomas Charles Hope. 
1844. William Gregory. 
1858. Lyox Playfair. 

Professors of Surgery since 1831. 
1831. John William Turner. 
1836. Sir Charles Bell. 
1842. James Miller. 

Professors of Institutes of Medicine 
since 1726. 
1726. John Innes, 
1747. Robert Whytt. 
1766. William Cullen. 
1773. Alex. Monro Drummond. 



16 



SEN'ATUS ACADEMICU5?. 



1776. James Gregory. 
1789, Andrew Duncan. 

1819. Andrew Duncan, secnndus. 
1821, William Fulteney Alison. 
1842. Allen Thomson. 

18-48. JoHX Hughes Bennett. 

Professors of M'ldivifery 
since 1726. 
1726. Joseph Gibson. 
1739. Robert Smith. 
1756. Thomas Young. 
1780. Alexander Hamilton. 
1800. James Hamilton. 
1840. James Y. Simpsox. 

Professors oj Clinical Surgery 

since 1803. 
1803. James Russell. 
1833. James Syme. 

Professors of Botany since 1676. 
1676. James Sutherland. 
1706. Charles Preston, 
1712. George Preston. 
1738. Charles Alston. 
1761. John Hope. 
1786. Daniel Rutherford. 

1820. Robert Graham. 

1845. John Hutton Balfour. 

Professors of Anatomy since 1705. 
1705. Robert Elliot. 
1708. Adam Drummond. 
1716. John MGill. 



1720. Alexander Monro. 

1754. Alexander Monro, secundus. 

1798. Alexander Monro, tertius. 

1846. JoHX GoODSlE. 

Professors of General Pathology 
since 1831. 
1831. John Thomson. 
1842. William Hexdersox. 

Professors of Natural History 

since 1767. 
1770. Robert Ramsay. 
1779. John Walker. 
1804. Robert Jameson. 

1854. Edward Forbes. 

1855. George James Allmax. 

Professors of Practice of Physic 
since 1685. 

1685. Sir Robert Sibbald. 
1685. James Halket. 
1885. Archibald Pitcairne. 
1713. James Crawford. 
1726. William Porterfield. 
1726, Andrew St. Clair. 
1726. John Rutherford. 
1766. John Gregory. 
1769. William Cullen, 
1790, James Gregory. 
1821, James Home. 
1842. William Pulteney Alison . 
1855. Thomas Laycock. 



SENATUS ACADEMICUS. 
The Principal and Professors constitute the Senatus Acade- 
micus. The Senatus is intrusted with the superintendence 
and regulation of the teaching and discipline of the University, 
and with the administration of its revenues and property, 
including the Library, Museums, and University Buildings. The 
Principal is President, with a deliberative and casting vote. 
In the absence of the Principal, the Senior Professor present 
acts as Chairman. The ordinary meetings of the Senatus are 
held on the last Saturday of Novenaber, December, January, 
February, and March, at two o'clock ; on the last Friday of May 
June, and July ; on 31st July and 1st August (for receiving 



UNIVERSITY COURT AND GENERAL COUNCIL. 17 

recommendation of Candidates, and fcr conferring Degrees in 
Medicine) ; and in April (for receiving recommendations, and 
for conferring Degrees in Arts) and October, on days fixed at 
the preceding meetings. Extraordinary meetings may be sum- 
moned by the Principal or by three Professors. One-third of the 
Senatus constitutes a quorum. The business is conducted by a 
Secretary. A Dean is nominated in each Faculty, by -whom its 
special affairs are superintended. 

UNIVERSITY COURT. 

The University Court is the Court of appeal from the Senatus 
Academicus. It has power to effect improvements in the internal 
arrangements of the University, after due communication with 
the Senatus and University Council, and with the sanction of the 
Chancellor, — to regulate the Class Fees, — and (on certain con- 
ditions), when sufficient cause is shown, to censure, suspend, 
or deprive Professors, It consists of the following members, viz., 
1. The Rector. 2. The Principal. 3. An Assessor elected by the 
Chancellor. 4. The Lord Provost of Edinburgh for the time 
being. 5. An Assessor elected by the Lord Provost, Magistrates, 
and Town-Council of Edinburgh. 6. An Assessor elected by the 
Rector. 7. An Assessor elected by the General Council of the 
University. 8, An Assessor elected by the Senatus Academicus. 
The Rector and his Assessor continue in office for three years, and 
the other Assessors for four years. Five members of the Court 
constitute a quorum. 

GEN ERAL COUNCIL. 

The General Council is instituted to take into consideration all 
questions affecting the wellbeing and prosperity of the Univer- 
sity, regarding which they are to make their representations to 
the University Court, who are to return a judgment thereon. The 
Chancellor and one of the Assessors in the University Court are 
elected by the Council. When a Poll is demanded, the election is 
made by means of Voting Letters, issued to the Members, which 
must be returned to the Registrar within 21 days. 

The General Council is appointed to meet twice every year, 
viz., on the first Tuesday after the fourteenth day of Ajyril, and 
on the last Friday in October. It consists of the Chancellor, the 
Rector and other members of the University Court, the Principal 
and Professors, the Masters of Arts of the University, the Doctors 

B 



18 STUDENTS — universities' COMMISSIONERS. 

of Medicine of the University, who have, as matriculated students, 
attended classes in any of the Faculties for four complete Sessions, 
and of all who, within three years of the passing of the Scottish 
Universities Act (August 2, 1858), have established that as matri- 
culated students, they had attended the University for four 
Sessions, or three complete Sessions and a fourth in some other 
Scottish University, the attendance for at least two of these Ses- 
sions having been on classes in the Faculty of Arts. 

All members of Council must be above the age of twenty-one. 
Their names are registered in a book kept for the purpose by the 
Registrar of the University. They pay an annual fee of 2s. 6d., 
Avhich may be compounded for by payment of £l at entrance. 
No student can be a member. The Chancellor is by statute Pre- 
sident of the Council ; whom failing, the Rector ; whom failing, 
the Principal ; whom failing, the Senior Professor present. The 
number of Members in the General Council is 2181. 

MATRICULATED STUDENTS. 

Matriculated Students have the privilege of electing the Rector 
of the University. In case of an equality of votes, the Chan- 
cellor, or failing him the Principal, has the casting vote. Stu- 
dents also enjoy the right of admission to the University Library, 
and on certain days to the Museum of Natural History, Their 
names are preserved in the General Album, which is the legal re- 
gister of attendance at the University. The number of Students 
in 1860-61 was 1573. Of these 647 were enrolled in the Faculty 
of Arts ; 598 in the Faculty of Medicine ; 234 in the Faculty of 
Law ; and 94 in the Faculty of Theology. 

UNIVERSITIES COMMISSIONERS. 

During the term of the Universities' Commission, the supreme 
government of the University is vested in the Commissioners. 
Their powers are in force until 1st January 1863. Subject to the 
provisions of the Scottish Universities Act, they are empowered to 
regulate by Ordinances the powers, jurisdictions, and privileges 
of the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, Rector, Assessors, Principal, 
Professors, and all other office-bearers or members of the Univer- 
.sity ; as also of the Senatus Academicus, the University Court, 
and the General Council ; the time, place, and manner of elec- 



LIBRARY. 



19 



tions ; the course of study, fees, manner of teaching, and manner 
of examination ; the qualifications, appointments, and number of 
examiners, and the amount of their remuneration ; the granting 
of Degrees of all kinds ; the foundation and remuneration of 
Professorships ; the revision and due administration of revenues 
and endowments ; and the preservation of the fabric of the Uni- 
versity. 

All Ordinances made by the Commissioners must be published 
in the Edinburgh Gazette for four successive weeks, and be laid 
before Parliament if it be sitting ; and if not, then before the next 
Parliament ensuing, and thereafter submitted to Her Majesty in 
Council. 

The Universities' Commission consists of the following per- 
sons : — 



The Duke of Argyll. 
The Earl of Abekdeex. 
The Eakl of Mansfield. 
The Eari, of Haddington. 
The Lord Justice-General, 
Sir William Gibson-Craig, 
The Lord Justice-Clerk. 



Bart. 



Lord Ardmillan. 

William Stirling of Keir, Esq., 

M.P. 
James Moncreiff, Esq., M.P. 
Alexander Hastie, Esq., M.P. 
A. Murray Dunlop, Esq , M.P. 



The Lord Justice- Clerk is Chairman of 
Robert Berry, Esq., Secretary. The office 
is at 36, Moray Place. 



the Commission, and 
of the Commissioners 



PART II. 

UNIYEKSITY LIBRARY, MUSEUMS, AND BOTANIC GARDEN. 

THE LIBRARY. 

The Library originated in a bequest, in 1580, by Mr. Clement 
Little, Commissary in Edinburgh, a learned citizen, and brother 
to the Lord Provost, who left his library to " Edinburgh and the 
kirk of God." This library, consisting of about 300 volumes, chiefly 
theological, w^s transferred by the Town-Council a few years after- 
wards to the University. The University Library was afterwards 
largely augmented, by donations from the citizens of Edinburgh 
and from the alumni of the University, and by the annual con- 
tributions of students when they took the Degree of Master of 



20 LIBRARY. 

Arts. Among the donors may be specified, for the extent and value 
of their benefactions, Principal Adamson, Dr. Robert Johnston, 
a physician in London, the Rev. James Nairne of Wemyss, in 
Fife, Dr. John Stevenson, Professor of Logic and Metaphysics in 
the University, and Dr. William Thomson, Professor of Anatomy 
in the University of Oxford. The celebrated Drummond of 
Hawthornden bequeathed his library to the University ; and the 
gift is valuable, both from the eminence of the donor's name, and 
from the rare specimens of our early literature with which the 
collection is enriched. 

The University Library contains about 130,000 printed volumes, 
and above 700 volumes of MSS., many of which are of great 
interest and value. The Library also possesses some valuable 
pictures and busts. The Library Hall, and the suite of rooms 
connected with it, occupy the south side of the College quadrangle. 

The ordinary management of the Library is vested in a 
Committee, appointed by the Senatus. 

The Library is open every lawful day, during the Winter Session, 
from 10 to 4 o'clock, except on Saturdays, when it is shut at 1 
o'clock. During the Summer Session the hours for public business 
are from 10 to 3 o'clock. 

The following regulations relate to the borrowing of books from 
the Library: — 

1. Professors. 

Every Professor is entitled to borrow to the extent of twenty- 
five volumes at a time. The books must be returned after the 
expiry of six weeks from the date of their being borrowed, and 
an annual return of all the books borrowed from the Library in 
the hands of the Professors, is called for by printed circulars in the 
last week of August. 

2. Memlers of the College of Surgeons. 

The rules applicable to them are similar to the above. 

3. Studeyits. 

Every student, before being entitled to borrow books from the 
University Library, must have inscribed his name in the General 
Album of Matriculation, and been enrolled in the class of at least 
one Professor. 



MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 21 

On first applying for the loan of a book, he must present his 
matriculation ticket, and also the ticket of at least one Professor, 
to the Librarian, who, on receiving from him a deposit of £,1, gives 
him a receipt for the same, and enters his name in the deposit- 
receipt book. 

Every student is entitled to borrow two volumes at a time for 
the deposit of £l. 

On applying for the loan of books, the student must fill up a 
Schedule, containing his name, address, the number of his deposit- 
receipt, and the titles of the books he wishes to borrow. 

The books must be returned uninjured at the end of a fortnight 
from the date of their being borrowed, but may again be lent out 
for another fortnight if not previously called for by another appli- 
cant. 

There is a Reading-Room for the purpose of affording to students 
an opportunity of study, and also of consulting books which do 
not circulate, such as Dictionaries, Encyclopaedias, Atlases, and 
Works of reference in general. 

The Reading-Room is open to all Matriculated Students. On 
asking for books to be consulted, the applicant must fill up a 
Schedule containing his name, address, number of matriculation 
ticket, and the title of the book he wishes to consult. 

4. Graduates. 

Graduates of the University, on producing their Diplomas to the 
Secretary, may, on payment of a fee of ten shillings annually, be 
furnished with a ticket entitling them to the use of the Library. 

They are not allowed to borrow books by deputy, but are 
required personally to transact business at the Library. 

MUSEUMS. 

1. The Museum of Natural History. — The extensive 
Museum of Natural History will afford to the Student valuable 
aid in his studies. It was established in 1812, in connexion with 
the University. It receives a Government grant of £200 a year. 
A large part of it was collected by the exertions of the late Pro- 
fessor Jameson, who was fifty years Professor of Natural History. 
The Museum occupies the greater part of the west side of the 
quadrangle of the College. 



22 ANATOMICAL MUSEUM. 

The Museum contains Zoological, Geological, and Mineralogical 
Collections, all of -which it has been the special object of the 
Regius-Keeper to develop in their educational aspect, so as to 
enable the Student to derive from them the greatest amount of 
advantage. 

1. The Zoological Collection — The Zoological Student is 
particularly directed to the British and Typical Collections. The 
British Collection is intended to illustrate, as far as possible, the 
fauna of the British Isles. It is arranged and displayed so as to 
afford ample facility for the comparison and identification of 
British Species. The Typical Collection is intended to illustrate 
the leading types of animal form, and consequently does not 
aim at the accumulation of mere species. Its object is to 
bring before the Student in broad outlines the fundamental 
truths of Animal Morphology, and render him acquainted with 
those relations upon which alone a Natural ClassiMcation can be 
based. 

II. The Mixeralogic.\l Collection. — This is very extensive, 
and contains many valuable specimens. It is arranged in a series 
of horizontal glazed cases, and is thus displayed in the best 
possible way for admitting an inspection of specimens. 

III. The Geological Collection. — In the Geological Section 
the Student's attention may be particularly called to the Typical 
Collection of Fossils, vih&xQ he will find the characteristic fossils 
of the various geological formations arranged in the order of 
their appearance on the earth's surface, thus enabling him to 
form a correct idea of some of the most striking features in the 
succession of the past life of the globe. 

The ]\Iuseum is open daily from 10 to 4 o'clock, admission 6d. 
Free admission is given to the Public on Saturdays and Holidays, 
and to ]\Iatriculated Students on the first ^londay of every 
month likewise. The number of visitors in 18G0 was 83.314. 
Professor Allman is Regius-Keeper of the Museum, and 3Ir. J. B. 
Davies Assistant Conservator. 

2. Anatomical Museum. — By a Joint-Resolution of the 
Patrons and the Senatus Academicus of the University, of 28th 
June 1826. it was agreed, — 

" 1. That £1, Is. be required of each Candidate for Graduation, fur the 



BOTANIC GARDEN. 26 

suppoi't of the Anatomical Museum, — it being at the same time understood, 
that if he pays this money on his first Matriculation at the University, 
or at any time during his Studies, he shall be entitled to a free entrance 
to the Museum thereafter. This fee, when paid, to be deducted from the 
fee for Graduation. 

" That no other Students shall be compelled to contribute to the 
Museum, but that Tickets of Admission shall be issued to all who wish 
for them, at 7s. for the Season ; and that none but the Students of the 
Anatomical Class shall be admitted to the Museum without such Tickets." 

The Museum is open on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays, 
from Two to Four o'clock. 

Tickets of admission are issued at the Museum, at Three 
o'clock, on the days on which the Museum is open. 

There are also valuable Museums in connexion with the Classes 
of Natural Philosophy, Agriculture, Materia Medica, Midwifery, 
and Botany. 



BOTANIC GAR D EN. 

The Royal Botanic Garden, at Inverleith Row, is connected with 
the University, in so far as the Professor of Botany is Regius- 
Keeper, and delivers his Lectures in the Class-room in the 
Garden. The Garden was founded in 1670, and the Chair of 
Botany in connexion Avith it is one of the oldest in the University. 
The Garden extends to 17 acres, and contains an extensive range 
of Greenhouses and Hothouses, with a large Palm-house 70 feet 
high, 90 feet long, and 57 broad. There is an arrangement of 
British plants according to the natural system. There is also a 
general collection of hardy plants of all countries, according to the 
same system ; and a series of medicinal plants, of which a Cata- 
logue has been pablished. Students have ample facilities for 
studying the plants in the Garden, and they are examined on 
Specimens, in the British Collection, which are selected for their 
determination. 

The Botanical Museum is open at all times to Students, and the 
Specimens contained in it are used for illustrating the Lectures. 
The University Herbarium is also kept at the Garden, and it can 
be consulted by Students under the direction of the Professor. 



24 

PART III. 

CLASSES AND COUKSES OF STUDY. 



UNIVERSITY TERMS. 
There are Tsvo Sessions in each year, viz. : — 

I. The Winter Session, which opens in the beginning of Novem- 
ber and ends with April ; during which the Classes in all the four 
Faculties are assembled. 

II. The Summer Session, which opens in the beginning of 
May and ends with July, in which some of the Medical Classes 
are ojjen. 

PROGRAMME OF CLASSES FOR 1861-62. 

The Session of 1860-61 will be opened on Monday, November 4, 
at Two o'clock, when an Address will be delivered by Principal 
Sir David Brewster, 

The Classes in the different Faculties will be opened for the 
Winter Session as follows : — 

FACULTY OF ARTS. 



Classes. 



-Junior Humanity 

Senior Humanity 

First Greek 

Second Greek 

Tliird Greek 

First Mathematical ... 
Second IMathematical 
Tliird IMathematical... 
Logic & Metapliysics... 

Moral Philosophy 

Natural Philosophy ... 
Hlietoric. and I>elles- ") 

Lettres / 

(English Language and 

Literature.) 
IVactical Astronomy.. . 

A^rriculture 

I'ni versa] History 

Tlieory of Music 



D<ays and Hours of 
Attendance. 



Nov. 5, 
Nov. 5, 
Nov. 5, 
Nov. 5, 
Nov. 5, 
Nov. 5, 
Nov. 5, 
Nov. 11 
Nov. 5, 
Nov. 5, 
Nov. 5, 



12 & 2 o'ck. 

10 o'clock. 
9 & 1 o'ck. 

11 o'clock. 
2 o'clock. 

12 o'clock. 

10 o'clock. 
, 9 o'clock. 

1 o'clock. 
12 o'clock. 

1 1 o'clock. 



Professors. 



Class 
Fee. 



Prof. Pillans. 
Prof. Piackie 



Nov, 5, 4 o'clock. 



Dec. 5, 12 o'clock. 
Nov. 7, 4 o'clock. 
Nov. 6, 2 o'clock. 
Nov, 5, 10 & 12 o'ck. 



Prof. Kelland. 



Prof. Eraser. 
Prof. Macdougall. 
Prof Tait. 

Prof. AvtouM. 



Prof Snivtli. 
Prof, Wilson. 
Prof Innes. 
Prof Donaldson. 



s. d. 
3 



3 
3 



3 
3 



3 3 



3 3 

4 4 
4 4 



Small 
Fees. 

5 



PROGRAMME OF CLASSES. 



25 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 



Classes. 

Hebrew — 

Junior Class 

Advanced Class — ") 

Hebrew & Arabic / 
Divinity — 

Junior Class 

Senior Class 

Divinity and Church ) 

History / 

Biblical Criticism & 'J 
Biblical Antiquities J 



Days and Hours of 
Attendance. 


Professors. 


Class 
Fee. 


Small 
Fees. 


Nov. 6, 2 o'clock. 


Prof. Liston. 


£ s. d. 
2 2 


£ s. d. 


Xov. 6,10 o'clock. 




2 2 




Nov. 6, 10 o'clock. 
Nov. 6, 11 o'clock. 


Prof. Crawford. 


2 2 




Nov. 6, 1 o'clock. 


Prof. Stevenson. 


2 2 




Nov. 6, 12 o'clock. 


Prof. Lee. 


Free. 


5 



FACULTY OF LAW. 



Medical Jurispru- 
dence (for Students \- Dec. 2, 2 o'clock, 
of Law) 

Civil Law Nov. 5, 4 o'clock. 

Law of Scotland iNov. 5, 3 o'clock. 

Conveyancing ;Nov. 5, 4 o'clock. 



Prof. Traill. 

Prof. Swinton. 
Prof. Swinton. 
Prof. Bell. 



4 


4 





4 


4 


0! 


4 


4 0' 


4 


4 


0; 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 



Dietetics, Materia Me- ) 
dica, & Pharmacy / 

Chemistry ..-.. 

Surgery 

Institutes of Medicine 

Midwifery and Dis- 
eases of Women and 
Children 

Clinical Surgery— 
[Mon. and Thurs.) 

Clinical Medicine — 
( Tues. and Frid.) 

Anatomy , 

General Pathology... , 

Natural History .... 

Practice of Physic... . 

Anatomical Demon- 
strations 



Nov. 

Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



5, 9 o'clock. 

5, 10 o'clock. 
5, 10 o'clock. 
5, 11 o'clock. 



Prof. Christison. 

Prof. Playfair. 
Prof. Miller. 
Prof. Bennett. 



Nov. 5, n o'clock. Prof. Simpson. 



jNov. 5, 12 o'clock. 

;Nov. 5, 12to2o'ck. 

Nov. 5, 1 o'clock. 

Nov. 5, 4 o'clock. 

Nov, 5, 2 o'clock. 

Nov. 5, 3 o'clock. 

Nov. 5, 4 o'clock. 



'Prof. Syme. 

j Profs. Bennett and 

Laycock, 
I Prof. Goodsir. 
Prof. Henderson. 
I Prof. AUman. 
jProf. Laycock. 

I Prof. Goodsir. 



4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


4 4 


2 2 



26 



MATRICULATION FEES, ETC. 



Practical Chemistry, under the superintendence of Professor Playfair. 
Analytical Chemistry, under the superintendence of Professor Playfair. 
The Chemical Laboratory will be opened on 1st November for Pupils who 
desire to practise Analytical Chemistry, or to practise Chemical investi- 
gations, under the immediate superintendence of Professor Playfair, 
aided by !Mr. Dittmar and Mr. "Wauklyn. 



Class Fees. 
£i 4 



SUMMER SESSION. 

Botany, Professor Balfour. May 1, 186?. 8 a.m., 

[Second Cour.=e, £3, 3s. Third and subsequent Courses, no fee. 

Perpetual Ticket, £6, 6s. Fee for Superintendent of Botanic 

Garden, 5s.] 
Practical Chemistry and Pharmacy, Professor Playfair. May 1., 
Natural History, Professor Allraan. .May 1. 1 p..m.. 
Medical Jurisprudence, Professor Traill. May 1. 11 a.m.. 
Clinical Lectures on Medicine. May 1. 12 a.m., 
Clinical Lectures on Surgery, Professor Syme. May 2. 12 a. m 
Practical Anatomy, Professor Goodsir. May 1, . 
Medical Psychology, Professor Laycock. May 6, 
Medical Psychology, with Practical Instruction in Mental Diseases, 
Histology, Professor Bennett. May 1, . 
Comparative Anatomy, Professor Goodsir, 

MATRICULATION FEES. 

For the Academical Year, 
For the Summer Session only. 
For the Theological Faculty only. 

Students are required to matriculate at the Secretary's Office, in the 
University, before entering any of the Classes. 

ROYAL INFIRMARY. 

Royal Infirmary at Noon, Daily. — Perpetual Ticket, £10; Annual 
Ticket, £5, 5s. ; Half- Yearly Ticket, £3, os. Separate payments of 2j 
years entitle the Student to a Perpetual Ticket. A Half- Yearly Ticket 
can be procured only b}' Students wlio have previously had an Annual 
Ticket. 







4 


4 









i 


4 









3 


3 





M., 




3 


3 









2 


2 









2 


2 





ases. 




3 


3 









3 


3 





£1 











10 











10 












MUSEUMS. 

The charc^e for admi.'^sion to the ^Museum of Natural History is 6d. 
Students are admitted without any payment, on the first Monday of each 
month, on production of their Matriculation Tickets. 

Th«; fee for Admission to the Anatomical jMnseum is 7s. for the Season, 
and £l, Is. for the Course of Medical Study. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 27 

SYNOPSES OF THE COUESES IN THE DIFEEEENT CLASSES 
OF THE UNIVERSITY, DURING SESSION 1861-62. 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 

Dean : 

ALEXANDER C. FRASER., M.A., 
Professor of Logic and Metaphysics. 



1. Humanity. 

PROFESSOR PILLANS. 

In both Classes a Trial Exercise will be "written in the Class- 
room on the first Saturday of the Session.* 

Junior Class. (12, and 2 p.m.) 

The Order of the day^ from November till Christmas. — First 
Principles of Latin Grammar prelected and examined upon for 
some time ; to be continued, where necessary, by the Class- 
Assistant, with Mair's Introduction as Text-book. The students' 
Readings will be in Curtius, and in the Fasti and Tristia of Ovid. 

After Christmas. — Curtius, Ovid, Odes of Horace, and a portion 
of Livy, Book vi. On the Fridays, at 2 p.m., Lectures on the 
Rise, Progress, and Decay of Literature among the Romans. 

Throughout the Session, a weekly written Exercise. On the 
Wednesdays, at 12 o'clock, lessons and demonstrations in Ancient 
Geography, — Text-hook, " First Steps in Physical and Classical 
Geography." 

Books required for Junior Class. — 1. Curtius, Leipsic Edition, with Preface and 
Notes, by Professor Pillars. 2. Selections from the Fasti and Tristia of Ovid. 
3. Horace. 4. Livy (lib. ti), Leipsic Edition, with Preface and Notes, by Professor 
Pillans. 5. Mair's Introduction. 6. Fiest Steps, &c. Recommended. — Adam's Gram- 
mar and Antiquities. 

Senior Class. (10 a.m.) 
Course of Reading. — Specimens of the writings of Cicero, 
chiefly from the Second Book de Natura Deorum : Of the writings 
of Cicero : Of Horace, Select Odes, Satires, and Epistles : Of 
Livy, Book ix. : Of Tacitus, The Annals. 

* This exercise is to test the proficiency of the Students at the time of entering the 
Classes, that it may be compared with a similar one to be done in March 1862. 



28 COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 

On the Wednesdays, at 10 a.m., before Christmas, Geographicai. 
Demonstrations, with illustrative passages from Lucan, Statins, 
Silius Italicus, Claudian, &c., appended to the text-book, viz.. 
" Elements of Physical and Classical Geography." 

After Christmas. — On the Wednesdays, at 10 a.m.. Course of 
Lectures on Philosophy of spoken Language ; and on alternate 
Fridays, Examinations, conducted chiefly in Latin, on Adam's 
Roman Antiquities. 

Written Exercises in Prose and Verse throughout the Session. 

*^* The Lectures may be attended by Amateur Students, on a separate Ticket. 



2. Greek. 

PROFESSOR BLACKIE. 

First Class. 



Edwards' First Greek Reader ; Xenophon ; Homer ; Daily 
Exercises in Greek Prose Composition and Conversation ; Clyde's 
Greek Syntax. 

Second Class. 

One of Plutarch's Lives ; A Play of Euripides ; Homer ; Exer- 
cises in Greek Prose Composition ; Weekly Expositions of some 
part of Pausanias' description of Greece. 

Third Class. 

The Gorgias of Plato ; Greek Prose Composition ; Twice a 
week Exposition of Homer's Iliad, beginning with Book vi. 



3. Mathematics. 

PROFESSOR KELLAND. 

First Class. 



Theory of Arithmetic ; Six Books of Euclid and part of the 
Eleventh Book ; Plane Trigonometry, with its Applications ; Men- 
suration ; the Elements of Perspective ; and Geometrical Conic 
Sections. 

Tt'xl -bonks. — Playfair's Geometry and Trigonometry indispensable. Elliott's IMensu- 
ration and Wallace's Conic Sections are recoinmenled and lari^ely drawn on. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 29 

Second Class. 

Introductory Lectures. Algebra, with its Applications to Analy- 
tical Trigonometry, Analytical Conic Sections, and Solid Geometry, 

Ttxt-books. — Kelland's Elements of Algebra, indispensable. Colenso's Examples, 
Wrigley's Examples, ov Bland's Equations, referred to and recommended. Snowball's 
Trigonometry. 

Third Class. — Nine to Ten, three days a week. 
The Diiferential Calculus with its Branches and Applications.* 

Text-books. — Hall's Diiferential Calculus. As the aim is, as completely as possible to 
read through the book, no other works are recommended. 

For the advanced Students, Lectures are given on the higher 
portions of Definite Integrals, and on Finite DiiFerences. 

Examinations, viva voce, are carried on daily in all the Classes. Written Examina- 
tions take place on alternate Saturdays. Exercises for solution at home are given out 
on Fridays. The Prize List is made out from a summation of the whole work. Extra 
Prizes are adjudged by competitions on Arithmetic, Equation.?, Trigonometry, &c., against 
time. Extra Prizes are also awarded for original Solutions of Problems, Essays, &c. 



4. Logic and Metaphysics. 

PROFESSOR ERASER. 

The Course, after seme Introductory Lectures, comprehends the 
three following parts : — 

Material or Psychological Logic. 

Objects denoted by Words, as originally presented in external 
and internal Sense, — as modified in mental Representation by 
Thought, — and as dependent through thought on Language. 
General phenomena of Understanding or Intelligence in Man. 

Mixed or Real Logic. 

Propositions and Reasonings, as True or False, materially legi- 
timate or the contrary. Self-evidence. Abstract Demonstration. 
Inductive and deductive Inference on matters of Experience — 
physical, and historical or moral. Limits of Knowledge and Belief. 



30 COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 

Pure on Formal Logic. 

Propositions and Reasonings, as identical or contradictory. 
Theory of Proposition and Syllogism, as founded on the formal 
analysis of Notions. Fallacies. Practical Exercises. 

The Class meets at one o'clock. The meetings are devoted partly to the delivery of 
Lectures, partly to Oral and Written Ex iminations and the criticisms of Exercises and 
Essays. Prizes are adjudged to Senior and Junior Students, for eminence in the business 
of the Class. 



5. Moral Philosophy. 

PROFESSOR MACDOUGALL. 



The course of Lectures comprehends mainly the following sub- 
jects : — 

Introductory. — The aims, province, and methods of Ethical 
study. The relations of Ethics or Moral Philosophy to Psychology. 

Division I. — General view of the mental constitution, or powers 
to be regulated by the sense of Duty. Particular examination of 
the powers usually denominated Active, — including detailed con- 
sideration of the Emotions, Desires, and Affections ; with discus- 
sion of the more important philosophical questions relating to them. 

Division IL — Ethics, more properly, and strictly so called ; or 
the system of ethical truth, and the philosophy of that system ; 
including (1.) Exposition of Duties, with their grounds ; and (2.) 
Inquiry into the nature and faculty of Moral Approbation, or the 
Theory of Moral Perception and Moral Sentiments. Review of 
leading Ethical Theories. Examination, in particular, of the views 
of Bishop Butler on both the preceding Divisions. 

Division III. — Inferential, and consummative ; as to the exis- 
tence, moral government, and character of Deity ; the immortality 
of the soul ; and future retribution. Duties thence arising, and 
reflex influence on Morality generally. Comparison of Natural 
and Christian Ethics. 

The Class meets from twelve to one o'clock each day, ou tive 
days of the week. The time' is devoted in part to the Lectures 
and in part to examinations, written and oral, on these and ou . 
prescribed portions of Ethical authors. Subjects are also prescribed I 
for elaborate Essays, as well as for briefer occasional exercises ; 
and prizes are awarded at the close of the Session for general in- 
dustry, proficiency, and ability. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 31 

6. Natural PMlosophy. 

PROFESSOR TAIT. 

The subjects embraced in the Course of Natural Philosophy are 
the following : — 

I. Properties of Matter. 

II. Mechanics, including Statics, Dynamics, Hydrostatics, and 
Hydrodynamics, with their application to Civil- Engineering. 

III. Heat, including the theory of the Steam-Engine. 

IV. Light (Common and Physical Optics). 

V. Electricity, including Frictional and Voltaic Electricity, 
Magnetism, Thermo- and Magneto- Electricity, and Electro-dyn- 
amics, with their practical applications. 

VI. Plane and Physical Astronomy. 

VII. Meteorology. 

Mechanics, the Second Section above, and two or three of the 
others (in rotation) are treated in detail every Session, the re- 
mainder being passed- over in a more cursory manner, as it is 
impossible to enter at length into all in the course of a single Ses- 
sion. It is intended that in Session 1861-62 the Sections I., II., 
III., and VI. above, shall form the more detailed part of the course! 

The Text-books recommended for the Junior and Middle Divi- 
sions are Goodwin's " Elementary Statics," and " Elementary 
Dynamics," (Deighton, Bell, & Co., 1861) ; or, Goodwin's " Course 
of Mathematics." 

The works on which the principal written Examinations will 
be held are, for this Session, — 

Third or Junior Division. 
In January — Goodwin's Statics, omitting Friction and Virtual 
Velocities, and Goodwin's Dynamics as far as relates to rectilinear 
motion only. In March — Herschel's Astronomy, in Lardner's 
Cyclopaedia. 

Second or Middle Division. 

In January — Goodwin's Statics and Dynamics generally, hi 
March — Geometrical Optics, in Goodwin's " Course." 

First or Highest Division. 
In January — Newton's Three Sections, as translated in Good- 
vin's Course. In March — Airy's Tract on the Undulatory Theory. 



32 COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 

The Introduction, on Undulations generally, and the explana- 
tion of the phenomena of Polarization by reflection and refraction 
at the surfaces of uncrystallized bodies. 

In addition to these principal Examinations, a v/ritten Exami- 
nation will be held every alternate Saturday throughout the 
Session. The subjects will in all cases be those which have been 
already treated in the Lectures. A prize will be given for the 
greatest number of correct answers in these Examinations ; and 
the marks obtained in them will be added to those obtained in the 
principal Examinations, to determine the order of merit for the 
Class Prizes. 

As a Text-book on the general subjects of the Lectures, one of 
the following may be named : — 

Golding Bird's ^N'atural Philosophy. 

Miller's Chemical Physics. 

Ganot, Traite de Physique. , 

Drion et Fernet, Physique Ele'mentaire. 



7. Rhetoric and Belles-lettres. 
{English Language and Literature.) 

PROFESSOR AYTOUN. 

The Students are taught and exercised, (1.) In the Principles 
of Vernacular Composition, a considerable portion of the lectures 
relating to the examination of style, as exhibited by eminent 
English authors. The history, formation, and development of the 
language are likewise comprehended in this branch. (2.) The 
leading rules for the framing and arrangement of spoken discourses 
are explained and illustrated. (3.) A critical review of British 
Literature, from the Anglo-Saxon period downwards, in its con- 
nexion with external history and social development. (4.) Occa- 
sional Lectures tending to illustrate remarkable epochs in Ancient 
and Mediffival Literature will be delivered in the course of the 
Session. 

Written exercises are prescribed, from time to time, with a view 
to the improvement of the Students in English Composition. 
These are returned to the Students after being revised and cor- 
rected by the Professor. 

Prizes are awarded for composition in prose and verse, and for 
accomplishment in elocution. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 33 

8. Practical Astronomy. 

PROFESSOR SMYTH. 

These lectures are confined strictly to the subject of Practical 
Astronomy, and are intended to illustrate the best methods of ap- 
plying instrumental measurement to celestial phenomena, for the 
purpose of deducing their nature, and ascertaining their bearing 
on astronomical theory. 

They commence with the simplest estimations of angle and 
distance required in first approximations ; and then show how 
rapidly as well as securely, the true arrangement of the universe 
may be arrived at by any one who, observing independently for 
himself the successive phenomena presented by the skies, is able, 
as he proceeds, to strengthen his means of observation and refine 
his methods of computation, up to the limits which the present 
advanced condition of Optics, Mechanics, and Mathematics place 
within his reach. 



9. Agriculture. 

PROFESSOR WILSON. 

The Lectures extend over two Sessions ; the first course treat- 
ing of the Principles, and the second of the Practice of Agricul- 
ture, 

First Course. — History of Agriculture. General purposes of 
Agriculture ; conditions affecting it ; and principles on which it 
is based. The Chemistry of Agriculture. The Geology of Agri- 
culture. The Botany of Agriculture. The Physics of Agriculture. 

Second Course. — The Mechanics of Agriculture and their appli- 
cation. Sequence of Agricultural operations. Economical Division 
of Labour. Rotations of various districts discussed and explained. 
Improvement of the Soil by Draining, Manuring, &c. Live stock. 
The Economics of Agriculture, Farm Engineering and Construc- 
tion. Agricultural Policy. General Management and Improve- 
ment of Landed Property,] 



10. Universal History. 

PROFESSOR INNES. 
C 



34 COURSES IN FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 

11. Theory of Music. 

PROFESSOR DONALDSON. 

In accordance with the Deed of Foundation* the Lectures 
embrace the following subjects : — 

The phenomena and philosophy of sound ; the nature and pro- 
duction of musical sounds, accordant and discordant. 

The Theory of Music. 

General rules for the composition of Music, including methodical 
composition in the different counterpoints, with a critical analysis 
of the works of the great masters. 

The laws of harmonics, with an exposition of how far the theory 
of Music, as taught by the best theorists, is deducible from, and in 
accordance with, these laws. 

Occasional Lectures are given on t^ie Structure, Compass, and Properties of Musical 
Instruments, as shown b.v Weber, Chladiii, Savart, Wheatstone, and others, having for 
their object to discover the true principles on which musical instruments ought to be 
constructed, and which may lead, and have led. to the invention of new ones. 

All the topics included in these branches are illustrated with diagrams, musical in.-tru- 
ments, and philosophical apparatus. 

Lectures are delivered occasionally on the history of the science. 
Three courses of Lectures are given during the Session ; tivo for 
gentlemen, and one exclusively for ladies. 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 

Dean : 

ROBERT LEE, D.D., Professok of Biblical Criticism and 

Biblical Antiquities. 



1. Divinity. 

PROFESSOR CRAWFORD. 

The Law of the Church of Scotland requires that every Theo- 
logical Student be enrolled by the Professor of Divinity at least 
four Sessions, three of which must be Sessions of regular or con- 
stant attendance. If the Student attend only two full Sessions, 



* This Chair was founded by General John Reid, for the teaching of Music as a Scien- 
tific Art, on a wide and comprehensive scale; or, to use the Testator's own words, so to 
teach it as to give " stability, respectability, and consequence tu the establishment." 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 35 

his course must extend to five Sessions. In every case six Dis- 
courses must be delivered with approbation, in order that the 
Professor may give such a certificate as shall warrant a Presbytery 
to take the Student on trial for License, as a Preacher of the 
Gospel. These Discourses are a Latin Exegesis, a Homily, a 
Lecture, a Popular Sermon, a Hebrew Exercise on a passage of 
the Old Testament, and a Critical Discourse on a passage of the 
New Testament. Every Student in the last Session of his course 
is expected to have all the requisite Discourses delivered before 
the end of December ; it being desirable that, soon after that 
period, every document necessary for entitling Presbyteries to 
take on trials the Candidates for License should be forthcoming. 

Students in their first year of regular attendance are expected 
to attend the Junior Class, and the others the Senior Class. But 
those who enrol in either Class may attend the other along with 
it, without any additional Fee. 

The course of study in the two Classes is as follows : — 

Junior Class. 

Lectures are delivered on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 
on the Evidences of Revealed Religion, and the Inspiration of 
Holy Scripture. On Tuesdays and Thursdays the Students are 
examined on the subjects of the Lectures, and on Paley's Evi- 
dences of Christianity. 

Senior Class. 

The course of study in this class extends over three Sessions. 
The subjects of the Lectures during Session 1861-2 will be, — 
Original Sin, and the Atonement. Lectures on these subjects will 
be delivered on Mondays and Wednesdays, and on the alternate 
Fridays. On Tuesdays and Thursdays the Students will be exa- 
mined on the subjects of the Lectures, and also on Hill's Lectures 
in Divinity, Books iii., iv., and v. The Students' Discourses will 
be delivered on the alternate Fridays, and at such extra hours as 
may from time to time be arranged. 



2. Divinity and Church History. 

PROFESSOR STEVENSON. 

The Christian Church, from its origin to the Council of Nicsea. 

A.D. 30-lUO. 
Part I. The Apostolical Period, a.d. 30-100. 
„ II. The Period of Conflict, „ 100-325. 



36 COURSES IN FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 

3. Biblical Criticism and Biblical Antiquities. 

PROFESSOR LEE. 

This class is now included in the curriculum required by the 
Church of Scotland of Students in Divinity, 

The Lectures are comprehended in two Courses, which are 
delivered during alternate Sessions. One of these Courses relates 
to the Criticism of the Old Testament ; the other to that of the New. 

Subjects of First Course. — 1. Canon of Old Testament ; Con- 
dition and History of Hebrew Text ; Account of principal Versions, 
particularly Septuagint, Vulgate, and Targums ; Modern efforts 
to improve Hebrew Text ; Account of printed Editions, &c. 
2. Hermeneutic.>, or Principles of Interpretation, as applicahle 
to Sacred Scriptures. 

Subjects of Second Course. — Manuscripts of New Testament ; 
different systems of classification ; accounts of particular MSS. ; 
disputed passages ; quotations in New Testament, &c. &c. ; mo- 
dern editions of New Testament — their characteristics and merits. 

On these subjects Lectures are delivered on Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days ; Monday's Lectures are devoted to Biblical Antiquities ; on 
Wednesday the Professor prelects on some portion of the Greek 
New Testament, and on Fridays he hears exercises by the Students. 

The Course of Lectures on Old Testament Criticism falls to be 
delivered Session 1861-62. 

N.B. — The hour of meeting this Session will be 12 o'clock in- 
stead of 1 o'clock as formerly. 



4. Hebrew. 

professor liston. 
Junior Class. 
Grammar (Tregelles' Heads of Hebrew Grammar) ; first twenty 
chapters of Genesis, and eight or ten Psalms. 

Senior Clas?. 

Grammar. The Psalms and a Historical Book on alternate weeks. 

Arabic or Syriac will form extra study. In Arabic — Elements 
of Grammar, and Dr. F. A. Arnold's Chrestomathia Arabica will 
be taught. In Syriac — Elements of Grammar, and Gutbir's Syriac 
New Testament will be taught. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF LAW. 37 

FACULTY OF LAW. 

Dean : 

ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL SWIXTON, LL.D., Professor of 

Civil Law. 



1. Medical Jurisprudence. 

PROFESSOR TRAILL. 

Part I. — Forensic Medicine. 

Section 1. Qtestions affecting the Civtt Rights of Individuals. — 1. Develop- 
ment of the Human Frame. 2. Duration of Human Life. 3. Personal identity. 
4. Marriage. 5. Divorce. 6. Impotence and Sterility. 7. Pregnancy. 8. Par- 
turition. 9. Monsters and Hermaphrodites. 10. Paternity and atfiliation. 11. 
Presumption of Survivorship. 12. Mental alienation. 13. Rishts of Deaf and Dumb. 
14. Maladies exempting from public duties. 15. Simulated diseases. 

Section 2. Injuries to Property.— 1. Nuisances from Manufactures. 2. Arson. 
3. Forgery. 4. Coining ot false money. 

Section 3. Pbesonal Injuries — 1. Defloration. 2. Rape. 3. Mutilation, 4. Cri- 
minal abordon. 5. Infanticide. 6. Homicide. 7. Death tro:ii starvation. 8. Death 
from e.\treraes of temperature. 9. Examination of wounds. 10. Toxicology. 

Part IF. — Medical Police. 

Section 1. Circumstances affecting the Hralth op Individuals. — 1. Cleanlinesf^. 
2. Aliment. 3. Police of Apothecaries' Shops. 1. Clothing 5. T-emperance. 6. 
Exercise. 7. Prostitution. 8. Celibacy and Marriage. 9. Lactation, and care of 
offspring. 10. Effects of professions and trades on health. 

Section 2. Circumstance.-^ affecting the Health op Communities. — 1. Climate. 
2 Sites of towns and habitations. 3. Drains and sewer.s. 4. Paving of streets and 
care of public ways. 5. Cemeteries. 6. Hospitals. 7. Schools. 8. Prisons. 9. 
Quarantine Establishments. 10. Punishments. 

Two Courses are annually given ; one adapted for Students of 
Law during the Winter, and another for Medical Students during 
the Summer. 



2. Civil Law. 

PROFESSOR CAMPBELL SWINTON. 



General principles of Roman Law treated very much in the 
order of Justinian's Institutes, with references to the Laws of 
Modern Nations. 

The Students are examined on the contents of the Lectures, 
and the Institutes of Justinian ; and subjects are prescribed for 
four or five Essays in the course of the Session. Cumin's 
Manual of Civil Law, and Sandars' Institutes of Justinian, are 



38 COURSES IN FACULTY OF LAW. 

recommended. Students intended for the Scotch Bar must make 
themselves acquainted with either Warnkoenig's Institutiones 
Juris Romani Privati, or Mackeldey's Systema Juj'is Romani 
hodie usitati. 

A Prize of ten guineas is awarded for an Essay written during 
the Summer recess. 



3. Law of Scotland. 

Lectures to he read by Professor Camphell Swinton. 

1. Introductory. 2. Social or Domestic Relations. 3. Contracts 
or Obligations. 4. Quasi or implied Contracts. 5. Obligations 
arising from Delinquency or Quasi Delinquency. 6. Assignation 
of Personal Claims. 7. Discharge or Extinction of Obligations, 
including Prescription. 8. Distinction between Heritable and 
Moveable Rights. 9. Heritable or Real Rights, 10. Deeds of 
Transmission, particularly Entails. 11. Burdens upon Real Pro- 
perty, including Heritable Debts and Leases, Teinds, and Parochial 
Burdens. 12. Succession, Heritable and Moveable, Testate and 
Intestate. 13. Election Law. 14. Actions and Diligence, in- 
cluding Defences against Actions. 15. Bankruptcy and Insol- 
vency. 16. Criminal Law. 

A full printed Syllabus of the Course is delivered to every Stu- 
dent, of which the above is a mere abstract. 



4. Conveyancing. 

PROFESSOR MONTGOMERIE BELL. 



The Lectures are intended to assist Students of Law in the pre- 
paration of Deeds and Instruments, and in judging of their legal 
efficacy, and adaptation to the objects of the parties. 

The Course is divided into three branches ; the^Vs^, relating to 
the particulars applicable to all or most deeds ; the second and 
third, to those peculiar to personal or moveable, and to heritable 
or real rights, respectively. 

Under Branch First are explained — (1.) The solemnities of 
authentication of deeds. (2.) The necessity of delivery and 
acceptance. (3.) That the parties must be competent, and the 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 39 

subject-matter lawful. (4.) There must be deliberate consent ; 
under which head are noticed shortly the general rules applicable 
to essential error, fraud, and force and fear, as grounds of reducing, 
and to homologation, and rei intervenius, as grounds of supporting 
deeds. (5.) The Stamp Laws in their relation to Conveyancing. 
(6.) The parts or clauses common to all or most deeds, being the 
narrative or introductory ; the warrandice, registration, and testing 
clauses. (7.) The general rules as to the effect of blanks in deeds. 

Branch Second. — (1.) The personal bond, and other personal 
obligations, transmissions thereof inter vivos, and discharges. 
Personal contracts, antl deeds relating to corporeal moveables, 
including maritime writs. (2.) Bills and promissory-notes, their 
authentication, structure, transmission, and extinction. (3.) 
Writs of personal diligence. 

Branch Third. — (1.) The writs constituting a feudal estate, and 
the rights of the Superior and Vassal. (2.) The writs of trans- 
mission, voluntary or judicial, of such estate, and of burgage lands. 
(3.) The marriage-contract, bond of provision, and relative writs, 
as affecting either personal or real estate, or both. (4.) Testa- 
mentary deeds, applicable to either or both classes of estate. (5.) 
The entail and disentail, and relative deeds. (6.) The completion 
of titles, by executors or next of kin, or heirs, of persons deceased, 
to personal or real estate. (7.) Heritable securities ; their con- 
stitution, transmission, and extinction. (8.) Writs of real dili- 
gence ; and lastly, Leases. 

Class hour 4 to 5 o'clock, on five days in the week. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

Dean : 
JOHN HUTTON BALFOUK, M.A., M.D., Pkofessor op Botany. 



1. Materia Medica. 

PROFESSOR CHRISTISON. 

Introductory. — Materia Medica comprises the subjects of 
General Therapeutics, Special Therapeutics, and Pharmacy ; and 
Diet and Regimen equally with Remedies ordinarily so called. 
Arrangement of the Course under that view of its objects. 



40 COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

General Topics. — On Pharmacopoeias. On General Thera- 
peutics, or the Actions of Remedies. 1. Physiological, or Actions 
on the Healthy Body, viz., their kinds of action, their modes of 
action, and the circumstances which modify their actions. 2. 
Therapeutic, or Actions on Disease ; their several kinds of action 
on disease. 

Sprcial Topics. — I. The Natural History, Pharmacy, Thera- 
peutic actions, Uses, and mode of administering Remedies, ordi- 
narily so called. 1. Mineral Substances, arranged according to 
their chemical constitution, viz.. Non-metallic oxidable elements ; 
acids ; ordinary metals and their compounds ; alkalis and earths, 
and their compounds ; compound inflammables ; mineral waters. 
2. Vegetable substances, arranged according to the natural fami- 
lies of plants, as this arrangement also classifies them in some 
measure according to their actions on the body. 3. Animal sub- 
stances. 4. Imponderables, or Qualities of matter, viz., Heat, cold, 
electricity, galvanism, magnetit-m ; appendix on acupuncture. 5. 
Blood-letting, general and local, 

II. On Diet and Regimen. — 1. Food, viz., its relative diges- 
tibility and nutriciveness ; the effects of improper food on man ; 
the proper food for man in various circumstances of life ; such as 
for maintaining the athletic constitution ; for persons under ordi- 
nary vigorous exercise ; for those iu confinement ; for children ; 
for hospitals. Dietetic treatment of diseases in detail, according 
to their nosological arrangement. — 2. Drink; its kinds ; its effects, 
when erroneous ; proper drink for health ; regulation of drink in 
the treatment of diseases. 3. Condiment; its kinds : their actions 
in health, and their applications to the treatment of diseases. 4. 
Exercise. 5. Climate. 6. Clothing. 7. Cleanliness. 8. Moral 
discipline. 



2. Chemistry. 

PJ10FE3S0R PLAYFAIR. 



The Course of instruction consists — 

1. Op Lkctuues. — In the Course of Lectures the general suli- 
jeets of Theoretical Chemistry, including a detailed description of 
Elementary Bodies and their Compounds, are considered with 
especial reference to their useful applications to Medicine and 
the Industrial Arts, The subjects of Chemical Physics are also 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 41 

fully discussed in their bearing on the general laws which govern 
the union of the different bodies. Examinations of the Students, 
both oral and written, are frequently held. The Chief and Second 
Assistant conduct Tutorial Classes in connexion with the Lectures, 
in order to discipline the Student on the subjects treated of. 

2. Laboratory. — The Laboratory is open for the reception of 
Pupils who desire to study Analytical Chemistry, or to undertake 
Chemical Investigations. The Hoi^e Prize, of the annual value of 
£50, is awarded to the author or authors of the best Investiga- 
tions, if approved by the Senate. The fee for the Laboratory is 
ten guineas for six months, or six guineas for three months. It 
is open during all the Winter Session, and for three months in the 
Summer Session. The Professor is aided in the Laboratory by 
Mr. Dittmar as Chief Assistant. 

3. Practical Classes. — The instruction in these is chiefly de- 
voted to practice in Qualitative Analysis, with the view of 
enabling the Student to test unknown substances, poisons, urine, 
&c. They are taught by the Demonstrator, Mr. Wauklyn, under 
the superintendence of the Professor. The fee is three guineas. 

Text-hoohs. — Any of the following, viz. : — Powne's Manual of 
Chemistry : Churchill, London. Gregory's Hand-Book of Chemis- 
try : Taylor & Walton, London. Miller's Elements of Chemistry. 
3 vols. : Parker & Sons, London. 



3, Surgery. 

PROFESSOR MILLER. 
I. — The Principles of Surgery. 

1. Elementary Diseases, including especially — 

The inflammatory process; congestion; the healing process; suppiration ; ulcere; 
mortification; hypertrophy, atrophy, and absorption ; tumours; hemorrhage. 

2. Diseases iyi certain tissues. — 

In the integument ; serous and mucous membranes ; peristeum and bone : joints ; 
arteries; veins; lymphatics; nerves. 

3. Injuries — 

Wounds ; eflFects of heat ; effects of cold ; fracture ; dislocation ; sprain, and ruj.ture of 
muBcle and tendon ; bruise : suspended animation. 



42 COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

II. — The Practice of Surgery. 
1. The subject of operations in general. 

2 Injuries and diseases of the head; 3. aflFections of the orbit and its contents; 4. 
affections of the nose ; 5. affections of the upper jaw ; 6. affections of the face ; 7. affec- 
tions of the lips; 8. of the palate; 9. of the teeth ; 10. of the lower jaw; 11. of the 
tongue; 12. of the uvula and tonsils; 13. of the pharynx; 14. of the oesophagus; 15. 
of the ear ; 16. of the neck ; 17. of the arm, forearm, wrist, and hand ; 18. injuries of 
the upper extremity ; 19. affections of the spine; 20. affections of the chest ; 21. of the 
mamm:i ; 22. of the abdomen ; 23. hernia : 24. affections of the rectum ; 25. stone ; 
26. affections of the bladder and prostate; 27. the venereal disease ; 28. affections of the 
urethra; 29. of the te>ticle ; 30. of the scrotum and penis: 31. of the female genital 
organs : 32. diseases and injuries of the lower extremity ; 33. amputation. 

The Professor uses his own work on the Principles and Prac- 
tice of Surgery as the text-book. 



4. Institutes of Medicine. 

PROFESSOR BENNETT. 



This Course of Lectures is divided into three parts. I. His- 
tology, or a Systematic Account of the Doctrine of the Tissues. 
II. Physiology, or a Systematic View of the Functions of the 
Animal Body, arranged in three groups. 1. Function of Nutri- 
tion ; 2. Function of Innervation ; and 3. Function of Reproduc- 
tion. III. Pathological Physiology, in relation to the three 
groups of functions referred to ; but more especially the general 
doctrines of congestion, fever, inflammation, tubercle, cancer, 
morbid growths, and degenerations of texture, parasitic growths, &c. 

These Lectures are illustrated by diagrams, preparations, and occasional experiments 
Every Haturday a demi)nstnition is given from 11 to 12 A..M., under a series of micro- 
Hcopt'.i, Ulustniiive of the properties, mc'de of development, and functions of the various 
tUsuc* and organs of the animal body. Examinations of the Class will also be held at 
ttated periods. 

Tixlbiiok. — Outlines of Physiology. By John Uughes Bennett, M.D., &c. Small Svo. 
woodcuts. Edinburgh. 

Summer Course. 
Practical Histology, and the use of the 2/icroscope. 
This Course is divided into, — 1. Lectures on the construction of 
Microscopes, as instruments of Physiological and Pathological re- 
search, and as a means of diagnosis at the bedside. 2. The mode 
of ein|»loyiiig the various parts of the apparatus. 3. The prac- 
tical demonstration, examination, and description, by each Student, 
of all the textures and fluids of the animal body, in health and 
disease ; examination of an extensive histological collection of 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 43 

objects, and experimental investigation into the phenomena of 
contractility, ciliary action, inflammation, &c. 

This Course is an Appendix to that of the Institutes, and an introduction to the 
higher kinds of Clinical Study. 

Text-book. — An Introduction to Clinical Medicine, &c , Lectures iv. and v. By John 
Hughes Bennett, M.D., &c. Third Edition. Edinburgh, 1857. 



5. Midwifery and Diseases of Women and Children. 

PROFESSOR SIMPSON. 

The Course of Instruction comprises, — 

I. 1st, The anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive 
organs, and their products ; 2d, Natural and morbid parturition ; 
3d, The pathology of the puerperal state ; 4tk, The physiology and 
pathology of pregnancy ; 5th, The special pathology of the female 
sexual organs j and 6th, The hygiene and diseases of infancy and 
childhood. 

II. Clinical Lectures are given once a week during the Session, 
on Diseases of Women, in connexion with No. 12 Ward, Royal 
Infirmary, which the Managers of that Institution have placed at 
Dr. Simpson's disposal for this purpose. 

III. Weekly Examinations and Demonstrations in Obstetric 
Operations will be conducted on Saturdays in the Class-room, at 
the usual Lecture hour, by the Class Tutor, under the superintend- 
ence of the Professor. 



6. Clinical Medicine. 

PROFESSORS BENNETT AND LAYCOCK. 

This Course, as directed by Dr. Bennett, is composed of two 
parts, — 1. Lectures on Tuesdays and Fridays, in which the Stu- 
dent's attention is first directed to the methods of examining the 
patients by interrogation, observation of symptoms, percussion, 
auscultation, the use of the microscope, and of chemical tests ; 
subsequently to the history and treatment of cases in the wards. 
2. Visits on the other four days of the week to the Clinical Wards 
of the Infirmary, at which the Student is taught to examine for 
himself the condition of the patient, form a diagnosis, and suggest 
a treatment. 



44 COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

Text-hooks — Introduction to Clinical Medicine, third edition, 
12mo, numerous woodcuts, Edinburgh ; or Clinical Lectures on 
the Principles and Practice of Medicine. By John Hughes 
Bennett, M.D., &c. Third edition, 8vo, 500 woodcuts. Edinburgh. 

Winter Course of Clinical Medicine, as conducted by Dr 
Laycock — 

1. Dr Laycock will commence the course. 

2. Senior Students will be invited to examine patients durin;,' 
the visit, under Dr. Laycock's guidance. 

3. Junior Students will be formed into small evening classes for 
special instruction in physical diagnosis. 

4. In the first instance, the Clinical Discourses will include a 
systematic exposition of the physiognomical diagnosis of morbid 
tissues, as illustrated by cases in the wards, with special reference 
to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases arising from mal-nutri- 
tion. The student will be practised in diagnosis at the bedside. 

Suuimer Course of Clinical Medicine, by Dr. Laycock. 

1. Special instruction in physical diagnosis will be given, as in 
the Winter Course. 

2. In addition to General Therapeutics, special attention will 
be directed to Diseases of the Nervous System, 

Text-hook. — Dr. Laycock's Principles and Methods of ?>Iedical 
(Observation and Research. 



7. Clinical Surgery. 

PROFESSOR SYME. 
The objects of this Course are to teach the discrimination of 
Surgical diseases, by pointing out their distinctive characters in 
the living body ; and to impress the principles of treatment, by 
showing their application in practice. With these views, all the 
patients whose cases come under consideration are placed before 
the Students in the theatre of the hospital, when, with due regard 
to their feelings, the opinions entertained as to the seat and nature 
of the malady are freely expressed, and the means of remedy 
deemed requisite are administered, either at the same time, or 
upon some other more convenient occasion. Tlie Lectures are de- 
livered at 12 o'clock on Mondays and Thursdays, and the hospital 
18 visited daily. 

The Text-Book is the Professor's " Principles of Surgery." 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 45 

8. Anatomy. 

PROFESSOR GOODSIR. 

Winter Courses. 
T. Lectures orf Anatomy, at 1 p.m. — The objects of this Course 
are the Demonstration and Description of the Structure of the 
Human Body, from the physiological point of view ; the parts 
being displayed and explained with reference to their actions 
and functions. 

The members of the Junior Division of the Class meet in sec- 
tions under the Demonstrators for the study of Microscopic 
Structure, and of parts which cannot be distinctly seen in the 
Theatre during lecture. 

Specimens of Elementary Anatomy are arranged for private 
study in an apartment provided for this purpose, and open from 
9 A.M. to 4 P.M. 

Microscopic Structure is examined and demonstrated in a spe- 
cial class-room, provided with simple and compound microscopes. 

One Gold and two Silver Medals are awarded to First Year 
Students for written answers to a series of questions proposed in 
the Theatre. The first competition takes place at the end of 
November, the three following at the end of each succeeding 
month, the final one at the end of the Winter Session. 

The following work may be consulted in connexion with the 
Lectures : — Quain's Elements of Anatomy, edited by Dr. Sharpey 
and Mr. Ellis. 

Fee, £4: 4 

Second Course, 3 3 

Third Course, Free. 

Perpetual Ticket 6 6 

IL Anatomical Demonstrations, by Mr. Turner, at 4 p.m. — 
In this Course, which is conducted in the Theatre, the Structure 
of the Human Body is displayed and demonstrated topographically, 
from the surface inwards, and with reference, more particularly, to 
the relative position of parts. Mr. Turner gives Demonstrations 
of the minute Anatomy of the Viscera to the Senior Division of 
this Class, in the class-room for Microscopic Anatomy, instead 



46 COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

of the Denionstratious in the Theatre, every Friday after the 

Christmas recess. 

Fee £^ 2 

When taken out along with Practical Anatomy, 1 1 

Third Course, Free. 

III. Practical Anatomy, under the superintendence of the 
Professor, assisted by the Demonstrators, William Turner, M.B., 
London ; Henry S. Wilson, M.D,, Edinburgh ; and Joseph Bell, 
M.D., Edinburgh. 

The Dissecting-rooms are open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and on 
Saturdays from 9 to 12 noon. 

The Manuals employed are Demonstrations of Anatomy by Professor Ellis, and 
Holden's Manual of the Dissection of the Human Body. 

Fee, £3 3 

No Perpetual Ticket for this Course. 

Summer Courses. 

I. Lectures on Comparative Anatomy, by Mr. Goodsir. — The 
Course is open to those engaged in Practical Anatomy during the 
Summer. 

II. Practical Anatomy, as in Winter. 

Fee £i 2 

III. Anatomical Demonstrations in the Theatre, by Mr. Tur- 
ner, as in Winter. 

This Course is open to those engaged in Practical Anatomy 
during the Summer. 



9. General Pathology. 

I'KUFKSSOR HENDERSON. 



In these Lectures the Causes, Processes, and Phenomena of 
Diseases are treated of as separate and distinct subjects of study, 
with the view of exhibiting the general facts or laws proper to 
each of these departments of Pathology. Accordingly, the Course 
is divided into three Sections, as follows : — 

1. Etiology, or the Causes of Disease, e.g., the operation of cold 
and heat ; nature, &c., of morbid poisons. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 47 

2. General pathology of the functions morbidly affected, in 
Pathological Physiology, as of digestion, respiration, &c., &c., or 
disease. 

3. General Pathology of the Symptoms and Signs of Disease, 
each considered by itself, e.g., pain, haemorrhages, convulsions, 
&c. 



10. Natural History. 

PROFESSOR ALLMAN. 



I. The Zoological Lectures embrace a general view of the 
Animal Kingdom, an exposition of the principles which should 
guide us in its study, and of the laws of a philosophical classifi- 
cation. They are occupied with the demonstration of the five 
great plans recognisable among animals, namely, Vertebrata, 
Annulosa, Mollusca, Radiata, and Protozoa ; the subordinate 
groups into which each of these admits of being divided are de- 
fined and illustrated, and the laws of their Distribution in Time 
and space examined. 

II. The Geological Lectures are occupied with an examination 
of the physical forces which have brought about the present con- 
dition of the earth's crust, considered under two distinct aspects : 
1. lis mode of formation ; 2. ^he successive periods of time which 
have elapsed during its formation. Under this second head the 
earth's crust is considered more particularly with reference to the 
remains of organized beings which are entombed in it, and the 
students' attention is specially directed to the value of zoological 
laws in the interpretation of geological phenomena. 

III. The Mineralogical Lectures embrace the general principles 
of Crystallography. The six great systems of Crystals are ex- 
plained, and their laws demonstrated. The various physical pro- 
perties of minerals, and the value of these properties in the diagnosis 
of species are considered. The more important mineral species are 
described. 



11. Practice of Medicine. 

PROFESSOR LAYCOCK. 

The Course will commence with the causes, nature, and treat- 
ment of Diathetic or Constitutional Diseases, and of Morbid Con- 



48 COURSES IN FACULTY OF BIEDICINE. 

stitutionjil States. The origin and physiognomy of Temperaments, 
and the diagnosis and pathology of Diatheses will have special 
attention. 

The local and visceral diseases treated of in the remainder of 
the Course are those of the Skin, the Kidneys, and the Heart and 
Lungs, including the large vessels and the arteries. 

Plxaininations are held during the Session for those students 
who desire to compete for prizes and certificates of merit. 



12. Medical Jurisprudence. 

PROFESSOR TRAILL. 
[See Faculty of Law, p. S7.] 



13. Medical Psychology : 

With Practical Instruction in Mental Diseases. 
PROFESSOR LAYCOCK. 

I. As to the Course of Medical P&ychology, — 

1. The first part of the Course will comprise an exposition of 
the relations of Psychology proper to the laws of life in general, 
and the functions of the brain in particular, 

2. A psychological nosology will be discussed so as to secure a 
general view of mental diseases in their relations to each other. 

3. Special forms of mental disorder will be treated of in succes- 
8i«»n, commencing with the disorders of the animal appetites. 
This ]»art of the Course will be illustrated by physiognomical 
j)hotographs and drawings. 

4. Sleep, Dreams, and Hallucinations will have a philosophical 
antl practical consideration, 

.0. The ]»hysiology and pathology of the higher faculties will be 
specially discussed, and illustrated by numerous examples of the 
writing, composition, and art-products of mono-idealists and the 
insane. 

II. Course of Clinical Instruction in Mental Diseases, — 

This will be carried out at an asylum, where the diseases of the 
insane will be investigated, and special cases examined. 

III. Clinical and written examinations will be held at the con 
clubion of the Course, and certificates of merit awarded. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 49 

Dr. Browne, one of the Coramissibners for Lunacy in Scotland, 
offers a prize, value three guineas, for the best essay on the applica- 
tions of Medical Psychology to the Practice of Medicine. Former 
members of the Class are invited to compete. 

Teart-hooks. — Dr. Laycock's " Mind and Brain, or the Correlations of Consciousness 
and Organization ;" Take and Buckaill's " Psychological Medicine." 



14. Botany. 

PROFESSOR BALFOUR. 



The Course of Botany is a general one, open to all Students. 
It consists of — 

1. Vegetable Organography, or an Account of the Tissues and Organs 
of Plants, illustrated by Specimens, Drawings, and Microscopical Dissec- 
tions. 

2. Vegetable Physiology, or an Account of the Functions of Plants, 
illustrated by the Microscope and Experiments on Living Plants. 

3. Classification of Plants, or an Account of the different Modes of Ar- 
rangement, with illustration of the Classes and Orders of the Vegetable 
Kingdom by means of Living Specimens and of Plants from the University 
Herbarium. 

4. Geographical Botany, or an Account of the Distribution of Plants 
over the Globe. 

5. Palseontological Botany, or a description of Fossil Plants, of their re- 
lation to each other and to the present Flora, illustrated by Specimens 
from the Museum. 

The work used as a text-book is Professor Balfour's Class -Book 
of Botany. 

I 1. Lectures are given at the Royal Botanic Garden every Mon- 
day, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, at 8 a.m., from 
the beginning of May till the end of July. 

2. Examinations in a Class-room at the College, every Wednes- 
day, at 3 P.M. Pupils who wish to be examined, and especially 
those who wish Certificates for examination, must give in their 

! names. 

\ 3. Besides the Lectures, Demonstrations are given on the Natural 

j Orders in the open ground of the Garden, on the Preparations 
in the Museum of Economic Botany, and on the Plants in the Hot- 
houses. In visiting the latter, Pupils are taken in parties of about 
a dozen at a time. The Demonstrations are given on Mondays, 
Wednesdays, and Fridays, from 9 to IO-a.m. 

D 



50 COURSES IN FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

4. Histological Class for instruction as to the use of the 
Microscope in examining Vegetable Structure, meets on Tuesdays 
and Thursdays at 9 a.m. The Class is conducted by the Professor 
and his Assistant. 

5. Saturdays occupied with Excursions and Demonstrations in 

the fields, 

(j. Rooms at the Garden open to pupils for the consultation of 
Books of Plates, Periodicals, and other Botanical Works ; as well 
as for the examination of recent and dried Specimens of Plants, 
and for the use of the Microscope. 

7. Prizes for Herbaria, Essays, Microscopical Preparations, and 
Competitive Examinations. 

8. Excursion for Eight or Ten Days at the beginning of 
August. 



CLASS PRIZE LISTS,— 1861. 

FACULTY OF ARTS. 

I.— HUMANITY CLASSES. 
Senior Class. 
Tlie Stratov Gold Medal (value £10), after a comparative trial in Latin Scholar- 
ship, of seventeen Competitors, was Ruined by J. P. Bannerman Robertson, Hish 
Scliool, Kdinburyh. Of the remaining Comi>etitors the two following were the 
most distinuuished, viz. :— James Spens Torrop, Edinburgh High School ; James 
it. Milne, Cauvin's Institution, and Junior Humanity Class. 

The following subjects were projiosed for Written Exercises, and Prizes in Books adjudi- 
cated to the best in eacli : — 

1. Italia Rkdiviva, — Latin Hexameters; Prize not due. Honourable Mention, — 

Campbell Macpiierson Grant, Eton College. 

2. Description of the Solar System in Latin Prose, on the basis of Cicero's account of 

it in the Somnium Scipionis, — First Prize, not due. Second, Thomas J. Kelly, 
Wallacehall Academy, and Junior Humanity Cla«s. Honourable Mention, — 
Robert .\loodic. High School, Stirling ; William P. Mackay, Montrose Academy. 

3. Translation into Latin of Principal Roljcrtson's Account of the Discovery of 

America,— /-Vr^i Prize, Gained byj. P. Bannerman liohnitson, ut supra ; Second, 
James R. Milne, ut sujira. 

4. Translation info Knglish of Livy's Account of the Roman Dis.ister at the Furcae 

('iiiidiniie (Lib. ix. can. 1 to 11 inclusive),— !. Peter MacK)nlay ; 2. William 
Moure, both from tlie Normal School, Castle Hill, Edinburgh. Honourable Men- 
tion,— James S. Torrop, ul suiira. 

5. Comparative View of the Political Constitution of Republican Rome, with its Con- 

»ul», Senate, and Ccmitia, and that of tireat Britain, with its Sovereign, Lords, 
and Commons,— 1. AL T ."^torniontli Darling, Kelso (iranimar Sciiool, and Junior 
Humanitv Class; 2. Jolin Hac, IliKh Sclionl, Edinburgh. Honourable Mention, 
llobvri U. lirowii. Grange School, Sunderland. 
0. A Summary of the Course of Lectures on General Grammar delivered during the 
ScKfcion, L William llastie, Wanlockhead, and Junior Humanity Class ; -2. Alex- 
ander Pn'.tiion, Cupar-I'ife. Hoiu)ural)le Mention. — Andrew Forrest, Edinburgh ; 
William .Mdcdonnld, Fdiiibiiri;li ; William P Maclmy, u; siqira ; R. F. Hampini, 
Ediiiburgli Academy, and Junior Humanity Class. 



CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 51 



7. Private Studies in Curtins, — James S. Torrop, %tt supra. In Livy, John Johnstone. 

Dunfermline High School, and Junior Humanity Class. 

8. For Proficiency in Ancient Geography,— John M'Kie Lees, Ayr and Edinburgh 

Academies. Honourable Mention,— John Duncan, Dalkeith Academy. 

9. Recitation,— 1. James.Macdonald, Edinburgh; 2. William Macdonald, Edinburgh. 

Junior Class. 
Prtzes were awarded for — 

1. Latin Hexameters and Pentameters— Subject, Imaginary Tour round the Medi- 

terranean Coast,— John M'Morine, Wallacehall Academy. 
Same subject in Latin Prose,— 5o\\n S. Black, Kirkcaldy Burgh School. Honour- 
able Mention, — James S. W. Irvine, Kirkwall. 

2. Abstract in Latin of a portion of Curtius,— John M'Morine, tit supra. Honourable 

Mention, — Alexander Drummond, Dundee High School. 

3. TnA.MSLATioN of ()vid"s Autobiography (Trist. Lib. iv. Eleg. 10), in English Couplets, 

— 1. George W. Manson. CorstorT)hiiie Parish School, and High School, Edinburgh, 
and Robert Fordvce Shetland— Equal. The same in Prose, — Honourable Mention, 
—Thomas Cockburn, Berwick-on-Tweed ; Alexander Phimister, Irvine Academy. 
An extra ordincm Prize was assigned for good Translation, both in Prose and Verse, 
to Peter Gloag, Perth Academy. 
4 For Private Studies in Curtius,— J. S. Black, ut supra. 

5. For Proficiency in Ancient Geography, — L David Moir, Normal School, Canongat«, 

Edinburgh; 2. Thomas Cockburn, id supra; 3. Simeon Little, Kirkton, Lillies- 
leaf; 4. John Rutherford, Scoonie. 

6. Recitation,— George W. Young, Edinburgh Academy, and John Rutherford, id 

supra — Equal. 

7. Exercise on Synonyms derived from Saxon and Latin roots, — Thomas Robertson, 

Ayr Academy. A Prize was also assigned to John Hunter for a Spicilegium. 
A Prize may be gained next Session for Summer Studies by any ilember of the Senior 
Class of this Session who shall attend the next Session, and by any Member of the 
JuxioR of this Session who enters the Setiior next November: the /(*■>•»/()• bv 
presenting the greatest amount in Quantity and Qualitv of Translations in Verse 
or Prose of the Extracts contained in the Anthologia attached to "The Elements 
of Physical and Classical Geography ; " beginning with the last extract and pro- 
ceeding regularly backwards : and the tatlt-r bv Readings and Registers of work 
done in the Eclogae Curtianae, distinguishing those parts which have been read 
before. 

JAMES PILLANS, Professor. 

IL— GREEK CLASSES. 
Senior Class. 

I. Straton Prize (^'10), for Greek Prose Composition,— Roderick M'Donald, Storno- 

way. 

II. Prfzks for General Excellence (Plato, Hesiod, Homer, — Greek Composition), — !. 
Roderick M'Donald, Stornoway, Lewis ; 2. Charles Moinet, Edinburgh ; 3. James 
Kennedy, Benares. 

III. Private Readings,— Summer Series— W. Cowan, Rattray ; First Winter Series 
— (Plato's Phaedrus) — R. M'Donald, Stornoway; Second Winter Series (Lucians 
Timon), R. M'Donald, Stornoway. 

Second Class. 

I. Prizes for General Excellence,— Plutarch's Cimon, Eurip. Iphig. An!., Homer's 

Iliad, 24, Pausanias Arcadia, Literary History of Greece,— !. (Rankin's Prize, 
io,) Henry Cowan, Ayr; 2. James Russell Milne, Dundee; 3. J. M. Lees, Edin- 
bu'gh ; 4. James Nicol, Laurencekiik ; o. William Hastie, Wanlochbead ; (j. 
John Burt, Sinclairtown ; 7. John Cameron, Mortlach; 8 James P. B. Robertson, 
Forteviot ; 9 Diiiiiel Ferguson, Bridye of Allan; Id. John Johnstone, Dunferm- 
line Subsequent Order of Merit,-!. John Kae ; 2. W. P. Mackay. 3. John Pitt : 
4. Alexander Pattison. 

II. Private Readings,— Summer Series— Iliad, i. 12,— Henrv Cowan. Ayr. First 
Winter Series,— Plutarch's Lysander,— Henry Cowan, Ayr. Second Winter Series. 
— Eurip. Ipliig. Taur., — Henry Cowan, Ayr 



52 



CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 



III. Special SxiiniES in Pliilolo^v and tlie Philosoiihy of Language,— R. T. Milne, 
Dundee ; William Kennedy, Edinburgh— Kqual. 

Junior Class. 

I. Prizes for General Excellence,— Cebetis Tabula, Xeno])hnn's Memorahilia, 

Homer's Odyssey, 13, )-l, lo, CIvde's Syntax, Daily Exercises in Greek Composition 
and Conversation,— 1. Joliii M'Morine. Wal/aceliall ; 2. Alexander M'Master, 
Kirkoswald; .J. Andrew Lvon, Avr; 4. John Chalmers, Blairgowrie ; 5. John R. 
Mitchell, Montrose ; G. John S. Black, Kirkcaldy; 7- William M'Donald, Edin- 
Imrgh; 8. Martin Mowat, Caithness;!). William Smith, Peebles; 10. George 
^^anson, Corstor))hine. Subsequent Order of Merit, — 1. John Braidwood, Car- 
michael ; 2. David Moir, Bridge of Allan; 3. James Sime, Airdrie ; 4. William 
Elliot, Hawick ; .0. John C. Mcllis, Edinburgh. 

II. Piiiv.ATE Readings,— First Series,— Xenophon's Memorabilia, i.,— J. M'ilorine, 
Wallacehall. Second Series,— Odyssey, i., J. M'Morine, Wallacehall. 

Suinmer Readings. 
il.) Students entering the Senior Class, Session Ififii-fii?, will receive a Prize after 

P^xamination on Ho.meh's Iliad, xiii.-xxiv. inclusive. 
(2.) Students entering the Seco.vd Class for Session ]8ol-62, will receive a Prize after 
Examination on Odvssey, i.-xii. inclusive. 

JOHN S. BLACKIE, Professor. 

III.-MATHEMATICS. 

First Class, 

Phizes,— ]. David Reid, Perthshire- Gold Mkdal; 2. William Hastie, Dumfriesshire. 

3. and 4. John Burt, Fit'esliire ; John Chiene, Edinburgh, — Equal. 5. William 
Ross, Caithness. G. Norman M'Coll, Edinburgh. 7- John Edgar Tinsley, Edin- 
burgh. 8. Thomas M Cosh, Avrshire. 9. John M'Kie Lees, Ayrshire. 10. 11. 
12. V,i. and 14. George Hill Dick, Edinburgh ; Peter Mathiesori, Selkirkshire ; 
William O. D. Welsh, Kirkcudbrightshire; Alexander Welsh, Kirkcudbright- 
shire; Roderick MLean, Fifeshire, — Equal. 15. John Pitt, Clackmannanshire. 
IH. James Iverach, Caithness. 17- and 18. A. Sutherland, Caithness ; William 
Meiklejohn, Caithness.— Equal. 19. George Edward Coxon, Northumberland. 
2o. Henry Gordon, Perthsliire. 21. John B. Reid, Lanarkshire. 22. James 
Russell .Vl'ilne, Forfarshire. 2.^. J. AVm. Pringle, Perthshire- - 24. John Sturrock, 
Selkirkshire. 25. William Douglas, F^dinbnrgh. 2y. James Gourlay, Wigtonshire. 

Prize for Essay on Parallels,— John Campbell, Perth. 

Cerl'JicaUs of Merit,— \. John W !Moir. 2. Henry Henderson. 3. John D. Van der 
Staaten 4. Jolin Kae 5. and (>. William Addison; Willoughby Mackintosh, — 
Equal. 7. John lilackay. 8. Adam Herbertson. 9. James R. Tait. 

Second Class. 

Prizes,- 1. David Laird Adams, Perthshire — Gold Mf.d.al. 2 John Robson, Roxburgh- 
bliirc. 3. Francis K. W Cowley, Red River Settlement. 4. William P. Mackay, 
Forfarshire. 5. and (!. Andrew '.Moody Stuart, Edinburgh ; James Kae, Dumfries- 
shire,— Equal. 7- Alister Mackenzie, Sussex. 8. James Robertson Buntine, Ayr- 
uliire. !). John Rattray .Mnclarcn, Edinburgh. 10. and 11. Allan Connal, 
Edinliurgh; John Woodbiirn, India,— Equal. 12. William Iverach, Orkney, 13. 
William Henry Seniple, Wigtonshire. 14. James Spens Torrop, Edinburgh. 

Prize for Essay,— John Bobson. 

Certjicnift of Merit,— \. and 2. Duncan Macrae ; William M. Milroy,— Equal. 3. and 

4. Henry A. Grahaine ; James .M'Gregor,— Equal. 5. Patrick G. Craigie. G. 
James A. Lyon. 7- Stodart M Donald. 

Third Class. 
Phizkr,— 1. and 2. Alexander Anderson, Aberdeen; Gilbert Laurie, Caithness,— Equal 
— (.^^TKATo.N Pkizk). 3. James Rae, Dumfries. 4. James Blyth, Kincardineshire. 

5. J nine* Dcwar, Perth. 

Certificatit (if Merit,— \. Colin H. MLachlan. 2. John Simpson. 



bubjccti for Essay for 18G1-2 :— First and Second Classes,— To construct a table of 
Loguiithmi from Napier's Dctiiiition, ^Thiro Class,— Inequalities. 

PHILIP KELLAND, Professor. 



CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 53 

IV.— LOGIC AND METAPHYSICS. 
I. Business of thk Session. 

Honours awarded by the Votes of the Class for general Eminence in the Ordinary Busi- 
ness of the Session. 

Senior Division. 
1. (Straton) Thomas Gray, Kirkcaldy. 2. R. VV. Cochran Patrick, Ayrshire. 3. 
Hugh Elder, Dunfermline. 4. Francis Mudie, Dundee. 5. Alan Cadell, Edin- 
burgh. 6. Alexander Milne Dalrymple, Leith. 7. Hugh Gordon, Sutherlandshire. 
8. Arthur R. W. Rainey, India. 9 Dan Wallace, Paisley. 
The following Gentlemen obtained Honourable JMention :— Franci<5 W. R. Cowle)', 
Canada; William MacCallum, Halifax; James Haswell, Edinburgh, 

Junior Division. 

1. (Straton) James Kennedy, India. 2. Robert Allan, Hamilton. 3. David Laird 
Adams, Perthshire. 4. Thomas J. Wilson, Dumfriesshire. .5. William M. 
Alilroy, Edinburgh 6. John Burt, Kirkcaldy. 7- Henry Cowan, Ayr. 8. R. 
Fulton Ranipini, Edinburgh. 9. James R Buntine, Ayr 10. James Mackintosh, 
Inverness. 11. John Woodburn, India. 12. Patrick W. Minto, Alloa. 13. David 
M. Connor, Lanarkshire. 14 George H. Dick, Edinburgh. 15. William R. Law- 
son, Forfarshire, lb". John Campbell, Auchterarder. 

The following Gentlemen obtained Honourable Mention :— James R. Caird, Arbroath ; 
William Meiklejohn, Thurso ; Cam])bell MacPherson Grant, Inverness-shire : 
James Iverach, Caithness; John B. Reid, Slamannan; Charles Moinet, Edin- 
burgh; Alexander Gibson, Kirkcaldy; John Cameron, Banffshire; Archibald 
Sutlierland, Caithness ; H. G. Graham, North-Berwick ; Douglas Cunningham, 
Prestonpans ; D. L. Fergusson, Stirling ; A. Moody Stuart, Edinburgh. 



II. BuSrXESS DURING THE VACATION, I860. 

I. For Essay on Berkeley's" Metaphysical Theory of Matter,"— (5'en/or), Dan Wallace, 

Paisley.— (/jui'or), W. R Lawson, Forfarshire. 

II. For Examination on the " De Augmentis " of Bacon,— 1. Alan Cadell, Edinburgh. 

2. W. Miller Nicolson, Edinburgh. 



Honours proposed for the ensuing Vacation, 1861. 
EssAV. — Exposition and Criticism of the Metaphysical System of Des Cartes, with an 
estimate of its influence in the history of Speculation. 

Examination.— Locke's "Essay on Human Understanding." 



Competition open to Students of the Class in the past and the ensuing Session. Essays, 
with the Author's name in a sealed note attached, to be given in, and Professions of 
S'Udy to be Intimated by 1st December iiexl. 

ALEXANDER C. FRASER, Professor. 

v.— RHETORIC AND BELLES LETTRES. 

I. Prose CoMPOsiTroN. — 1. (Straton Prize) David Kinnear, Forfarshire. 2. Robert 

M. Gloag, Edinburgh. 3. William Morrison, Dumfriesshire. 4. George D. Low, 
Perthshire; D. D. Bannerman, East Lothian ; William Grindlay, Edinburgh, — 
Equal. 5. Andrew H. Burgess, Dumfriesshire. 6. George Moir, Forfarshire ; 
Alexander Thomson, Edinburgh ; John Woodburn, Bengal,— Equal. 7. James 
Ross, IMorayshire. 8. John Young, Forfarshire. 9. Robert R. Simpson, Linlith- 
gowshire. 10. James Black, Fife. 11. Alexander H. Japp, Forfarshire. 12. 
"VVilliam N. Nicolson, Edinburgh ; William Douglas, New York, — Equal. 13. 
John Rutherford, Edinburgh. 14. James B. Duncan, Edinburgh. 
Special Prize for Exercises before Competition, — Alexander Gallie, Edinburgh. 
Worthy of Honourable Mention, — Robert M. Hendry, Forfarshire; Francis Braid- 
wood, Edinburgh; Robert Kerr, Edinburgh; James Hope, Roxburghshire; 
William Affleck, Edinburgh; George Simpson, Roxburghshire. 

II. Poetical Composition (Suhjuct, "Penelope at the Loom"), — 1. John Cairns, 
Edinburgh. 2. Alexander Ewing, Northumberland. 

III.— Elocution. — (Decided by the votes of the Class),— 1. Alexander Thomson, Edin- 
burgh. 2. David Brand, Lanarkshire. 3. Thomas Neave, Forfarshire 

W. EDMONDSTOUNE AYTOUN, Professor. 



r)4 CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 

VI. -MORAL PHILOSOPHY CLASS. 

I. BuStXESS OF THE SEssrox, 18()ll-(il. 

HoNODRs awarded for general eminence and ability in the ordinary business of the 
Class. 
Land 2. David Johnson, Glasgow; William Lawson, Forfarshire, — Equal,— (Straton 
Prizki. ;{. Thomas Gray, Fifcshire. 4 Alexander iMilne Dalrymple, Leith. 5. 
Alexander Millinf,'en, Constantinople. (5. K. \V. Cochran Patrick, Ayrshire. 7* 
James Ross, Kluin. 8. Huuh W. Mackay Gordon, Sutherland.shire. 9. William 
Iverach, Orkiu-y. !<•■ .Tames M'Kwen Stott, Edinburgh. U. Francis Mudie, 
Dundee. 12. Thomas Neave, Dundee. 
Obt.aixkd Hoxour.aklb Mentiox.— Alan Cadell, Edinburgh; James Cameron, 
Perthshire; David M.Connor, Lanarkshire; Thomas Finlayson, Greenock ; John 
S. Guthrie, Ayrshire; Charles Jcrdaii, Dalkeith; Archibald Jolly, Bowden ; 
William MacDonald, Ko^is-shire , James Masson, Kintore; James M. Mitchell, 
Inverness-shire ; James bimpson, Edinburgh; James L. Walker, Linlithgow. 

IL BUSI.VESS DURING SUMMER VACATION, 18(i0. 

1. For Essay on " Dogmatism and Scepticism, their Analogy and Contrast— parti- 
cularly in relation to -Moral Truth," — John Morgan, Kinross-shire. 

2 For Essav on " Analogical Pividcnce, and the mode of its employment by Bishop 
Butler," — Robert Rankin, Clackmannanshire. 

3. For Examination on Selected Philosophical Readings,— David M. Connor, Lanark- 
shire. 

Prizes PROPosho for Summer Vacation, 1861. 

1. Kssai/s — Any of the following Subjects :— 1. The Immutability of Moral Distinctions; 

2. Kant's Ethical Theory. 3 The Will, its Nature and Functions. 

2. Studies.- (1.) Cicero's treatise " De Finibus," Books ]ii.,iv.; or (2.) Bishop Butler's 

" Analouy " and his " Sermons." 
The Comi)etilion to be ojien to Students of the Class for the past or the ensuing Session. 
Essays to be given in before 1st December ISlil, distinguished by a motto, and with the 

anthor's name in a sealed note attached. Professions of Study to be intimated at 

the same date. 

P. C. MACDOUGALL, Professor. 

VII. -NATURAL PHILOSOPHY CLASS. 
First Division. 
1. anil 'J. John M'Heath, Perthshire; John Ross, Caithness,— Equal,— Straton Prize 
divided. 3. W. A. P. Joliuman, Perthshire. 

Second Division. 
1. William Burnett, Northumberland. *J. and 3. James Dewar, Perthshire; David 
K. .Miller, Perthshire, —Equal. 4. Francis Deas, Edinburgli. 
WouTiiY OK Special Mention. — Alexander Ander.son; George Kemp. 

Third Dirixion. 
1. Isaac Braithwaife, Kendal. 2. and ."?. Patrick Cunningham, Edinburgh; George 
I). Low. I'erthsiiire, — Eqnal. 4 Joliii Simiison, Kinross-shire. ."J. Patrick G. 
Craiyie. Perthiliire. (i Rohert B. Heron, Roxburghshire. 7. and 8 D. D. Ban- 
nernian, Edinburgh; A. G. Ellis, Edinburgh,— Kqual. 9. and 10. Alister Mac- 
kenzie, Inverness Robert Rankine, Clackmannanshire,— Equal. 11. Daniel 
M'Kercliar, Perlhshire. 
WouTiiY OK .Special M k.vtion.- John Barclay: A. J. Duncan; George Grim; Adam 

HerliertKon; Jainei JefTrey ; Jolin Brown-Morrison; W. Russell. 
Prl«c for the griateHt number of correct Written Answers to Questions on the Lectures 
— Williuiu Burnett. 

PETER G. TAIT, Professor. 

ALEXANDER C. ERASER, Dean of the Faculty of Arts. 



CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 55 

FACULTY OF DIVINITY. 

VIII.— HEBREW CLASS. 

Juniar Class. 
Proficiency,—!. James Patterson, Dumfriesshire. 2. Robert Paton, Edinburghshire. 
EsSAV,— 1. John Henderson, Peeblesshire. 2. Duncan Wright, Edinburghshire. 

Senior Class. 
Proficiexcy, — 1. George P. Hunter, Kirkcudbrightshire. 2. Alexander C. Soutar, 
Ross-shire. Essay,— 1. William M. Bell, Fifeshire. 

DAVID LISTON, Professm: 

IX.— DIVINITY CLASSES. 
Junior Class. 

Prizes for Proficiency as determined by a series of Written Examinations of the whole 
Class,— 1. J. P. Macmorland, Haddingtonshire. 2. W. Newbiggina, Dumfries- 
shire. 3. Andrew Paton, Fife. 4 Daniel Cameron, B.A., Berwickshire. 5. 
James Patterson, Dumfriesshire. 6. Andrew Taylor, Edinburgh. 7. John W. 
Foyer, M.A., Edinburgh. 

Senior Class. 

Prizes for Essays written during the previous Summer : — 

By Students of the Fourth Year:— On the connexion of the Internal and External Evi- 
dences of Christianity,— Alexander Bryson, Lanarkshire. On the Origin of Sacri- 
fice,— Alexander Bryson, Lanarkshire. 

Students of the Third Year:— On the Adaptation of Christianity to the condition of 
Man, — L W. Porteous, St. John's, New Brunswick. 2. Alexander O. Hood, 
Forfarshire. On the Cha.acter of Judas Iscariot,— Alexander O. Hood, Forfar- 
shire. 

Students of the Second Year:— On the Necessity of Revelation.— 1. Andrew Paton, 
Fife. 2. G. P. Hunter, M.A., Kirkcudbrightshire. 

The following Subjects are prescribed for Prize Essays, to be written during the vacation, 

and given in on or before 2(ith November : — 
For Students of the First Year in Session 1860-61 :— On the Character of Jesus Christ 

as an Evidence of Christianity. 
For Students of the Second Year :— On the Personality of the Holy Spirit. 
For Students of the Third and Fourth Years :— On the Nature of Faith. 

THOS. J. CRAWFORD, Pro/dwor. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

X.-PRACTICE OF MEDICINE CLASS. 
Senior Division, 
1. Kenneth M'Leod, A.M., North Uist, Inverness-shire. 2. George Granville Ban- 
tock, Sutherlandshire. 

Junior Division. 
1. Alexander Davidson, A.M., Edinburgh. 2. James Anderson, Perthshire. 3. 
Donald Maclver, Stornoway. 

T. LAYCOCK, Professor. 

XL— MIDWIFERY CLASS. 

Gold Medal,— 1. Kenneth MLeod, M.A., North Uist, Inverness-shire. Silver 
Medals,— 2. Ramsay H. Tarquair, Perthshire. 3. John Callender Gooding, 
M.R.C.S., Barbadoes. 4. George Granville Bantock, Sutherlandshire. 5. Thomas 
S. Gray, Perthshire. 

Certificates of Merit— 6. William Stephenson, M.R.C.S.E., Edinburgh. 7- Archibald 
Hamilton, Edinburgh. 8. John Berryman, New Brunswick. 9. James Hardie, 
East Lothian, lu. William Nelson Duggan, East Indies. 

J. Y. SIMPSON, Professor. 



56 



CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 



XII.-SURGERY CLASS. 

1. Kenneth M'Leod. M.A., North Uist, Inverness-shire. 2. William Jobson, Dundee. 
3. James T. M'Conchic, Newton-Stewart. 4. William Nelson Duggan, East 
Indies. 5. . C. James W. Black, Banffshire. 

JAS. MILLER, Professor. 

Xin.-ANATOMY CLASS. 
Junior Division. 
For Written Exercises,—!. James Rutherford, Falkirk, Gold Medal. 2. Ansus Mac- 
donald, M.A., Kins's College, Aberdeen, Silver Medal. 3. James C. Russell, 
Edinburgh, Silver AIedal. 

JOHN GOODSIR, Professor. 

XIV.-CHEMISTRY CLASS. 

Hope Prfze for Original Investiyation, awarded to S. Dana Haves (Boston, U.S ), for 
a Memoir "On a New Lead Salt correspondins; to Cobalt Yellow," published in 
Quarterly Journal of Chemical Society, vol. xiii. p. 335. 

First Class Honour.'^, — Medals taken by those who have obtained at least 75 per 
cent, of the available marks during the Session :— J. H. G. Hill ; R. G. Anderson, 
A. Macdonald— Equal. J. Thomson; J. R. Pryse, I. Braithwaite, Alexander 
Kydd— Equal. T. J. Denton, T. Evans, John" Wylie— Equal. John Barron; 
James Brims, Thomas Dalton, W. Sinclair— Equal. R. B.Thomson ; J. S.Crich- 
ton ; Charles Russell ; J. C. Russell ; E. A. Briysis ; Alexander Munro ; J. L. 
Arnott: John Morrison, C. Millingen— Equal. William M'Neil, David Thomas 
— Equal. James Duncan, J. H. Davidson— Equal. J. R. Lloyd. 

Second Class Hoxoirs.— Certikicatks taken bv those who have obtained at least 
id per cent, of the attainable marks during the Session,— A. D. \V. Barss ; J. R. 
Oliver; A. H. F. Cameron; J. Caldcrwood ; G. E. Holland; R. Davy, F. Dale, 
J. W. Taylor— Equal. G. B. .Mowat ; J. R. Whitelaw ; H. Pictet, J." Russell, J. 
R. Thomson— Equal. W. Gregory, W. Walford — Equal. J. Maule ; R. Skim- 
ming; J. Cutler, D. Wright— Equal. G. H. Bullock. 

LYON PLAYFAIR, Professor. 

J. H. BALFOUR, Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. 



FACULTY OF LAW. 

XV.-LAW OF SCOTLAND. 



Straton Prize for best Essay,— John Blair Balfour, Clackmannan. 

PuizK for the best written Answers,— Jolin Blair Balfour, Clackmannan. 

The following Students (arranged ali>liabetically) were also highly distinguished:— 
James Anderson, ISrechin ; William Anderson, Forfar: Duncan Antonio, Crieff ; 
William Arctiibald, Alloa ; James Armstrong, Annan; AViliiam Burns, East 
Linton; Williani Crabl>, Kirriemuir; David Crammond, Dundee; William M. 
Drummoiid, Crieff; Holiert Falconer, Stonehaven; Thomas (Gibson, Falkirk; 
Thomas II llcndrv, (ilasgow ; tiarden Milne Hossack, Banff: John Innes, Edin- 
hur({li; John MFarlane. Dundee: William .Mackie, Stonehaven; James David 
Murdoch, Flain ; Andrew Orr, Paisley; James Charles Stevenson, Jedburgh; 
William Wilkic, Kirriemuir. 

J. S. MORE, Professor. 

XVI. -CIVIL LAW CLASS. 
I. ExAMiNATinN.s.- 1. William Mackintosh, Inverness-shire, (Straton Prize). 

2. David Brand, Glrts;;iMv. 3. Alexander Asher, Banffshire. 4. James Moir, 

rtTtliHliirc. .'). James Barclav, Pertlishirc, William F. Hunter, Argyleshire, and 

Jurnc)! .Spalding, Forfarshire— Equal, 
IL Fhhavh,— 1. David Brand (Special Prize). 2. Alexander Asher. 3 William 

Mncklntoih. 4 William F. Hunter. 5. James Barclay. 6. Peter M'Casland, 

Olaagow. 



CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 57 

III. Vacation Essay prescribed to the Students of last year,— Robert Beatson, 

Craigmillar, near Edinburgh, and Robert Straclian— Equal (Forensic Prize). 

[The Forensic Prize, open for Competition among the Students of this year, will be 

given for the best Essay on " Tiie Roman Laic of Contracts." The Essays must be 

given in to Mr. Small, at the University Library, on or before the 1st of November.] 

A. CAMPBELL SWINTON, Professor. 

XVII.— CONVEYANCING CLASS. 

1. First or Straton Prize to Students of the first year,— John Blair Balfour, 

Clackmannan, and David Crichton, Cummock — Equal. 

2. Second Prize to Students of tlie first year, — Andrew Orr, Paisley. 

3. First or Straton Prize to Students of the second year,— John Neilson, Renfrew- 

shire, and William Cleghorn Murray, Edinburgh— Equal. 

4. Second Prize to Students of the second year, — Lewis A. Inkson, Inverness. 

The following other Gentlemen eminently distinguished themselves in the Examina- 
tions:— James S Wilson. Portsoy; John Stevenson, Edinburgh; Robert Falconer, 
Stonehaven; William Pollok, Bothwell ; Andrew Jameson, Edinburgh ; J chn 
Middleton, Aberdeen; Neil M. Campbell, Dundee; Garden M. Hossack, Banff; 
W^illiam Mackie, Stonehaven; David Chapel, Arbroath; John Monteitti, Glas- 
gow; James Manson M'Cosh, Dairy; Henry Gordon, Perth ; W. C. Hunter, Aber- 
deen: John G. Hamilton, Kilmarnock; Charles Ritchie, Edinburgh ; James 
Brunton, Edinburgh; Henry Garnliam, Brechin; A. D. Campbell, Argyleshire ; 
and W. M'Gavin Greig, Dundee ; also William M'Ciure, W^igtownshire. 

ALEXANDER M. BELL, Professor. 
A. CAMPBELL SWINTON, Bean of the Faculty of Law. 

CLASS OF MEDICAL PSYCHOLOGY AND MENTAL DISEASES. 

1, Certificate of Merit, — James Crichton Browne. 2. and 3. William C. M'Intosh, 
James Peddie Steele— Equal. 4. James Middleton. 
Prize Essay,— William C. M'Intosh. 

T. LAYCOCK, Professor. 

CLASS OF MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE. 
Gold Medal, — James Pettigrew, Calder Bank, Lanarkshire. 

THOMAS STEWART TRAILL, Professor. 

PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 
First Prize to John Nicholson. 
A Prize to R. M. Meiklejohn, Frederick Gahne— Equal. 

LYON PLAYFAIR, Professor. 



List of Honours awarded for Summer Session 1861. 

BOTANICAL CLASS. 
I. — For Herbarium collected vrithin twenty miles of Edinburgh. 

1. Robert B. Thomson, Nairn {Gold Medal). 

This Herbarium contained about 530 species and varieties, collected 
between 6th April and 18th July 1861. 

2. Johann Meyne, Germany {Silver Medal). 

This Herbarium contained about 480 species and varieties, collected 
between 18th July 1860 and 18th July 1861. 

3. George Ann Panton, Edinburgh. 

This Herbarium contained about 250 species and varieties. 



oS CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 

Cirtificdtes of Merit. 

4. Robert Scott Lauder, London. 

This Herbarium contained about 270 species and varieties. 

5. George R. W. Hay, Roxburghshire. 

This Herbarium contained about 200 species and varieties. 

IL — Prize given 6y Messrs. P. Lawson & Son /or Dissections of twelve 

named rarieties of Cultivated Barleif. 

1. "William M. Banks, Edinburgh. 

III. — Prize in Junior Dirision for a Series of Specimens illustrating the 
Cuufonnation and Development of Hoots, Rhizomes, Conns, and 
JJulbs. 

1. Joseph Brampton Wright, Northamptonshire. 

2. James C. Russel, Edinburgh. 

IV. — For Monthly Competitive Examinations, conducted hy Written 
Exercises in the Class-room, without the aid of Books or Notes. 

Senior Division, 

(Number of Competitors, 15 ; available marks, 300.) 
Each of the following Competitors obtained more than 75 per cent, of 
the available marks, and received a prize and certificate in the First CLiss 
of Honours : — 

1. William Pringle Dickson, Bengal (79*6 per cent.) 

2. .Tames Rhind, Cheshire (77*6 per cent.) 

3. John T. Eddison, Yorkshire (V6 per cent.) 

The following Competitor obtained more than 50 per cent, of the 
available marks, and received a Certificate in the Second Class of 
Honours : — 

4. James Rutherford, Falkirk (55 per cent.) 

Junior Division. 

(Number of Competitors, G5 ; available marks, 300.) 
Each of the following Competitors obtained more thon 75 per cent, of 
the available marks, and received a Prize and Certificate in the First 
Class of Honours : — 

1. .Tolin Thomson, Nairn (92 per cent.) 

2. lioLert 15. Thomson, Nairn (88 per cent.) 

3. Thomas L. Harrison, Shetland (87 per cent.) 

Each of the following Competitors obtained 50 per cent, or more of 
the available marks, and received a Certificate in the Second Class of 
Honours : — 

4. William Jobson, Forfarshire (73*6 per cent.) 
f}. An<ln'w .Tames Dimcan, India (726 per cent.) 
G. John Woodburn, Bengal (72 per cent.) 



CLASS PKIZE LISTS. 59 

7. Wa ller Beid. Fifeshire ("7 per cent.) 

8. William Thomson, ILdliibUigli (?0 |JGr cent.) 

9. Henry Barnes, Cumberland (69'3 per cent.) 

10. Matthew Charteris, Diimfriessliire (66 per cent.) 

11. James C. Eussel, Edinburgh (63 '3 per cent.) 

12. William Brown, Junior, Peeblesshire (61*6 per cent.) 

13. Johann Meyne, Germany (566 per cent.) 

14. Motto, " Withering " (56 per cent.) 

15. Alexander D. N. Munro, Edinburgh (54 per cent.) 

16. Thomas J. Denton, Yorkshire (51*6 per cent.) 

17. Alexander A. H. Knight, Berwickshire (51 "3 per cent.) 

18. George Wilson, Morayshire (50 per cent.) 

V. — For a Series of Twenty-four 3Iicroscopical Preparations illustrating 
the Minute Structure of various parts of Plants, prepared hy Pupils 
of the Histological Class. 

(Number of Competitors, 15). 
Prize with First Class Certifcate. 

1. William Thomson, Edinburgh. 

2. William M. Banks, Edinburgh. 

First Class Certificate. 

3. Thomas L. Harrison, Shetland. 

4. John Hugh Mackenzie, Cawnpore. 

5. William Sinclair, Stirling. 

Second Class Certificate. 

6. AVilliam James Dickson, Fifeshire. 

7. Eobert Wright, Edinburgh. 

8. David Wright, Ayr. 

9. AVilliam Dyson Wood, Yorkshire. 

VI. ^—For Assistance in conducting the Duties of the Class, more especially 
in the Histological part of the Course, and in Museum work, 
{Alphabetically arranged.) 
John Craw, Eoxhurghshire. 
Thomas J. Denton, Yorkshire. 
William James Dickson, Forfarshire. 
Eoderick M'Leod, Skye. 
William Eamsay M'Nah, Edinburgh. 
William Sinclair, Stirling. 

VII. — For a Voluntary Essay, " Stir les Ajfinites des Plantes et des 

Animaux.^^ 
Certificate of Merit. 
Henri Pictet, Geneva. 

J. H. BALFOUR, Professor, 
and Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. 

For particulars in regard to all Prizes for Summer Session 1862, 
see Notice at the Botanic Garden. 



60 



PART IV. 

GRADUATION IX ARTS, MEDICINE, LAW, AND THEOLOGY. 

I.-DEG REE IN ARTS. 

Ekgulations for the Degree in Arts are contained in the 
following Ordinances of the Universities Commissioners: — 

I. 

At Edinburgh, the Twenty- Sixth day of January^ Eighteen 
Hundred and Sixty-one Fears. 

Whereas, by an Act passed in the Twenty-first and Twenty- 
second Years of Her Majesty's Reign, Chapter Eighty-three, 
intituled, " An Act to make Provision for the better Government 
and Discipline of the Universities of Scotland, and improving and 
regulating the Course of Study therein ; and for the Union of the 
Two Universities and Colleges of Aherdeen^^ the Commissioners 
under the said Act are empowered, inter alia, to make Rules for 
the Management and Ordering of the several Universities of 
Scotland, the Manner and Conditions in and under which Students 
shall ])e admitted thereto, the Course of Study and Manner of 
Teaching therein, the Manner of Examination, with the Qualifica- 
tions, Appointment and Number of Examiners, and the Amount 
and Manner of their Remuneration, the granting of Degrees, 
whether in Arts, Divinity, Law, or Medicine, and to provide that, 
in so far as shall be practicable, and, in the Opinion of the Com- 
missioners, conducive to the Wellbeing of the Universities, and 
to the Advancement of Learning, the Course of Study, the Manner 
of Examination, and the Conditions under which Degrees are to 
be conferred, shall be uniform in all the Universities of Scotland; 
and whereas the Commissioners of Her Majesty's Treasury are 
empowered by the same Act to pay out of such jMoneys as may be 
provided by Parliament for the Purpose, such Sums of Money as 
the Commissioners under the Act shall recommend to be paid for, 
among other Purposes, that of providing Remuneration to the 
Examiners appointed in pursuance thereof: the Commissioners 
under the said Act statute and ordain, with reference to the 
granting of Degrees in Arts in each of the said Universities, as 
follows : — 



KEGULATIONS FOR DEGREE IN ARTS. 6l 

I. The Course of Study necessary for the Degree of Master of 
Arts shall extend over Four Winter Sessions, and shall include 
Attendance for not less than Two Sessions on the Classes of 
Humanity, Greek, and Mathematics respectively ; and Attendance 
for not less than One Session on the Classes of Logic, Moral 
Philosophy, and Natural Philosophy respectively ; and also 
Attendance on a Course of English Literature, for which each 
University shall make due Provision : Provided always, that any 
Student, who, at the Time of his Entrance to the University, shall 
satisfy the Professors in the Faculty of Arts, on Examination, that 
he is qualified to attend the higher Classes of Latin, Greek, and 
Mathematics, or any of them, shall be admitted to such higher 
Class or Classes, as the case may be, without having previously 
attended the First or Junior Class or Classes in the same Depart- 
ment or Departments : Provided also, that, where a Student has 
been admitted to the higher Classes both of Latin and Greek, 
without having previously attended the First or Junior Latin and 
Greek Classes, his Course of Study for the Degree of Master of 
Arts may be completed within Three Winter Sessions, instead of 
Four. 

II. In pursuing the Course of Study for the Degree of Master 
of Arts, no Student shall be permitted to pass from the Junior to 
a higher Class in any Department, unless the Professor shall be 
satisfied of his Fitness to enter the higher Class. 

III. Examinations for the Degree of Master of Arts shall take 
Place, in each University annually, at such convenient Time, 
after the Close of the Winter Session, as the Senatus Academicus 
shall from Time to Time appoint ; with power to each University 
to appoint Examinations to take Place at such other Time or 
Times as may be convenient. 

IV. Candidates for the Degree of Master of Arts shall be 
examined on the Subjects of Instruction embraced in the Course 
of Study above prescribed ; and the Examinations may be con- 
ducted partly in Writing and partly viva voce. 

V. Any Student, who has completed his Attendance on the 
Latin and Greek Classes required in the prescribed Course of 
Study, may be examined on these Subjects at any Examination 
for Degrees, although he has not completed his Attendance on the 
other Classes of the prescribed Course ; and, in like manner, any 
Student, who has completed the Attendance required in the pre^ 



62 REGULATIONS FOR DEGREE IN ARTS. 

scrihed Course of Study on the Classes of Logic and Moral Philo- 
sophy and Course of English Literature, may be examined ou 
these Subjects at any Examination for Degrees, although he has 
not completed his Attendance on the other Classes of the prescribed 
Course ; and also, in like manner, any Student, who has completed 
the Attendance required in the prescribed Course of Study on the 
Classes of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, may be examined 
on these Subjects at any Examination for Degrees, although he 
has not completed his Attendance on the other Classes of the 
prescribed Course ; and, if such Student shall satisfy the Exa- 
miners, \Yhen so examined in Latin and Greek, or in Logic, Moral 
Philosophy, and English Literature, or in Mathematics and 
Natural Philosophy, he shall receive from them a Certificate to 
that Effect, and he shall not be again examined on the same 
Subjects, as a Condition of his taking the Degree of Master of 
Arts. 

VI. Students, who have passed satisfactorily an Examination 
or Elxaminations on the several Subjects embraced in the pre- 
scribed Course of Study, shall be entitled forthwith to receive the 
Degree of Master of Arts without Honours ; but they may, before 
taking a Degree, offer themselves for a farther Examination with 
a View to Graduation with Honours : Provided always, that no 
Person shall be admitted to Examination for Honours, after he 
has ceased to be a Matriculated Student in Attendance on a Class 
or Classes in the University, for more than One Winter Session ; 
but it shall be in the Power of the Senatus Academicus in parti- 
cular cases, on the Ground of ill Health or other sufficient Cause, 
to dispense, so far as may be necessary, with this Regulation. 

VI I. There shall be Four Departments, in any one or more of 
which Candidates for Graduation with Honours may offer them- 
selves for Examination, viz : — (1.) Classical Literature ; (2.) 
Mental Philosophy, including Logic, Metaphysics, and Moral 
Philosophy ; (3.) Mathematics, including pure Mathematics and 
Natural Philosophy ; and (4.) Natural Science, including Geology, 
Zdology, and Chemistry. 

VIII. In each of the first three of the above mentioned Depart- 
ments, viz., in Classical Literature, in jNIcntal Philosophy, and in 
Matijcmatics, there sliall be Two Grades of Honour, each represent- 
ing, as nearly as may bo. a uniform Standard of Qualification, to 
bo Jcuomiuatcd respectively the First Class and the Second Class ; 



KEGULATIONS FOR DEGREE IN ARTS. 63 

but in the Department of Natural Science there shall be One 
Class of Honours only ; and the Examiners shall determine, with 
reference to each Candidate for Honours, whether he is entitled 
to any honourable Distinction, and, if so, whether, in regard to 
each of the first Three Departments, he has attained the Standard 
of the First, or only of the Second Class ; and the Names of the 
Candidates entitled to Honours in each Class, in the several 
Departments, shall be arranged in alphabetical Order. 

IX. The Examiners for Graduation without Honours in each 
University shall be the Professors whose Classes are embraced in 
the prescribed Course of Study, and, in addition, Three Persons, 
not being Professors or Assistant Professors in any Scottish 
University, to be appointed by the University Court, and in the 
Appointment of whom regard shall be had to their Eminence in 
Classical Literature, Mental Philosophy, and Mathematical 
Science. 

X. Of the Three Examiners first appointed by the University 
Court in each University, One shall be appointed for the Term of 
Two Years, another for the Term of Three Years, and the Third 
for the Term of Four Years ; and thereafter, every additional 
Examiner shall be appointed for a Term of Three Years : Pro- 
vided that the Appointment of any Examiner, during the Cur- 
rency of his Term of Oflfice, to a Professorship or Assistant 
Professorship in any Scottish University, shall be held to vacate 
his Office of Examiner : Provided also, that, in the Event of a 
Vacancy in the Office of an Examiner occurring otherwise than 
by Expiration of his Term of Office, the Examiner to be appointed 
by the University Court in his Room, shall be appointed for the 
Remainder of such Term only. 

XI. No Person, who has been appointed to the Office of Exa- 
miner for the Period of Three Years or Four Years, shall be 
eligible for Re-appointment to the Office of Examiner in the same 
University, until he has ceased to hold the Office of Examiner in 
such University for not less than One Year, 

XII. The Examiners for Graduation with Honours shall be the 
same Professors and additional Examiners, as for Graduation 
without Honours ; and, in the Examination of Candidates for 
Honours in the Department of Natural Science, there shall be 
added the Professors of Natural History and of Chemistry ; and the 
University Court may, if they think fit, appoint an additional 



G4 REGULATIONS FOR DEGREE IN ARTS. 

Examiner, skilled in Natural Science, not being a Professor or 
Assistant Professor in any Scottish University. 

XIII. No Person shall be appointed an Examiner, who is not a 
Member of the General Council of one or other of the Scottish 
Universities. 

XIY. With the Exception of the additional Examiner in Natural 
Science, each of the Examiners to be appointed by the University 
Court, shall, for each full Period of a Year in which he shall act 
as Examiner, receive, in the Case of the Universities of Glasgow, 
Aberdeen, and Edinburgh, a Sum of Eighty Pounds, and in the 
Case of the University of St. Andrews, a Sum of Fifty Pounds, to 
be annually voted by Parliament ; and, where an additional 
Examiner in Natural Science is appointed, he shall receive, from 
the General Funds of the University, such Remuneration as the 
Senatus Academicus, with the Approval of the University Court, 
shall appoint. 

XV. The first Article of Ordinance, No. 12, Aberdeen, No. 4, of 
the Second Day of July Eighteen hundred and Sixty, shall be, 
and the same is hereby, repealed ; and the Course of Study to be 
required hereafter in the University of Aberdeen, as necessary for 
Admission to the Degree of jMaster of Arts, shall be the Course of 
Study hereinbefore prescribed ; and all existing Regulations in 
any of the said Universities inconsistent in any respect with the 
Provisions of this Ordinance shall be, and the same are hereby, 
repealed. 

XVI. The Degree of Master of Arts shall in no case be conferred, 
except on Persons who have complied with the Conditions herein- 
before set forth, and shall in no Case be conferred honoris causa 
tantnm ; and the Degree of Bachelor of Arts shall not hereafter 
be conferred. 

XVII. The Provisions of this Ordinance shall come into Opera- 
tion, in each University, at the Commencement of the Winter 
Session next after the Approval thereof by Her Majesty in Council. 

XVIII. Every Student, who, at the Time when this Ordinance 
shall come into Operation, shall have completed a Part of his 
Course, with a View to Graduation in Arts in any of the said 
Universities, under Regulations in Force at the Time in such 
University, and shall thereafter complete his Course of Study in 
Conformity with such Regulations, may become s Candidate for 
the Degree of Master of Arts, without complying with the Pro- 



REGULATIONS FOR DEGREE IN ARTS. 65 

visions of this Ordinance regarding the Course of Study for that 
Degree, provided he pass the Examination or Exapainations 
required by this Ordinance. 

In Witness whereof, these Presents a,re pealed :yrith the 
Se^,! of the Commission. 

John Inglis, Chairman. 




II. 

At Edinburgh, the Tenth Day of June, Eighteen 
Hundred and Sixty-one Years. 

Whereas, by an Act passed in the Twenty-first and Twenty- 
second Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty, Chapter Eighty- 
three, intituled " An Act to make Provision for the better 
Government and Discipline of the Universities of Scotland, and 
improving and regulating the Course of Study therein ; and for 
the Union of the Two Universities and Colleges of Aberdeen," the 
Commissioners under the said Act are empowered, inter alia, 
i to make Rules for the granting of Degrees in Arts in the several 
Universities of Scotland ; and whereas, on the Twenty-sixth Day 
of January in the present Year, the Commissioners issued aji 
Ordinance for the Regulation of such Degrees, which has since re- 
ceived the Approval of Her Majesty in Council ; and whereas 
Doubts have been expressed as to the Effect of the First Clause of 
the said Ordinance ; and whereas it is expedient that the said 
Ordinance should be explained and amended as hereinafter pro- 
vided ; the Commissioners declare and ordain, with reference to 
the granting of Degrees in Arts in the said Universities, as 
follows : — 

I. No Student who, under the Provisions of the First Section of 
the said recited Ordinance, shall be admitted to the higher Class 
of Latin, Greek, or Mathematics, without having previously at- 
tended the First or Junior Class in the same Department, shall be 
required to give Attendance in such Department for more than 
One Session, as a necessary Part of the Course of Study for the 
Degree of Master of Arts. 

II. It shall be in the Power of any Student, who has given 
Attendance during One or more Sessions on the Course of Study 
in any Scottish University, to complete his Course of Study by giv- 

E 



G6 REGULATIONS FOK DEGREE IN ARTS. 

ino- Attendance during the remaining Sessions of the Course in 
another Scottish University, and to proceed to a Degree in the 
latter University in the same way in all respects, as if the previ- 
ous part of his Course of Study had been therein : Provided 
always, that every such Student shall be bound to produce to the 
satisfaction of the Senatus Academicus of the latter University 
Testimonials of his Attendance at the former University, and shall 
be examined in all the Departments necessary for the Degree of 
Master of Arts by the Examiners of the University in which he 
completes his Course, and in which alone he shall be allowed to 
o-raduate : Provided also, that no Student shall be admitted to a 
Decree in any University, unless he has given Attendance in such 
University during the last Two Sessions of his Course, 

III. The Department of Honours in ^N'atural Science shall in- 
clude Botany, in addition to Geology, Zoology, and Chemistry, as 
provided in the said Ordinance ; and the Professor of Botany, in 
each University where such a professorship exists, shall be one of 
the Examiners of Candidates for Honours in the said Department. 

IV. It shall be in the Power of the University Court of each 
University, if it shall think fit, by Regulation to that effect, to 
require that all Candidates for Graduation shall, in addition to the 
Attendance specified in the said recited Ordinance, give Attend- 
ance on the Lectures of one of the Professors, whose Branches of 
Study are included in the Department of Honours in Natural 
Science ; and the University Court may, in such Regulation, 
either specify the particular Branch on which Attendance 
shall be required, or leave it to the option of each Candidate 
to select the particular Branch of Natural Science on which 
he shall give Attendance. It shall also be in the power of 
the University Court, if it shall think fit, to require that all Candi- 
dates for Graduation shall be examined in the Branch on which 
Attendance may be so required or given, and to direct that, where 
the particular Branch is prescribed by the University Court, the 
Professor of such Branch, or where an option is given, the Pro- 
fessors of the said several Branches, shall be an Examiner or Exa- 
miners for Graduation without Honours. 

In Witness whereof, these Presents are sealed with the 
Seal of the Commission. 

JouN Inqlis, Chairman. 




GRADUATES IN ARTS, 1861. 



67 



GRADUATES IN ARTS IN 1861. 



On the 22(1 day of April, tlie 
Degree of Master of Arts on — 

William Affleck, B.A. 

D. Dous^las Bannerman, B.A. 

James Bonar. 

Francis Deas, B.A. 
5 William Eadie. 

George Elder. 

John W. Gibson, B.A. 

George Grim, B.A. 

Thomas P. Henderson. 
10 Cumberland Hill, B.A. 

James Jeffrey, B.A. 

William A. P. Johnman, B.A. 

Alex. 0. Johnston. 

William L. Ker. 

And the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 

James Blyth. 

Alan Cadell. 

William R. Campbell. 

William Cowan. 
5 John T. Crawford. 

Alex. M. Dalrymple. 

Robert Finlayson. 

Thomas Finlayson. 

Charles Eraser. 
10 James Gibson. 

James Gordon. 

James Haswell. 

Robert Heron. 

William Iverach. 
15 William C. E. Jamieson. 

Charles Jerdan. 

Thomas F. Johnstone. 



Senatus Academicus conferred the 

15 George D. Low. 

John M'Beath. 

Adam Macintyre, B.A. 

David K. Miller, B.A. 

James W. Morrison. 
20 Thomas M. Mi;re, B.A. 

William Nicolson, B.A. 

John Paton. 

Robert Rankin, B.A. 

George Robertson, B.A. 
25 John Ross. 

John Rutherfurd, B.A. 

John Steele. 

James F. Thomson. 

on — 



James Kilgour. 

Gilbert Laurie. 
20 William P. Mackay. 

George Marjoribanks. 

Alexander Millingen. 

James M. Mitchell. 

William M. Nicolson. 
25 James Oliver. 

Charles E. Paterson. 

R. W. C. Patrick. 

John Pringle. 

Edward Rolland. 
30 William John Shiress. 

James Simpson. 

James M. Stott. 

George W. Thomson. 

John Wilson. 



The Examination in Classics, preparatory to a Degree, was passed by 
the following Gentlemen : — 
Alex. Anderson. 



Herbert Bell. 
Robert Brockley. 
Donald Cameron. 
William G. Core. 
Francis W. R. Cowley. 
Thomas Gray. 



Thomas J. Kelly. 
Wm. K. M'Adam. 
10 William Morison. 
Thomas Scott. 
Alexander Steele. 
D. M'Kenzie Wallace. 
Robert W. Weir. 



68 GRxiDUATES IN ARTS, 1861— ORDER OF MERIT. 



The names of the Graduates, as given above, are placed iu 
alphabetical order. In the subjoined Lists, the names are arranged 
in the Order of Merit in the several departments, as ascertained 
by the Seven Days' Examination in April. In some Departments, 
in -which the names of several Gentlemen do not appear, those 
Gentlemen have passed the Examinations at the end of ^ previous 
Session. 

The gentlemen who names are above the line in those several 
departments, have passed the Examination with Honours. 



First Day. — Latin. 



Cadell. 

Core. 

Gray. 

Cameron, 

Campbell, 

Crawf(ird, 

Iverach, [ EquaL 

Kelly, 

Macadam, | 

Eollaud, ) 

Brockley, 

Dalrymple, 

Gordon, 

Haswell, 

Henderson, 

Millingen, 

"NV. Morrison 

A. Steele, 

"Wilson, 

Weir, 



)■ Equal. 



■^ 



Anderson, 

Bell, 

Bonar, 

Cowan, 

E. Finlayson, 

Eraser, 

Jamieson, 

Kilgour, 

Low, 

Marjoribanks, 

]\Iackay, 

M'Beath, 

Boss, 

Sbiress, 

Stott, 

Simpson, 

J. F. Thomson, 

G. W. Thomson, 

"Wallace, 

Cowley, ^, 

T. Finlayson, 

Jerdan 

Laurie, 

Scott, 

Mitchell. 

Paterson. 



j>Equal. 



1>-Equal. 



'^Equal 



Gray, 

W. Mon-i8on 



Second Day. — Greek. 



I Equal. 



Core, 

Cameron 

M'Beatli 



:} 



Equal. 



Anderson, "^ 

Cadell, 1 

Millingen, [-Equal. 

Low, i 

G. W. Thomson, j 



GRADUATES IN ARTS, 1861— ORDER OF MERIT. 



69 



Second Dai/.— Greek, continued. 


Brockley, ^, 


Cowley, 


Mackay, | 


E. Finlayson, 


Eolland, J^Equal. 


Henderson, 


Cowan, 1 


Marjoribanks, 


Iverach, J 


Paterson, 


Mitchell. 


Eoss, 


Campbell. 


Stott, 


Gordon, 




Weir, 


Bell, 




Bonar, '\ 
Dalrymple, (^^^ 


Jerdan, 




Kilgour, 




Haswell, i 
Wilson, ) 


Laurie, 


>Equal. 


Scott, 




Jamieson. 


Simpson, 




A. Steele. 


J. F. Thomson, 

Wallace, J 




Eraser. 




Crawford. 


T. Finlayson. 


Kelly. 




Macadam. 




Shiress. 


Third Day. — Mathematics. 


Eadie. 


E. Finlayson. 


M'Beath. 


Marjoribanksi 


Eoss. 


T. Finlayson. 


Low. 


Patrick. 


Laurie. 


A. Steele. 


Blyth. 


Dalrymple. 


Mackay. 


Eraser. 




Jerdan. 


Crawford. 


Cadell. 


J. _F. Thomson. 


T.F. Johnstone 


Pringle. 


Oliver. 


Kerr. 


AVilson. 


Millingen. ; 


Jamieson. 


Iverach. 


A. 0. Johnston. 


Paterson. 


Kilgour. 


Cowan. 


Gordon. 


J. W. Morrison. 


Campbell. 


Gibson. 


Simpson. 


Eolland. 


G._W. Thomson 


W. M. Nicolson. 


Shiress. 


Heron. 
Mitchell. 


Bonar, ) -p, , 
Stott, j-^^'^*^- 


Elder. 


Henderson. 


Haswell. 




Paton. 



'^Equal. 



70 GRADUATES IN ARTS, 1861 — ORDER OF MERIT. 



Fourth Day.— Logic asd Metaphysics. 



Laurie. 

Ross. 

R. Finlayson. 

Cadell. 



Patrick, ) t?„„„i 

G.W.Thomson, l^^^^^" 

Dalrvtnple, "^ 

^}:j^^-tb, (.Equal. 

J. F. Thomson, J 

W. M. Nicolson. 

Campbell. 

Iverach, ~| 

A. 0. Johnston, >-Equal. 

Low, ) 

Kilgour. 

Stott. 

T. Finlayson. 

Simpson. 

Jerdan. 

Haswell. 

Gibson. 

Henderson. 



Mitchell. 

EoUand. 

Shiress. 

T. F. Johnstone 

Cowan. 

Paterson. 

Mackay. 

Wilson. 

Blyth 

Bon 

Eadie, [► Equal 

Pringl 

Crawford 

Fraser. 

J. W. Morrison 

A. Steele. 

Gordon, "^ 

Jamieson, ( 

Ker, 

Marjoribanks, J 

Elder. 

Oliver. 

Heron. 

Paton. 



lytn. 

onar, ") 

adie, >l 

ringle, ) 



Equal 



M'Beath. 



E. Finlayson, 

Laurie, 

W. M. Nicolson 

Eadie. 

Cadell. 

Pringle. 

G. W. Thomson. 

Dalrymplo. 

A. O. Johnston. 

T. V. Johnstone. 

J. F. Thomson. 

J. Steele. 

Iverach. 

Milliiipen. 

Patrick. 

T. Finlayson. 

Ross. 

Campbell. 

Simpson. 

Stott, 

Plyth. 

Mitchell. 



> Equal. 



Fifth Bay. — Moral Philosophy. 

Mackay. 

Low. 

Eolland. 

Henderson. 

Oliver. 

Jerdan. 

Ker. 

Gordon. 

Gib.son. 

Haswell. 

Heron. 

Bonar. 

Elder. 

Cowan. 

Crawford. 

Kilgour. 

Shiress. 

Wilson. 

Paterson. 

Jamieson. 

Marjoribanks. 

J. W. Morrison. 

Fraser. 

Paton. 



ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1861. 



71 



Sixth Day. — Natural Philosophy. 



Eoss. 


Grim. 


M'Beath. 


A. 0. Johnston. 


Jolinman. 


Mure, 




Gibson. 


Hill. 


Ker. 


Eadie. 


Elder. 


Bannerman. 


Eobertson. 


Miller. 


Bonar. 


Low. 


Paton. 


J. F. Thomson. 


J. W. Morrison. 


Jeffrey. 


Affleck. 


Eankine. 


Henderson. 


W. Mcolson. 


Macintyre. 


Deas. 


J. Steele. 


Eutherfurd. 




Seventh Z>a^.— Ehetori 


c AND Belles Lettres. 


Deas. 


J. W. Mom son. 


Bannerman. 


Mure, ") 


Low. 
Affleck. 


Eankin, f -pi ■, 
Hill, p*!"^^' 


Eoss. 


Eutherfurd, J 




Ker, -) 


J. Steele. 


Gibson, >• Equal 


W. Nicolson, ^ 


J. F. Thomson, ) 


A. 0. Johnston, vEqual. 


Paton. 


M'Beath, ) 


Eadie, ^ 


Henderson. 


Macintyre, vEqual. 


Miller. 


Bonar, } 


Johnman. 


Grim. 


Jeffrey. 


Eobertson. 


Elder. 





EXAMIMTION PAPERS FOR DEGREES m ARTS. 

GIVEN IN APEIL 1861. 



I. — LATIN. — For the Minimum. 

r. 

" Who are to be attacked first (says he), after what manner, and at 
what time, hear, if you please, in a few words." And as they all desired 
this, he proceeds : — " The night will be fittest for this purpose ; for so we 



72 ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1861. 

shall strike a groat terror into the enemy ; nor will any of tlieir allies dare 
to succour them in the dark." 

The Latin ■words being given as follows, it is required to w'rite them in 
the right form, and in the same order. 

" Quis sum invade primus (inquam) qnis modus et quis tempus, si tu 
placeo, audio paucus." Qui quum omnis cupio, pergo : " Nox sum aptus 
hie res, nam ita incutio magnus terror hostis ; nee quisquam socius audeo 
succurro ille in tenebrae." 

Translate into English the following passages : — 

II. 

Postremo ad id ventum inopiae est, ut lora detractasque scutis pelles, 
ubi fervida moUissent aqua, mandere conarentur, nee muribus aliove 
animali abstinercnt, et onine herbarum radicumque genus aggeribus in- 
fimis niuri enierent ; et, quum hostes obarassent quidquid herbidi terreni 
extra murura erat, raporum semen injecerunt, ut Hannibal, £one vsqice, 
dum ea nascantur, ad Casilinum sessurus sum ? exclamaret : et, qui 
nullam antea pactionem auribus admiserat, tum demum agi secum est 
passus de redemptione liberorum capitum. Septuuces auri in singulos 
pretium convenit. — Liv. Lib. xxiii. 

III. 

Soleo saepe mirari nonnullorum insolentiara philosophorum, qui naturae 
cognitionem admirantur, cjusque inventori et principi gratias exsultantes 
agunt, eumque venerantur ut Deum : liberates enim se per eum dicunt 
gravissimis dorainis, errorc sempiterno, et diurno ac nocturno metu. 
Quo errore ? quo metu ? Quae est anus tam delira quae timeat ista quae 
vos, videlicet, si physica non didicissetis, timeretis, — " Acherusia templa 
alta Orci — pallida Leti, nubila tenebris loca!" Non pudet philosophum 
in eo gloriari, quod haee non timeat et quod falsa esse cognoverit? 

Praeclarum autem nescio quid adepti sunt, quod didicerunt, se, quum 
tempus mortis venisset, totos esse perituros. Quod ut ita sit (nihil enim 
pugiio), quid habet ista res aut laetabile aut gloriosum ? Nee tamen 
raihi sane quidquam occurrit, cur non Pythagorae sit et Platonis vera 
sententia. L't enim rationera Plato nullam aflferret (vide, quid homiiii 
tribuam), ipsa auctoritate me frangeret. Tot autem rationes attulit, ut 
velle cereris, sibi certe persuasisse videatur. — Cic. Tusc. Qucest. lAh. i. 

Mention briefly the subjects of the first and second Tusculan Questions. 

IV. 

Non his .inventus orta parcntibus 
Infecit aequor sanguine Punico, 
PyiThuniqne, et ingontom cecidit 
Aiitioi'hum, Annibalemque dirum : 
Scd rustieorum mascula militum 
ProloH, Sabcllis docta ligonibus 
Versare glebas, et severae 
Matris ad arbitriuln recisos 



ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 186 f. "fS 

Portare fustes, sol ubi montium 
Mntaret umbras et juga demeret 
Bobus fatigatis, amicum 

Tempus agens abeunte curru. 

Hor. bd. Lib. iii. 6. 

Describe the Stanza and Metres of the above, marHng the quantities. 
Scire velis, niea cur ingratus opuscula lector 
Laudet ametque domi, premat extra limen iniquus? 
Non ego ventosae plebis suffragia venbr 
Impensis coenarum, et tritae munere vestis. 
Non ego, noLilium scriptorum auditor et ultor, 
nvammaticas ambire tribus, et pulpita dignor. 
Hinc illae lacrymae. — Hor. Epist. Lib. i. 19. 
V. 

Tlie history of Polemo to be written in Latin, after it has been read in 
English to the candidates. 

I. — Latin. — For the Maximum. 
I. 

Numquid igitur aliud in judicium venit, nisi, iiter utri insidias fecerit ? 
profecto, nihil : si hie illi, ut ne sit impune ; si ille huic, turn nos scelere 
solvanjur. Quonam igitur pacto probari potest, insidias Miloni fecisse 
Clodium? Satis est quidem, in ilia tarn audaci, tarn nefaria bellua, 
docere, magnam ei causam, magnam spem, in Milonis morte propositani, 
magnas utilitates fuisse. Itaque illud Cassianum, " Cui bono fuerit,^^ 
in his personis valeat ; etsi boni nullo emolumento impelluntur in fraudem, 
improbi saepe parvo. Atqui, Milone interfecto, Clodius hoc assequebatur, 
non modo ut praetor esset, non eo consule, quo sceleris nihil facere posset ; 
sed etiam, ut his consulibus praetor esset, quibus, si non adjuvantibus, at 
conniventibus certe, speraret, se posse rempublicam eludere in illis suis 
cogitatis furoribus : cujus illi conatus (ut ipse ratiocinabatur) nee, si 
possent, reprimere cuperent, cum tantum beueficium ei se debere arbitrar- 
entur; et, si vellent, fortasse vix possent frangere hominis sceleratissimi 
corroboratam jam vetustate audaciam. — Cicero pro Milone, Cap. xii. 

II. 

Stemmata quid faciunt ? Quid prodest, Poiitice, loflgo 

Sanguine censeri, pictosque ostendere vultus 

Majorum, et stantes in curribus Aemilianos, 

Et Curios jam dimidios, humeroque minorem 

Cortinum, et Galbam auriculis nasoque carentem ? 

Quis fructus generis tabula jactare capaci 

Corvinum, posthac multa deducere virga 

Fumosos Equitum cum Dictatore Magistros, 

Si coram Lepidis male vivitur ? effigiesque 

Tot bellatorura, si luditur alea pernox 

Ante Numantinos ? si doraiire incipis ortu 

Luciferii quo signa duces et castra movebant ? — Juv. Sat. viii. 



74 ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1861. 

III. 

Ductiim inde agmen ad ultimos Bructerornm : quantumque Amisiani 
et Luppiam amnes inter vastatura, baud procul Teutoburgiensi saltu, in 
quo reliquiae Vari legionumque insepultae dicebantur. 

Cnpido Caesarcm invadit, solvcndi suprenia mibtibus ducique ; per- 
moto ad niiserationem omni qui aderat exercitu, ob propinquos, aniicos, 
deniqiie ob casus bellorum et sortem hominum. Praemisso Caecina, ut 
occulta saltuum scrutaretur, pontesque et aggeres bumido paludum et 
fallacibus canipis iniponeret, incedunt moestos locos, visuque ac raemoria 
deformes. Prima Vari* castra, lato ambitu et dimensis principiis, trium 
legionuni nianus ostentabant : deiii semiruto vallo, bumili fossa, accisae 
jam relinquiae consedisse intelligcbantur : medio campi albentia ossa, ut 
ftigeraut, ut restiterant, disjecta vel aggerata : adjacebant fragmina 
telorum equorumque artus, simul truncis arborum antefixa ora : lucis pro- 
pinquis barbarae arae, apud quas tribunos ac primorum ordinum cen- 
turioncs mactaverant : et cladis ejus superstites, pugnam aut vincula 
elapsi, referebant *bic cecidisse legates ; illic raptas aquilas ; primum ubi 
vuliius Varo adactum ; ubi infelici dextra et suo ictu mortem invenerit; 
quo tribunali concionatus Armiiiius,f quot patibula captivis, quae scrobes ; 
utque signis et aquilis per superbiam illuserit.' 

Igitur l\omanus qui aderat exercitus, sextum post cladis annum, trium 
legionum ossa, nullo noscente alienas reliquias an suorum humo tegeret, 
omnes ut conjunctos, ut consanguineos, aucta in bostem ira, maesti simul 
et infcnsi condebant. Primr.m exstruendo tumulo cespitem Caesar posuit, 
gratissimo munere in defunctos, et praesentibus doloris socius. — Tacit. 
Annul., Lib. i. 

IT. GREEK.— For the Minimum. 

1. Wbat were the most notable events in the life of Cimon ? 

2. "Wbat was the general character of the Athenians, and what was 
there peculiar about the character of Cimon ? 

3. Give a philological analysis of the following words : — 

1. ^iSioXov. 5. eyxeLpiSiOP. 9. dv\€?os. 

2. &i0(jjv. 6. KOTvXt]. 10. aefxvbs. 

3. arjKo^. 7. dxa-fris. 11. Xdyos. 

4. xPVP^(^'''^t(^- 8. iSiuT-qi. 

4. Give a geographical account of the following names : — 

(1.) Strymon. (3.) Dodona. (5.) Acharnae. 

(2.) CerauK'icuH. (4.) Pisa. ((5.) Triopium. 

f). Who were Cratinus, Gorgias, Simonidos, Diodonis Siculus, Callinus, 
('lemcn.s Ah-xandrinus, Plotinus ; when did they flourish ; and for what 
were they notable V 

(J. Kxplain till' allusion in Luoian, 6 Aolkcov i/j.a(XTiyu}TO. 

7. ( iivo an account of the following mythological personages : — Hecate, 
the Jlnrpics, and the sons of Inpetits. 

8. Show tho faults of structure in the following Iambic verse : — 

Tls Tu!v Kparepwv vvv prfrbpuiv cr^Sei. (poivrjv : 
• Wlio was Varus ? f Who was Ai-minius ? 



ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1861. 75 

9. Translate :— 

AetTrerai 5' t}ij.iv enreiv irepL twv Tvpprjvcov. Ovtol yap to fiev iraXaiov 
avdpeca SieveyKavres, x^P^^ ttoWtju KareKT-tjaavro, kul iroXeis a^ioXoyovs 
Kat TToXXas eKTicrav. OfMOioJS §e Kac vavriKais dvpa/meaLv lax^cavTes, Kac 
iroWovs XjOoi'ouy ^okaTTOKpaT-qaavres, to [xev irapa t7]v iTaXtav ireXayos 
a(f> eavT(j)v eiroi-qaav TvpprjviKov irposayopevdrjvaf Ta de /cara ras Tre^LKas 
dvvafxeis eKirovyjaavTes, ttjv te aaKirLyya e^evpov, evxp'r]<yTOTaTT}v /xev eis 
Tovs ToXefMovs, air' eKeiPWv 5' ovo/xacrOeLcrav TvppTjvrjv, to, re wepc tovs 
Tjyov/xevovs aTpuTrjyovs a^ioj/j-a KUTeaKevacrav, Trepidevres Tois Tjyov/Jievois 
pa^dovxovs, Kai dtcppov eXe<f>avTLvov. 

II. GEEEK.— For the Maximum. 

1. "WTien did Sophocles live? "WTiat is his character as a dramatist 
compared with ^schylus and Euripides? How many of his plays are 
extant ? Give a short argument of each. 

2. Translate the following passage, give the rhythmical structure, and 
mark the accents of the first ten lines : — 

aKTLS aeXiov, to KaX- 

XicTTOv eTTTairvXo: (pavev 

Qr](3a TWV vpoTepcov (paos, 

e(pav0r]s wot, ca xpv(T€as 

a/j-epas ^Xecpapov, 

AipKatwv virep peedpojv [xoXovaa 

TGV XevKaaTTLv Apyodev 

(pUTa ^avTa iravaayia, 

(pvyada irpodpo/xov o^VTepw 

Kivrjcraaa X'^'-^'-v^, 

ov ecf) (xp-eTepa 7a IIoXvv€lkt]S 

apOeis veiKeojv e^ a/xcpiXoywv 

.... o^ea KXa^wp 

aceTos es yav virepeTTa, 

XevKTjs xiofos TTTepvyL aTeyavos 

TToXXuv jxed^ oirXwv 

^vv 6^ iTnroKOfjiois KopvOecrcri. 

3. Turn into Greek : — 

I certainly agree with you in admiring the heautiful forms of these 
lucid stones, the fine fragrance and hue of these various flowers, — for if 
Nature he, as some one truly said, the living poem of God, who would 
dare to deny that such a poem is supremely worthy of heing read ? But, 
though I love nature much, I love man more, and in the works of the 
greatest poets and philosophers, I cannot but recognise something more 
lovely, grand, and godlike, than the richest growth of the forest, and the 
most luxuriant bloom of the garden. The wisest mortals are mere lisping 
children when compared with Supreme Wisdom ; but stones, and trees, 
and flowers, cannot even lisp; and there is something infinitely above 
mute nature in articulate intelligence, though it be but the lisping intelli- 
gence of a child. 



7G ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1861. 

III. MATHEMATICS.— For the Minimum. 

1 . If one side of a triangle is produced, the exterior angle is equal to 
the sum of the iiitovior opposite angles. 

What step in your demonstration would be fallacious were the lines not 
subject to the definition of rectilinearity ? 

2. The square described on the longest side of a right-angled triangle, 
is equal to the sum of the squares described on the other two sides. 

Give two demonstrations of this proposition. 

3. If a straight line be bisected, and a point be taken in the line or the 
line produced, the scjuares of the distances of this last point from the two 
extremities of the line are together double of the square of its distance 
from the middle point of the line, and of the square of half the line 
bisected. (II. 9 and 10). 

4. To find the centre of a given circle. Let the construction be so 
stated as not to appear to assume Prop. 2. 

5. The angle at the centre of a circle is double the angle at the circum- 
ference. 

Prove this ; and state without demonstration some of the consequences 
which directly flow from it. 

6. Define proportionals ; and show that Prop. 1, B. YL is a direct ap- 
plication of the definition. 

7. If two triangles have one angle of the one equal to one angle of the 
other, and the sides about the equal angles proportionals, the triangles 
shall be equiangular, and shall have those angles equal which are oppo- 
site to homologous sides in each. 

8. If two circles cut one another, and from any point in the circumfer- 
ence of the one, straight lines be drawn through the points of intersection 
to meet the other, the angle contained by the segment which they inter- 
cej)t is always the same, whatever point be taken and in whichever 
circle. 

9. If the first of four magnitudes of the same kind have to the second 
a greater ratio than the third has to the fourth, the first shall have to the 
third a greater ratio than the second has to the fourth. 

10. J'rove that 11 sin. (A — 13) = sin. A cos. B — cos. A sin. B. 

11. Find the numerical values of sin. 30°, sin. 45°, and sin. 15°, when 
the radius is 1. 

12. Ifa = 4, 6=2, c = 3, (Z= 1, find the value of the following ex- 
pressions : — 

;. " I '' _L <^ 



I. V a -\- 2b + ^a — 2& + V a^ -j- h^ -^ c — 2bd- 
13. liciluce to their simplest forms : — 

a l-{2_(7-*~lj} +2 — {3 + (4_.r:^}- 

-^— + 



o»— 1 a-« — 1' 

^ 3x 1 1_ 

X* — f Z^ + y'.! y—x'^y + Z 



ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1861. 77 



14. Solve the following simple equations :— 

XX 

7, V^ + 8 __ /s/a:+48 

c. X — 2/=3,a;2 — ^2 — 45^ 

15. Solve the following quadratic equations : — 

{x-^\f , x~l ^ 

&. x + y = ?,0,xy = 2U. 

16. A labourer was hired on the condition that for every day he worked 
he should receive 2s., and for every day he was idle he should pay Is. 4d. 
At the end of 360 days it was found that he had paid for his idleness just 
what he had received for his work. How many days did he work ? 

17. A boy at a fair spends his money in oranges. If he had got five 
more for his money, they would have averaged a halfpenny each less ; and 
if three less, a hallpenny each more. How much did he spend ? 

18. Sum the arithmetical progression, — 

9 -f 8^ + to 50 terms ; 
and the geometrical progression, — 
V 2 + V i + to infinity. 

19. Prove the rule for finding the greatest common measure of two 
numbers. 

Find that of 

a^ — Ix — 6, and x^ — Ax^ -f- 4a; — 3. 

20. Prove that every section of a right cone on a circular base has the 
property that the square of the ordinate varies as the rectangle by the 
abicissas. 

How is the focus of the conic section connected with the coue ? 

III. MATHEMATICS.-FoR Honours. 

1. Solve, by Descartes' method, the equation, — 

X* + Af — 6:c2 — 25a: + 26 = 0. 

2. Solve, by the aid of trigonometry, the equation, — 

a;3 — 6x + 4 = 0. 

3. Prove the Binominal Theorem. 

Find the sum of the squares of the coefficients. 

4. Prove the expression for finding the number of shot in a triangular 
pyramid. 

^ Find the number in an incomplete pile of ten courses, the number in a 
side of the base being 14. 

5. Expand cos. ^ + V — 1 sin. 6 in terms of 6. 

6. Find the greatest parabola which can be inscribed in a given 
isosceles triangle. 



78 ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 18G1. 



— ax 



7. Determine tlie e volute of tlie cycloid. 

8. ^''^^J(r^'^^Ja 4- b C0S2 .c' ^""V e cos. bx dx. 

9. Integrate the equation, -^ + 4 ■^4j/ = 2;. 

lY. LOGIC AXD METAPHYSICS. 
Ordinary Examination. 

1. Explain concisely the mutual relations of Logic and Psychology. 

2. Enumerate the chief questions regarding Attention which have been 
discussed among psychologists. Give the various answers to each ques- 
tion. Give your own answers, with reasons. 

3. Explain the hypothesis of unconscious mental modifications. State 
and criticise the evidence offered in its support. Mention any applica- 
tions of the hypothesis to account for mental phenomena. "WTiat other 
explanations of the same phenomena have been suggested, and by whom? 

4. Enunciate the forms of Proposition according to (a) the Old and (6) 
the New or Hamiltonian Analytic. Explain in detail the relation of the 
logical theory of Propositional Forms to the principle of the Concept. 

5. Distinguish the Major and Minor Propositions in a Syllogism. 
Mention various names given to the different Syllogistic Terms and Pro- 
j)ositions. What is the place of the Major and Minor Terms in the 
conclusion of (a) an extensive, and (6) a comprehensive Syllogism ? 
]\Iention possible variations of Syllogistic Form. 

G. Express in Syllogisms the reasonings for and against the Thesis 
that consciousness is continued in Sleep. Test their formal and material 
validity. 

7. Express the following reasoning in Logical form, and test its formal 
and material validity : — 

The end of punishment is either the protection of society or the refor- 
mation of the individual. Capital punishment ought therefore to be 
abolished. It does not in fact prevent crimes of violence, and so fails 
to protect society, while on the other alternative it is absurd. 

8. What are the different meanings of the word Experience ? Mention 
any controversies occasioned by a neglect to mark them. 

y. Distinguish and exemplify Logical, Mathematical, Metaphysical, 
Physical, and Moral Necessity. 

10. Distinguish Demonstration, Deduction, Induction. Give three 
difTerent meanings of Induction. Mention some recently controverted 
questions regarding Inductive Method. 

IV. LOGIC AND METAPHYSICS.— For Honours. 

I. 
Give a brief account of the matter treated of in the Theaetetus, and 
unfold the order of the discussion. State and explain the doctrine of 



ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1861. 79 

Protagoras discussed in this dialogue, and its relevancy in tlie discussion. 
Exhibit syllogistically the objectious to the theory of Protagoras, with the 
answers to the same. AVhat is the conclusion regarding it, and on what 
grounds ? Compare the theory of Protagoras with analogous and opposite 
theories in ancient and modern philosophy, 

II. 

Explain philosophically the terms alad-qcns, ^apraa-ia, S6^a, Xoyos, and 
iirt.(XTrj/jLT]. 

III. 

Explain the relative position of the following passage in the Theaetetus, 
and then translate and comment on it : — 

'E7C!; yap ad iddKow oLKOijecv tlvGjv, otl to, /xev rrpQra olovirepel aroLX^la, 
i^ wv TjfjieTs re avyKeijxeda Kol raXka, \6yov ovk ^x°'- 0.VT0 yap Kad' avrb 
eKaarov ouop-dcrai p,6vov elrj, irpoaeiireLv S^ ov8ev dXXo dwarop, ov6^ ojs ^ctIv, 
oiid^ cbs OVK ^aTLv. TJdT] yap ^j- ovaiav r) /jltj ovcriav avTip irpoffTideadai, delv 
be ovSep 7rpocr<p€p€cv, elirep avrb eKeivo p.6vov rls ipe?. iirel ovSe to airb, 
ovhk rb eKeivo, ovSe rb eKacrrop, ovde rb /xopop, ov8^ rb tovto TrpocroLaTeov, 
ovb^ dWa TToXXa Toiavra, ravra pevydp irepLTpexopra irdai. irpoarpepeadai, 
€T€pa oPTa eKe'iPWP oh irpoaTideTac. deTp 8e [e'lirep -^p Svparbp) avrb Xeyea- 
dac Kal elxep oIk€iop avrov \6yop, dpev twp dWwp dirdvrwp Xeyeadac vvv 
be dSvparop elvat otcovp tQp irpuiTUv prjOijpaL Xoyc^}' ov yap eXvai avrt^ dXX' 
7} opofid^e^yOat julopop. 'opojxa yap /j-opop ^xeti'. rd de eK tovtcjp i]8r} (TvyKeifxeva, 
&cnrep avrd TreirXeKTai, outoj Kal rd opo/xara avrQp avp^ivXaKePTa, Xbyov 
yeyopepai. oPO/xaTcop yap avp.TrXoKT]P, elpac Xoyov ovaiap. ovtco di] rd fxh 
(TTOixeia, dXoya Kal aypwaTa elz/at, alad-qra be rds be (TvXXa(3ds, ypojards 
T€ Kal prjTas, Kal dXyjde? bo^rj bo^aards. Urap fxep odv dpev Xbyov ttjv 
dXrjdT] dXr]6T] bo^ap rtpos Xd^rj rls, dXrjdeveip fxep avrov ttjp ^vxw T^^pl 
avrb, ycPilxTKeiP 5' ov. rbp yap jar] bvpdfxepop bovpai re Kal be^aadaL Xbyov, 
dpeirLaTrjpLOPa elpac irepl tovtov irpoaXa^oPTa be Xbyov, bvparop re ravra 
Trdvra yeyopepai, Kal reXeius wpbs iinaTrip.rjp ^xeiv, 

IV. 

Describe the original design of the Instauratio Magna, and the place 
filled by the De Augmentis in that design. What is the history and 
date of publication of the De Augmentis ? Give an outline of the division 
of human knowledge contained in that treatise, and compare it with any 
other classifications known to you. What is the leading subject in each 
book. ^ 

V. 

Give Bacon's view of the Province and Parts ot, Logic, and of the 
nature of Metaphysics. Compare with the opinions of Kant, Stewart, 
Whately, and Mill. Describe the "ars judicandi" of Bacon — its ends, 
means, divisions, and subdivisions. 

VI. 

Enumerate and classify the chief psychological writers and treatises of 



80 ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1861. 

the 17th centurv. Give a brief account of the contents of the Becherche 
of :^Iak-branche; and a list of the more important psychological doctrines 
discussed in it. 

YII. 

State and criticise Locke's explanation of our Ideas of Space, Time, 
and Infinity. 

V. MORAL PHILOSOPHY.— For the Minimum. 

1. Can the title of a professed Eevelation to reception as divine, be 
absolutely independent of a Natural Morality ? • i j 

2. HoW far, or in what respects, is a Natural Morality recognised and 
proceeded on by the Christian Eevelation? 

3 How does Volition differ, if at all, from Desire ? . 

-. 4. How do both differ from Feeling, in immediate nature, as also m 

oriirin or source? , -r^ . j a xr i.- o xr^^r 

5. Wbat is the difference between tlie Desires and Affections? How 

are the latter usually distributed ? . i • j- + 

6 How do lleid and others account for the seemingly immediate 

approvableness of some of the Benevolent Afieptions? Eemark on the 

satisfactoriness, or the contrary, of that explanation. . , 

7. In the Affections in question, can any elements ot a truly rational 

or moral character be detected ? , ^ ,^ , -r. • , , ,i x 

8 Distinguish between Self-regard and Selfishness. Point out the true 
grounds of the discredit attaching to the latter ; and name its opposite. 

9 Distinguish between Active habits and Passive. What general law 
does each kind seem to follow? Show its ethical importance. Can the 
law, in either case, be in any measure explained ? _ 

10. How was the relation between virtue and happiness represented by 
Plato and by Aristotle respectively ? -,-.1 • , oi ft v 

11 Specify the chief contributions made to Ethics by Shattesbury. 
By whom was his idea of the moral fliculty most firmly apprehended and 
developed ?— and in what form ? . , • , vi 

12. Give Jonathan Edwards' theory of the nature of true virtue ; with 

any remarks. /. 1 nr 1 tt- u 

13. What is Bi.shop Butler's view as to the nature of the Moral t acuity, 
or the constituents ot Moral Approbation? t . n x i 

14. What arc the chief difficulties that attach to the Intellectual 
theoriop of I\Ioral Approbation ? ^ ^ , . ^ r ^i 

15. What exception does Mackintosh take to Butler s statement ot the 
o?>/Vc< of moral approval, and why? ,.,,^ 1., i- -^ 

■ 11; State the two questions in Ethical theory which Mackintosh insists 
on keeping always apart. Prove and illustrate their distinctness. Give 
iuKUmcf-H of the mo<le in which they have been confounded. _ 

17. How docs his own theory answer each of those questions? 

18. How does he apply his views of the relation between Conscience 
and the Will to the controversy on Liberty and Necessity ? and with 
what succosH ? 



ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1861. 81 

V. MORAL PHILOSOPHY.— For Honours. 

Aristotle, Eth. Nicom. V., VI., VIII., IX., X. 

1. Give a short account of the leading events of Aristotle's life, with 
the dates. State generally what was the history and fate of his writings. 

2. What was the tradition as to the import of the titles Nicomachean 
and Eudemian? What do the expressions 'H^ixd 'NiKo/uidxeia, 'H^t/coi 
'Evdrjfjiei.a, themselves naturally suggest? What is most probable, as to 
the connexion of persons of those names with the respective treatises ? 

3. What Books of the Nicom. Eth. are doubted by some to be genuine ? 
Give some idea of the grounds, internal and external, for this doubt. 

4. Translate the folio-wing : — 

Tpta 5' i(TTli> iv rrj \pvxv to. Kvpia trpd'^eus Kal aX-qdeias, a'ia6r]<ns, vovs, 
ope^LS. To6tu}v 5' ij ai(T0T](ns ovde/xias apxh irpd^ews' drjXov 8e tc3 to. S-Tjpta 
aiffdrjaLV p.ev exeiv, Trpd^eojs di /mi] Kotvojvelv ean S' oivep ev dcavoia Kard- 
(paais Kal dirbcpauLS, tovt ev ope^et S/w^is Kal ^vyrj' uxtt' eTreidr] i] tjOlkt] 
dperrj e'|ts TrpoaipeTiKT], ij Se Trpoaipecns ope^LS ^ovXevTLKi^' Set did ravra top 
re Xoyov dXrjd?] eluai, Kal r7]v ope^ip Ojid-qv, e'Lirep i] Trpoalpeais airovSaia Kal 
TO. aiird tov fxev (pdvai, rr]v Be dLdoKeiV avrrj fxkv odv i) didpoca Kal i] dXrjdeLa 
TrpaKTLKi). T-^s 5e '^ewprjTLKTjS Siavoias, Kal fii] irpaKTiKrjs, fJ-V^^ iroLrjTCKTjs, 
TO ev Kal KaKQs TdXrjdes iaTL Kal xpevSos' tovto ydp iaTt iravTos hi.avo'qTLKOv 
epyop' TOV de irpaKTiKCv Kal diavorjTCKOv i] dXrjdeLa d/J.oX6yu}s exovaa Ty 
ope^ei T-^ 6p6rj. Upd^eojs /xiv odv dpxv Tvpoalpeais, bdev 97 Kbrjais, dX\' 
ovx ov eveKa' irpoaLpeaeojs Be, ope^ts Kal Xoyos 6 eveKd tlpos' Blo ovt^ dpev 
pov Kal Scavoias, ovt^ dvev rjdiKTJs iaTCP e^ews i} wpoaipecns' evirpa^la ydp 
Kal TO epaPTLOv ep irpd^et dpev Siapoias Kal ijdous oiiK iaTi. 

5. The author had just divided the Eeason into two parts, one to 
iinaTTjKOPiKbp, the other, to Xoyt.aTLK6p : What is distinctively the object- 
matter, and end of each ? 

6. What is the exact meaning of irpd^Ls in the above extract? And 
what, briefly, does the passage establish ? 

7. What are the five intellectual habits, and the kinds or relations of 
truth with which they severally deal ? 

8. Discriminate ao(pla in its highest meaning, from the same in its 
lowest applications ; and distinguish crvpeais from both. 

9. Mention the subject of Books viii. and ix. ; show how it belongs to 
Ethics ; and what might naturally give to it peculiar importance in the 
eyes of a Greek. 

10. ^Tiat sort of ^tXai^ria does Aristotle represent as reprehensible, 
and why ? What, again, as laudable, and on what grounds ? How is it 
shown that the good alone are capable of friendship ? 

Translate : — 

TeXetot 5^ Tijp epepyeiap tj rjSovTj' ov top avTov Be Tpbirop ijre 7]Bop'r] 
TeXeioX Kal to aladrjTov re Kal ij a'CadrjaLs, (nrovBala 'opra' Cbairep ovSe i] 
{ryieia Kal 6 laTpos o/jlolojs ahid iaTi tov vyiaipeip. Kad' eKdaT-qp 5' a'laOrj- 
civ OTL ylpcTaL ij ijBoPTj, BtjXop' <pap.ev ydp opdfxaTa Kal aKompLaTa elvai 
ilSea' dijXop Be Kal oti /xdXi.(jTa, eireLBdv tjtc atadrjais y KpaTlcTT}, Kal irpbs 

r 



i 



82 ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1861. 

ToiovTOV ivepy-^' tolovtwu oi &vtu}v, rod re alaOiirov kol tou aiadavoix^vov 
det (ffrai. rjdoi'rj, VTrdpxofTds ye tou TrocrjcrovTos Kai tou Treccrofievou. TeAetoc 
S^ T-i]i> ivipyeiav ij i]5ovri, oux ws V e'^'S ivvTrdpxovcra, d\X' ths eTriyiyvo/xepov 
TL T(\os, oloi> Tols a.K/j.aiois i] Copa' ews 5' oil dp Trore to aladrjTov i) potjtov 
77 olov 5(1, Kal t6 Kplvov r) '^ewpovv, ^aTai ev Ty evepyeia ij ijdoi'r]' 6/xoicov 
yap 6tnr(i}i', Kai irpos dWffKa Tbv avTOv Tpbirov kx^^Twv tou re Tradt^TLKOu 
Kal Tov TTOL-QTLKOv, t6 avTb Tr^(pvK€ yiueaOai. 

11. Enunciate generally the Aristotelian theory of pleasure and pain. 
State in what respects it differs from the Platonic ; — the latter being set 
forth chiefly in which of the Dialogues ? 

12. Explain Aristotle's notion oi euepyeia ; its relation on the one hand 
to fcreX^xf"^ i ori ^^^^ other, and especially, to dufa/j-Ls ; and any peculiarity 
of the latter, in its application distinctively to capacities mental? 

13. If pleasure iniply a prior capacity or susceptibility correspondent, 
why should not pleasure itself be regarded as an evepyeia? 

14. In which of the significations of a'lTia, would laTpbs and vyieia be 
respectively alTiai. tov vyLaipeiu? Enumerate and explain the several 
significations of a'/rta 

15. Explain fully the import of the expression oi'x cjs i] e^is evvirdp- 
Xovaa. 

16. How would the answer of Plato to the question at the close of the 
extract have probably diftercd from that of Aristotle ? 

17 As the result of the wdiole, what is the relation brought out by 
Aristotle between pleasure and happiness? 

18. (Jive his definition of the latter, and explain briefly the import 
and relations of its several constituent parts. 



VI. NATURAL PHILOSOPHY.— Mechanics. 

1. What is the physical assumption made in the common proof of the 
Parallelogram of Forces ? Can the proposition be proved without its aid? 

2. Forces, represented in direction and magnitude by the bisectors of 
the sides of a triangle, act at one point. Investigate the magnitude of 
their resultant. 

3. Define the Centre of Gravity of a body, — and find the condition that 
a body of any i'orm placed on a horizontal plane may not fall over. 

4. Enunciate the princi|)lc of Virtual Velocities for two forces in equili- 
brio, their points of api)lication being connected by any combination of 
hiuiple uiachincH. 

Prove its truth in the case of the bent Lever. 

5. If pn-HHuro iiui)ait motion to a given mass, what do we ascertain 
from the nion»(!ntum, and what from the vis-viva produced? 

Driine the "Work done" by a force. What is the ordinary unit of 
Work? What additional element is involved in the unit called a 
" HorHc-powcr?" 

(■». J )eline tlic mass of a body, and explain how we should experimentally 
proTC that the weights of all bodies are proportional to their masses. 



ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1861. 83 

Astronomy, Heat, and Electeicity. 
{Questions on two of these Subjects must he answered.) 

1. How is it proved that tlie Moon rotates about an axis, and wliat is 
(rougbly) the period of rotation ? 

2. What are the principal physical phenomena which the Moon pro- 
duces in and on the Earth ? 

3. Trace the steps by which we may advance from the measurement of 
a base-line of a few miles in length, to the approximate determination of 
the distance of a fixed star, — specifying the nature of the observation most 
suitable for the particular object of each step. 

4. Distinguish between Heat and Temperature. What is the probable 
Centigrade temperature of a body deprived of heat? 

5. What is meant by Latent Heat ? Explain how the latent heat of 
steam may be roughly estimated. 

6. What is the principle made use of in measuring heights by the 
thermometer? 

7. Explain the method of employing the gold-leaf electroscope to dis- 
tinguish the kind of electricity with which a body is charged. 

8. What is the nature of the Earth's action on a compass needle? 
What ou either pole ? Explain the temporary magnetization of a bar of 
soft iron held in the line of dip. 

9. Give a rule for the direction of the force exerted by a straight con- . 
ducting wire on the N. pole of a magnet. If a magnetic pole be moved 
near a closed conducting wire a current is in general produced, how may 
its direction be determined without trial ? 

VI. NATUEAL PHILOSOPHY.— Honour Examination. 

Mechanics. 

1. Find the centre of gravity of an uniform wire in the form of a 
quadrant. 

2. If the ends of a chain (not necessarily uniform) be attached to two 
points, — prove that the horizontal tension is the same throughout, and 
compare the whole tensions at the extremities, when the weights of the 
portions of the chain on each side of the lowest point are equal. 

3. What is meant by Centrifugal Force ? How does it depend on the 
radius of the orbit and the velocity ? Employ the expression to investigate 
the form of the surface of a mass of fluid revolving uniformly about an 
axis. 

4. If a particle describe equal areas in equal times in one plane about 
a point, it is acted on by a force tending to that point. 

5. What is the moment of inertia of a hollow spherical shell of given 
external and internal diameters ? 

Compare the times occupied by such a shell in rolling, and sliding, 
down a given inclined plane. 

6. Prove the convertibility of the Centers of Suspension and Oscillation. 



84 ARTS EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1861. 

Astronomy and Optics. 

1. In what state did Newton leave the solution of the following ques- 
tions : — 

(a) The motion of the Moon's node. 
(/3) Precession. 
(7) Tides. 

To whom are the greatest subsequent advances due ? 

2. Explain generally the production of a great Inequality when the 
mean motions of two planets are nearly commensurable. Give instances 
in the Solar System. Who first gave the true explanation ? 

3. Explain the refraction of light, and deduce the law of the sines, in 
the language of the Corpuscular and also of the Undulatory Theory. 

4. Explain (assuming the truth of the Undulatory Theory) generally 
the colours of thin plates and of finely grooved surfaces. 

5. What is the cause of the dark lines in the Solar Spectrum? How 
can we produce such lines in the spectrum formed by light, from a source 
which is free from them ? 

6. What is the nature, and what the cause, of the phenomena known 
as Conical Kefraction ? 



VII. EHETORIC AND BELLES LETTRES. 

1. P^numerate as fully as you can, the leading requisites of Style. 

2. Describe the nature of the "loci communes," of the formal Rhetori- 
cians, and state the purposes which they were intended to serve in 
Oratory. 

3. What are the Rhetorical Tropes most commonly employed in general 
composition, and what is their effect and value ? 

4. What are the two leading kinds of Introduction for spoken discourses, 
and under what circumstances is each most appropriate? 

5. What cause can be assigned for the varieties of dialect in the common 
speech of the people in difl'erent districts of Britain ? 

0. Who were the most distinguished authors during the reigns of 
Elizabeth and Jamcjs, and what were the literary characteristics of each ? 

7. Change the following lines into correct and elegant prose, making 
HUcli alterations of diction and arrangement as are necessary : — 

A Spanish poet may, witli good event, 
In one day's space whole ages represent; 
There oft the hero of a wandering stage 
Bei^ins a child, and ends the play of age. 
But we, that arc by reason's rules confined, 
Will that with art the poem be designed, 
"^I'liat unity of action, time and place, 
Keep the stage full, and all our labours grace. 

8. Give a succinct account of the formation of the English language. 



ARTS EXAMINATION FOR 1862. 85 

MASTER OF AETS EXAMINATIOK 

Intimation fok 1862. 

I. The Course of Study necessary for the Degree of Master of 
Arts shall extend over Four Winter Sessions, and shall include 
attendance for not less than two sessions on the Classes of Huma- 
nity, Greek, and Mathematics respectively ; and attendance for 
not less than one Session on the Classes of Logic, Moral Philosophy, 
and Natural Philosophy respectively ; and also attendance on a 
Course of English Literature (Rhetoric). *But any student who, 
at the time of his entrance to the University, shall satisfy the 
Professors of the Faculty of Arts, on Examination, that he is 
qualified to attend the Higher Classes of Latin, Greek, or Mathe- 
matics, or any one of them, shall be admitted to such Higher Class 
or Classes, without having previously attended the First or Junior 
Class or Classes in the same department. And when any Student 
has been thus admitted to the Higher Classes both of Latin and 
Greek, without having previously attended the First or Junior 
Latin and Greek Classes, his Course of Study for the Degree of 
Master of Arts may be completed within three Winter Sessions, 
instead of Four. 

II. In pursuing the Course of Study for the Degree of Master 
of Arts, no Student shall be permitted to pass from the Junior to 
a Higher Class in any department, unless the Professor shall be 
satisfied of his fitness to enter the Higher Class. 

III. Candidates for the Degree of Master of Arts shall be ex- 
amined on all the subjects of instruction embraced in the above 
Course of Study, and the Examinations may be conducted partly 
in Writing and partly viva voce. 

IV. Any Student who has completed his attendance on the 
Latin' or Greek Classes required in the prescribed Course of Study, 
may be examined on these Subjects, at any Examination for De- 
grees, although he has not completed his attendance at the other 
Classes of the prescribed Course. In like manner, any Student who 
has completed the attendance required in the prescribed Course of 
Study on the Classes of Logic, Moral Philosophy, and English Lite- 
rature (Rhetoric), may be examined on these Subjects, at any Ex- 
amination for Degrees, though he has not completed his attendance 
on the other Classes of the prescribed Course. Also, in like manner, 
any Student who has completed the attendance required in the pre- 



86 ARTS EXAMINATION FOR 1862. 

scribed Course of Study on the Classes of Mathematics and Natural 
Philosophy, maybe examined on these Subjects at any Examination 
for Degrees, al though he has not completed his attendance on the other 
Classes of the prescribed Course. And if such Student shall satisfy 
the Examiners, when so examined in Latin and Greek, — or in Logic, 
Moral Philosophy, and English Literature, — or in Mathematics 
and Natural Philosophy, he shall receive from them a Certificate 
to that effect, and he shall not be again examined on the same 
Subjects, as a condition of his taking the Degree of Master of Arts. 

V. The Degree of Bachelor of Arts shall not hereafter be con- 
ferred. 

VL Students who have passed, in any order, the Ordinary Ex- 
amination on the several Subjects embraced in the prescribed 
Course of Study, shall, on presenting themselves at the Public 
Ceremonial of Graduation, be entitled to receive the Degree of 
Master of Arts. 

VIL The Ordinary Examinations for 1862 shall take place on 
the four following days : — Monday the 7th of April, Tuesday the 
Sth, "Wednesday the 9th, and Thursday the 10th. The Examina- 
tions shall be conducted in the following order : — 

First Day, Monday, April 7. — Latin, (9 to 12.) Greek, (1 to 4.) 

Second Day, Tuesday, Aprils. — Logic, (9 to 12.) ]\Iathematics, 
(1 to 4.) 

Third Day^ Wednesday, April 9. — Moral Philosophy, (9 to 12.) 
Natural Philosophy, (1 to 4.) 

Fourth Day, Thursday, April 10. — English Literature, (10 to 1.) 

The Subjects of Examination shall be as follows : — 

1. Latin. — Translation of English Narrative into Latin. Liv}-^, 
Books xxi. to xxiv. inclusive. Cicero, De Natura Deorum, Book 
ii. Epistles of Horace, Book i. 

2. Greek. — Plutarch's Life of Solon. Tlomer's Iliad, Books i. 
and xxiv, Medea of Euripides. Lucian's Piscator. History of 
Greek Literature. Laws of Hexameter and Iambic Verse. 

3. Mathematics —The First Six Books of P^uclid. Elementary 
Algebra. The Rudiments of Trigonometry and Conic Sections. 

4. Logic. — Elementary Questions on the General Phenomena of 
Intelligence in Man. Demonstration and Induction. Exercises 
in Formal Propositions and Reasonings, and in Fallacies. 

•5. Moral Philosophy.— Springs of Human Action. The Duties 



AETS EXAMINATION FOR 1862. 87 

and Virtues. Ethical Theories — especially those of Clarke, Butler, 
Hutcheson, Smith, Reid, Brown, and Mackintosh. 

6. Natural Philosophy. — Elementary Mechanics. Elements of 
Astronomy and Experimental Physics. 

7. English Literature. — Style and Practical Composition. The 
Fonnation and Progress of the English Language. 

VIIL The names of Candidates for the Degree of Master of 
Arts, or for the Examinations in any of the three Departments 
specified in Article IV., must be announced to the Dean of the 
Faculty before the 15th of March 1862, and Certificates of attend- 
ance on the requisite Classes, together with Matriculation Tickets, 
must be lodged with him before the 5th of April, 

GRADUATION IN ARTS AVITH HONOURS. 

I. There shall be Four Departments for Craduation in Arts with 
Honours, in any one or more of which Students, who have pre- 
viously passed their Ordinary Examinations on all the Subjects 
embraced in the Course of Study necessary for a Degree in Arts, 
may offer themselves for Examination, before taking the Degree, 
viz.: — Classical Literature; Mental Philosophy, — including Logic, 
Metaphysics, and Moral Philosophy ; Mathematics, — including 
Pure Mathematics and Natural Philosophy ; Natural Science, — 
including Zoology, Geology, Chemistry, and Botany. 

II. In each of the first three of the above mentioned Depart- 
ments, viz., in Classical Literature, in Mental Philosophy, and in 
Mathematics, there shall be two Grades of Honour, each repre- 
senting, as nearly as may be, a uniform standard of qualification, to 
be denominated respectively the First Class and the Second Class; 
and the names of Candidates entitled to Honours, in each Class, 
in the several Departments, shall be arranged in Alphabetical 
Order. In the Department of Natural Science, there shall be only 
one Class for Honours ; and the names of Candidates entitled 
to Honours in that Class shall be arranged in Alphabetical Order. 

III. The Examinations for Honours for 1862 shall be held on 
Monday the lAth of April and following days. The subjects of 
Examination are as follows : — 

A. — Department op Classical Literature. 

Latin. 

1. Third Decade of Livy. 

2. The Annals of Tacitus, Books i., ii., iii. 



88 ARTS EXAMINATION FOR 1862. 

3. Cicero De Natura Deornra. 

4. The Hexameter Works of Horace. 

5. Lucretius, Books i., ii., iii. 

6. Juvenal, Satires, viii., x., xiv. 

7. Latin Prose and Verse Composition. 

8. A passage of some Latin author not prescribed, to be translated 

ad aperdtram. 

Greek. 

1. Homer's Odyssey i.-xii. 

2. Tiiucydidcs. 

3. Euripides — Hippolytus. 

4. Sophocles — Antigone Philoctetes. 

5. Greek Prose Composition. 

6. Questions on the Civil and Literary History of Greece, and on Greek 

Antiquities. 

7. A passage of some Greek writer not prescribed, to be translated 

od aperturam. 



B. — Department of Mental Philosophy. 
Iliglier Logic, and ^letaphysics. 

1. Novum Organum. 

2. History of Logic — Pure and Mixed. 

3. The Metaphysical Systems of the l7th and 18th centuries. 

Moral Philosophij. 

1 . The Philosophy of Plato, with special Study of the Eepublic, Books 

i., ii., iv, vi., vii. 

2. Ethical Theories — Ancient and Modern. 

3. Natural Theology, with recent discussions. 

4. An optional paper in Political Economy ■will be set, which may 

be taken instead of any one of the three preceding subjects for 
Honours in Moral Philosophy. 



C. — Department op Mathematics. 
Pure and Applied Mathematics generally. 



D. — Department op Natural Science. 
Zoology. Geology. Chemistry. Botany. 
IV. All Candidates who propose to offer themselves for the 
Examination in Honours in any year, are required to intimate 
the name to the Dean of the Faculty of Arts, before the 15th of 
March preceding the Examination, specifying the Department 
or Departments for which they offer themselves; and no one, with- 
out the special permission of the Senatus Academicus, shall be 
admitted to an Examination for Honours, after he has ceased, for 



STATUTES RELATIVE TO DEGREES IN MEDICINE, 89 

more than one "Winter Session, to be a Matriculated Student in 
attendance on a Class or Classes in the University. 

By authority of the Faculty of Arts, 

ALEXANDER C. ERASER, 

Prof, of Logic and Metaphysics, and 
Dean of the Faculty of Arts. 



I l.-D EGREES IN MEDICINE. 

STATUTES of the University of Edinburgh, relative 
to GtRAduation in Medicine, enacted February 4, 
1861. 

I. Three Medical Degrees are conferred by the University of 
Edinburgh, viz. — Bachelor of Medicine (M.B.), Master in Surgery 
(CM.), and Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) The Degree of Master in 
Surgery is not conferred on any person who does not also at the 
same time obtain the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine. 

II. The preliminary branches of extra-professional education are 
English, Latin, Arithmetic, the Elements of Mathematics, and 
the Elements of Mechanics ; and the proficiency of Students in 
these branches is ascertained by Examination, as far as possible, 
prior to the commencement of their Medical Study. 

III. No Candidate is admitted to a Professional Examination 
who has not passed a satisfactory Examination on at least two 
of the following subjects (in addition to the subjects mentioned 
above) : — Greek, French, German, Higher Mathematics, Natural 
Philosophy, Logic, IMoral Philosophy ; and the Examination oa 
these latter subjects also takes place, as far as possible, before the 
Candidate has entered on his Medical Curriculum. 

The Examinations uuder Sections II. and III. are conducted by 
Examiners in Arts, together with some of the Medical Examiners. 

lY. A Degree in Arts (not being an Honorary Degree) in any 
one of the Universities of England, Scotland, or Ireland, or in any 
Colonial or Foreign University, specially recognised for this pur- 
pose by the University Court, exempts from all Preliminary Ex- 
amination. 



90 STATUTES RELATIVE TO DEGREES IN MEDICINE. 



y. No one is admitted to the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine 
or Master in Surgery who has not been engaged in Medical and 
Surgical Study for four years — the Medical Session of each year, 
or Annus Medicus, being constituted by at least two courses of 
not less than one hundred Lectures each, or by one such course, 
and two courses of not less than fifty Lectures each ; with the 
exception of the Clinical Courses, in which Lectures are to be 
given at least twice a week during the prescribed periods. 

VL Every Candidate for the Degrees of M.B. and C.i\L must 
give sufficient evidence by certificates — 

1. That he has studied each of the following departments of 
Medical Science, viz. : — 



ANATOMY 

CHEMISTRY, . .... 

MATERIA MEDICA, 

INSTITUTES of MEDICINE or PHYSIOLOGY, 
PRACTICE of MEDICINE, . . . . , 
suite, KRY 



\ 



MIDWIFERY, and the DISEASES peculiar to WOMEN and 
CH ILDREN ; two Courses of Midwifery, of Three Months 
each, being reckoned equivalent to a Six Months' Course, 
provided different departments of Obstetric Medicine be 
taught in each of the Courses, 

GEXEIIAL PATHOLOGY, or, in Schools where there is no 
such Course, a Three Months' Course of Lectures on 
Morliid Anatomy, together with a Supi>lemental Course 
of Practice of Medicine, or Clinical Medicine, 

PRACTICAL ANATOMY 

PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY, 



During Course'; 

including not less 

than One Hundred 

Lectures. 



I'RACTICAL MIDWIFERY, 



CLINICAL MEDICINE. 
CLINICAL SURUEUY, 



MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE, . 

noTANY 

NATURAL HISTORY, including ZOOLOGY. 



Six Months. 
Three Months. 

/Three Months at a 
Midwifery Hospi- 
tal, or a Certificate 
of Attendance on 
six Cases from a 
Registered Medi- 
cal Practitioner. 

During Courses of 
Six Months, or two 
Courses of Three 
Months : Lectures 
being given at least 
twice a week. 

During Courses in- 
cluding not leFE 
than Fifty Lec- 
ture-. 



STATUTES RELATIVE TO DEGREES IN MEDICINE. 91 

2. That lie has attended, for at least two years, the Medical 
and Surgical Practice of a General Hospital which accommodates 
not fewer than eighty Patients, and possesses a distinct staff of 
Physicians and Surgeons. 

3. That he has been engaged, for at least three months, by Ap- 
prenticeship or otherwise, in compounding and dispensing drugs 
at the Laboratory of an Hospital, Dispensary, Member of a Surgical 
College or Faculty, Licentiate of the London or Dublin Society of 
Apothecaries, or a member of the Pharmaceutical Society of Great 
Britain. 

4. That he has attended, for at least six months, by Apprentice- 
ship or otherwise, the out-practice of an Hospital, or the practice 
of a Dispensary, Physician, Surgeon, or Member of the London or 
Dublin Society of Apothecaries. 

VII. The studies of Candidates for the Degrees of Bachelor of 
Medicine and Master in Surgery are subject to the following 
Ptegulations : — 

1. One of the four years of Medical and Surgical Study, required 
by Section V., must be in the University of Edinburgh. 

2. Another of such four years of Medical and Surgical Study 
must be either in the University of Edinburgh, or in some other 
University entitled to give the Degree of Doctor of Medicine. . 

3. Attendance during at least six winter months on the Medical 
or Surgical Practice of a General Hospital, which accommodates 
at least eighty patients, and, during the same period, on a course 
of Practical Anatomy, may be reckoned as one of such four years, 
and to that extent shall be held equivalent to one year's attend- 
ance on Courses of Lectures, as above prescribed. 

4. One year's attendance on the Lectures of Teachers of Medi- 
cine in the Hospital Schools of London, or in the School of the 
College of Surgeons in Dublin, or of such Teachers of Medicine 
in Edinburgh, or elsewhere, as shall from time to time be recog- 
nised by the University Court, may be reckoned as one of such 
four years, and to that extent shall be held as attendance on 
Courses of Lectures, as above prescribed. 

5. Candidates may, to the extent of Four of the Departments 
of Medical Study required by Section VI., Sub-section 1, attend 
in such year or years of their Medical and Surgical Studies, as 



92 STATUTES RELATIVE TO DEGREES IN MEDICINE. 

may be most convenient to them, tlie Lectures of the Teachers of 
Medicine specified in the foregoing Sub-section 4. 

6. All Candidates, not Students of the University, availing 
themselves of the permission to attend the Lectures of Extra- 
Academical Teachers in Edinburgh must, at the commencement 
of each year of such attendance, enrol their names in a book to be 
kept by the University for that purpose, paying a fee of the same 
amount as the Matriculation Fee paid by Students of the Univer- 
sity, and having, in respect of such payment, a right to the use of 
the Library of the University, 

7. The Fee for attendance on the Lectures of an Extra-Aca- 
demical Teacher in Edinburgh, with a view to Graduation, must 
be of the same amount as that exigible by Medical Professors in 
the University. 

8. No Teacher is recognised who is at the same time a Teacher 
of more than one of the prescribed branches of study, except in 
those cases where Professors in the University are at liberty to 
teach two branches. 

0. It is not necessary for any Teacher, attendance on whose 
Lectures is now recognised for the purposes of Graduation in the 
University, to obtain a new recognition from the University Court; 
and attendance on the Lectures of every such Teacher will con- 
tinue to be recognised as heretofore. 

10. It is in the power of the University Court, if they shall see 
cause, at any time to withdraw or suspend the recognition of any 
Teacher or Teachers. 

VIII. Every Candidate must deliver, before the 31st day of 
March of the year in which he proposes to graduate, to the 
Dean of the Faculty of ^lediciue — 

1. A Declaration, in his own handwriting, that he has completed 
his twenty-first year, and that he will not be, on the day of gra- 
duation, under articles of Apprenticeship to any Surgeon or other 
master. 

2. A Statement of his Studies, as well in Literature and Philo- 
BOphy as in Medicine, accompanied with proper certificates. 

3. A Thesis composed by himself, to be approved by the Medical 
Faculty. 

IX. Each Candidate is examined, both in writing and viva 



STATUTES RELATIVE TO DEGREES IN MEDICINE. 93 

voce, — First, on Chemistry, Botany, and Natural History ; 
Secondly^ on Anatomy, Institutes of Medicine, and Surgery ; and. 
Thirdly, on Materia Medica, Pathology, Practice of Medicine, 
Clinical Medicine, Clinical Surgery, Midwifery, and Medical Juris- 
prudence. The Examinations on Anatomy, Chemistry, Institutes 
of Medicine, Botany, and Natural History are conducted, as 
far as possible, by demonstrations of objects placed before the 
Candidates ; and those on Medicine and Surgery, in part by 
Clinical demonstrations in the Hospital. 

X. Students who profess themselves ready to submit to an 
Examination, on the first division of these subjects, at the end of 
their second year, may be admitted to Examination at that time. 

XI. Students who have passed their Examination on the first 
division of these subjects, may be admitted to Examination on 
the second division at the end of their third year. 

XII. The Examination on the third division cannot take place 
until the Candidate has completed his fourth Annus Medicus. 

XIII. Candidates may, if they choose, be admitted to Exa- 
mination on the first two of these divisions at the end of their 
third year, or to the three Examinations at the end of their 
fourth year. 

XIV. If any Candidate, at these Examinations, be found un- 
qualified, he cannot be again admitted to Examination unless he 
has studied during another year two of the prescribed subjects, 
either in the University, or in some other School of Medicine. 

XY. After the Candidate has satisfied the Medical Examiners, 
the Dean will lay the proceedings before the Senatus Academicus, 
by whose authority the Candidate will be summoned, on the 31st 
day of July, or, if that day be Sunday, then on the preceding 
day, to defend his Thesis ; and, finally, if the Senate think fit, he 
will be admitted, on the first day of August, or, if that day be 
Sunday, then on the following day, to the Degree of Bachelor of 
Medicine, or to the Degrees of Bachelor of Medicine and of Master 
in Surgery. 



94 STATUTES IlELATIVE TO DEGREES IN MEDICINE. 

XVI. The Senatus Academicus, on the day here appointed, will 
assemble at ten o'clock a.m., for the purpose of conferring Degrees; 
and no Candidate, unless a sufficient reason be assigned, shall 
absent himself, on pain of being refused his Degree for that year. 

XVII. Candidates for Graduation are required to produce evi- 
dence of their having conformed to the Regulations which were 
in force at the time they commenced their Medical Studies. 

XVIII. The Degree of Doctor of Medicine may be conferred on 
any Candidate who has obtained the Degree of Bachelor of Medi- 
cine, and is of the age of twenty-four years, and has been engaged, 
subsequently to his having received the Degree of Bachelor of 
Medicine, for at least Two Years in attendance on an Hospital, or in 
the Military or Naval Medical Services, or in Medical and Surgical 
Practice : Provided always that the Degree of Doctor of Medicine 
shall not be conferred on any person, unless he be a Graduate in 
Arts of one of the Universities of England, Scotland, or Ireland, 
or of such other Universities as are above specified, or unless he 
shall, before or at the time of his obtaining the Degree of Bache- 
lor of Medicine, or within three years thereafter, have passed a 
satisfactory Examination in Greek, and in Logic or Moral Philo- 
sophy, and in one at least of the following subjects, namely, 
French, German, Higher Mathematics, and Natural Philosophy. 

XIX. The Medical Examiners for all Candidates for Graduation 
ill Medicine are the Professors in the Faculty of INIedicine, and, in 
addition. Three Persons appointed annually by the University 
Court. 

XX. The Provisions of these Statutes came into operation on 
the 4th of February 1861. 

XXI. Persons, who began their Medical Studies before the 4th 
of February 18(il, are entitled to graduate under the system in 
force before or after that date, according as they may comply with 
the regulations in force in the University before or after that 
date. 

John Hutton Balfour, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Medicine and Botany, and Dean of the 
Medical Faculty. 



EXTRA-PROFESSIONAL EXAMINATIONS. 95 

Notice to Candidates for Graduation^ v.'?io commenced their 
Studies hefore 1861. 

Candidates wlio commenced their Medical Studies by attendance on 
Qualifying Classes before the 4th day of February 1861, are entitled to 
appear for Examination for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine, after four 
years' Study, on completing their twenty-first year, and without having 
taken the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine. They are also exempted from 
the Preliminary Examinations mentioned in Sections II. and III., and 
require only to undergo an Examination on Latin. They are also ex- 
empted from attendance on Practical Chemistry, and Practical Midwifery, 
and require only three months of Clinical Suigery, and eighteen months 
of Hospital attendance. 

Candidates who commenced their Studies before 1825, require only 
one year's Hospital attendance, and are exempted from the fourth yeax of 
attendance at Classes, from the necessity of a year's study in Edinburgh 
(Sect. VII., 1), and from attendance on 

Clinical, Surgery. Practical Anatomy. 

Medical Jurisprudence. Pathology, and 

Natural History. Surgery distinct from Anatomy. 
Military Surgery. 

Those who commenced between 1825 and 1831 are exempted from 
attendance on General Pathology, and also on Surgery distinct from 
Anatomy. 

Those who commenced between 1825 and 1833, are required to at- 
tend cnly two of the following Classes, viz. : — 

Clinical Surgery. Military Surgery. 

Medical Jurisprudence. Practical Anatomy. 

Natural History. 
And those who commenced before 1833 are exempted from attend- 
ance on Practical Pharmacy, and Dispensary Practice (Sect. VI., 3 
and 4.) 



PEELIMINAEY BRANCHES OF EXTEA-PROFESSIONAL 
EDUCATION, 1861-62. 

I. In conformity with Section II. of the Statutes, of date 
February 4, 1861 (see page 89), an Examination on the Pre- 



96 EXTRA-PROFESSIONAL EXAMINATIONS. 

liminary Branches of Extra-Professional Education will take place 
before next winter Session, commencing on Wednesday, 30th 
October, and ending on 19th November 1861. 

1. EnrjUsh. — "Writing from Dictation and a knowledge of Composi- 

tion. 

2. Latin. — Twenty-second Book of Livy and the Fifth ^neid of 

Vir-il. 

3. Arithmetic. — The Common Eules, including Decimals. 

4. Elements of Mathematics. — Euclid, Books i., ii., and iii. 

5. Elements of Mechanics. — Carpenter's Mechanical Philosophy. 

II. At the same time an Examination will take place in con- 
formity with Section III. of the said Statutes, which enacts that 
no Candidate shall be admitted to a Professional Examination 
who has not passed a satisfactory Examination on at least two of 
the following subjects : — 

1. Greeh. — Anabasis of Xenophon, Books i. and ii. 

2. French. — Voltaire, Histoire de Charles XII. 

3. German. — Schiller, Geschichte des dreissigjahrigen Kriegs. 

4. Higher Mathematics. — Euclid, Books i. to vi., Piudiments of 

Trigonometry and Conic Sections. 

5. Natural Philosophy. — Elements of Natural Philosophy, by Gold- 

ing Bird and Brooke. 
G. Lodic. — Whately's Logic, or Hind's Abridgment, or Morell's 

Handbook ot" Logic. 
7. Moral Philosophj. — Brown's Lectures on Ethics, edited by 

Chalmers. 

III. In Section XVIII. of the said Statutes it is enacted, That 
the Degree of Doctor of Medicine shall not be conferred on any 
person unless he be a Graduate in Arts, or unless he shall, before 
or at the time of his obtaining the Degree of Bachelor of jMedicine, 
or within three years thereafter, have passed a satisfactory Exa- 
mination on three of the subjects mentioned in No. II. Two of 
these must be Greek and Logic or Moral Philosophy, and the third 
may be any one of tlie following subjects — namely, French, Ger- 
man, Higher ^Mathematics, Natural Philosophy. 

Examinations of the same extent at other British Universities 
granting the Degree of M.D. will exempt from these Preliminary 
Examinations. Certificates of having passed such Examinations 
mu.st be produced, with an official notice of the subjects of Exa- 
mination. 

The Examination' in Latin for Students who come under the 



STATUTES RELATIVE TO DEGREE OF M.D. 97 

old Statutes, in consequence of having commenced their Medical 
Curriculum by attendance on Classes before 4th February 1861, 
will take place on "Wednesday, 30th October, and will be confined 
to the following works : — 

1 . Twenty-second Book of Livy. 

2. Second Book of Cicero de Natura Deoruni. 

3. Fifth ^neid of Virgil. 



RIGHTS OF THE MEDICAL GRADUATES OF SCOTLAND, 
ACCORDING TO THE MEDICAL ACT. 

Before the passing of the Medical Act of 1858, the Degree of 
Doctor of Medicine granted by the Universities of Scotland 
(as the possessor underwent a complete education and Exa- 
mination in all departments of Physic and Surgery,) qualified 
the Graduate to practise every branch of the Medical pro- 
fession throughout Scotland. One principal purpose of the 
Medical Act was to extend local rights of practice over the 
whole of Her Majesty's dominions. But according to the 
hitherto accepted reading of a dubious clause in the Act, no 
one can practise both Medicine and Surgery without possessing 
two distinct Diplomas — one for Medicine, and another for 
Surgery. The Universities were thus compelled, in justice to their 
Graduates, to give them the additional title of Master in Surgery, 
not as implying any additional Study or Examination, but as de 
daring more distinctly their qualifications, and to permit Regis- 
tration as regularly qualified practitioners in the whole field of 
their Professional Education. The Secretary for War some time ago 
issued an order that Candidates for admission into the Medical 
Service of the Army should obtain their qualifications in Physic 
and Surgery from two different sources ; the efi'ect of which would 
have been to prevent any one L^niversity from qualifying for this 
purpose. The Scottish Universities Commissioners, recognising 
the serious evils of such a system, followed up a remonstrance 
which had been offered on the part of the University of Edinburgh, 
and obtained the rescinding of all restrictions in the source of 
qualification. Consequently any single University in Scotland 
can now qualify Candidates for the Military Service, as well as for 
any other Public Medical Service in the country. 

G 



98 GRADUATES IN MEDICINE, 1861. 



NOMINA EOKUM QUI GRADUM MEDICINE DOCTORIS IN 
ACADEMIA JACOBI SEXTI REGIS, QVJE EDINBURGI 
EST, ANNO SIDCCCLXI ADEPTI SUNT. 

§ Those who have obtained Prizes for their Dissertations, t Those deemed worthy 
of competing for the Dissertation Prizes. * Those commended for their Dissertations. 

* Allfrey, Carolus Henricus, Anglus. On Iodine in its appli- 

cation to Medicine and Surgery. 
Anderson, Jacobus, Scotus. On the Semeiology of Phthisis 
Pulraonalis. 
§ Anderson, Joannes, Scotus. Contributions to Zoology. 

Armstrong. Gulielmus Crawford, Anglus. On the Symptoms 
and Treatment of Cholera. 
5 Baines, Carolus Gulielmus, Anglus. On Tetanus. 

Bantock, Georgius Granville, Scotus. On a case of Aggra- 
vated Hysteria. 
Benny, Michael, Scotus. On the Pathology of Spurious 

Melanosis. 
Berryman, Joannes, Novo-Brunsvicensis. On Excision of 
Joints, 
t Brown, Alexander Crum, A.M. Kdin., Scotus. On the Theory 

of Chemical Combination. 
10 Cameron, Andreas Robertson, Scotus. On the Corporeal 
Sympathies of certain Mental Conditions. 
Carrington, Atholl Forbes, Scotus. On Nutrition. 
§ Clouston, Thomas Smith, Orcadensis. Contributions to the 
Minute Anatomy and Physiology of the Nervous Sys- 
tem, as illustrated in the Invertebrata. 
Cumraing, Kennethus Gulielmus, Canadensis. On Cataract. 
Cuthbertson, I^avid, Scotus. Some Observations on the 
Pathology of Simple Apoplexy. 
* 15 Davies, Thomas Clifford, Anglus. On the Bites of Venomous 
South African Ophidians, and their Treatment, 
Dick, Thomas Thomson, Scotus. On Diabetes. 
Douglas, Campbell ^Nlellis, Canadensis. On Polysarcia. 
Fletcher, Adamus, Anglus. On Urscmia. 

* Gooding, Joannes Callcnder, Barbadensis. On the Import- 

ance of Position in Medical and Surgical Practice. 



GRADUATES IN MEDICINE, 1861. 99 

1 20 Gray, Thomas Scotfc, Scotus. Ou the Botany, Chemistry, 
Physiological and Therapeutical Properties of the 
Cytisus Laburnum. 
■^ Hamilton, Archibaldus, Scotus. On the Corpus Luteum, its 
N'ature, Origin, and Value as a Sign of Conception. 

* Howden, Thomas, Scotus. On Epilepsy in its Relations to 

Insanity. 
Jackson, Thomas, Anglus. On Epilepsy. 
James, David, Scotus. On the Pathology and Treatment of 

True Aneurism. 
2.5 Johnstone, Georgius, Anglus. On Diseases Incident to Arts, 

Trades, and Professions. 
Kydd, David, Scotus. On some Surgical Appliances. 
Linton, Joannes, Scotus. On Infanticide. 
Little, David, Scotus. On Oil of Turpentine and its Use in 

the Treatment of Rheumatism and Uterine Haemorrhage. 

* Little, Jacobus, Hibernus. On some Medico-Legal Questions 

connected with Unsoundness of Mind. 

* 30 Logan, Fredericus Lockwood, Scotus. On Bright's Disease 

in its acute form. 
M'Cuaig, Duncanus, Scotus. On the Benefit of Chloroform 

in Surgery. 
M'lver, Donaldus, Scotus. On the Relations between the 

Ptelief of Symptoms and the Cure of Disease. 

* Maclean, Joannes Lindsay, Bahamensis. On Epidemic 

Yellow Fever. 
t M'Leod, Kennethus, A.M. Abred., Scotus. On Homologies 
of Limbs. 

* 35 M'Nee, Jacobus, Scotus. On the Woorara Poison. 

* M'Rae, Donaldus, Scotus. On Peculiarities of the Circula- 

tion in Different Organs, 
t Meintjes, Stephanus Jacobus, a Promontorio Bonse Spei. On 
the Anatomy and Physiology of Vegetable Irritability. 

* Meredith, Joannes, Anglus. On the General Paralysis of the 

Insane. 
Moore, Gulielmus Withers, Anglus. On Hygiene as a Branch 
of Education. 

* 40 Nairne, Joannes, Scotus. On Enteric or Typhoid Fever. 

O'Herlehy, Daniel Power, Hibernus. On the Signs and 
Symptoms of Pregnancy. 



10(» GRADUATES IN MEDICINE, 1861. 

Passmore. Eduardus Bunbury, Anglus, On Morbus Cordis. 
§ Pettigrew, Jacobus, Scotus. On the Arrangement of the 
Cardiac Nerves, and their Connexion with the Cerebro- 
spinal and Sympathetic Systems in Mammalia. 
Porter, Joannes Dunn, Hibernus. On Phthisis Pulmonalis. 
45 Ramsbotham, Samuel Henricus, Anglus. On the Tongue as 
a ]Means of Diagnosis. 
Held, Robertus, Scotus. On Acute Pleurisy. 

* Renwick, Arthurus, A.B. Syd., Australensis. On the Ac- 

commodation of the Eye to Distinct Vision at Variou?; 
Distances, its Phenomena, Jlechanism, and Modus 
Operandi. 

* Roberts, Joannes, Anglus. A Review of Paul Portal's Work 

on Midwifery. 
Robertson, Daniel Grant, Scotus. On the Prophylactic 

Treatment of Small-Pox. 
50 Robson, Gulielmus, Scotus. On Inflammation and the 

Blood-letting Controversy. 
Schroeder, Henricus Sacheverel Eduardus, ab India Orientali. 

On Sierra Leone and its Fevers. 
Selby, Robertus Bird, Bervicensis. On Diphtheria. 
Seller, Joannes Larden, Anglus. On Delirium Tremens. 
Shields, Andreas, Scotus. On the Study of Medicine as a 

Means of Mental Culture. 
*55 Simpson, Joannes, A.M. Abred., Scotus. Notes of Cases 

from the Medical Wards of the Edinburgh Infirmary, 

1860-61. 
Smith, Alfredus Rickards, Anglus. On Presumptions of 

Survivorship. 
Spalding, Gulielmus, Americanus. On the Mechanism of 

Vesicular Emphysema. 

* Steele, Henricus, Scotus. On the Spinal Cord and its Rela- 

tion to i\Iu8cular Contraction. 

Steele, Jacobus Peddie, A.B. Edin., Scotus. On Epilepsy. 
60 Steel), Fredericus, Scotus. On Diphtheria. 

Stephenson, Gulielmus, Scotus. On certain Nervous Symp- 
toms due to Exhaustion. 

Swanson, Georgius Isles, Scotus. On Bright's Disease. 

Turner. Gulielmus, Cambro-Britannus. On Aneurism. 



EXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGREE. lOI 

* Wallace, Joannes, Scotus. Observations on the Phocidaj 
Groenlandicae. 
65 Watson, Gulielmus M'Cullocli, Scotus. On the Anatomy of 
the Aphrodite aculeata. 
Williamson, Henricus Georgius, Anglus. On the Nature and 
Treatment of Cholera. 
67 Wilson, Gulielmus Cheyne, Scotus. On the Foetal Circula- 
tion. 



EXAMINATION PAPERS FOR MEDICAL DEGREE. 

L ATI'S. — Wednesday, Blst Octoher 1860. 
G. Cornelius Tacitus. Ageicola. Cap. xxxiii. 

Agricola ita disseruit : Octavus annus est, commili tones, ex quo virtute 
et auspiciis imperii Romani, fide atque opera vestra Britanniam vicistis : 
tot expeditionibus, tot pi'oeliis, seu fortitudine adversus bostes, seu patientia 
ac labore, paene adversus ipsam rerum naturam opus fuit : neque me mili- 
tum, neque vos ducis poenituit. Ergo egressi, ego veterum legatorum, 
vos priorum exercituum terminos, finem Britanniae, non fama, nee rumore, 
sed castris et armis tenemus. Inventa Britannia, et subacta. Equidem 
saepe in agmine, cum vos paludes, montesve, et flumina fatigarent, for- 
tissimi cujusque voces audiebam, Quando dabitur bostis, quando acies? 
. Veniunt e latebris suis extru-i ; et vota virtusque in aperto, omniaque 
proua victoribus, atque eadem victis adversa. Nam, ut superasse tantum 
itineris, silvas evasisse, transisse aestuaria, pulcbrum ac decorum in 
frontem ; ita fugientibiis periculosissima, quae hodie prosperrima sunt. 
Neque enim nobis aut locorum eadem notitia, aut commeatuum eadem 
abundantia : sed manus, et arma, et in bis omnia. 

Marcus Tullius Cicero. I)e Officiis, lib. ii. cap. v. 

Cum igitur bic locus nihil habeat dubitationis, quin homines plurimum 
hominibus et prosint et obsint ; proprium hoc statue esse virtutis, con- 
ciliare animos bominum, et ad usus suos adjungere. Itaque, quae in rebus 
inanimis, quaeque in usu et tractatione belluarum fiunt utiliter ad bomi- 
num vitam, artibus ea tribuuntur operosis : hominum autem studia, ad 
amplificationem nostrarum rerum promta ac parata, virorum praestantium 
saj)ientia et virtute excitantur. Etenim virtus omnis tribus in rebus fere 
vertitur ; quarum una est in perspiciendo, quid in quaque re verum 
sincerumque sit, quid consentaneum cuique, quid consequens, ex quo 
quaeque gignantur, quae cujusque rei causa sit; alteram, cobibere motus 
animi turbatos, quos Graeci irddT] nominant ; appetitionesque, quas illi 
opfMas, obedientes efficere rationi : tertium, iis, quibuscum congregamur, 



102 EXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGREE. 

uti moderate et scienter, quorum studiis ea, quae natura desiderat, ex- 
pleta cumulataque liabeamus ; per eosdemque, si quid importetur nobis 
incommodi, propulsemus, ulciscamurque eos, qui nocere nobis conati sint, 
taiitaque poena afBcianius, quantam aequitas liumanitasque patiatur. 

Q. HoRATius Flaccus. Dk Arte Poetica, 333-350. 

Aut prodesse volunt aut delectare Poetae . 
Aut simul et jucunda et idonea dicere vitae. 
Quicquid praeci})ies, esto brevis : ut cito dicta 
Percipiant animi dociles, teneantque fideles. 
( )niiie supervacuum pleiio de pectore manat. 

Ficta voluptas causa sint proxima veris : 
Nef;, quodcunque volet, poscat sibi tabula credi : 
Xeu pransae laniiae ^^vum puerum extrahat alvo. 
Centuriae seniorum agitant expertia tVugis : 
Celsi praetereunt austera poemata Kbamnes. 
Omne tulit punctum qui miscuit utile dulci, 
Lectorem deleclando, pariterque monendo. 
Hie meret aera liber Sosiis ; tic et mare transit, 
Et longura noto scriptori prorogat aevnm. 
Sunt delicta tamen, quibus ignovisse velimus. 
Nam neque chorda sonum reddit quera vult manus et mens ; 
Poscentique gravem persaepe remittit acutum : 
Nee semper f'eriet quodcunque miuabitur arcus. 

LATi:^.— Tuesday, 2Gth March 1861. 

(i. Crispi Sallustii. Bellum JuGUETHiNUM, Cap. Ixxxv. 

Scio ego, Quirites, pler.)sque non eisdem artibus inperium a vobis 
l>etere et postquara adepti sunt gerere : primo industrios, supplices modicos 
'sse, dein per ignaviam et superbiara aetatem agere. Sed mihi contra 
-a vidutur : nam quo pluris est universa res publica quam consulatus aut 
praetiua, eo majore cura illam administrari quam baec peti debere. Neque 
rae fallit, quantum cum maximo vostro beneticio negotii sustineam. 
l'»fllum parare simul et aerario parcere, cogere ad militiani eos quos nolis 
oHi-ndere, domi forisque omnia curare, et ea agere inter iiividos occursan- 
loH factiosos opiiiione, Quirites, asperius est. Ad hoc, alii si deliquere, 
vctus nobiliuis, niaiorura fortia facta, cognatornm et adfinium opes, 
nujltae clieutehie, omnia haec praesidio adsunt : mihi spes onines in memet 
Hilae, quas necesso |;8t virtute et innoceutia tutari : nam alia iiifirma 

Hlltlt. 

Tin Livii. lIisTOKiA. Lib. xxi. cap. xliii. 

Si, quern aiiimum in alienae sortis exemplo paulo ante habuistis, 
iMindeni mox in acstimanda iortuna vestra habueritis, vicimus, milites. 
Nc(im; etiim Hpoctacnlura modo illud, sed quaedum velut imago vestrae 
ronditionis erat. Ac ncscio, an majora vincula majoresque necessitates 
vobis. quam captivis vcstris, fortuna cirounidederit. Dextra laevaque 
•iu(» maria claudunt, nullam ne ad elliigiuni quidem, navem habentibus. 



EXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGREE. 103 

contra Padus amnis, major Padus ac violentior Ehodano ; ab tergo Alpes 
urgent, vix integris vobis ac vigentibus transitae. Hie vincendum aut 
moriendum, milites, est, ubi prinium bosti occurristis. Et eadem fortuna, 
quae necessitatem pugnandi imposuit, praemia vobis ea victoribus proponit, 
quibus ampliora homines ne ab Diis quidem immortalibus optare solent. 
Si Siciliam tantum ac Sardiniam, parentibus nostrisereptas, nostra virtute 
recuperaturi essemus, satis tamen ampla pretia essent. Quicquid Romani 
tot triumphis partum congestumque possident, id omne vestrum cum ipsis 
dominis futurum est. 

ViRGiLius. JEneidos, Lib. iii. 482. 

Nee minus Andromache, digressu mcesta supremo, 

Fert picturatas auri subtemine vestes, 

Et Phrygiara Ascanio chlamydem ; nee cedit honori, 

Textilibusque onerat donis, ac talia fatur : 

Accipe et hsec, manuum tibi quae monumenta mearum 

Sint, puer, et longuni Andromachae testentur amorem 

Conjugis Hectoreae. Cape dona extrema tuorum, 

raihi sola mei super Astyanactis imago ! 

Sic oculos, sic ille manus, sic ora ferebat : 

Et nunc sequali tecum pubesceret ^evo. 

Hos ego digrediens lacrymis affabar obortis : 

Vivite felices, quibus est fortuna peracta 

Jam sua : nos alia ex aliis in fata vocamur. 

FIRST EXAMINATION.— 2%Mrs<?a?/, 2Uh March 1861. 

Anatomy. — 1. Describe the parts as they successively appear in the 
dissection of the Groin down to the subjacent Muscles, including the 
Femoral Sheath with its contents. 

2. Describe the an-angement and structure of the cortical substance of 
the Kidney, involving in the description the Pyramids of Ferrein, with the 
arterial and venous distributions. 

3. Give the anatomical characters of the plain or unstriped Muscular 
Fibre ; and state a few of the more important structures in which this 
kind of fibre occurs. 

CTiemistry. — 1. Describe the preparation of Chlorine, give its leading 
properties, and state in what manner it acts as a disinfectant. 

2. Show the relations of Ethers and Alcohols in the homologous series, 
commencing with Methyl C, H3, and ending with Amyl Cio H„. 

3. What is the Constitution of an ordinary Fat in its relation to a Com- 
pound Ether ; and what are the chief Fats and Fatty Acids found in the 
Human Body? 

FIRST EXAMINATION.— /^aiitrcZa?/, 3Iarch 30, 1861. 
Institutes of Medicine. — 1. Mention any three Excito-Secretory Actions, 
and state what are the Incident and what the Excident Nerves connected 
with each. 



104 EXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGREE. 

2. Describe the mode in which Ova are formed in and extruded from 
the Ovary, and in what the act of Impregnation consists. 

3. State any two of the theories advanced to account for the stoppage 
of the circulation in inflamed parts, and give particularly the one you con- 
sider most consistent with the present state of our knowledge. 

Botany. — 1. Describe what is meant by an Inferior Ovary, and explain 
its formation as viewed in connexion with the Calyx, or ■with the Eecep- 
tacle. Mention a Calycifloral Natural Order and a Genus in which such 
an Ovary occurs. 

2. ^Mentiun the two great Divisions of Calycifloral Dicotyledons, and 
give the characters of each. 

3. Give the essential characters which distinguish Umbelliferae from 
Cinchonaceje. 

Natural Hintorif. — 1. Enumerate the essential differences between the 
Amphibia and the Pisces, confining yourself to the Respiratory and Circu- 
latory Systems. 

2. What is the condition of the Digestive, Circulatory, and Xervous 
Systems in the Rhizopoda ? 

3. Distinguish between the Hydrozoa and the Actinozoa ; and give an 
example of each of these groups. 

SECOND EXAMINATION.— J/ontia^/, June 3, 1861. 

Materia Medica. — 1. State the chief diseases in which Arsenic is used, 
the doses, and duration of treatment, and precautions. 

2. Stale the officinal preparations of Zinc, and the characters by which 
they may be known. 

3. Describe the Digitalis Plant, its preparations, and its several actions 
as a poison and a medicine. 

Midwifery. — 1. The mechanism, diagnosis, and management of breech 
and footling presentations. 

2. The chief rules and cautions required in the use of Chloroform, in 
natural and in operative labours. 

3. The causes and treatment of Rupture of the Perinaeum. 

Surgery. — 1. Describe the symptoms and treatment of Hip-joint 
disease. 

2. IIow would you attempt the radical cure of reducible Hernia? 

Clinical Surgery. — 1. What are the respective advantages and dis 
advantages of the old and Ilunterian operations for Axillary Aneurism? 

2. Describe the symptoms and treatment of Fissure of the Anus. 

SECOND EXAMINATION.— Twe^c/a^^, June A, 18G1. 

Practice of Physic. — 1. The differential diagnosis and the treatment 
<»f Nervons or Sympathetic Palpitation and Irregular Action of th<' 
Heart. 

2. The pathology and treatment of that fonn of Anaemia which is as- 
BOciatiMl with protulterant eyes and bronchocele. 

3. Tlie symptoms and causes of Typhlitis or Inflammation of i\\>^ 
Ciecuni, and tho treatment in reference to the etioloc^v. 



EXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGREE. 105 

General Patholoriy. — 1. What is tlie nature of the Amyloid Degenera- 
tion, and what are its ordinary physical characters, and the chemical 
phenomena by which it is distinguished? 

2. State the various sources of Pneumothorax, specifying the most com- 
mon ; and mention the physical signs which distinguish Pneumothorax. 

3. What are the signs of the so-called " Phosphatic Diathesis," and 
what is the proper explanation of the changes in the urine? 

Legal Medicine. — 1. How to make the Hydrostatic Test of the Lungs 
in cases of suspected Infanticide. 

2. Death from Hanging — how detected. 

3. How best to prevent the falsification of written documents. 

PRESCRIPTIONS. 

( The names, quantities, and directions to he written in Latin words, 
ivithout contractions.) 

1. Prescribe Calumba and Iron in a Tonic mixture. 

2. Write a formula for the administration of Sulphate of Quinine in 
Solution without the addition of the Sulphuric or other Acid. 

3. Prescribe Aconite as a sedative in Heart Disease. 

LATIN EX AUmATlOls.— Wednesday, June 26, 1861. 
Sallustius. Bellum Jugurthinum. Cap. xvii. 

In divisione orbis terrae plerique in partem tertiam Africam posuere ; 
pauci tantummodo Asiara et Europam esse, sed Africam in Europa. Ea 
finis habet ab occidente fretum nostri maris et Oceani ; ab ortu solis decli- 
vem latitudinem, quern locum Catabathmon incolae appellant. Mare 
saevum, importuosum ; ager frugum fertilis, bonus pecori, arbore infecun- 
dus ; coelo terraque penuria aquarum ; genus hominum salubri corpore, 
velox, patiens laborum ; plerosque senectus dissolvit, nisi qui ferro aut 
bestiis interiere, nam morbus baud saepe quemquam superat ; ad hoc 
malefici generis plurima animalia. Sed qui mortales initio Africam 
habuerint, quique postea accesserint, aut quomodo inter se permixti sint, 
quamquam ab ea fama, quae plerosque obtinet, divorsum est, tamen uti ex 
libris Punicis, qui regis Hiempsalis dicebantur, interpretatum nobis est, 
utique rem sese habere cultores ejus terrae putant, quam paucissimis 
dicam ; ceterum fides ejus rei penes auctores erit. 

Livius. Lib. xxi. cap. xxxvii. 

Tandem, nequicquam jumentis alque hominibus fatigatis, castra in jugo 
posita, aegerrime ad id ipsum loco purgato : tantum nivis fodiendum atque 
egerendum fuit. Inde ad rupem muniendam, per quam unani via esse 
poterat, milites ducti, cum caedendum esset saxum, arboribus circa im- 
manibus dejectis detruncatisque, struem ingentem iignorum faciunt : 
eamque (cum et vis venti apta faciendo igni coorta esset) succendunt, 
ardentiaque saxa infuso aceto putrefaciunt. Ita torridam incendio rupem 



106 EXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGREE. 

ferro pandunt, molliuntque anfractibus modicis clivos, ut non J amenta 
solum, sed olcplianti etiam, deduci possent. 

ViRGiLius. ^NEiDOs, Lib. iii., 192-208. 

Postquam altum teuuere rates, nee jam amplius ullae 
Apparent terrae, coelum undique et iindjque pontiis : 
Turn mihi coeruleus supra caput astititimber, 
Xoctem byememque ferens ; et inhorruit uuda tenebris. 
Continuo venti volvunt mare, magnaque surgunt 
Aequora; dispersi jactamur gurgite vasto. 
Involvere diem nimbi, et nox bumida codum 
Abstulit ; ingeminant abruptis nubibus ignes. 
Excutimur cursu, et caecis erramus in uudis. 
Ipse diem noctcmque negat discernere coelo, 
Xec meminisse viae media Palinurus in unda. 
Tres adeo incertos caeca caligine Soles 
Erramus pelago : totidem sine sidere noctes. 
Quarto terra die primum se attoUere tandem 
Visa, aperire procul luontes, ac volvere fumum. 
Vela cadunt ; remis insurgimus ; baud mora, nautae 
Anuixi torquent spumas, et coerula verrunt. 

FIRST EXAMINATION.— Jfon<?a?/, Jvltj 1, 1861. 
Chemistry.— ^ . Give by formulae tbe Oxides and Hydrides of Arsenic 
and Antimony, sbowing tbeir analogy to Nitrogen. 

2, Wliat is tbe composition of tbe mineral matter of Bone, and what is 
the nature of tbe organic matter associated witb it? 

3. Describe tbe chemical characters of Urea and Uric Acid, and the 
conditions under which each appears in Urine. 

Botany. — 1. Tbe term Fruit includes different organs when applied to 
the Apple, Nut, Phim, Strawberry, Pine-Apple, and Fig ; what are the 
organs common to all, and what are peculiar to each of these ? 

2. Describe tbe phenomena of Cyclosis and Potation; mention the 
plants and the parts of the plants in which they are most easily seen, 
and the mode of observing them. 

3. Ciivc the distinctions between the orders Malvaccre, Stercuhacese, 
and Hyttneriacejc, as regards their stamens : mention some of the impor- 
tant j)rodurts of each of these orders, with the plants and the parts of the 
plants which furnish the products. 

Natural Iliatory—l. Enumerate the stages through which a Lepidop- 
terous Insect i)asBcs in its progress from the egg to the perfect state, and 
niention sonic of the more iiiii)ortant modifications in the Metamorphosis 
of llihccts. 

2. What are the essential characters of the group Coelenterata ? 

3. State tlic leading points of distinction between the Gasteropoda and 
Ceplialopodu, and give a typical example of each group. 



EXAMINATION PAPERS — MEDICAL DEGREE. 107 

FIRST EXAMINATION.— Twes^ay, July 2, 1861. 

Anatomy. — 1. Describe the boundaries and contents of the Popliteal 
Space, giving the parts in their order and relations as they come into 
view during dissection. 

2. Give the configuration, relations, connexions, and structure of the 
Prostate, including, in the description, the prostatic portion of the 
Urethra. 

Institutes of Medicine. — 1. State iu what forms and by what channels 
Food is Excreted from the body. 

2. How is an Electrical Current shown to exist in living nerves, and 
what is meant by the Electro-tonic state of a nerve ? 

3. Give the theory of Fatty Degeneration of Organs, and name any two 
diseases dependent on such degeneration. 

SECOND EXAMINATION.— J/on(/ay/, July 15, 1861. 

Materia Medica. — 1. State the preparations of Iron in which that 
metal exists simply as an Oxide, — their distinctive characters, — their 
doses, — and the mode of administering them. 

2. State the poisonous and medicinal actions of Squill ; and the 
diseases for which it is used. 

3. Give the details of treatment for ordinary Acute Cholera, and its 
occasional sequel, Chronic Diarrhoea. 

Midwifery. — 1. The mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of Face 
Presentations. 

2. The pathological nature, course, and treatment of Fibroid Turaonrs 
of the Uterus. 

3. The causes and treatment of Asphyxia of the Foetus during Labour. 

Surgery. — 1. State the dangers and treatment of Cut-throat. 
2. State the pathology and treatment of Articular disease affecting 
Cartilage. 

Clinical Surgery. — 1. In which disease of the joints is the Actual 
Cautery most useful, and what are its symptoms? 

2. What injuries of the Shoulder-joint may be mistaken for Dislocation ? 

SECOND EXAMINATION.— r«m%, July 16, 1861. 

Practice of Physic. — 1 . The differential diagnosis of Acute Mania from 
Phrenitis and Delirium Tremens respectively. 

2. The forms of Icterus which are more particularly associated with 
Acute or Chronic Affections of the Duodenum ; and the treatment. 

3. The diagnosis of Capillary Bronchitis from Pneumonia ; and the 
treatment. 

General Pathology. — 1. ^Vhat explanations are given of the retarda- 
tion of the current, and ultimate stasis, of blood-vessels of an inflamed 
part? 



1()8 DEGREES IN LAW AND THEOLOGY. 

2. \\ hat are the morbid effects of extreme atmospheric heat on human 
beings, — and what viscera are chiefly affected in fatal cases? 

3. In what diseases is the Arterial Blood darkened, and how is tlie 
appearance to be explained in the different instances ? 

Leffal Medicine. — 1. Detection of spots of Blood on garments m- 
weapons. 

2. Poisoning by Opium — Symptoms — Detection in the contents of the 
Stomach. 

3. Poisonous adulterations of food from Culinary vessels. 

Prescriptions. 

( The navies, fjiuintities, and directions, to he written in Latin icords, 

without contractions ) 

1. An Aperient for regular use in habitual Constipation, when there is 
a liability to Haemorrhoids. 

2. Nitric Acid and l^-a-Ursi, as in Chronic Inflammation of the Bladder. 

3. A Purijative for a case of Lead Colic. 



Ill.-DEGREES IN LAW, 1861. 

On 22d xVpril the Senatus Academicus conferred the Honorary Degree 
of LT..I). on— 

The Right Hon. Sir John M'Neill, G.C.B. 
William Stirling, Esq. of Keir. 
.Tohn Muir, Esq., D.C.L. 



IV. DEGREES IN THEOLOGY. 186 0-1. 

On the 2il Ni)veniber l.S(3(), the Senatus Academicus conferred the D. 
gree of D.D. on — 

The Kev. Samuel Richardson, IM.A., Minister of Pcniiinghanio. 
The Rev. Sir Henry AVellwood Moncreiff, Bart., Edinburgh. 
The Rev. John Cunningham, Minister of Crieff. 
The Rev. Thomas Bums, Otago. 



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BURSARIES AND SCHOLARSHIPS. 




BURSARIES AND SCHOLARSHIPS. 



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114 



BURSARIES AND SCHOLARSHIPS. 



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EUESAKIES AND SCHOLARSIIirS. 



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PITT SCHOLARSHIP. 117 



PITT SCHOLAESHIP. 

ORDINANCE OF THE UNIVERSITIES' COMMISSIONERS. 

At Edinburgh, the Thirteenth Day of May, Eighteen Hundred 
and Sixty -One Years. 
Whereas by Deed of Mortification, dated the nineteenth and twenty- 
second days of April Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-one, Sir George 
Clerk of Penicuik, Baronet, David Anderson of Moredun, Esquire, and 
William Pitt Dundas, Esquire, therein described as surviving members 
of a committee appointed by the Pitt Club of Scotland to appropriate 
and dispose of the remaining funds of the Club have, for the considera- 
tions therein mentioned, given, granted, and mortified the sum of One 
thousand four hundred and eighty pounds, being the amount of the 
funds of the said club in the Union Bank of Scotland, to and in favour 
of the University of Edinburgh, for the foundation and endowment of 
a Scholarship, under the name of the Pitt Scholarship, in the said 
University, such Scholarship to be in the gift and appointment of the 
Senatus Academicus, and to be open for competition to Students who 
have completed the Course of Study in the Faculty of Arts in the said 
University, and to be tenable by the same individual for a period not 
exceeding four years ; and it is by the said deed declared, that the object 
of the said endowment is the Encouragement and Promotion of the 
Study of Classical Literature in the University ; and it is further pro- 
vided and declared, that the same shall be subject to such conditions 
and regulations as may be provided in that behalf by the Commissioners 
under the Act of the twenty-first and twenty second years of the reign 
of Her present Majesty Queen Victoria, chapter eighty-three, intituled 
' An Act to make Provision for the better Government and Discipline 
' of the Universities of Scotland, and improving and regulating the 
' Course of Study therein, and for the Union of the two Universities 
' and Colleges of Aberdeen ;' and it is thereby further provided and 
declared, that, until the first appointment to the Scholarship, the 
interest or proceeds of the mortified sum shall be added to the 
capital, and that in any year in which the said Scholarship may be 
vacant, the interest or proceeds of the said mortified sum shall be 
added to the capital, subject always to the provisions of the said deed, 
and in conformity with any conditions and regulations to be made by 
the said Commissioners ; and the Senatus Academicus of the said 
University are empowered to lay out and invest the said sum, as in the 
said deed is provided ; and it is thereby further provided and declared, 
that the stipend of the Scholar shall be the free annual proceeds of the 



118 PITT SCHOLARSHIP. 

Slid mortified sum, or of the funds or security or securities, iu which 
the same shall be invested : the said Commissioners statute and ordain, 
■with reference to the University of Edinburgh and the said mortifica- 
tion, as follows : — 

I. 'I'lie Pitt Scholarship shall, in accordance with the provisions of 
the said deed, b* in the gift of the Senatus Academicus of the Univt^rsity 
of Edinburgh, who shall, from time to time, appoint thereto the Candi- 
date who shall appear to be the best qualified on examination, as here- 
inafter provided. 

II. The Scholarship shall be open for general competition to all 
Students who, havinu; passed regularly through the Course of Study in 
the Faculty of Arts in the said University, have been admitted to the 
degree of .Master of Arts therein, at any time within four years before 
the time at which the competition shall take place. 

III. Candidates for the Scholarship shall be examined in classical 
literature and in English lit rature ; and the examination shall be con- 
ducted by three or more examiners, to be selected by the Senatus Aca- 
demicus from their own body. 

IV. The first competition for the Scholarship shall take place at a 
time to be hereafter fixed by the Senatus Academicus. 

V. The Scholarship shall be tenable for four years ; and, whensoever 
it shall, from any cause, become vacant, it shall be again competed for 
under the same conditions, and at the same period of the year ; and so 
on thereafter, as often as it shall become vacant. 

In Witness whereof, these Presents are sealed with the Seal of the 
Commission. 

JOHN INGLIS, Chairman. (l.S^ 



A PPENDIX. 



NOTICE TO STUDENTS IN AKTS. 

University of Edinburgh, 
nth October 1861. 

Students who propose to complete their Course for the 
Degree of Master of Arts, within Three Winter Sessions, or 
who otherwise desire to attend the higher Latin or Greek 
Classes with a view to Graduation, are required, in terms of 
the Ordinance of the Scottish Universities' Commissioners, 
dated 26th January 1861, " to satisfy the Faculty of Arts, on 
Examination, that they are qualified to be admitted to the 
higher Classes of Latin and Greek." 

In terms of this Eegulation, an Examination will be held 
by the Faculty of Arts, in the University Court-Koom, on 
Saturday, November 2, at Eleven o'clock. 

At the same time, Students who desire, with a view to a 
Degree, to attend the Second Mathematical Class, without 
attending the First Class, will be examined. 

By Authority of the Faculty of Arts. 

ALEXANDEE C. FRASEE, 

Professor oj Logic a7id Metaphysics, 
and Dean of the Faculty. 



120 APPENDIX. 



B. 

PRELimNAKY EXAMINATION— MEDICAL DEGEEE. 

University of Edinbdbgh, 
nth October 1861. 

According to the late Ordinances of the Scottish Universi- 
ties' Commissioners, Students commencing their Medical 
Studies in November next, with the intention of graduating 
at this University, are required to pass a Preliminary Ex- 
amination in General Education. This Examination may 
be taken at any period of their studies before the Examina- 
tions in jNIedicine. 

According to the recommendation of the General Medical 
(.^ouncil of the United Kingdom, the Preliminary Examination 
should be taken prior to the commencement of Medical Study. 

The Senatus Academicus therefore direct that all Students 
who intend to enter in November next, for the first Session of 
their Medical Studies, should report themselves to the Dean 
of the Faculty of Medicine, not later than Tuesday, 12tli of 
November, and that such as desire to postpone their Pre- 
liminary Examination, shall submit their reasons for postpone- 
ment to the Medical Faculty. 

J. H. BALFOUR, 

Dean of I acuity. 



EDINBURGH 



Eitthrsiti CalenJrar. 



1862-63. 



CORRECTED TO OCTOBER 1862. 




'4^ ! -, 



^ 






Irittleb bg ^omm Constable for il^e Senatus lirabemitns 

AND SOLD BY 

EDMONSTON AND DOUGLAS, EDINBURGH. 



1862, 



fibiitbitrglj ^iiib^rsHn Caknirar. 

li luis been resolved by the Senatus Academicus that the Uni- 
versity Calendar shall in future be issued at the close of the 
Winter Session, and that it shall be the Academical Organ for 
the Publication of the Prize and Graduation Lists, as well as 
of the annual Programme of the Classes, the Synopses of the 
Courses, and the Regulations and Announcements in the Four 
Faculties regarding Degrees. 

The Medical Graduation Lists for 1862, and the Honours of 
fJie Summer Session, will be found in the Supplement. 

College of Edinburgh, 
October ] 862. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 



Calendar, 4 

Uniyersity Officees, 7 

FIRST PART. 
History and Present Constitution of the University, . . 11 

' SECOND PART. 
Libraries, Museums, and Botanic Gtarden, .... 25 

THIRD PART. 

Classes, and Course of Study in each. Class Prize Lists, . 29 

FOURTH PART. 

Regulations with regard to Graduation in Arts and Medi- 
cine.' Announcements for 1863 ; Examinations for 1862 ; 
Names of Graduates in Arts, Medicine, Law, and Theo- 
logy, 69 

FIFTH PART. 
Endow^ients of the University, 117 

Appendix — Ordinance regarding Retiring Allowances, . .139 

Supplement, . ■ 141 



I 



1862.— MAY^Sl^ySi 

1 Th SrMMBR 8E3SIOS opens. 
2'Fr Sun rises 4ti. 30ra. 
Sun sets 7h. 50m. 



Sa 
S 
M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

9Fr 

lOISftl 

Ills I 
12 M 
13Ta' 
14|W| 
ISlTh 
lelFr 
117|Sa 
18,S 
19|M 
20;Tu 
21 W 
22'Th 
•^3Fr 
24iSa 

26 S 
26 M 
27|Tu 
28W 
29|Th 
30, Fr 
ISlSa 



JUNE, 30 Days. 



Examination of Schoolmasters. 



Court of Session sits. 

Sun rises 4h. .'Jm. . ou 1 f:,^ 

Whitsunday Term.— i^un sets 8I1. 15m 



General Assembly meeti-. 
Queen's Birthday —Bank Holiday. 



Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 



JXJLY, 31 Days. 



Sun rises 3h. 38m. Sets 8h. 45m. 
Second Examination for Degrees m 
[Medicine begins. 



TVhitsunday. 



Trinity Sundav. 

Sun rises 3h. 28m. Sets fh. 5Sm. 



Bank Holiday.— Queen's Acces. 1837 
Longeat Day. 

Midsummer Day. 

Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. _ 
Bank Holiday.— Queens Coronation. 



AUGUST, 31 Days. 



[Medicine. 



1 Tu Sun rises 3h. 33m. 

2;W I Sun HetsSh. 58m. 

3Th, First Examination for r)';;?Tees in 

4'Fr 

5|Sa 

6S 

TM 

STu 

9|W 
lOTh 
llFr 
118* 

13tS 
14' M 
Is'Tii 

ic'w 

17)Th 
IsFr 
198a 
20 S 



Medical Degrees conferred. 
Sun rises 4h. '^Im. [Lammas 
Sun sets 8h. 15m. 



Day. 



[Medicine. 
Second Exainii ation for Degrees in 
Sun risen 3h. 51m. 
Hun oets 8h. 45111. 

Court »'f Session rises. 



31 


M 


IS 


Tu 


S3 


W 


24 


Th 


2.vFr 


2i; Ha 


27 S 


28 M 


29 Tu 


30 W 


XI 


PI 



Ordinary Micting of Senatus. 



Summer 8c8.<iion ends. I 

MtrlliX of «.tali.i. «.»n. for Mel T)c,> .onounocd. 



SEPTEMBER* 30 Days. 


OCTOBER, 31 Days. { 


1 M 


Sun ri?es 5b. 19m. 


1 


W 


Sun rises 6h. 18m. 


2|Tu 


Son sets Th. 4m. 


2 


Th 


Sun sets 5h. 4bic- 


3W 




3 


Fr 




4|Th 




4 


Sa 




SJFr 




6 


S 




6Sa 




6 


M 




7jS 




7 


Tu 




8 31 




8 


W 




9Tu 




9Th 




lolw 




10 Fr 




11 Th 




118a 




12 Fr 




12|S 




13 Sa 




13' M 




14S 




14iTu 


, 


15 'M 


, 


15|W 




16 Tu 




16:Th 




17 W 




17iFr 




18 Th 




18Sa 




19 Fr 




i9S 




20Sa 




20M 




21S 




2i|Tu 




2-2 JM 




22 jW 


fLeith. 


23iTu 




23 Th 


Sacramental Fast-day in Edinburgh and 


24lW 




24 


Fr 




25;Th 




25 


Sa 




26'Fr 




26 


S 


Communion Sunday in Edinburgh and 


27!Sa 




27 


M 


fLeith. 


28iS 




28 


Tu 




29111 


Michael ras Dav. 


29 


\V 


Prelim. Medical Examination. 


iSOTu 




30 


Th 




1 _ 




31 


Fr 


General Council of the Univer. meets. 


NOVEMBER, 30 Days. 


DECEMBER, 31 Days. 


I'sa 


Sun rises 7h. 22m. Sets 4h. 32m. 


IM 


Class of Medical Jurisprudence opens. 


2S 


[Address. 


2Tu 


Sun rises 8h. 26m. Sets 3h. 40m. 


3M 


Winter Session opens. — Principal's 


3 W 




4Tu 


Classes in Arts, Law, and Medicine 


4Th 




5 W 


Classes in Theology open. [open. 


5Fr 




6Th 




6 


Sa 




7|Fr 




7 


s 




SiSa 




8 


M 




9S 


"" 


9 


Tu 




lOiM 




10 


W 




11 Tu 


Martinmas Term. 


11 


Th 




12 |W 


Court of Session sits. 


12 Fr 




13|Th 




13 Sa 




14 Fr 


Examination of Schoolmasters. 


14 S 




15 Sa 


Election op Rectoe. 


15 M 


Sun rises 8h. 40m. 


16;S 


Sun rises 7h. 53m. 


16 Tu 


Sun sets 3h. 36m. ' 


17 M 


Sun sets 4h. Ira. 


171 W 




18 Tu 




18 Th 




19 W 


Last day of Medical Registration. 


19 Fr 




20Th 




20 Sa 




21 Fr 




21|S 




22 Sa 




22 .M 


Shortest Day. 


23 


s 




23 Tu 




24 


M 


• 


24W 




25 


Tu 




25 Th 


Chkistmas-dat. 


26 


W 




26 Fr 




27 


Th 




27'Sa 


Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 


28 


Fr 




28:S 




29 


Sa 


Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 


29!M 




30 


s 


Advent Sunday. 

1 


30;Tu 
31 W 





1863.— JANUARY, 31 Days. 



Bank Holiday. — Sun rises 8h. 47m. 
Sun sets 3b. 48m. 



Class of Public Law opens 
Examination of Schoolmasters. 



Sun rises 8h. 38m. 
Sun sets 4h. 10m. 



Holiday in Faculty of Arts. 



Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 



MARCH, 31 Days. 



Sun rises 7h. 8m. 
Suu set8 fib. 46m. 







1 
IS 


2M 


3Tu 


4W 


5T»i 


6Fr 


7 


Sa 


8 


S 


i) 


M 


10 


Tu 


11 


W 


12 


Th 


l.S 


Fr 


14 


t^a 


15 


S 


16 


M 


17 


Tu 


18 


W 


19 


Th 


20 


Fr 


21 


Sa 


22 


R 


23 


M 


24 


Tu 


2,5 


W 


26 


Th 


27 


Fr 


28 


Sa 



FEBRUARY, 28 Days. 



Sun rises 8h. 11m. 

Candlemas Term.— Sun sets 4h. 45m. 



Queen married, 1840. 



Sun rises 7h. 42m. 
Sun sets 5h. 15m. 



Holiday in Faculty of Arts. 



Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 



Examination of Schoolmasters. 
.Sun riMjH Oh. 'Mm. Sets 6h 1.5m. 
Candidates for I)t(,Tec8 in Art.s must 
[tjivu in tlieir iiunies 



C<iurt of Session rises.— Day and Night 
[equal. 



Ijwly I lay 

Ordinary Meeting of Senatus. 
Theses given ia 



APRIL, 30 Days. 



i;w 

2Th 

3|Fr 

4Sa 

5'S 

6'M 

7|Tu 

8 W 

9Th 

lOFr 

llSa 

12S 

la'M 

14 Tu 

15 W 
IfiTh 
17Fr 
18 Sa 
19S 
20 M 
2l!Tu 
22, W 

23 Th 

24 Fr 
2', Sa 
26 S 
27, M 
28!Tii 
29jW 
30 Th 



Sun rises oh. 47m. Sets 6h. 49m. 

Good Friday. 

Prelim. 2\Iedical Examination. 

Easter Sunday. 



First Written Medical Examination. 
Do. do. 

Pass Examination for M.A. begins. 



M.A. Examination for Honours begins. 
General Council of the University 
[meets. 
Sacramental Fast-day. 
Dkgkeks in Arts, Law, and Theo- 
[logy conferred. 
Communion Sunday in Edinburgh and 
[Leith. 



niir^rsitg #ffmrs. 



Date of Chancellor. 

Institution. Appointed. 

1859. The Right Hon. LORD BROUGHAM and VAUX, D.C.L., LL.D.,.. 1859 
Vice-chancellor. 

1859. SIR DAYID BREWSTER, K.H., D.C.L., L.L.D., 1860 

Rector. 

1859. The Right Hon. WILLIAM EWART GLADSTONE, D.C.L., LL.D., 1859 

Principal. 

1582. SIR DAVID BREWSTER, K.H., D.C.L., LL.D., 1859 

President. 

THE RECTOR OF THE UNITERSITY. 

Ordinary Members. 

THE PRINCIPAL. 

ALEXANDER WOOD, M.D., Assessor, Nominated by Chancellor, 1860 

THE LORD PROVOST OF EDINBURGH. 

R. S. GRIEVE, Assessor, Elected by To^vn-Counca, 1859 

JOHN BROWN, M.D., Do. Nominated by Rector, 1859 

E. F. MAITLAND, LL.D., Do. Elected byGeneral Council, 1859 

PROFESSOR CHRISTISON, Do. do. Senatus, 1859 

Curators. 

Right Hon. W. E. GLADSTONE, D.C.L., LL.D., \ Elected bv the 

EDWARD F. MAITLAND, LL.D., V ^^^^^^, ^ou^t in 1859. 

DAVID MURE, MP., ) 

ROBERT JOHNSTONE, W.S., "^ 

ANDREW FYFE, S.S.C, I Elected by the 

DAVID PEAT, r Town-CouucU in 1859. 

JOHN MOOD. I 



UNIVERSITY OFFICERS. 



President. 

THE PRINCIPAL OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

Faculty of Theology. 

Dean. 

ROBERT LEE, D.D., Professor of Biblical Criticism and Biblical Antiquities. 

Date of 

liisutution. Chairs. Professors. Appointed. Patrons. 

1620 Divinity T. J. Crawford, D.D. . . 1859 Curators. 

1642 Hebrew David Liston, M.A 1848 Curators. 

1695 Divinity and Ecclesiastical 

History Wm. Stevenson, D.D. 1861 Crown. 

1846 Biblical Criticism and 

Biblical Antiquities. .. .Robert Lee.D.D 1846 Crown. 

Faculty of Law. 

Dean. 
* * ^ -1^ ^ 

1707 Public Law James Lorimer, M.A., . .1862 Crown. 

1710 Civil Law J. Muirhead, Advocate, 1862 Faculty of Advocates, 

and Curators.* 

1719 History Cosmo Innes, M.A 1846 Faculty of Advocates, 

and Curators. 

1722 Law of Scotland George Ross, Advocate, 1861 Faculty of Advocates, 

and Curators. 
1807 Medical Jurisprudence 

and Police Douglas Maclagan.M.D., 1862 Crown. 

Ib25 Conveyancing Alex. Montgomerie Bell, 1856 Curators, Dep.-Keeper 

and Society of Writers 
to the Signet, t 

Faculty of Medicine. 

Vean. 
JOHN HUTTON BALFOUR, M.A., M.D., Professor of Botany. 

167G Botany J.,hn H. IJalfour. M.D. 1845 Curators. 

1686 Insatulea of Medicine . . John H. Bennett, M.D. 1848 Curators. 

• For tbia Chair. a« also for the Chair of Scots Law and History, the Faculty of 
AdTocaUM »cnd to tlio Curators a leet of two, of whom the Curators must choose one. 

f The Election U by— (1.) Two Delegates from the Curators; (2.) Two from the 
^u>clety < f Wrilcn to the Signet; and (3.) The Deputy-Keeper of the Signet 



UNIVERSITY OFFICERS. 9 

Faculty of Medicine — continued. 

Date of 
Institution. Chairs. Professors. Appointed. Patrons. 

1685 Practice of Physic Thomas Laycock, M.D. 1855 Curators. 

1705 Anatomy John Goodsir 1846 Curators, 

1713 Chemistry and Chemical 

Pharmacy L. Playfair, C.B., Ph.D. 1858 Curatorsi 

1T26 Midwifery and Diseases of 

Women and Children . . J. Y. Simpson, M.D. . . 1S40 Curators. 

i^,-, n,- ■ ,»...•• ( J. H. Bennett, M.D. . . 1848 

1741 Cluneal Medicine - m. t i m T^ i o^r 

( Thos. Laycock, M.D., 1856 

1767 Natural History Geo. J. Allman, M.D. . . 1855 Crown. 

1768 Dietetics, Materia Medica, 

and Pharmacy Robert Christison, M.D. 1832 Curators. 

1803 Clinical Surgery James Syme 1833 Crown. 

1807 Medical Jurisprudence 

and Police Douglas Maclagan, M.D., 1862 Crown. 

1831 Surgery James Miller, 1842 Curators. 

1831 General Pathology Wm. Henderson, M.D. 1842 Curators. 

Faculty of Arts. 
Bean. 
ALEXANDER CAMPBELL ERASER, M.A., Professor of Logic and Metaphysics. 
1597 Humanity James Pillans, M.A. . . 1820 Lords of Session, Cura- 
tors, Fac. of Advocates, 
Soc. of Writers to the 

1674 Mathematics Philip Kelland, M.A. . . 1838 Curators. [Signet.* 

1708 Greek John S. Blackie, 1852 Curators. 

1708 Logic and Metaphysics . . Alex. C. Eraser, M.A., 1856 Curators. 

1708 Moral Philosophy Pat. C. MacDougall . . 1852 Curators. 

1708 Natural Philosophy P. Guthrie Tait, M.A., 1860 Curators. 

1762 Rhetoric and English I 

Literature W. E. Aytoun, D.C.L. 1845 Crown. 

1719 History Cosmo Innes, M.A., . . 1846 Faculty of Advocates, 

and Curators. 
1786 Practical Astronomy .... C. Piazzi Smyth ..... 1845 Crown. 
1790 Agriculture John Wilson 1854 Lords of Session, Cura- 
tors, & Univer. Court.f 

18.39 Theory of Music John Donaldson 1845 University Court. 

1862 Sanscrit Theodore Aufrecht, M.A. 1862 Crown. 

, Secretary of the Senatus Academicus. 

Professor Kelland. 

* The Judges of the Court of Session nominate two delegates, the Curators two, the 
Faculty of Advocates one, and the Society of Writers to the Signet one. These six dele- 
gates appoint the Professor, who receives his Commission from the Curators. 

t The Professor is elected by nine delegates, three chosen by the Judges of the Court 
of Session, three by the Curators, and three by the University Court. 



10 UNIVERSITY OFFICERS. 



^nlbcrsilji d^vamtncrs for Jegrecs. 

In the Faculty of Medicine. 
The Professors of the Faculty of Medicine. 
Jambs Begbie, M.D. ^ • t d h 

Andrew Douglas Maclagak, M.D. ^ ^ .'^^°'° ^^ ^ 
-_ „ „- T. I University Court. 

WiLLiA-M Robertson, M.D. / •' 

In the Faculty of Arts. 
The Professors of Humanity, Mathematics, Greek, Logic and Metaphysics Moral 

Philosophy, Natural Philosophy, and Rhetoric and English Literature. 
Jambs Doxaldson, M.A., Examiner in Classical Literature. 

(Appointed for 3 years.) 
Joes Dowses, M.A., Examiner in Mental Philosophy. | Appointed in 1861 by 

(Appointed for 4 years.) ^ University Court. 

Balpocr fexBWART, M.A., Examiner in Mathematics. 
(Appointed for 2 years.) 



([Iulb£rsitn 63fammers of ^cljoolmiistcrs. 



Appointed in 1861. 



Profbssor Lee. 
Professor Crawford. 
Professor Stevenson. 



Professor Pillass. 
Professor Kelland. 
Professor Frasbr, 



Secretary of the Examiners. 
Pbofessob Fraser. 



^t£p£rs of ^iiscums. 

Museum of Natural History, Professor Allman. 

Anatomical Museum, Professor Goodsir. 

Botanical Museum and Botanic Garden, Professor BALFOtiR. 



TTniverBity Librarian. ' Secretary and Registrar of University. 

John Small, M.A. I Albxandkr Sjiith. 

Factor of the University. Printer to the University. 

Joii.N <"()(iK, W.S. Thomas Constable. 



Janitor. 
Jaubs Cahbrom. 

Warder. 

Tno.vA6 Galbbeatu. 



11 



Jftrst ^ari 

HISTORY AND PRESENT CONSTITUTION OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

Charter. — The University of Edinburgh was founded in 1582, 
by a Royal Charter, granted by James vi. It is accordingly 
called " Academia Jacobi Regis," " King James' College," and 
" King's College." The Charter contemplated a University on 
a wide basis, with the conditions necessary for liberal study, 
and arrangements suited to the progressive state of science. 
" Nos enixe cupientes," are the terms which it employs, " ut in 
honorem Dei et commune bonum nostri regni, literatura indies 
augeatur, volumus et concedimus, quod licebit praefatis praeposito, 
consulibus et eorum successoribus, edificare et reparare sufficientes 
domes et loca, pro receptione, habitatione, et tractatione Profes- 
sorum, scholarum grammaticalium, humanitatis, et linguarum, 
philosophise, theologiae, medicinse, et jurium, aut quarumcunque 
aliarum scientiarum liberalium." This Charter constituted the 
Lord Provost, Magistrates, and Town-Council of Edinburgh patrons 
and governors of the University. In 1621, an Act was passed 
by the Scottish Parliament, which ratified to the University of 
Edinburgh, in ample form, all the rights, immunities, and privileges 
enjoyed by other Universities in the kingdom. This ratification 
was renewed in the Treaty of Union between England and Scot- 
land, and in the Act of Security. 

Chairs and Faculties in 16th and 17th Centuries. — In the 
end of the 16th century, what is now called the Senatus Aca- 
demicus contained a Principal and four Regents. The Prin- 
cipal was at first also the Professor of Theology. A separate 
Chair of Theology was founded in 1620. The Faculty of Arts, 
or Fundamental Faculty, was in a measure organized in the 
end of the 16th century. For more than a century after the 
foundation of the University, the four Regents in rotation con- 
ducted the academical youth through the course of study in 
Philosophy necessary to a Degree in Arts. Each Regent had 
charge of his Students from their enrolment, in the first year 
of their attendance at College, to the end of the fourth session. 
It was his duty to teach them in succession the several branches 
of Philosophy, viz., Logic or Dialectic, Ethics, and Physics or 



12 PKOGRESS OF UNIVERSITY FROM 1582. 

Natural Philosophy, — with such kindred studies, liternr}' and 
mathematical, as were most nearly connected with these funda- 
mental parts of knowledge. It was also the duty of the Regents 
to instruct their resj^ective classes in Greek during the course in 
Philosophy. The Chair of Hiimanity was founded before the 
close of the IGth century, in consequence of the imperfect prepara- 
tion of many students in Latin. The Chair of Mathematics was 
instituted in 1674. 

In 1642 and 1695 the Chairs of Hebrew and Church History 
were founded. The Faculty of Theology was thus developed in 
the course of the 17th century. 

The first Professor of Medicine was appointed in 1 685, and the 
Chair of Botany was founded some years earlier ; but the Medi- 
cal Faculty was not founded until the following century. 

Graduation tx 16x11 and 17Tn Centuries. — Those students who 
were in the first year of their course, and employed in Latin and 
Greek, were called the Bejan Class ; those in the second year, 
during which Logic and Metaphysics were the chief studies, were 
called the Semi Class ; those in the third year, which was mostly 
devoted to Mathematics and Ethics, were called the Bachelor 
Class ; those in the fourth year, in which Physics and Astronomy 
were the principal studies, were termed the Magistrand Class. 
The Regent who had charge of this last Class concluded the curri- 
culum by having the ^Master's Degree conferred on his Students 
in the Act of Laureation. After Students had received the 
Degree of Master of Arts, they were understood to be qualified 
for entering on dic biudy of Theulogy, Law, or ]Medicine. 

The Degree in Arts in Edinburgh dates from 1587, in which year 
forty-seven gradu; te^^ were admitted. In the 17th century it was 
customary to print and ])ublish the subjects of the Philosophical 
Theses submitted to disputation on occasion of taking this De- 
gree. The leading doctrines in Logic, ]\Ietaphysic3, Ethics, and 
Physics were discussed in these Theses or reasoned essays. The 
Degree was taken by all the students, at the close of their cur- 
riculum in the end of*the fourth year. They were then gradu- 
ated according to their proficiency, at the Public Act of Laurea- 
tion. The ancient practice of taking Degrees in Arts fell into 
disuse in the University of Edinburgh, soon after the close of 
the 17th century. It is only now beginning to revive, and to be 



PROGRESS OF UNIVERSITY FROM 1582. 13 

a recognised condition of admission into the three other Facul- 
ties, and the learned professions. 

Parliamentary Commission in 1690. — After the Revolution of 
1688, the University of Edinburgh, along with the other Scottish 
Universities, was subjected to a Parliamentary Visitation. A Com- 
mission was issued in 1690, and the University was under the 
authority of the Commissioners until after the close of the century. 
The Chair of Greek was instituted in 1708. With that year too 
commenced the history, in their present distinctive form, of the 
three Chairs of Philosophy, viz., Logic and Metaphysics, Moral 
Philosophy, and Natural Philosophy. Thus, in 1708, as afterwards 
in the other Scottish Universities, the present professorial arrange- 
ment in the Faculty of Arts was substituted for the previous 
system of Regent-tutors, in accommodation to the growth of 
modern knowledge. 

Growth op Professoriate and Faculties. — After 1708 the 
professorial system was rapidly developed in the University. The 
Faculties of Law and Medicine were organized early in the 18th 
century, and Degrees were then granted in both these Facul- 
ties. The Chair of History was founded in 1719, and connected 
with the Faculty of Law, and a separate Chair of Rhetoric was 
given to the Faculty of Arts in 1762. The Class of Natural History 
was founded in 1767. Professorships of Practical Astronomy and 
Agriculture were added in 1786 and 1790. In 1707 the foundation 
of the Faculty of Law was laid, by the institution of a Chair of 
Public Law, followed in a few years by Chairs of Civil or Roman 
and of Scotch Law. In the Faculty of Medicine several new 
Chairs were founded in the course of the 18th century, long before 
the close of which the Medical School of Edinburgh was among 
the most renowned in Europe. In the present century the 
Chairs of Music * and Sanscrit + have been founded in the Faculty 
of Arts ; Chairs of Clinical Surgery, Medical Jurisprudence, 
Surgery, and General Pathology in the Faculty of Medicine ; the 
Chair of Conveyancing % in the Faculty of Law ; and the Chair of 
Biblical Criticism in the Faculty of Theology. 

* This Chair was ounded by General John Raid, for the teaching of Music as a 
Scientific Art. 

t This Chair was founded in 1862 by John Muir, LL.D. (Edin.), D.C.L. (Oxon.), late 
of the Bengal ('ivil Service, no-.v residing in Edinburgh. 

I Endowed by Society of Writers to the Signet. 



14 CHANCELLOR, VICE-CHANCELLOR, AND EECTOR. 

Universities Act and Commission of 1858. — From its founda- 
tion in 1582, until 1858, the University was governed by the Lord 
Provost, Magistrates, and Town- Council of Edinburgh. In 185S an 
Act of Parliament was passed, which instituted the offices of 
Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Rector, and withdrew the 
government of the University from the Town-Council, placing 
it in the Senatus Academicus and the University Court, in con- 
nexion with a General University Council. The patronage of those 
Chairs which had been previously in the gift of the Town-Council, 
was, by the same Act, transferred to seven Curators, — three 
nominated by the University Court, and four by the Town- 
Council. The University is under the regulation of a Parlia- 
mentary Commission until 1st January 1863. 

CHANCELLOR. 

The Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh is elected by 
the General Council of the Univers^ity. The office is held for life. 
The Chancellor is the official head of the University. Changes in 
its internal arrangements, proposed by the University Court, must 
receive his sanction. It is through him, or his deputy the Vice- 
Chancellor, that all Degrees are conferred. The Chancellor is 
President of the University Council. 

Chancellor iw 1861. 
Henry, Loud Brougham and Vadx. 

VICE CHANCELLOR. 

The Vice-Chancellor is nominated by the Chancellor. He may, 
in the absence of the Chancellor, discharge the duties of his Office, 
in so far as regards conferring of Degrees. 

Vice-Chancellor in 1861. 
Sir David Brewster. 

RECTOR. 

The Rector is elected by a General Poll of the Matriculated 
Students of the University. The Second Saturday after the com- 
mencement of the Winter Session is the day appointed for the 
election of the Rector. The term of office is three years. The 
last election was on November 12, 1859. The Rector is President 
of the University Court. 

Rector in 1861. 
Right, lion. William Ewart Gladstone. 



UNIVERSITY COURT AND CURATORS. 15 

UNIVERSITY COURT. 

The University Court is the Court of appeal from the Senatus 
Academicus. It has power to effect improvements in the internal 
arrangements of the University, after due communication with 
the Senatus and University Council, and with the sanction of the 
Chancellor, — to regulate the Class Fees, — and (on certain con- 
ditions), when sufficient cause is shown, to censure, suspend, 
or deprive Professors, It consists of the following members, viz., 
1. The Rector. 2. The Principal. 3. An Assessor elected by the 
Chancellor. 4. The Lord Provost of Edinburgh for the time 
being. 5. An Assessor elected by the Lord Provost, Magistrates, 
and Town- Council of Edinburgh. 6. An Assessor elected by the 
Rector. 7, An Assessor elected by the General Council of the 
University. 8. An Assessor elected by the Senatus Academicus. 
The Rector and his Assessor continue in office for three years, and 
the other Assessors for four years. Five members of the Court 
constitute a quorum. The University Court holds the patronage of 
the Chair of Music, and a share in that of the Chair of Agriculture. 

CURATORS. 

By the " Universities (Scotland) Act, 1858," the patronage of 
the seventeen Chairs, previously in the gift of the Town-Council, 
was transferred to seven Curators, three nominated by the Uni- 
versity Court, and four by the Town- Council. Besides these 
seventeen Chairs, the Curators have also the share in the patronage 
of those of Humanity, Agriculture, Civil Law, Law of Scotland, 
and Conveyancing, which was formerly possessed by the Town- 
Council. The Curators hold office for three years. 

PRINCIPAL. 

The Principal is appointed by the Curators. The office is held 
for life. He is the resident Head of the College, and President of 
the Senatus Academicus. 

Principals since 1582. 



1585. Robert RoUock, First Regent 
1599. Henry Charteris. 
1620. Patrick Sands. 

1622. Robert Boyd. 

1623. John Adamson. 

1652. William Colvill. 

1653. Robert Leiffhton. 



1662. William Colvill. 

1675. Andrew Cant. 

1685. Alexander Monro. 

1690. Gilbert Rule. 

1703. William Carstairs. 

1716. William Wishart. 

1730. William Hamilton. 



16 SENATE AND PROFESSORS. 



1732. .Tames Smith. 



1736. William Wishart, secundus 
1754. John Gowclie. 



1762. Wilh'am Robertson. 



1793. George Husband Baird. 
1840. John Lee. 
1859. Sir David Bkewster. 

SENATUS ACADEMICUS OR SENATE. 

The Principal and Professors constitute the Senatus Academicus 
or Senate. The Senate is intrusted with the superintendence 
and regulation of the teaching and discipline of the University, 
and with the administration of its revenues and property, 
including the Library, Museums, and University Buildings. The 
Principal is President, with a deliberative and also a casting 
vote. In the absence of the Principal, the Senior Professor pre- 
sent acts as Chairman. The Ordinary IMeetings of Senate are 
held on the last Saturday of November, December, January, 
February, and March, at two o'clock ; on the last Friday of May, 
June, and July ; on .31st July and 1st August (for receiving 
recommendation of Candidates, and for conferring Degrees in 
Medicine) ; and in April (for receiving recommendations, and 
for conferring Degrees in Arts) and October, on days fixed at 
the preceding meetings. Extraordinary Meetings may be sum- 
moned by the Principal or by three Professors. One-third of the 
Senate constitutes a quorum. 

The business of the Senate is conducted by a Secretary, who 
prepares the Minutes, summons the Meetings, intimates business 
assigned to the Principal, to the Dean of any Faculty, or to the 
Convener of any Committee, and draws up the return for the 
Widows' Fund. The Secretary also administers the Sjyonsio 
Acndemica to Graduates. 

FACULTIES AND PROFESSORS. 

The Chairs of the University are comprehended in the four Facul- 
ties. The affairs of each Faculty are superintended by the Dean, 
who is elected by the Professors of the Faculty, with the ap- 
proval of the Senate. 

FACULTY OF ARTS. 
The Faculty of Arts, the most ancient in the University,* com- 
prehends the Chairs of Humanity (Latin), Mathematics, Greek, 



• In the order of mniLn-it;/, the FjiciiUy of Arts is first, and the Faculty of Medicine 
lant. On occaxion of Univt-raity cercnn nies, however, the relative precedence of each 
Faculty i* -.is follows:— l. Ihvinity; '2. La-.v ; ."}. Medicine; 4. Arts. On these occa- 
•ion«. ih<! Denn of i-ach Faculty takes jjrecedence, and after him the Members of the 
Faculty iu Uie order of the dntes of their Commissions. 



FACULTIES AND PROFESSORS. 



17 



Logic and Metaphysics, Moral Philosophy, Katural Philosophy, 
and Rhetoric and English Literature. Attendance on these 
is required for the Degree of Master of Arts. The Faculty of 
Arts also embraces the Professorships of History (in conjunction 
with the Faculty of Law), Practical Astronomy, Agriculture, 
Music, and Sanscrit. 

Professors and Eegents in the Faculty of Arts since 1582. 

P r of essors of Humanity since 1597 
1597. John Ray. 
1606. Blase Colt. 
1611. Oliver Colt. 
1611. Robert Buruet. 

Andrew Stevenson. 

Samuel Rutherford. 

Thomas Crawford. 

John Armour. 

Alexander Gibson. 

-James Wiseman. 
1638. Robert Young. 
1644. James Pillans. 
1653. John Wishart. 
1656. William Forbes. 
1656. James ISI'Gowan. 
1658. Hugh Smith. 
1663. William Gumming. 
1665. Andrew Ross. 
1665. Thomas Bell. 
1676. Gilbert MacMurdo. 
1679. Alexander Cunningham. 

1689. John Drummond. 

1690. Laurence Dundas. 
1728. Adam Watt. 
1734. John Ker. 
1741. George Stuart, 
1775. John Hill. 
1806. Alexander Christison. 
1820. James Pillaxs. 

Professors of Mathematics 
since 1674. 

1674. James Gregory. 

1675. John Young. 
1683. David Gregory. 
1692. James Gregory. 
1725. Colin M'Laurin. 
1747. Matthew Stewart. 



1775. Dugald Stewart. 
1785. Adam Ferguson. 
1785. John Playfair. 
1805. John Leslie. 
1819. William Wallace. 
1888. Philip Kellaxd. 

Eegents since 1583. 

[^Tlie CMirs of Greek, Logic and Meta- 
physics, Moral Philosophy, and Natural 
Philosophy were occupied by the Regents, 
in rotation, from 15S3 iintil 1708.] 

1583. Robert Rollock, first Pie- 
gent. 
1583. Duncan Nairn. 

1585. Charles Lumisdaill. 

1586. Adam Colt. 

1586. Alexander Scrimgecur. 

1587. Philip Heslop. 

1588. Charles Ferme or Fair- 

holm. 

1589. Henry Charteris. 
1589. Patrick Sands. 
1594. George Robertson. 
1597. John Rae. 

1597. William Craig. 

1597. John Adamson. 

1598. James Knox. 
1598. Robert Scott. 
1601. Andrew Young. 

1603. James Reid. 

1604. David Monro. 

1606. Blase Colt. 

1607. James Fairley. ' 

1608. William King. 
1611. Andrew Stevenson. 
1671. Robert Burnet. 
1625. Samuel Rutherford. 
1625, Robert Ranken. 



B 



18 



FACULTIES AND PROFESSORS. 



1626. Thomas Crawford. 
1626. John Brown. 

1630. John Armour 

1631. Alexander Hepburn. 
1633. Alexander Gibson. 
1630. James Wyseman. 
1638 James Wright. 

1638. Robert Young. 

1639. Duncan Forrester. 
1644. William Tweedie. 
1644. James l^illans. 
1647. Andrew Suttie. 

1653. John Wishart. 

1654. William Forbes. 
1656. James M'Gowan. 
1658. Hugh Smith. 
1663. William Gumming. 
1665. Andrew Ross. 
1665. George Sinclair. 

1665. Thomas Bell. 

1666. John Wood. 

1667. William Paterson. 
1679. Gilbert M'.Murdoch. 

1679. Andrew Massie. 

1680. Alexander Cockburn. 

1681. Robert Lidderdail. 
1684. Herbert Kennedy. 
1686. Thomas Burnet. 

1689. Alexander Cunningham. 

1689. John Drummond. 

1690. William Law. 
1090. Lawrence Dundas. 
1695. .John Row 

1695. William Scott. 
1701. Charles Areskine. 
1703. Robert Stewart. 

1707. Colin Drummond. 

Proff SHOTS of Greek s'uice 1708. 

1708. William Scott, one of the 

RpfJPVtH. 

1729. William Scott, Secundus. 

17''0. (^olin Drummond. 

173K. Robert Ijiw. 

1711. Robert Hunter. 

1772. Andrew Ualzel. 

1805. George Dunbar. 

1862. John IStlaut Blackie. 



Professors of Logic and Meta- 
physics since 1708. 
1708. Colin Drummond, one of 

the Rcfients. 
1730. John Stevenson. 
1774. John Bruce. 
1786. James Finlayson. 
1808. David Ritchie. 
1836. Sir William Hamilton. 
1856. Alexaxder C. Frasek. 

Professors of Moral Philosophy 
since 1708. 
1708. William Law, one of the 

Regents. 
1729. William Scott. 
1734. John Pringle. 
1745. William Cleghorn. 
1754. James Balfour. 
1764. Adam Ferguson. 
1785. Dugald Stewart. 
1810. Thomas Brown. 
1820. John Wilson. 
1853. P. C. MacDougall. 

Professors of Natural Philosophy 
since 1708. 



0/ 



1708. Robert Stewart, one 

the Regents. 
1742. John Stewart. 
1759. .\dam Ferguson. 
1764. James Russell. 
1774. John Robison. 
1805. John Playfair. 
1819. Sir John Leslie. 
1833. James David Forbes. 
1860. Peter Guthrie Tait. 

Professoi's of Rhetoric and English 
Literature since 1762. 
1762. Hugh Blair. 
1784. William Greenfield. 
1801. Andrew Brown. 
1835. George Moir. 
1840. William Spalding. 
1845. W. E. Aytoux. 

Professors of History since 1719. 
(See Faculty of Law:) 



FACULTIES AND PROFESSORS. 



19 



Professors of Practical Astronomy 
since 1786. 
1786. Robert Blair. 
1834. Thomas Henderson. 
1846. Charles Piazzi Smyth. 

Professors of Agriculture 
since 1790. 
1790. Andrew Coventry. 
1831. David Low. 
1855. John Wilson. 



Professors of the Theory oj Music 
since 1839. 

1839. John Thomson. 

1842. Sir Henry Rowley Bishop. 

1844. Henry Hugh Pearson. 

1845. John Donaldson. 

Professor of Sanscrit in 1862. 
1862. Theodore Aufrecht. 



FACULTY OP THEOLOGF. 

This Faculty, the second in Chronological order, comprehends 
the Chairs of Divinity, Hebrew, Divinity and Ecclesiastical History, 
and Biblical Criticism and Antiquities. 

Professors in the Faculty of Theology since 1620. 

Professors of Divinity since 1620. 
1620. Andrew Eamsay. 
1627. Henry Charteris. 

1629. James Fairly. 

1630. John Sharpe. 

1648. Alexander Colvill. 

1649. Samuel Rutherford. 
1650 David Dickson. 
1662. Patrick Scougall. 
1664. William Keith. 
1675. Laurence Charteris. 

1682. John Menzies. 

1683. John Strachan. 
1690. George Campbell. 
1701. George Meldrum. 
1709. William Hamilton. 
1715. William Dunlop. 

1732. James Smith. 

1733. John Gowdie. 
1754. Robert Hamilton. 
1779. Andrew Hunter. 
1809. William Ritchie. 
1828. Thomas Chalmers. 
1844. John Lee. 
1859. Thomas J. Crawford. 

Professors of Hehreio since 1642. 
1462. Julius Conradus Otto. 
1656. Alexander Dickson. 



1679. Alexander Amedeus. ' 
1681. Alexander Douglas. 
1 692. Patrick Sinclair. 
1694. Alexander Rulie. 
1702. John Goodall. 
1719. James Crawford. 
1732. WilUam Dawson. 
1751. James Robertson. 

1792. George Husband Baird. 

1793. William Moodie. 

1812, Alexander Murray. 

1813. Alexander Brunton. 
1848. David Liston, 

Professors of Divinity and Church 
History since 1695. 
1702. John Gumming. 
1726. Matthew Crawford. 
1737. Patrick Gumming. , 
1762. Robert Gumming. 
1788. Thomas Hardie. 
1799. Hugh Meiklejohn. 
1831. David Welsh. 
1844. James Robertson. 
1861. William Stevenson. 

Professor of Biblical Criticism <& 
Biblical Antiquities since 1846. 
1847. Robert Lee. 



20 



FACULTIES AND PROFESSORS. 



FACULTY OF LAW. 

This Faculty comprehends the Chairs of Public Law, Civil or 
Roman Law, History (in conjunction with the Faculty of Arts), 
Law of Scotland, i\Iedical Jurisprudence (in conjunction with 
the Faculty of Medicine) and Conveyancing. 

Professors in the Facidty of Laio since 1707. 



Professors of Public Law since 

1707. 
1707 Claries Areskine. 
173-4. William Kirkpatrick. 
1735. George Abercroiuby. 
1750 Robert Bruce. 
1764. James Balfour. 
1779. Allan Maconochie. 
1796. Robert Hamilton. 
1832. » ^ ^ 
1862. James Lokimer. 
Profensors of Civil Lavj 
since 1710. 
1710. James Craig. 
1732. Thomas Duudas. 
1745. KeiiUfth M'ivenzie. 
1755. Robert Dick. 
1792. John Wilde. 
1800. AUxaiuk'r Irving. 
1827. Douglas Cheape. 
1842. A. Campbell 8 win ton. 
1802. James Muibhead. 

ProftssoTK (f Jli-^torji fiincc 1710. 
1719. Charles Mackie. 
1753. John Gordon. 
1764. William Wallace. 
1755. John I'ringU'. 



1780. Alex. Fraser Tytler. 
1«01. William Fra.ser Tytler. 

1821. Sir William Hamilton. 
1837. George Skene. 

1842. James Frederick Ferrier. 

1846. Cosmo Ixxes. 
Professors of the Law of Scotland 

since 1722. 
1722. Alexander Bayne. 
1737. John Erskine. 
1765. William Wallace. 
1 786. David Hume. 

1822. George Joseph Bell. 

1843. John Schank More. 

1861. George Ross. 
Professors of Medical Jurispru- 

dence since 1807. 
1807. Andrew Duncan, Secuiidns. 
1820. William Pulteney Alison. 
1822. Robert Christi^^ou. 
1832. Thomas Stewart Traill. 

1862. Douglas MACLAGAX.i 
Professors of Convetjancinrj 

since 1825. 
1825. Macve}' Napier. 

1847. Allan Menzies. 

1856. A. MuNTGOMEiuE Bell. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 
The Faculty comprehends the Chairs of Botany, Institutes of 
Medicine, Practice of Physic, Anatomy, Chemistry, Midwifery, 
Natural History, Materia jNIedica, Clinical Surgery, Medical 
Jurisprudence (in conjunction with the Faculty of Law), Surgery, 
and General Pathology. Some of these Chairs arc nominally re- 
ferred to the Seventeenth Century, but it does not appear that 
the .Medical School and Faculty of the University was estab- 
lished sooner than the early part of last century. 



FACULTIES AND PROFESSORS. 



21 



Professors in the Faculty oj Medicine since 1676. 



Professors of Botany since 1676. 

1676. James Sutherland. 

1706. Charles Pre.ston. 

1712. George Preston. 
1738. Ch.-irles Alston. 
1761. John Hope. 

1 786. Daniel Rutherford. 

1820. Robert Graham. 

1845. John Hutton Balfour. 

Professors of Institutes of Medicine 
since 1685. 

1726. John Innes. 

1747. Robert Whytt. 

17G6. William Cullen. 

1773. Alex. Monro Drummond. 

1776. James Gregory. 

1789. Andrew Duncan. 

1819. Andrew Duncan, secundus. 

1821. William Fulteney Alison. 
1842. Allen Thomson. 

1848, John Hughes Bennett. 

Professors of Practice of Physic 
since 1685. 
1685. Sir Robert Sibbald. 
1685. James Halket. 
1685. Archibald Pitcairne. 

1713. James Crawford. 
1726. William Porterfield. 
1726. Andrew St. Clair. 
1726. John Rutherford. 
1766. John Gregory. 
1769. William Cullen. 

1790. James Gregory. 
1821. James Home. 

1842. William Pulteney Alison. 
1855. Thomas Laycock. 

Professors of Anatomy since 1705. 
1705. Robert Elliot. 
1708 Adam Drummond. 
1716. John M'Gill. 
1720. Alexander Monro. 
1 754. Alexander Monro, secundus. 
1798. Alexander Monro, tertius. 

1846. John Goodsir. 



1713. 

1726. 
1755. 

1766. 



Professors of Chemistry 
since 1713. 
James Crawford. 
Andrew Plummer. 
William Cullen. 
Joseph Black. 
1795. Thomas Charles Hope. 
1844. William Gregory. 
1858. Lyon PlayfxVir. 
Professors of Midwifery 
since 1726. 
Joseph Gibson. 
Robert Smith. 
Thomas Young. 
Alexander Hamilton. 
James Hamilton. 
James Y. Simpson. 
Professors of Natural History 
since 1767. 
Robert Ramsay. 
John Walker, 
Robert Jameson. 
Edward Forbes. 
George James Allman. 
Professors of 3Iateria Medica 
since 1768, 
Francis Home. 
Daniel Rutherford. 
James Home. 

Andrew Duncan, Secundus. 
Robert Christison. 
Professors of Clinical Surgery 

since 1803. 
1803. James Russell. 
1833. James Syme. 
Professor's of Medical Juris- 
2)rudence since 1807. 
(See Faculty of Law.) 
Professors of Surgery since 1831. 
1831. John William Turner. 
1836. Sir Charles Bell. 
1842. James Miller. 
Professors of General Pathology 
since 1831. 
1831. John Thomson. 
1842. William Henderson. 



1726. 
1739. 
1756. 
1780. 
1800. 
1840. 



1770. 
1779. 
1804. 
1854. 
1855. 



1768. 
1786. 
1798. 
1821. 
1832. 



22 UNIVERSITY EXAMINERS FOR DEGREES, ETC. 

UNIVERSITY EXAMINERS FOR DEGREES. 

The ^ledical Examiners of all Cardidates for Graduation in 
Medicine are the Professors in the Faculty of Medicine, and, in 
addition, three persons appointed annually by the University 
Court. The examination of Candidates for Medical Degrees in 
the preliminary branches of extra professorial education, and also in 
Greek, French, German, Higher Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, 
Logic, and Moral Philosophy, is conducted by the Examiners in 
Arts, together with some of the Medical Examiners. 

The Examiners for the Degree in Arts are the seven Professors 
■whose classes are embraced in the prescribed course of study, and, 
in addition, three persons (not Professors or Assistant Professors 
in any Scottish University) appoiCted by the University Court, 
and in whose appointment regard must be had to their eminence 
respectively in Classical Literature, Mental Philosophy, and 
Mathematical Science. Candidates for Honours in Natural 
Science are also examined by the Professors of Natural History, 
Chemistry, and Botany. 

UNIVERSITY EXAMINERS OF SCHOOLMASTERS. 

By the " Parochial and Burgh Schoolmasters (Scotland) Act, 
18G1," the University Court of each Scottish University was re- 
quired, within two months after the passing of the Act, to appoint 
six persons to be Examiners of Parochial and Burgh Schoolmasters. 
Of these, three must be Professors in the Faculty of Arts, and 
three Professors in the Faculty of Divinity of the University. 
The Examiners continue in Office during two years from the date 
of their respective appointments, and they may be re-appointed by 
the Univer.sity Court. They appoint one of their own number to 
act H8 Secretary. The Edinburgh School District comprehends 
all the Parochial Schools situated within any of the counties of 
Berwick, Eilinburgh, Haddington, Linlithgow, Peebles, Roxburgh, 
Selkirk, and Stirling. Examinations are held in the University 
on the second Friday of November, January, March, and May. 
Nominees to schools are required to lodge with the Secretary of 
the Examiners at least three days previously to the Examination, 
a notice of their intention to apj)car, together with a duly certi- 
fied copy of the minute cf their election. 



COUNCIL AND STUDENTS. 23 

GENERAL COUNCIL. 

The General Council consists of the Chancellor, the Rector, 
and other members of the University Court, the Principal and 
Professors, the Masters of Arts of the University, the Doctors 
of Medicine of the University, who have, as matriculated students, 
attended classes in any of the Faculties for four complete Sessions, 
and of all who, within three years of the passing of the Scottish 
Universities Act (August 2, 1858), have established that, as matri- 
culated students, they had attended the University for four 
Sessions, or three complete Sessions and a fourth in some other 
Scottish University, the attendance for at least two of these Ses- 
sions having been on classes in the Faculty of Arts. 

The Council is appointed to meet twice every year, viz., on 
the first Tuesday after the fourteenth day of A'pril^ and on the 
last Friday in October^ to take into consideration all questions 
affecting the wellbeing and prosperity of the University, regarding 
which the Council are to make their representations to the 
University Court, who are to return a judgment thereon. The 
Chancellor and one of the Assessors in the University Court are 
elected by the Council. When a Poll is demanded, the election is 
made by means of Voting Letters, issued to the Members, which 
must be returned within 21 days to the Registrar of the Univer- 
sity, who is also Secretary to the Council. 

All members of Council must be above the age of twenty- one. 
Their names are registered in a book kept for the purpose by the 
Registrar ; the registration fee is 5s. They pay an annual fee of 
2s. 6d., and all future annual fees may be compounded for at any 
time by payment of £l. No student can be a member. The 
Chancellor is by Statute President of the Council ; whom failing, 
the Rector ; whom failing, the Principal ; whom failing, the Senior 
Professor present. 

Number op Members of the General Council, 2279. 

MATRICULATED STUDENTS. 
Matriculated Students are members of any of the four Faculties. 
They have the privilege of electing the Rector of the University. 
In case of an equality of votes, the Chancellor, or failing him 
the Principal, has the casting vote. Students, also enjoy the 
right of admission to the University Library, and on certain days 
to the Museum of Natural History. Their names are preserved 



24 universities' commissioners. 

in the General Album, \\'hich is the legal register of attendance 
at the University. 

Number of Students in Winteu Session, 1861-62, 1427. 



I. Faculty of Arts, 618. 
1 1. Faculty of Medicine, 516. 



III. Faculty of Law, 202. 

IV. Faculty of Theology, 91. 



UNIVERSITIES' COMMISSIONERS. 

During the term of the Universities' Commission, the supreme 
government of the University is vested in the Commissioners. 
Their powers are in force until 1st January 1863. Subject to the 
])rovisions of the Scottish Universities Act, they are empowered to 
regulate by Ordinances the powers, jurisdictions, and privileges 
of the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, Rector, Assessors, Principal. 
Professors, and all other office-bearers or members of the Univer- 
sity ; as also of the Senatus Academicus, the University Court, 
and the General Council ; the time, place, and manner of elec- 
tions ; the course of study, fees, manner of teaching, and manner 
of examination ; the qualifications, appointments, and number of 
examiners, and the amount of their remuneration ; the granting 
of Degrees of all kinds ; the foundation and remuneration of 
Professorships ; the revision and due administration of revenues 
and endowments ; and the preservation of the fabric of the Uni- 
versity. 

All Ordinances made by the Commissioners must be published 
in the Edinburgh Gazette for four successive weeks, laid before 
Parliament if it be sitting, if not, then before the next Parliament 
ensuing, and finally be approved by Her Majesty in Council. 

The Universities' Commission consists of the following Noble- 
men and Gentlemen : — 



Duke ok Akgvi.i,. 

liAllI. OF AlJEItDKKX. 
I''aIII, ()¥ Manhkiki.i). 
I.AUI, <»K HaUDINOTOX. 
I.OKK .Il'.sTK K ( JkNKKAL. 

SiK WiM.iAM (iibson-Cbaio, Bart. 



Lord Justice-Clerk. 

LoRo Akdmillan. 

Loud Advocate (Moncreiff). 

William Stiklixg of Keiu, M.P. 

Alexander Hastie. 

A. Murray Dunlop, M.P. 



The Lord Justice-Clerk is Chairman of the Conmiission, and 
Mr. Robert Ikrry, Secretary. The office of the Commissioners 
is at 36 Moray Place. 



UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 25 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, MUSEUPflS, AND BOTANIC GARDEN. 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 

The Library originated in a bequest, in 1580, by Mr. Clement 
Little, Commissary in Edinburgh, a learned citizen, and brother 
to the Lord Provost, who left his library to " Edinburgh and the 
kirk of God." This library, consisting of about 300 volumes, chiefly 
theological, was transferred by the Town-Council a few years after- 
wards to the University. The University Library v/as afterwards 
largely augmented, by donations from the citizens of Edinburgh 
and from the alumni of the University, and by the annual con- 
tributions of students when they took the Degree of Master of 
Arts, Among the donors may be specified, for the extent and value 
of their benefactions, Principal Adamson, Dr. Piobert Johnston, 
a ph^'sician in London, the Rev. James Nairne of Wemyss, in 
Fife, Dr. John Stevenson, Professor of Logic and Metaphysics in 
the University, and Dr. William Thomson, Professor of Anatomy 
in the University of Oxford. The celebrated Drummond of 
Hawthornden bequeathed his library to the University ; and the 
gift is valuable, both from the eminence of the donor's name, and 
from the rare specimens of our early literature with which the 
collection is enriched. 

The University Library contains about 130,000 printed volumes, 
and above 700 volumes of MSS., many of which are of great 
interest and value. The Library also possesses some valuable 
pictures and busts. The Library Hall, and the suite of rooms 
connected with it, occupy the south side of the College quadrangle. 
The ordinary management of the Library is vested in a 
Committee, appointed by the Senatus. 

The Library is open every lawful day, during the Winter Session, 
from 10 to 4 o'clock, except on Saturdays, when it is shut at 1 
o'clock. During the Summer Session the hours for public business 
are from 10 to 3 o'clock. 

The following regulations relate to the borrowing of books from 
the Library : — 



26 LIBRARIES. 

1. Professors. 

Every Professor is entitled to borrow to the extent of twenty- 
five volumes at a time. The books must be returned after the 
expiration of six weeks from the date of their being borrowed, and 
an annual return of all the books borrowed from the Library in 
the hands of the Professors, is called for by printed circulars in the 
last week of August, 

2. Members of the College of Surgeons. 

The rules applicable to them are similar to the above. 

3. Students. 

Every student, before being entitled to borrow books from the 
University Library, must have inscribed his name in the General 
Album of Matriculation, and been enrolled in the class of at least 
one Professor. 

On first applying for the loan of a book, he must present his 
matriculation ticket, and also the ticket of at least one Professor, 
to the Librarian, who, on receiving from him a deposit of <£l. gives 
him a receipt for the same, and enters his name in the deposit- 
receipt book. 

Every student is entitled to borrow two volumes at a time for 
the deposit of £,\. 

On applying for the loan of books, the student must fill up a 
Schedule, containing his name, address, the number of his deposit- 
receipt, and the titles of the books he wishes to borrow. 

The books must be returned uninjured at the end of a fortnight 
from the liate of their being borrowed,l)ut may again be lent out for 
another fortnight if not previously called for by another applicant. 

There is a Reading- Room for the purpose of affording to students 
an ojiportunity of study, and also of consulting books which do 
not circulate, such as Dictionaries, Encyclopaedias, Atlases, and 
Works of reference in general. 

The Reading- Room is open to all ]\Iatriculated Students. On 
asking for books to be consulted, the applicant must fill up a 
Sciiedule containing his name, address, number of matriculation 
ticket, and the title of the book he wishes to consult. 

4. Graduates. 

Gra<luatc8 of the University, on producing their Diplomas to the 
Secretary, may, on payment of a fee of ten shillings annually, be 
furuiahed with a ticket entitling them to the use of the Library. 



MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 27 

They are not allowed to borrow books by deputy, but are 
required personally to transact business at the Library. 

In addition to the University Library there are Libraries for the 
special use of Students in Theology and in Law. The Theological 
Library was founded in 1698, and contains above 10,000 volumes. 

MUSEUMS. 

1. The Museum of Natural History. — The extensive 
Museum of Natural History was established in 1812, in con- 
nexion with the University. It receives a Government grant of 
£200 a year. A large part of it was collected by the exertions of 
the late Professor Jameson, who was fifty years Professor of 
I^atural History. It occupies the greater part of the west side 
of the quadrangle of the College. 

The Museum contains Zoological, Geological, and Mineralogical 
Collections, all of which it has been the special object of the Regius- 
Keeper to exhibit in their educational aspect, so as to enable 
the Student to derive from them the greatest amount of advantage. 

I. The Zoological Collection. — The Zoological Student is 
particularly directed to the British and Typical Collections. The 
British Collection is intended to illustrate, as far as possible, the 

fauna of the British Isles. It is arranged and displayed so as 
to afford facility for the comparison and identification of 
British Species. The Typical Collection is intended to illustrate 
the leading types of animal form, and consequently does not 
aim at the accumulation of mere species. Its object is to 
bring before the Student in broad outlines the fundamental 
truths of Animal Morphology, and render him acquainted with the 
relations upon which alone a Natural Classification can be based. 

II. The Mineralogical Collection. — This is very extensive, 
and contains many valuable specimens. It is arranged in a series 
of horizontal glazed cases, and is thus displayed in the best 
possible way for admitting an inspection of specimens. 

III. The Geological Collection. — In the Geological Section 
the Student's attention may be particularly called to the Typical 
Collection of Fossils, vihexG, he will find the characteristic fossils 
of the various geological formations arranged in the order of 
their appearance on the earth's surface, thus enabling him to 
form a correct idea of some of the most striking features in the 
succession of the past life of the globe. 



28 MUSEUMS AND BOTANIC GARDEN. 

The Museum is open daily from 10 to 4 o'clock, admission 6d. 
Free admission is given to the Public on Saturdays and Holidays, 
and to Matriculated Students on the first jMonday of every 
month likewise. The number of visitors in 1860 was 83,314. 
Professor Allman is Regius-Keeper of the Museum, and Mr. J. B. 
Davies, Assistant Conservator. 

2. Anatomical Museum. — This IMuseum was founded in 
1800, by Dr. IMonro, secundus, who presented his own Anatomical 
Collection, and that of his father, to the University, for the pur- 
pose of " demonstrating to the students the structure, physiology, 
and diseases of the human body." 

The Museum is open on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays, 
from Two to Four o'clock. 

Tickets of admission are issued at the Museum, at Three 
o'clock, on the days on which it is open. 

There are also valuable Museums in connexion with the Classes 
of Natural Philosophy, Agriculture, Materia Medica, Midwifery, 
and Botany. 

BOTANIC GARDEN. 

The Royal Botanic Garden, Inverleith Row, is connected with 
the University, in so far as the Professor of Botany is Regius- 
Keeper, and delivers his Lectures in the Class-room in the 
Garden. The Garden was founded in 1670, and the Chair of 
Botany in connexion with it is one of the oldest in the University. 
The Garden extends to 17 acres, and contains an extensive range 
of Greenhouses and Hothouses, with a large Palm-house 70 feet 
liigh, no feet long, and 57 broad. There is an arrangement of 
British plants according to the natural system. There is also a 
general collection of hardy plants of all countries, according to the 
eame system ; and a series of medicinal plants, of which a Cata- 
logue has been published.* Students have ample facilities for 
studying the jilants in the Garden, and they are examined on 
SpcciineiKs, in the British Collection, which are selected for their 
determination. 

The Botanical Museum is open at all times to Students, and the 
Specimens contained in it arc used for illustrating the Lectures. 
The University ncrl)arium is also kept at the Garden, and it can 
be consulted by Students under the direction of the Professor. 



• Thl« Catalogue may be hud from Me«rs. Maclachlan & Stewart. Booksellers, 64, 
South Bridge. 



29 
CLASSES, COURSES OF STUDY, AND CLASS PRIZE LISTS. 

SESSIONS. 

There are Ttvo Sessions in each yeai', viz. : — 

I. The Summer Session, which opens in the beginning of 
May and ends with July, in which. Classes, chiefly in the Faculty 
of Medicine, are open. By Ordinance of the Universities' Com- 
missioners there are also to be Lectures in Civil and Scots Law 
during the Summer Session. But this Begulation will not take 
effect till the Summer of 1863. 

II. The Winter Session, which opens in the beginning of Novem- 
ber and ends with April ; during which the Classes in all the Four 
Faculties are assembled. 

SUMMER SESSION, 1862. 



Classes. 



Botany 

Botanical Demons- ( 
trations / 

Medical Jurisprudence 

Clinical Medicine 

Clinical Surgery 

Natural History 

Practical Anatomy, ... 

Anatomical Demons- ) 
trations, > 

Comparative Anatomy 

Medical Psychology ... 

Do., with Practical 
Instruction in Men- 
tal Diseases. 

Practical Histology 



Theory of Music 
Hindustani, etc.'* 



Days of Opening, and 
Hours of Attendance. 



May 1, 8 
May 12, 9 

May 1, 11 

May 2, 12 
May 1, 12 
May 1, 1 
May 1, 9 

May 5. 

May 13, 2 
Mayo, 3 



o'clock, 
o'clock. 

o'clock. 

o'clock, 
o'clock, 
o'clock, 
to 4. 



o'clock, 
o'clock. 



May 10, 1 o'clock. 
May 6, 3 o'clock. 
May 6, 1 o'clock. 



Professors. 



Prof. Balfour. 

Prof. Balfour. 

Prof Maclagan. 
Prof. Laycock. 
Prof. By me. 
Prof. A 11 man. 
Prof. Goodsir. 

Prof. Goodsir. 

Prof Goodsir. 
Prof. Laycock. 

Prof. Laycock. 

Prof Bennett. 

Prof Donaldson. 
Prof Listen. 



Cl:iSS 

Fee. 



£ s. d. 
4 4 



4 4 

3 3 

3 3 

4 4 
2 2 



2 2 

3 3 
3 3 
3 3 



Dissecting Rooms open daily, under the superintendence of 
Professor Goodsir. (See p. 47.) 

Chemical Labokatories open daily, under the superintendence 
of Professor Playfair. 



* For Particulars, apply to the Librarian. 



30 



PROGRAMME OF CLASSES. 



WINTER SESSION, 1862-63. 

The Sessio)i will he opened on Mondaij, November 3, at Two 
o'clock, when an Address will he delivered by the Pkincipal. 



FACULTY OF ARTS OR LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY. 



Classes. 



Junior Humanity 

Senior Huiiiaiiity 

First Greek 

Second Greek 

Third Greek 

First Mathematical ... 
Second Mathematical 
Third ]\Iatheniatical... 
Losric & ^letaphysics... 

Moral Philosophy 

Natural Philosophy ... 

Rhetoric and English ^ 

Literature J 



Days of Opening, and 
Hours of Attendance. 



Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
iNov. 

'Nov. 

I 

Nov. 



4, 12 & 2 o'ck. 
4, 10 o'clock. 
4, 9 & 1 o'ck. 
4, 11 o'clock. 
4, 2 o'clock. 
4, 12 o'clock. 
4, 10 o'clock. 
10, 9 o'clock. 
4, 1 o'clock. 
4, 12 o'clock. 
4, 11 o'clock. 

4, 4 o'clock. 



Practical Astronomy. ..iDec. 4, 12 o'clock. 

Agriculture Nov. 6, 4 o'clock. 

Theory of Music JNov. 4, 10 & 12 o'ck 

Sanscrit Nov. 4, o'clock. 



Professors. 



Prof. Pillans. 
Prof. Piackie. 



Class 
Fee. 



Prof. Kelland. 



Prof. Fraser. 
Prof. Macdougall. 
Prof. Tait. 

Prof. Aytoun. 



Prof. Smvth. 
Prof. Wilson. 
Prof. Donaldson. 
Prof. Aufrecht. 



3 3 

3 3 

4 4 
3 3 
3 3 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 



Divinity — 

.Junior Class 

Senior Class 

Divinity and Church 

Tlistiiry 

Pil)Hcal Critiiism & 1 vj r ^ i i i 
Pil.lioalAnti.iuitiesJ ^'ov. 5, 1 o clock 
Hrlircw — 

.Junior Class 

Advanced (Mass — "| 
Hebrew & Arabic J 



Nov. 5, 10 o'clock. 
Nov. 5, 11 o'clock. 

Nov. 5, 12 o'clock. 



Nov. 5, 2 o'clock. 
Nov. 5,' 10 o'clock. 



Prof. Crawford. 
Prof. Stevenson. 
Prof. Lee. 

Prof. Liston. 



2 2 

2 2 

2 2 

2 2 

2 2 



PROGRAMME OF CLASSES. 



31 



FACULTY OF LAW. 



Classes. 



Law of Scotland 

Medical Jurisprudence 

Civil Law 

Public Law 

Conveyancing 

Constitutional Law, "j 

and Constitutional / 

History '■• 



Days of Opening, and 
Hours of Attendance. 



Nov. 4, 10 o'clock. 
Dec. 1, 2. o'clock. 
Nov. 4, 3 o'clock. 
Jan. 6, 3 o'clock. 
Nov. 4, 4 o'clock. 

Nov. 4, 4 o'clock. 



Professors. 



Prof. Ross. 
Prof. Maclagan. 
Prof. Muirhead. 
Prof. Lorimer. 
Prof. Bell. 

Prof. Innes. 



Class 
Fee. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 



Dietetics, MateriaMe- ) 
dica, & Pharmacy / 

Chemistry .-... 

'Surgery 

Institutes of Medicine 

Midwifery and Dis- ~| 
eases of Women and >■ 
Children J 

Clinical Surgery — ) 
(Mon.and Thvrs.) ) 

Clinical Medicine — "I 
( Tues. and Frid.) j 

Anatomy 

Natural History 

Pi'actice of Physic 

General Pathology 

Anatomical Demon- \ 



Nov. 4, 9 o'clock. 



Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



strations 



4, 10 o'clock. 
4, 10 o'clock. 
4, 11 o'clock. 



Nov. 4, 1 1 o'clock. 



Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



4, 12 o'clock. 

4, 12to2o'ck. 

4, 1 o'clock. 

4, 2 o'clock. 

4, 3 o'clock. 

4, 4 o'clock. 



Nov. 4, 4 o'clock. 



Prof. Christison. 

Prof. Playfair. 
Prof. Miller. 
Prof. Bennett. 

Prof. Simpson. 



Prof. Syme. 

Profs. Bennett & 

Laycock 
Prof. Goodsir. 
Prof. Allman. 
Prof. Laycock. 
Prof. Henderson. 

Prof. Goodsir. 



4 4 

4 4 

4 4 

4 4 

4 4 



4 4 

4 4 

4 4 

4 4 

4 4 

4 4 

2 2 



PtOYAL INFIRMAEY. 
Eoyal Infirmary at Noon, Daily. — Perpetual Ticket, £10; Annual 
Ticket, £5, 5s. ; Half-Yearly Ticket, £3*''3s. Separate payments of 22- 
years entitle the Student to a Perpetual Ticket, A Half- Yearly Ticket 
can be procured only by Students who have previously had an Annual 
Ticket. 

MATRICULATION FEES. 

For'the Academical Year, . . . £10 

For the Summer Session only, . . 10 

All Students are reqtoired to matriculate at the Secretary's Office, in the 

University, before enterine^ any of the Classes. 



"* The Course will terminate before the Christmas Vacation. 



32 COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 

SYNOPSES OF THE COURSES IN THE CLASSES. 

1882-63. 



CLASSES IN THE FACULTY OF ARTS, OR OF LITERA- 
TURE AND PHILOSOPHY. 

1. Humanity. 

PROFESSOR PILLAXS. 

In both Classes a Trial Exercise will be written in the Class- 
room on the first Saturday of the Session. 

Junior Class. 

The Order of the daif, from November till Christmas. — First 
Principles of Latin Grammar prelected and examined upon, for 
some time ; to be continued, where necessary, by the Class- 
Assistant, with Mair's Introduction as Text-book. The students' 
Readings and Examinations will be in Curtius, and in the Fasti 
and Tristia of Ovid. 

After Christmas.— Qnxims, Ovid, Odes of Horace. The lat- 
ter half of Book vi. of Livy. On the Fridays, at 2. Lectures 
on the Rise, Progress, and Decay of Literature among the 
Romans. 

Throughout the Session, a weekly written Exercise. On the 
Wednesdays, at 12 o'clock, lessons and demonstrations in Ancient 
Geography, — Text-look, " First Steps in Physical and Classical 
Geography," by Professor Pillans. 

Books required for Junior Class— 1. Curtius, Leipsic Edition, with Preface and 
Notes by Professor Pillans. 2. Selections from the Fasti and Tkistia of Ovid. 
:!. -Text of Horace. 4. Livy, Leipsic Edition, with Preface and Notes, by Professor 
Pillans. 5. Mairs Introauetion. 6. "First Steps" (as above). Recommended.— 
Adttiu s Grammar and Antiquities. 

Skxiok Class. 

Course of TiJmJinr/.— Specimens of the Oratorical and Philoso- 
phical writings of Cicero: Of Horace, Select Odes, Satires, and 
Epistles : Of Tacitus, The Annals, Book i. 

Un the Wednesdays, before Christmas, Geographical Demon- 
strations, with illustrative passages, chiefly from the later and 
less known Poets, Lucan, Statins, Silius Italicus, Claudian, etc., 
and which are appended to the text-book required, viz., " Ele- 
ments of Physical and Classical Geography," by Professor Pillans. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 33 

After Christmas. — On the Wednesolays, Lectures on General 
Grammar, Part II., Written Language ; after which a few Lectures 
will be delivered on the Laws of the Twelve Tables. On alternate 
Fridays, Examinations, conducted chiefly in Latin, on Adam's 
R,oman Antiquities. 

Written Exercises, weekly and also occasionally, in Prose and 

Verse, throughout the Session. 

Books required for Senior Class : — Curtius, Horace, Livy, as above, Cicero, Tacitus' 
Annals, Vdam's Roman Antiquities. 

*^* The Lectures may be attended by Amateur Students, on a separate Ticket. 

Prizes are proposed for the long Vacation of 1862, to Members 

of both Classes, who shall be Members of either Class next Session ; 

to the Junior, in Curtius, beginning at the Fifth Book, and to the 

Senior in Livy, the Sixth and Ninth Books. It is expected that a 

Register of these Studies be kept, and presented to the Professor 

on or before the 20th of November 1862. 



2. Greek. 

PROFESSOR BLACKIE. 

First Class. 
Xenophon, or other early Greek prose writers ; Homer ; Daily 
Exercises in Greek Prose Composition and Conversation ; Clyde's 
Greek Syntax. 

Second Class. 
Thucydides ; A Play of Euripides ; Homer ; Exercises in Greek 
Prose Composition. Expositions or Lectures once a week. 

Third Class. 
The higher Greek poets and prose writers — Plato, Aristotle, 
-^schylus, Pindar ; Greek Prose Composition. Expositions or 
Lectures twice a week. 



3. Mathematics. 

PROFESSOR KELLAND. 

First Class. 
Theory of Arithmetic ; Six Books of Euclid and part of the 
Eleventh Book ; Plane Trigonometry, with its Applications ; Men- 

C 



IL. 



34 COURSES IN FACULTY OF AKTS. 

suration ; the Elements o£ Perspective ; and Geometrical Conic 

SecoTid Class. 

Third Class.— Nine to Ten, three days a v:eeh. 
The Differential Calculus with its Branches and Applications. 

T.x^.oo..-Han•s Differential Calculus. As the ai. is, as completely a. possible to 
«ad through the book, no other works axe recommended. 

For the advanced Students, Lectures are given on the higher 
portions of Definite Integrals, and on Finite Differences. 

^uVj>lerr.entary Classr-Nine t^ Ten, five days a fortnight. 

Free to Students of the Second and Third Classes. 

The object of this Class is to read the portions of the ext-bo k 

on Alcrebrr^hich were omitted the previous year, together with 

Todl^untrVl-^^ Geometry, and Analytical Geometry of 

three dimensions. ^ • „ 

Examinations. H.. roc. are carried on daily in ^^^^^^ ^^.^^ 
tions take place on alternate Saturdays. L.erc.ses for soluuon at home g 

on Fridays. The Prize List is made out ^^ ^ ;— ^^^^ ^i^n- t v. etc. apalnst 
Prizes are adjudi;ed by competitions on Arithmetic. Equations _il^'«o° • ' ^ 

f.C Extra Prize, are also awarded for original Solutions of Problem.. E.sajs, etc. 

4. Logic and Metaphysics. 

PROFESSOR FRASER. 

The Course, after some Lectures Introductory to Logic and the 
Philosophical Sciences, comprehends the four following parts :- 
L— Preliminary Psychology. 

A psychological review of the Objects of Consciousness— (1.) as 
intuiu/ely present in Perception, ^nd (2.) as mentally mod^^ed 
in mention, by Association, and by the elaborative activity of I 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 35 

Thought, operating through means of resembling and of verbal 

Signs. 

II. — Demonstration and Formal or Deductive Logic. 

Verbal Signs and Notional Science. Theory and province of 
Demonstration or necessitated Conclusion. Propositions and 
Reasonings as identical and contradictory. Formal Conclusive- 
ness. The Forms of Proposition and Syllogism. Formal and 
Verbal Fallacies. 

III.— Probability and Physical or Inductive Logic. 

Natural Signs and Real Science. Theory and Methods of the 
inductive and analogical Interpretation of material phenomena 
and of human history, with a view to the formation of Probable 
Premises. Nature and occasions of Error or Misinterpretation. 

lY. — Certainty and Metaphysics or Metaphysical Logic. 

The Ultimate Premises and their signification. Human Science 
and the Moral and Practical Intuitions of Man. Exposition and 
Criticism of Ancient and Modern Systems of Metaphysical Philo- 
sophy. 

In Session 1862-63 special attention will be given to Parts II. 
and III., in preparation for which Thomson's " Outlines of the 
Laws of Thought," or Whately's " Elements," may be studied by 
junior Students, and Hamilton's " Lectures," with Mill's " Logic," 
by the more advanced. Some Lectures will be delivered under 
Part IV., especially to senior and general Students. 



5. Moral Philosophy. 

professor macdougall. 

The Course will embrace the following subjects: — 
Introductory. — Aims, province, and methods of Moral Philo- 
sophy, with its relations to Psychology. 

Division I. — General view of the mental constitution. Parti- 
cular examination of the Emotions, Desires, and Affections ; with 
discussion of relative philosophical questions. 

Division II. — Ethics Proper. System of Duty. Moral Faculty. 
Ethical Theories. Christian Ethics. 



36 COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 

Division III. — Divine existence, character, and government. 

The Class meets on five days of the week. The time is devoted 
in part to the Lectures, and in part to examinations on these 
and on prescribed portions of Ethical authors. Subjects are also 
prescribed for elaborate Essays, as well as for briefer occasional 
exercises ; and prizes are awarded at the close of the Session for 
general industry, proficiency, and ability. 



6. Natural Philosophy. 

PROFESSOR TAIT. 



The subjects embraced in the Course of Natural Philosophy are 
the following : — 

I. Properties of Matter. 

IT. Mechanics, including Statics, Dynamics, Hydrostatics, and 
Hydrodynamics, with their application to Civil-Engineering. 

III. Heat, including the theory of the Steam-Eugine. 

IV. Light (Common and Physical Optics). 

V. Sound. 

VI. Electricity, including Frictional and Voltaic Electricity, 
ISIagnetism, Thermo- and Magneto- Electricity, and Electro-dyn- 
amics, with their practical applications. 

VII. Plane and Physical Astronomy. 

VIII. iSIeteorology. 

Mechanics, the Second Section above, and two or three of the 
others (in rotation), are treated' in detail every Session, the re- 
mainder being passed over in a more cursory manner, as it is 
impossible to enter at length into all in the course of a single Ses- 
sion. It is intended that in Session 1862-03 the Sections I., II., 
IV., and VI. above, shall form the more detailed part of the course. 

The works on which the principal written Examinations will 
be held are, for this Session, — 

Third or Junior Division. 
In Jiiwinry — Cloodwin's Statics, omitting Friction and Virtual 
Velocities, and Goodwin's Dynamics as far as relates to rectilinear 
motion only. /;* March Heischers Astronomy, in Lardner's 
Cyclopaedia. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 37 

Second or Middle Division, 
hi January — Goodwin's Statics and Dynamics generally, lii 
March — I^ewton's Three Sections, in Goodwin's " Course." 

First or Highest Division. 
In January — Lloyd's Wave Theory of Light. In March — 
Airy's Tract on Precession and Nutation. 

In addition to these principal Examinations, a written Exami- 
nation will be held every alternate Saturday throughout the 
Session. The subjects will in all cases be those which have been 
already treated in the Lectures. A prize will be given for the 
greatest number of correct answers in these Examinations ; and 
the marks obtained in them will be added to those obtained in the 
principal Examinations, to determine the order of merit for the 
Class Prizes. 

As a Text-book on the general subjects of the Lectures, in case 
the forthcoming Volume by Professors Thomson and Tait do not ap- 
pear before Christmas 1862, one of the following may be named: — 
Miller's Chemical Physics. 
Bird and Brooke's Natural Philosophy. 
Ganot, Traite de Physique /recently translated). 
Drion et Fernet, Physique Elementaire. 
Subject of Essay to be given in before the end of January 1863, 
Conservation of Force in its hearings on Cosmical Phenomena. 



7. Ehetoric and English Literature. 

PROFESSOa AYTOUN. 

The Course embraces, — 1. Instruction and exercise in the Prin- 
ciples of Vernacular Composition, a considerable portion of the lec- 
tures relating to the examination of style, as exhibited by eminent 
English authors. The history, formation, and progress of the 
language are likewise comprehended in this branch. 2. The 
leading rules for the framing and arrangement of spoken discourses 
are explained and illustrated. 3. A critical review of British Lit- 
erature, from the Anglo- Saxon period downwards, in its connexion 
with external history and social development. 4. Occasional 
Lectures tending to illustrate remarkable epochs in Ancient and 
Mediaeval Literature will be delivered in the course of the Session. 



38 COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 

Written exercises are prescribed, from time to time, with a view 
to the improvement of the Students in English Composition. 
These are returned to the Students after being revised and cor- 
rected by the Professor. 

Prizes are awarded for composition in prose and verse, and for 
accomplishment in elocution. 



8. Practical Astronomy. 

PROFESSOR SMYTH. 

These lectures are confined strictly to the subject of Practical 
Astronomy, and are intended to illustrate the best methods of ap- 
plying instrumental measurement to celestial phenomena, for the 
purpose of deducing their nature, and ascertaining their bearing 
on astronomical theory. 

They commence with the simplest estimations of angle and 
distance required in first approximations ; and then show how 
rapidly as well as securely, the true arrangement of the universe 
may be arrived at by any one who, observing independently for 
himself the successive phenomena presented by the skies, is able, 
as he proceeds, to strengthen his means of observation and refine 
his methods of computation, up to the limits which the pi'csent 
!idvanced condition of Optics, Mechanics, and Mathematics place 
within his reach. 



9. Agfriculture. 

profp:ssor wilson. 

The Lectures extend over two Sessions ; the first course treat- 
ing mainly of the Principles, and the second of the Practice of 
Agriculture. 

First Course. — History of Agriculture. General purposes of 
Agriculture ; conditions affecting it ; and scientific principles on 
which it is based. — These comprise the Cliemistr}' of Agriculture. 
— The Geology of Agriculture. — The Botany of Agriculture. — 
The Physics of Agriculture. 

ikcoad Course. — The Mechanics of Agriculture and their appli- 
cjition to the different descriptions of Implements, and Labour 
required on a Farm. Sequence of Agricultural operations. Econo- 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF ARTS. 39 

mical Division of Labour. Rotations of various districts discussed 
and explained. Improvement of the Soil by Draining, Manuring, 
etc. Live stock. The Economics of Agriculture. Farm Engineer- 
ing and Construction. Agricultural Policy. General Manage- 
ment and Improvement of Landed Property. 



10. Theory of Music. 

PROFESSOR DONALDSOX. 

In accordance with the Deed of Foundation the Lectures 
embrace the following subjects : — 

The phenomena and philosophy of sound ; the nature and pro- 
duction of musical sounds, accordant and discordant. 

The Theory of Music. 

General rules for the composition of Music, including methodical 
composition in the different counterpoints, with a critical analysis 
of the works of the great masters. 

The laws of harmonics, with an exposition of how far the theory 
of IMusic, as taught by the best theorists, is deducible from, and in 
accordance with, these laws. 

Occasional Lectures are giTen on the Structure, Compass, and Properties of Musical 
Instruments, as shown by Weber, Chladni, Savart, Wheatstone, and others, having for 
their object to discover the true principles on -which musical instruments ought to be 
constructed, and which may lead, and have led, to the invention of new ones. 

All the topics included in these branches are illustrated with diagrams, musical instru- 
ments, and philosophical apparatus. 

. Lectures are delivered occasionally on the history of the science. 

Two courses of Lectures are given during the Winter Session ; 

one for gentlemen, and one exclusively for ladies. 



11. Sanscrit. 

PROFESSOR AUFRECHT. 

The Course in Sanscrit embraces instruction in the Sanscrit 
Language, Literature, and Philosophy, and in Comparative Philo- 
logy. 

In each Winter Session at least fifteen Lectures will also be 
delivered on Sanscrit Literature and Philosophy, and at least 
fifteen Lectures on Comparative Philology, which, in addition to 
the regular Students of the Class, may be attended by such other 



40 COURSES IN FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 

persons as desire to attend the same, on payment of the Fee to be 
fixed by the University Court. 

The Professor will instruct such of his ordinary Students as 
desire it in the principles of Hindu Law. 

The special arrangements of the Course for Session 1862-63 will 
be duly announced. 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 
1. Divinity. 

PROFESSOR CRAWFORD. 

The Law of the Church of Scotland requires that every Theo- 
logical Student be enrolled by the Professor of Divinity at least 
four Sessions, three of which must be Sessions of regular or con- 
stant attendance. If the Student attend only two full Sessions, 
his course must extend to five Sessions. In every case six Dis- 
courses must be delivered with approbation, in order that the 
Professor may give such a certificate as shall warrant a Presbytery 
to take the Student on trial for License, as a Preacher of the 
Gospel. These Discourses are a Latin Exegesis, a Homily, a 
Lecture, a Popular Sermon, a Hebrew Exercise on a passage of 
the Old Testament, and a Critical Discourse on a passage of the 
New Testament. Every Student in the last Session of his course 
is expected to have all the requisite Discourses delivered before 
the end of December ; it being desirable that, soon after that 
period, every document necessary for entitling Presbyteries to 
take on trials the Candidates for License should be forthcoming. 

Students in their first year of regular attendance are expected 
to attend tbe Junior Class, and the others the Senior Class. But 
those who enrol in cither Class may attend the other along with 
it, without any additional Fee. 

The course of study in the two Classes is as follows : — 

Junior Class. 

Lectures are delivered on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 
on the Evidences of Revealed Religion, and the Inspiration of 
Holy Scripture. On Tuesdays and Thursdays the Students are 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 41 

examined on the subjects of the Lectures, and on Paley's Evi- 
dences of Christianity. 

Senior Class. 
The course of study in this class extends over three Sessions. 
The subjects of the Lectures during Session 1862-3 will be, — 
The Extent of the Atonement, the Work of the Spirit, the 
Benefits of Redemption, and the Means of Grace. Lectures on 
these subjects will be delivered on Mondays and Wednesdays, and 
on the alternate Fridays. On Tuesdays and Thursdays the 
Students will be examined on the subjects of the Lectures, and 
also on Hill's Lectures in Divinity, Books iii. and iv. The Stu- 
dents' Discourses will be delivered on the alternate Fridays, and 
at such extra hours as may from time to time be arranged. 



2. Divinity and Church History. 

PKOFESSOR STEVENSON. 

I. The Christian Church from the end of the Apostolic period 
to the Council of Nica^a, a.d. 100-325. 

IL From the Council of Nicaea to the Accession of Gregory the 
Great, a.d. 325-590. 



3. Biblical Criticism and Biblical Antiquities. 

PROFESSOR LEE. 

This class is now included in the curriculum required by the 
Church of Scotland of Students in Divinity. 

The Lectures are comprehended in two Courses, which are 
delivered during alternate Sessions. One of these Courses relates 
to the Criticism of the Old Testament ; the other to that of the Kew. 

Subjects of First Course. — 1. Canon of Old Testament ; Con- 
dition and History of Hebrew Text ; Account of principal Versions, 
particularly Septuagint, Vulgate, and Targums ; Modern efforts 
to improve Hebrew Text ; Account of printed Editions, etc. 
2. Hermeneutics, or Principles of Interpretation, as applicable 
to Sacred Scriptures. 

Subjects of Second Course. — Manuscripts of New Testament ; 
different systems of classification ; accounts of particular MSS. ; 
disputed passages ; quotations in New Testament, etc. etc. ; mo- 
dern editions of New Testament — their characteristics and merits. 



42 COURSES IX FACULTY OF LAW. 

On these subjects Lectures are delivered on Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days ; jNIonday's Lectures are devoted to Biblical Antiquities ; on 
Weduesday the Professor prelects on some portion of the Greek 
New Testament, and on Fridays he hears exercises by the Students. 

The Course of Lectures on Xeio Testament Criticism falls to be 
delivered Session 1862-63. 



4. Hebrew, 

PROFESSOR LISTON. 

Junior Class. 
Grammar (Tregelles' Heads of Hebrew Grammar) ; first twenty 
chapters of Genesis, and eight or ten Psalms. 

Senior Class. 

Grammar. The Psalms and a Historical Book on alternate weeks. 

Arabic or Syriac will form extra study. In Arabic — Elements 
of Grammar, and Dr. F. A. Arnold's Chrestomathia Arabica will 
be taught. In Syriac — Elements of Grammar, and Gutbir's Syriac 
New Testament will be tauiirht. 



FACULTY OF LAW. 
1. Law of Scotland. 

PROFESSOR ROSS. 

I. — 1. Constitution of Marriage. 2. Rights and Obligations of 
Husband and Wife. 3. Dissolution of Marriage. 4. Legal Effects 
of dissolution of Marriage. 5. Parent and Child. 6. Legitimacy. 
and Legitimation. 7. International Questions of Marriage, 
Legitimacy, and Divorce. 8. Pupils and Minors. 

II. — 1. Heritable and Movable. 2. Personal and Real. 3. Ob- 
ligations and Contracts in general. 4. Particular Contracts. 
5. Cautionary Obligations. 6. Piincinal and Agent. 7. Partner- 
ship. 8. Compensation, Retention, and Lien. 9. Negotiable Instru- 
ments. 10. Assignations and Arrestments. 

HI. — 1. Rights of Property in Land. 2. Feudal Relation 
of Superior and Vassal. 3. Voluntary Securities over Land. 
4. Adjudications. .0. Real Burdens. 6. Servitudes. 7. Teinds. 
8. Leases. 0. Prescription. 



COURSES IN FACULTY OF LAW. 43 

IV. — 1. Movable Succession. 2. Testamentary Deeds. 3. Vest- 
ing of Legacies and Provisions. 4. Heritable Succession. 5. Con- 
ditional Institution. 6. Collation. 7. Approbate and Reprobate. 
8. Law of Entails. 9. Trusts. 

V. — Insolvency and Bankruptcy. 

VI. — Actions and Diligence. 



2. Medical Jurisprudence. 

PROFESSOR MACLAGAN. 

The following is the Syllabus of the Course as hitherto de- 
livered : — 

Part I. — Forensic Medicine. 

Section 1. Questmis affecting the Civil Rights of Individuals. — 
1. Development of the Human Frame. 2. Duration of Human 
Life. 3. Personal Identity. 4. Marriage. 5. Divorce. 6. Im- 
potence and Sterility, 7. Pregnancy. 8. Parturition. 9. Mon- 
sters and Hermaphrodites. 10. Paternity and affiliation. 11. 
Presumption of Survivorship. 12. Mental alienation. 13. Rights 
of Deaf and Dumb. 14. Maladies exempting from public duties. 
15. Simulated diseases. 

Section 2. Injuries to Property. — 1. Nuisances from Manufac- 
tures. 2. Arson. 3. Forgery. 4. Coining of false money. 

Section 3. Personal Injuries. — 1. Defloration, 2. Rape, 3. 
Mutilation. 4. Criminal abortion. 5. Infanticide. 6. Homicide. 

7. Death from starvation. 8. Death from extremes of temperature. 

9. Examination of wounds. 10. Toxicology. 

Part II. — Medical Police. 
Section 1. Circumstances a